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(Early Show) An Evening With Richard Shindell

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York’s Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way and expanding our sense of just what it is a song may be.
From his first record, Sparrow’s Point (1992) to his current release, Careless (September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct.
Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question. After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered “I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty.”

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York’s Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way and expanding our sense of just what it is a song may be.
From his first record, Sparrow’s Point (1992) to his current release, Careless (September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct.
Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question. After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered “I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty.”

Howie Day with Special Guest Brian Jarvis

Howie Day’s emotionally resonant lyrics and inventive melodies have earned him both critical praise and a legion of devoted fans. He is known for his energetic, heartfelt shows, where he connects with audiences through the strength of his songwriting and his quirky sense of humor. Day’s warm tenor voice “soars into fluttering, high registers, but also grates with real, pleading grit,” as one critic put it. After sales of over a million records and two Top 10 hits, Day is back on the road in support of his new studio album, Lanterns.

A native of Bangor, Maine, Day began playing piano at age five and guitar at age 12. By 15, he was writing his own songs and performing across New England. Shortly after graduating high school, Day became a fixture at college coffeehouses across the U.S. He wrote, financed and released his first effort, Australia, which was named Best Debut Album at the 2001 Boston Music Awards. The Boston Globe called Day “gorgeously seasoned, far beyond his years” with “a brave, beautiful singing voice.” During his relentless touring schedule, Day began experimenting with effects pedals and loop-sampling techniques as he performed, layering live percussion with vocal harmonies and guitar parts to become a veritable one-man band. He went on to sell over 30,000 copies of Australia as he navigated the independent music scene and continued to hone his craft.

After signing with Epic Records, Day released his major-label debut, Stop All The World Now, and hit the road to support it. The constant promotion paid off: Stop was certified gold in the U.S. and spawned two Top 10 radio hits: “She Says” and the platinum single “Collide.” After three subsequent years of intense worldwide touring, Day moved to Los Angeles and returned to the studio. His next release, Sound the Alarm, built on the emotionally complex spirit of its predecessor and delved into Day’s journey from indie wunderkind to platinum-selling artist. Its lead single, “Be There,” became a staple at modern AC radio.

After parting ways with Epic and relocating to New York City in 2010, Day released the Ceasefire EP on his own label, Daze. Over the next two years, as a reenergized Day toured North America, Australia and Asia, new songs began to emerge and evolve. His fourth full-length album, Lanterns, was recorded in Boston with producer and longtime friend Mike Denneen. Awash with a warm musicality and unique instrumentation, the album also features guest vocals from Aimee Mann. Lanterns was released in April 2015.

Howie Day’s emotionally resonant lyrics and inventive melodies have earned him both critical praise and a legion of devoted fans. He is known for his energetic, heartfelt shows, where he connects with audiences through the strength of his songwriting and his quirky sense of humor. Day’s warm tenor voice “soars into fluttering, high registers, but also grates with real, pleading grit,” as one critic put it. After sales of over a million records and two Top 10 hits, Day is back on the road in support of his new studio album, Lanterns.

A native of Bangor, Maine, Day began playing piano at age five and guitar at age 12. By 15, he was writing his own songs and performing across New England. Shortly after graduating high school, Day became a fixture at college coffeehouses across the U.S. He wrote, financed and released his first effort, Australia, which was named Best Debut Album at the 2001 Boston Music Awards. The Boston Globe called Day “gorgeously seasoned, far beyond his years” with “a brave, beautiful singing voice.” During his relentless touring schedule, Day began experimenting with effects pedals and loop-sampling techniques as he performed, layering live percussion with vocal harmonies and guitar parts to become a veritable one-man band. He went on to sell over 30,000 copies of Australia as he navigated the independent music scene and continued to hone his craft.

After signing with Epic Records, Day released his major-label debut, Stop All The World Now, and hit the road to support it. The constant promotion paid off: Stop was certified gold in the U.S. and spawned two Top 10 radio hits: “She Says” and the platinum single “Collide.” After three subsequent years of intense worldwide touring, Day moved to Los Angeles and returned to the studio. His next release, Sound the Alarm, built on the emotionally complex spirit of its predecessor and delved into Day’s journey from indie wunderkind to platinum-selling artist. Its lead single, “Be There,” became a staple at modern AC radio.

After parting ways with Epic and relocating to New York City in 2010, Day released the Ceasefire EP on his own label, Daze. Over the next two years, as a reenergized Day toured North America, Australia and Asia, new songs began to emerge and evolve. His fourth full-length album, Lanterns, was recorded in Boston with producer and longtime friend Mike Denneen. Awash with a warm musicality and unique instrumentation, the album also features guest vocals from Aimee Mann. Lanterns was released in April 2015.

The Black Lillies with Special Guest The Shiners

The Black Lillies' story is one of hard work and highway miles ... a story that traces their evolution from a group of friends making music in songwriter and frontman Cruz Contreras' living room into what is now one of Americana's biggest success stories: an internationally-renowned band of roots-rockers, armed with songs that blur the boundaries between folk, soul, red dirt country, blues and jazz.

More importantly, The Black Lillies' story is still unfolding, with the band's sharp, southern-influenced songs — including Americana radio hits like "Hard to Please," the kickoff single and title track from the band's most recent album — leading the charge. Centered around multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Contreras (Robinella and the CCstringband), and featuring a rotating cast of incredible musicians including bassist and vocalist Sam Quinn (the everybodyfields), drummer Bowman Townsend (Jill Andrews), and guitarist/vocalist Dustin Schaefer (Micky & The Motorcars), The Black Lillies enter this chapter as one of the most visible, viable groups in contemporary roots music.

Hard to Please, produced by Grammy winner Ryan Hewitt and recorded at Nashville's legendary House of Blues Studio D, earned praise from Rolling Stone Country, NPR, American Songwriter and beyond, debuting at #12 on Billboard Heatseekers and #30 on Billboard's Top 200 Country Albums. 2013's Runaway Blues and 2011's 100 Miles of Wreckage both fared similarly well, with outlets like Entertainment Weekly praising the band's "strong roots-folk songwriting, sweet harmonies, and charismatic indie spirit." The Black Lillies promoted each release in the blue-collar tradition: by hitting the highway, racking up 230 gigs in 2014 alone and averaging 175 during the remaining years. That road-warrior work ethic has become as integral to the band's success as Contreras' songwriting, taking the band from coast to coast, border to border, and even country to country.

Proudly independent since their formation, The Black Lillies were one of the first independent bands to play the Grand Ole Opry and have since returned dozens of times - sharing that stage with big-budget bands and major-label mainstreamers. They've chased down success on their terms, ignoring the trends of Nashville and focusing on a sound that, as Vanity Fair notes, "continues to cross generations and musical genres - country, folk, blues and…a touch of the Dead, for good measure." With a reimagined lineup, new songs and the same dedication to touring, the Lillies continue to sink their roots deep into the Americana landscape.

The Black Lillies' story is one of hard work and highway miles ... a story that traces their evolution from a group of friends making music in songwriter and frontman Cruz Contreras' living room into what is now one of Americana's biggest success stories: an internationally-renowned band of roots-rockers, armed with songs that blur the boundaries between folk, soul, red dirt country, blues and jazz.

More importantly, The Black Lillies' story is still unfolding, with the band's sharp, southern-influenced songs — including Americana radio hits like "Hard to Please," the kickoff single and title track from the band's most recent album — leading the charge. Centered around multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Contreras (Robinella and the CCstringband), and featuring a rotating cast of incredible musicians including bassist and vocalist Sam Quinn (the everybodyfields), drummer Bowman Townsend (Jill Andrews), and guitarist/vocalist Dustin Schaefer (Micky & The Motorcars), The Black Lillies enter this chapter as one of the most visible, viable groups in contemporary roots music.

Hard to Please, produced by Grammy winner Ryan Hewitt and recorded at Nashville's legendary House of Blues Studio D, earned praise from Rolling Stone Country, NPR, American Songwriter and beyond, debuting at #12 on Billboard Heatseekers and #30 on Billboard's Top 200 Country Albums. 2013's Runaway Blues and 2011's 100 Miles of Wreckage both fared similarly well, with outlets like Entertainment Weekly praising the band's "strong roots-folk songwriting, sweet harmonies, and charismatic indie spirit." The Black Lillies promoted each release in the blue-collar tradition: by hitting the highway, racking up 230 gigs in 2014 alone and averaging 175 during the remaining years. That road-warrior work ethic has become as integral to the band's success as Contreras' songwriting, taking the band from coast to coast, border to border, and even country to country.

Proudly independent since their formation, The Black Lillies were one of the first independent bands to play the Grand Ole Opry and have since returned dozens of times - sharing that stage with big-budget bands and major-label mainstreamers. They've chased down success on their terms, ignoring the trends of Nashville and focusing on a sound that, as Vanity Fair notes, "continues to cross generations and musical genres - country, folk, blues and…a touch of the Dead, for good measure." With a reimagined lineup, new songs and the same dedication to touring, the Lillies continue to sink their roots deep into the Americana landscape.

Captured Pittsburgh Event

For more information please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/events/355648174901552/

For more information please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/events/355648174901552/

An Evening With Charlie Mars

"I know people think, ‘Oh great, another guy with an acoustic guitar,'" says Charlie Mars. "What I really want is to say to them, ‘Not so quick. Just one minute. That's not what this is.'"

Charlie Mars has been a journeyman artist with all the ups and downs that entails, from major label releases and high profile gigs opening for the likes of REM, KT Tunstall, Citizen Cope, Steve Earle, among others, from uncertainty to redemption. Now, with the extraordinary new Blackberry Light, the Mississippi-based troubadour builds upon the distinctive musical approach first mined on his 2009 breakthrough Like A Bird, Like A Plane, employing supple grooves and ambient Daniel Lanois-inspired production to enhance the elemental force of his classic songwriting influenced by the likes of Bob Marley, Bill Withers and Dire Straits. From the dreamlike, "Nothing But The Rain," to the shimmering "Picture of an Island," the album sees Mars delving deep within to offer insight and a path to self awareness and ultimately transcendence via a gracefully beatific distillation of folk, rock, and smooth acoustic soul.

"This music takes my mind to a place that allows me to see more clearly where I'm falling short," Mars says. "It takes my mind to a reflective place. It makes me sentimental about my past, my present, my future. It has a way of humanizing me and helping me shed some of the things that get in my way."

Currently residing in Oxford, Mississippi, Mars was at a professional standstill before Like A Bird, Like A Plane. With "no manager, no agent, no band and no money," he doggedly developed a sonic style uniquely his own, a sound informed less by traditional rock than by sinewy and soulful rhythms that seemed to bubble up from within his soul.

"We stumbled upon this percussive, atmospheric tone that, as far as I'm concerned, was different from anything else out there," Mars says. "I thought, ‘This is my sound. This is what separates me from the things that I'm hearing elsewhere and I want to explore that further.'"

Mars kickstarted his second act by spending much of the next two years on the road; growing an increasingly fervent following while slowly compiling a sheaf of new songs. Recording officially got underway in August 2011 at Austin's Texas Treefort Studios, with Mars once again accompanied by many of his cohorts, including producer Billy Harvey (Bob Schneider), keyboardist John Ginty (Santana, Citizen Cope), bassists George Reiff (Ian Moore, Steve Poltz) and Dave Monzie (Fiona Apple), and drummers J.J. Johnson (John Mayer, Tedeschi Trucks Band) and Dony Wynn (Robert Plant, Robert Palmer).

That stripped down framework comprises a stark and cinematic sound inspired in part by producer Daniel Lanois' famed collaborations with Bob Dylan, Ron Sexsmith, and Emmylou Harris. With its sparse instrumentation and focus on transcendent grooves and ambient space, the minimalist approach serves to add maximum intensity to Mars' already powerful songwriting.

"It's not just less is more," Mars says. "Less can be massive. When you find that special place of less, everything just opens up. Sometimes I'll think we're doing so little, we should do more, but then it's like, let's do less and see what happens."

Mars took a similarly modest tack towards the overall recording, looking to capture those perfect uncalculated moments where everything just clicks. "Back of the Room" - written initially as part of an Esquire feature asking five songwriters to compose a tune incorporating the words "Somewhere in Mississippi…" - was literally cut live as the band unwound from a long day's work, while the rollicking, funk-fueled "How I Roll" was truly born of spontaneous energy, its unabashedly wicked opening lines put down by Mars while Johnson was out on a brief appointment. Upon his return to the studio two hours later, the band jammed the track and recorded it straightaway.

"That was it," Mars says. "We never did it again."

Penned as a "counterbalance to some of the slower, more moodier songs" on the album, "How I Roll" sees Mars acknowledging his myriad demons, even celebrating their essential place in his complete being.

"Part of what I've gone through is acknowledging that I have a darker self," he says, "and I have to work diligently to try and improve myself so that I can stay out of that. At some point, I came to the realization that that darker self is going to win sometimes and I'm a little tired of apologizing for it. It's part of the whole, I don't have to carve that part of myself out and deny it."

Like any songwriter worth his salt, Mars employs his art as a channel towards personal discovery, candidly exploring all the human limitations - from pride and fear to cynicism self-doubt - that stand in the way of his attaining true happiness.

"The desire for connection and my terror in the face of it," he says. "That's what the album is about."

To get there, songs like "Great Wall of China" or the title track take lyrical cues from such literary heroes as Haruki Murakami, Cormac McCarthy, Walker Percy, and Denis Johnson, relying on spare language and abstract imagery to create vivid-to the bone revelations about universal life experience.

Upon the sessions' conclusion, Mars began aggressively pursuing one of his dream collaborators, legendary producer/engineer/mixer Tchad Blake. The Grammy Award-winner - known for his distinctive work with such artists as Elvis Costello, Richard Thompson, and Sheryl Crow - ultimately agreed and helped give Blackberry Light much of its uniquely spacious warmth.

"If there is a leap from the last record to this one, Tchad played a huge part in it, Mars says. He's an artist. He takes something and infuses it with his artistry and it becomes something else. He's the real deal." The same can be said of Charlie Mars. Imbued with jazzy warmth, simmering dynamics, and uncommon use of space and intensity, Blackberry Light presents a gifted writer and musician at his confident and creative peak, a milestone work in what has proven to be a most extraordinary artistic evolution.

"I know people think, ‘Oh great, another guy with an acoustic guitar,'" says Charlie Mars. "What I really want is to say to them, ‘Not so quick. Just one minute. That's not what this is.'"

Charlie Mars has been a journeyman artist with all the ups and downs that entails, from major label releases and high profile gigs opening for the likes of REM, KT Tunstall, Citizen Cope, Steve Earle, among others, from uncertainty to redemption. Now, with the extraordinary new Blackberry Light, the Mississippi-based troubadour builds upon the distinctive musical approach first mined on his 2009 breakthrough Like A Bird, Like A Plane, employing supple grooves and ambient Daniel Lanois-inspired production to enhance the elemental force of his classic songwriting influenced by the likes of Bob Marley, Bill Withers and Dire Straits. From the dreamlike, "Nothing But The Rain," to the shimmering "Picture of an Island," the album sees Mars delving deep within to offer insight and a path to self awareness and ultimately transcendence via a gracefully beatific distillation of folk, rock, and smooth acoustic soul.

"This music takes my mind to a place that allows me to see more clearly where I'm falling short," Mars says. "It takes my mind to a reflective place. It makes me sentimental about my past, my present, my future. It has a way of humanizing me and helping me shed some of the things that get in my way."

Currently residing in Oxford, Mississippi, Mars was at a professional standstill before Like A Bird, Like A Plane. With "no manager, no agent, no band and no money," he doggedly developed a sonic style uniquely his own, a sound informed less by traditional rock than by sinewy and soulful rhythms that seemed to bubble up from within his soul.

"We stumbled upon this percussive, atmospheric tone that, as far as I'm concerned, was different from anything else out there," Mars says. "I thought, ‘This is my sound. This is what separates me from the things that I'm hearing elsewhere and I want to explore that further.'"

Mars kickstarted his second act by spending much of the next two years on the road; growing an increasingly fervent following while slowly compiling a sheaf of new songs. Recording officially got underway in August 2011 at Austin's Texas Treefort Studios, with Mars once again accompanied by many of his cohorts, including producer Billy Harvey (Bob Schneider), keyboardist John Ginty (Santana, Citizen Cope), bassists George Reiff (Ian Moore, Steve Poltz) and Dave Monzie (Fiona Apple), and drummers J.J. Johnson (John Mayer, Tedeschi Trucks Band) and Dony Wynn (Robert Plant, Robert Palmer).

That stripped down framework comprises a stark and cinematic sound inspired in part by producer Daniel Lanois' famed collaborations with Bob Dylan, Ron Sexsmith, and Emmylou Harris. With its sparse instrumentation and focus on transcendent grooves and ambient space, the minimalist approach serves to add maximum intensity to Mars' already powerful songwriting.

"It's not just less is more," Mars says. "Less can be massive. When you find that special place of less, everything just opens up. Sometimes I'll think we're doing so little, we should do more, but then it's like, let's do less and see what happens."

Mars took a similarly modest tack towards the overall recording, looking to capture those perfect uncalculated moments where everything just clicks. "Back of the Room" - written initially as part of an Esquire feature asking five songwriters to compose a tune incorporating the words "Somewhere in Mississippi…" - was literally cut live as the band unwound from a long day's work, while the rollicking, funk-fueled "How I Roll" was truly born of spontaneous energy, its unabashedly wicked opening lines put down by Mars while Johnson was out on a brief appointment. Upon his return to the studio two hours later, the band jammed the track and recorded it straightaway.

"That was it," Mars says. "We never did it again."

Penned as a "counterbalance to some of the slower, more moodier songs" on the album, "How I Roll" sees Mars acknowledging his myriad demons, even celebrating their essential place in his complete being.

"Part of what I've gone through is acknowledging that I have a darker self," he says, "and I have to work diligently to try and improve myself so that I can stay out of that. At some point, I came to the realization that that darker self is going to win sometimes and I'm a little tired of apologizing for it. It's part of the whole, I don't have to carve that part of myself out and deny it."

Like any songwriter worth his salt, Mars employs his art as a channel towards personal discovery, candidly exploring all the human limitations - from pride and fear to cynicism self-doubt - that stand in the way of his attaining true happiness.

"The desire for connection and my terror in the face of it," he says. "That's what the album is about."

To get there, songs like "Great Wall of China" or the title track take lyrical cues from such literary heroes as Haruki Murakami, Cormac McCarthy, Walker Percy, and Denis Johnson, relying on spare language and abstract imagery to create vivid-to the bone revelations about universal life experience.

Upon the sessions' conclusion, Mars began aggressively pursuing one of his dream collaborators, legendary producer/engineer/mixer Tchad Blake. The Grammy Award-winner - known for his distinctive work with such artists as Elvis Costello, Richard Thompson, and Sheryl Crow - ultimately agreed and helped give Blackberry Light much of its uniquely spacious warmth.

"If there is a leap from the last record to this one, Tchad played a huge part in it, Mars says. He's an artist. He takes something and infuses it with his artistry and it becomes something else. He's the real deal." The same can be said of Charlie Mars. Imbued with jazzy warmth, simmering dynamics, and uncommon use of space and intensity, Blackberry Light presents a gifted writer and musician at his confident and creative peak, a milestone work in what has proven to be a most extraordinary artistic evolution.

(Early Show) WYEP Exclusive Member Show with Los Lobos - Presented by 91.3fm WYEP and Opus One

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

SOLD OUT - (Late Show) Los Lobos - Presented by 91.3fm WYEP and Opus One

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Greg Warren

Greg Warren, most recently seen on "The Late Late Show" and "Comedy Central Presents" has built a strong fan base with an act inspired by his Midwestern upbringing. His CDs, "Running Out of Time" (2013) and "One Star Wonder" (2009) hit #3 and #6 respectively in iTunes Top Comedy Albums. An honest mix of self-deprecation, frustration and an arsenal of lifelike characters highlight Greg's colorful perspective. Greg attracts a diverse audience spectrum, having performed as a "Coming to the Stage" finalist on BET and on Country Music Television's "Comedy Stage." He is also a favorite on the nationally syndicated Bob & Tom radio show, which led to touring theaters across the country with The Bob & Tom All Stars Comedy Tour. He appeared in the independent film "23 Minutes to Sunrise," and will be featured in the upcoming film "Marshall The Miracle Dog" with Matthew Settle, Lauren Holly and Shannon Elizabeth.

Greg Warren, most recently seen on "The Late Late Show" and "Comedy Central Presents" has built a strong fan base with an act inspired by his Midwestern upbringing. His CDs, "Running Out of Time" (2013) and "One Star Wonder" (2009) hit #3 and #6 respectively in iTunes Top Comedy Albums. An honest mix of self-deprecation, frustration and an arsenal of lifelike characters highlight Greg's colorful perspective. Greg attracts a diverse audience spectrum, having performed as a "Coming to the Stage" finalist on BET and on Country Music Television's "Comedy Stage." He is also a favorite on the nationally syndicated Bob & Tom radio show, which led to touring theaters across the country with The Bob & Tom All Stars Comedy Tour. He appeared in the independent film "23 Minutes to Sunrise," and will be featured in the upcoming film "Marshall The Miracle Dog" with Matthew Settle, Lauren Holly and Shannon Elizabeth.

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Greg Warren

Greg Warren, most recently seen on "The Late Late Show" and "Comedy Central Presents" has built a strong fan base with an act inspired by his Midwestern upbringing. His CDs, "Running Out of Time" (2013) and "One Star Wonder" (2009) hit #3 and #6 respectively in iTunes Top Comedy Albums. An honest mix of self-deprecation, frustration and an arsenal of lifelike characters highlight Greg's colorful perspective. Greg attracts a diverse audience spectrum, having performed as a "Coming to the Stage" finalist on BET and on Country Music Television's "Comedy Stage." He is also a favorite on the nationally syndicated Bob & Tom radio show, which led to touring theaters across the country with The Bob & Tom All Stars Comedy Tour. He appeared in the independent film "23 Minutes to Sunrise," and will be featured in the upcoming film "Marshall The Miracle Dog" with Matthew Settle, Lauren Holly and Shannon Elizabeth.

Greg Warren, most recently seen on "The Late Late Show" and "Comedy Central Presents" has built a strong fan base with an act inspired by his Midwestern upbringing. His CDs, "Running Out of Time" (2013) and "One Star Wonder" (2009) hit #3 and #6 respectively in iTunes Top Comedy Albums. An honest mix of self-deprecation, frustration and an arsenal of lifelike characters highlight Greg's colorful perspective. Greg attracts a diverse audience spectrum, having performed as a "Coming to the Stage" finalist on BET and on Country Music Television's "Comedy Stage." He is also a favorite on the nationally syndicated Bob & Tom radio show, which led to touring theaters across the country with The Bob & Tom All Stars Comedy Tour. He appeared in the independent film "23 Minutes to Sunrise," and will be featured in the upcoming film "Marshall The Miracle Dog" with Matthew Settle, Lauren Holly and Shannon Elizabeth.

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