club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
The Roomsounds with Special guests The Black Six and Cape Cod

There’s a reason legions of young rock fans fall in love with their parents’ records. It’s the same reason so many radio stations still play classic rock: Great music never gets old. And it's what prompted singer and guitarist Ryan Michael to reinvent his sound, leaving behind his teenage past in a Warped Tour band signed to a Warner Bros. subsidiary and relocating from Connecticut to Texas.

"We wanted to immerse ourselves in the South," explains Michael. "To be around the best blues and country players. It all just seemed so much more authentic than the shit going on around me."

The entire band embraced those influences — Beatles, Stones, Petty, Big Star, Faces and Oasis to new a few. Along with guitarist/vocalist Sam Janik, bassist/vocalist Red Coker and drummer Dan Malone, The Roomsounds make their own sound, initially from a run down industrial space with no heating, cooling or plumbing. They’re now living in a proper house in East Dallas, but not much else has changed. There’s always someone over– beautiful women, musicians and what the band calls ‘permanent guests," all decked out with long hair and bell-bottoms. They’ve created their own Exile in Dallas and the music shows it.

The Dallas Observer thought the band’s 2012 self-titled debut album was "consistent with their Keith Richards and Tom Petty worship, an unpretentious album of purist rock ‘n’ roll riffs." Rodney Hall, owner of FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, heard the band through a friend and dug their sound so much he invited the band to FAME Studios to record their sophomore album, "Elm St."

"It really inspired us to bring our A game," admits Ryan. "Even in the control room, you see Duane Allman outtakes on tape and it’s really hitting home. 'OK, some really great people came out of here.' I think it really inspired us to be the best we could be." And like their heroes, The Roomsounds craft songs durable enough to become tomorrow’s classics.

"Musically we think of ourselves as a modern day Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers," continues Michael. "We admire the way everyone in the band plays for the song. I'm lucky to have a band that understands that, because a lot of good players just want to get off on what they're playing as opposed to making the best song possible."

Much of this spirit can be found in the title in the title track. "We played our first show in Dallas on Elm St.," says Michael. "It's the arty place where musicians, artists, and weirdos alike hang out and it's maintained that vibe for many years. It's said that blues greats like Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lead Belly, and Robert Johnson often walked the streets and played the night clubs."

There’s a reason legions of young rock fans fall in love with their parents’ records. It’s the same reason so many radio stations still play classic rock: Great music never gets old. And it's what prompted singer and guitarist Ryan Michael to reinvent his sound, leaving behind his teenage past in a Warped Tour band signed to a Warner Bros. subsidiary and relocating from Connecticut to Texas.

"We wanted to immerse ourselves in the South," explains Michael. "To be around the best blues and country players. It all just seemed so much more authentic than the shit going on around me."

The entire band embraced those influences — Beatles, Stones, Petty, Big Star, Faces and Oasis to new a few. Along with guitarist/vocalist Sam Janik, bassist/vocalist Red Coker and drummer Dan Malone, The Roomsounds make their own sound, initially from a run down industrial space with no heating, cooling or plumbing. They’re now living in a proper house in East Dallas, but not much else has changed. There’s always someone over– beautiful women, musicians and what the band calls ‘permanent guests," all decked out with long hair and bell-bottoms. They’ve created their own Exile in Dallas and the music shows it.

The Dallas Observer thought the band’s 2012 self-titled debut album was "consistent with their Keith Richards and Tom Petty worship, an unpretentious album of purist rock ‘n’ roll riffs." Rodney Hall, owner of FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, heard the band through a friend and dug their sound so much he invited the band to FAME Studios to record their sophomore album, "Elm St."

"It really inspired us to bring our A game," admits Ryan. "Even in the control room, you see Duane Allman outtakes on tape and it’s really hitting home. 'OK, some really great people came out of here.' I think it really inspired us to be the best we could be." And like their heroes, The Roomsounds craft songs durable enough to become tomorrow’s classics.

"Musically we think of ourselves as a modern day Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers," continues Michael. "We admire the way everyone in the band plays for the song. I'm lucky to have a band that understands that, because a lot of good players just want to get off on what they're playing as opposed to making the best song possible."

Much of this spirit can be found in the title in the title track. "We played our first show in Dallas on Elm St.," says Michael. "It's the arty place where musicians, artists, and weirdos alike hang out and it's maintained that vibe for many years. It's said that blues greats like Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lead Belly, and Robert Johnson often walked the streets and played the night clubs."

Paper Bird with Special Guests The Hills And The Rivers and Ryan Hoffman

For Paper Bird, their new album marks a milestone. More importantly, it provides them with a new beginning, a new chapter in their trajectory that sees them redefining their direction, a change in their musical sensibility while maintaining their trademark upbeat attitude.

The band's self titled album, available September 9th on Thirty Tigers Records/ Sons of Thunder Records, introduces vocalist Carleigh Aikins to the line­up, whose previous credits include extended stints with the critically acclaimed bands Bahamas and Fox Jaws. Her addition to the band adds an extra edge, highlighting a clear sonic evolution. A shift in the band's line­up has opened up new possibilities, swapping electric guitars and amped up instrumentation for the laid back, folk­flavored sound they favored in the past.

"In truth this is an entirely new band," bassist Caleb Summeril explains. "With Carleigh coming on board, we've literally made a fresh start."

Guitarist Paul DeHaven first met Aikins at a concert on Willie Nelson's ranch during South by Southwest in 2012. The two hit it off, and before long Aikins and the rest of the band began collaborating long distance via email. "It was serendipitous that we could join forces so seamlessly," says Aikins. "We created an instant bond and a new sound we can all stand proudly behind; which merges our respective influences from the Canadian and American music we were raised with. Everyone's input is welcome here and everyone has their moment to shine, in the true democratic sense and tradition of a band."

Paper Bird has always made a point of encouraging each of its members to share the spotlight. The group boasts three lead vocalists ­­ singer Sarah Anderson, singer and keyboard player Genevieve Patterson, and Aikins herself ­­ all of whom blend their voices in seamless three part harmonies. The instrumental duties are shared by Summeril, DeHaven, and drummer Mark Anderson.

Hailing from Denver, Colorado, Paper Bird first emerged from the same environs that launched such outfits as Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats and the Lumineers. The group has toured extensively throughout the U.S., sharing bills with the aforementioned bands, as well as Daryl Hall & John Oates, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, and Shakey Graves.

On Paper Bird, the band collaborates with world­renowned musician, singer and songwriter John Oates, who co­produced the album with Aikins' fellow Canadian David Kalmusky. The album was recorded and mixed at Addiction Sound Studios in Nashville, and for his part, Oates couldn't be more delighted.

"Paper Bird is a band that possesses a sound that's more than the sum of its parts," Oates effuses. "It's the coming together of two perfect trinities. It has three distinctly unique female lead singers whose harmonies blend together as one...united with an inventive, cohesive rhythm section trio. I loved their sound from the first time I heard them and they just keep getting better. They are a true musical family united by a unique and pure artistic vision...a rare quality in this day and age of so much disposable and less than original music."

Paper Bird has a sound that blends the engaging vocal harmonies of Fleet Foxes and The Lone Bellow with the classic ‘70s stylings of bands like Heart and Fleetwood Mac without imitating or emulating any one of them in particular. Indeed, the new music is rugged, resilient and flush with enthusiasm. It conveys the essence of inspired Americana, while still staying true to its riveting rock regimen.

The album starts with the soulful strut of "To The Light," and heads into desire and yearning with the single "Don't Want Half." With its playful harmonies and rhythms, "I Don't Mind" captures the ephemeral feelings of love, as "it's not easy to be a dreamer, when you're sleeping with the wind." Paper Bird merge the musical past with the present on "Sunday," conjuring up doo-wop, rock and groove sounds.

"This is definitely the start of something exciting," Summeril suggests. "We're at a point in our career where we feel we're ready to take on the world."

For Paper Bird, their new album marks a milestone. More importantly, it provides them with a new beginning, a new chapter in their trajectory that sees them redefining their direction, a change in their musical sensibility while maintaining their trademark upbeat attitude.

The band's self titled album, available September 9th on Thirty Tigers Records/ Sons of Thunder Records, introduces vocalist Carleigh Aikins to the line­up, whose previous credits include extended stints with the critically acclaimed bands Bahamas and Fox Jaws. Her addition to the band adds an extra edge, highlighting a clear sonic evolution. A shift in the band's line­up has opened up new possibilities, swapping electric guitars and amped up instrumentation for the laid back, folk­flavored sound they favored in the past.

"In truth this is an entirely new band," bassist Caleb Summeril explains. "With Carleigh coming on board, we've literally made a fresh start."

Guitarist Paul DeHaven first met Aikins at a concert on Willie Nelson's ranch during South by Southwest in 2012. The two hit it off, and before long Aikins and the rest of the band began collaborating long distance via email. "It was serendipitous that we could join forces so seamlessly," says Aikins. "We created an instant bond and a new sound we can all stand proudly behind; which merges our respective influences from the Canadian and American music we were raised with. Everyone's input is welcome here and everyone has their moment to shine, in the true democratic sense and tradition of a band."

Paper Bird has always made a point of encouraging each of its members to share the spotlight. The group boasts three lead vocalists ­­ singer Sarah Anderson, singer and keyboard player Genevieve Patterson, and Aikins herself ­­ all of whom blend their voices in seamless three part harmonies. The instrumental duties are shared by Summeril, DeHaven, and drummer Mark Anderson.

Hailing from Denver, Colorado, Paper Bird first emerged from the same environs that launched such outfits as Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats and the Lumineers. The group has toured extensively throughout the U.S., sharing bills with the aforementioned bands, as well as Daryl Hall & John Oates, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, and Shakey Graves.

On Paper Bird, the band collaborates with world­renowned musician, singer and songwriter John Oates, who co­produced the album with Aikins' fellow Canadian David Kalmusky. The album was recorded and mixed at Addiction Sound Studios in Nashville, and for his part, Oates couldn't be more delighted.

"Paper Bird is a band that possesses a sound that's more than the sum of its parts," Oates effuses. "It's the coming together of two perfect trinities. It has three distinctly unique female lead singers whose harmonies blend together as one...united with an inventive, cohesive rhythm section trio. I loved their sound from the first time I heard them and they just keep getting better. They are a true musical family united by a unique and pure artistic vision...a rare quality in this day and age of so much disposable and less than original music."

Paper Bird has a sound that blends the engaging vocal harmonies of Fleet Foxes and The Lone Bellow with the classic ‘70s stylings of bands like Heart and Fleetwood Mac without imitating or emulating any one of them in particular. Indeed, the new music is rugged, resilient and flush with enthusiasm. It conveys the essence of inspired Americana, while still staying true to its riveting rock regimen.

The album starts with the soulful strut of "To The Light," and heads into desire and yearning with the single "Don't Want Half." With its playful harmonies and rhythms, "I Don't Mind" captures the ephemeral feelings of love, as "it's not easy to be a dreamer, when you're sleeping with the wind." Paper Bird merge the musical past with the present on "Sunday," conjuring up doo-wop, rock and groove sounds.

"This is definitely the start of something exciting," Summeril suggests. "We're at a point in our career where we feel we're ready to take on the world."

Ava Luna with Special Guest Honey

The roots of Brooklyn-based indie art funk septet Ava Luna began in frontman Carlos Hernandez's high-school bedroom, where he would write and record songs under the name Ava. In college he met Julian Fader and Nathan Tompkins, and the three of them changed the band name to Ava Luna, figuring "Ava" was probably already taken by a more prominent act somewhere. Hernandez spent time as an engineer and working on various small-scale noise and punk projects after college, with Ava Luna coming in and out of focus as the years went on. With 2009's 3rd Avenue Island, a homemade CD-R release, the band congealed yet again, this time featuring Hernandez on vocals with a host of various singers and a minimal musical backdrop of drums and synthesizers. The band followed in 2010 with the Services EP, featuring a different lineup and a sound that continued toward the heavy vocal harmonies of bands like Dirty Projectors with increasingly obtuse neo-soul-inspired musical backdrops. A proper debut surfaced in 2012 with the release of Ice Level. By this point the band was more or less in a stable lineup, featuring Hernandez on vocals and guitar, Fader on drums, Tompkins on synths, Ethan Bassford on bass, and a trio of female singers, Felicia Douglass, Becca Kauffman, and Anna Sian. The group toured in support of Ice Level, opening some larger shows for Twin Sister. They returned with the less chaotic follow-up Electric Balloon in 2014. ~ Fred Thomas, Rovi

The roots of Brooklyn-based indie art funk septet Ava Luna began in frontman Carlos Hernandez's high-school bedroom, where he would write and record songs under the name Ava. In college he met Julian Fader and Nathan Tompkins, and the three of them changed the band name to Ava Luna, figuring "Ava" was probably already taken by a more prominent act somewhere. Hernandez spent time as an engineer and working on various small-scale noise and punk projects after college, with Ava Luna coming in and out of focus as the years went on. With 2009's 3rd Avenue Island, a homemade CD-R release, the band congealed yet again, this time featuring Hernandez on vocals with a host of various singers and a minimal musical backdrop of drums and synthesizers. The band followed in 2010 with the Services EP, featuring a different lineup and a sound that continued toward the heavy vocal harmonies of bands like Dirty Projectors with increasingly obtuse neo-soul-inspired musical backdrops. A proper debut surfaced in 2012 with the release of Ice Level. By this point the band was more or less in a stable lineup, featuring Hernandez on vocals and guitar, Fader on drums, Tompkins on synths, Ethan Bassford on bass, and a trio of female singers, Felicia Douglass, Becca Kauffman, and Anna Sian. The group toured in support of Ice Level, opening some larger shows for Twin Sister. They returned with the less chaotic follow-up Electric Balloon in 2014. ~ Fred Thomas, Rovi

High and Mighty Brass Band

The High and Mighty Brass Band (HMBB) is a party already in progress. Their performances are both fiercely entertaining and refreshingly inspiring. The group's sincere enthusiasm and dynamic energy connects with every audience member who is willing to get involved. Their sound is a mix of classic New Orleans Funk, R&B and more modern influences of Afro-Beat and Hip Hop.

Beginning with a heavily percussive and tribal groove, the horns weave through solos, building and stretching the energy to its limits. Just catch one of their upcoming performances in the New York City area and see for yourself!

The High and Mighty Brass Band (HMBB) is a party already in progress. Their performances are both fiercely entertaining and refreshingly inspiring. The group's sincere enthusiasm and dynamic energy connects with every audience member who is willing to get involved. Their sound is a mix of classic New Orleans Funk, R&B and more modern influences of Afro-Beat and Hip Hop.

Beginning with a heavily percussive and tribal groove, the horns weave through solos, building and stretching the energy to its limits. Just catch one of their upcoming performances in the New York City area and see for yourself!

(Early Show) Nick Hakim with Special Guest Jake Sherman

For singer-songwriter Nick Hakim, it all started in a house in Jamaica Plains, MA with collaborators Naima and Solo Woods. There, he put the finishing touches on his breakthrough EPs, Where Will We Go, Pt. I & II, which would later release through his Earseed Records and earn critical praise from NPR and The New York Times. But it was where the sessions for the two-part project ended and the ideas began to materialize for what would become his full-length debut, Green Twins (releasing via ATO Records in 2017), an experimental step forward with emotional heft gleaned from his experiences in the years since.


The story of Green Twins truly began when, armed with the masters for his EPs, Hakim moved from Boston to Brooklyn, spending his time fleshing out unfinished ideas in his bedroom. He came up with lyrics on the spot while playing the live circuit at solo shows including Palisades and NYXO, recording sketches and lyrics on voice memos and a four-track cassette recorder, and embracing the local community of musicians by performing with bands like Jesse and Forever and Onyx Collective. From there, Green Twins came about as a sum of its parts: Hakim took the demo recordings to studios in New York City, Philadelphia and London, and built on them with engineers including Andrew Sarlo (bass, engineering, production), keeping the original essence of the songs intact. Sarlo notes that "for other artists, a demo serves as a potential shape the song could form into. But for Nick, demos are more like creating a temple: a sanctuary that now we have to go into and somehow clean, furnish, and get ready for other people to experience the sermon in."


"I put a lot of thought to the things I'd say, but a lot of it is what I was thinking in the moment, very specific songs," he says of Green Twins, "many of them are like self-portraits". The record draws from influences spanning Robert Wyatt, Marvin Gaye and Shuggie Otis to Portishead and My Bloody Valentine. "I also felt the need to push my creativity in a different way than I had on the EPs", he continues. "We wanted to imagine what it would have sounded like if RZA had produced a Portishead album. We experimented with engineering techniques from Phil Spector and Al Green's Back Up Train, drum programming from RZA and Outkast, and were listening to a lot of The Impressions, John Lennon, Wu-Tang, Madlib, and Screaming Jay Hawkins."

"Bet She Looks Like You," recorded mostly in his home bedroom, was one of the first songs that "started this fire for exploring this experiment through song." Each track peels back a particular aspect of his life: on the title song, he gets deeply personal, reflecting on a recurring dream. "All these things reflect how I feel, how I write," he says. "I sometimes have trouble articulating myself verbally. This is a place I can talk and be myself, with music, this intangible space I create."

Hakim's debut comes as the culmination of years chiseling his skills as a musician. Hailing from Washington, D.C., he grew up in a musical household-his older brother introduced him to bands like Bad Brains and Nirvana, and his parents exposed him to Nueva canción-while he set out on his own to discover the DC music scene. He didn't take an interest in learning an instrument until later in high school, when he taught himself to play the keys. After graduation, he moved to Boston to continue his study of music. In the time since moving to Brooklyn and setting to work for three years on Green Twins, he embraced the live circuit, both as a solo musician and with his band, whom he's brought together from within his community in Boston and New York.

With Green Twins, Hakim plans to tour through the beginning of the year, and hopes that folks will connect with the songs he'd written. "I think everybody feels insecure about certain things and everybody has lost people dear to them. I think I'm writing about common things that people feel," he says. "I'm very grateful for anybody that's listening or wants to be a part of my little world that I've created through song."

For singer-songwriter Nick Hakim, it all started in a house in Jamaica Plains, MA with collaborators Naima and Solo Woods. There, he put the finishing touches on his breakthrough EPs, Where Will We Go, Pt. I & II, which would later release through his Earseed Records and earn critical praise from NPR and The New York Times. But it was where the sessions for the two-part project ended and the ideas began to materialize for what would become his full-length debut, Green Twins (releasing via ATO Records in 2017), an experimental step forward with emotional heft gleaned from his experiences in the years since.


The story of Green Twins truly began when, armed with the masters for his EPs, Hakim moved from Boston to Brooklyn, spending his time fleshing out unfinished ideas in his bedroom. He came up with lyrics on the spot while playing the live circuit at solo shows including Palisades and NYXO, recording sketches and lyrics on voice memos and a four-track cassette recorder, and embracing the local community of musicians by performing with bands like Jesse and Forever and Onyx Collective. From there, Green Twins came about as a sum of its parts: Hakim took the demo recordings to studios in New York City, Philadelphia and London, and built on them with engineers including Andrew Sarlo (bass, engineering, production), keeping the original essence of the songs intact. Sarlo notes that "for other artists, a demo serves as a potential shape the song could form into. But for Nick, demos are more like creating a temple: a sanctuary that now we have to go into and somehow clean, furnish, and get ready for other people to experience the sermon in."


"I put a lot of thought to the things I'd say, but a lot of it is what I was thinking in the moment, very specific songs," he says of Green Twins, "many of them are like self-portraits". The record draws from influences spanning Robert Wyatt, Marvin Gaye and Shuggie Otis to Portishead and My Bloody Valentine. "I also felt the need to push my creativity in a different way than I had on the EPs", he continues. "We wanted to imagine what it would have sounded like if RZA had produced a Portishead album. We experimented with engineering techniques from Phil Spector and Al Green's Back Up Train, drum programming from RZA and Outkast, and were listening to a lot of The Impressions, John Lennon, Wu-Tang, Madlib, and Screaming Jay Hawkins."

"Bet She Looks Like You," recorded mostly in his home bedroom, was one of the first songs that "started this fire for exploring this experiment through song." Each track peels back a particular aspect of his life: on the title song, he gets deeply personal, reflecting on a recurring dream. "All these things reflect how I feel, how I write," he says. "I sometimes have trouble articulating myself verbally. This is a place I can talk and be myself, with music, this intangible space I create."

Hakim's debut comes as the culmination of years chiseling his skills as a musician. Hailing from Washington, D.C., he grew up in a musical household-his older brother introduced him to bands like Bad Brains and Nirvana, and his parents exposed him to Nueva canción-while he set out on his own to discover the DC music scene. He didn't take an interest in learning an instrument until later in high school, when he taught himself to play the keys. After graduation, he moved to Boston to continue his study of music. In the time since moving to Brooklyn and setting to work for three years on Green Twins, he embraced the live circuit, both as a solo musician and with his band, whom he's brought together from within his community in Boston and New York.

With Green Twins, Hakim plans to tour through the beginning of the year, and hopes that folks will connect with the songs he'd written. "I think everybody feels insecure about certain things and everybody has lost people dear to them. I think I'm writing about common things that people feel," he says. "I'm very grateful for anybody that's listening or wants to be a part of my little world that I've created through song."

(Late Show) Opus One and Burning Bridges Festival Presents Aparna Nancherla. Hosted by John Dick Winters

Aparna Nancherla is delighted you are here. She's a comedian of the stand-up variety, but can often be seen sitting. She recently wrote for Late Night with Seth Meyers on NBC. You can also see her on the current season of Inside Amy Schumer on Comedy Central and on the upcoming season of Love on Netflix. In addition, she currently hosts the long-running popular underground New York comedy show, Whiplash at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater on Monday nights at 11 p.m.

Her artistic journey took off in Washington D.C. (it's all about the Washingtons), but she now resides in the biggest apple in the gosh darn world.

Aparna's sense of humor tends toward the dry, observational variety, but do be warned, her act runs rampant with absurdism and unregulated whimsy.

Other credits include writer and performer on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell and appearances on Conan on TBS, Meltdown with Jonah and Kumail, @midnight, and Adam Devine's House Party on Comedy Central, NBC's Last Comic Standing, Seeso's Night Train with Wyatt Cenac and Rooftop Comedy's Live From the Barrel House, VH1's "I Love the 2000s", TruTV's How to Be a Grown Up and Friends of the People, and Fuse's White Guy Talk Show. She has also done videos for Above Average, Refinery29, Funny or Die, Slate V, and MTV Other.

In addition to being a 2013 New Face at the prestigious Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal, she has also been on numerous lists such as Vulture‘s "50 Comedians You Should Know in 2015", Marie Claire‘s Funniest Women of 2015, Time Magazine‘s 140 Top Tweeters of 2014, Jezebel's Comedy Queens of 2014, Time Out NY's "10 Funniest Women in New York", Flavorpill's "11 Essential Young Comedians in New York City", LA Weekly‘s "12 Comedy Acts to Watch", Serial Optimist's "10 Comics You Must Know", and Splitsider's "10 Up-and-Coming Comedians on Each Coast". She has also been featured in in Laughspin, BUST Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Elle India, Reader's Digest, The Huffington Post, and The Washington Post Magazine.

You may have heard Aparna on the WTF Podcast with Marc Maron, the Nerdist Podcast with Chris Hardwick, NPR's "Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me!", Radio Q on CBC, or seen her at countless festivals such as the Melbourne International Comedy Festival in Australia, SXSW, SF Sketchfest, OutsideLands, the Bridgetown Comedy Festival, and the Great American Comedy Festival.

Comics Aparna has been humbly delighted to open for include John Oliver, Tig Notaro, Paul F. Tompkins, Eugene Mirman, Maria Bamford, Kurt Braunohler & Kristen Schaal, Dave Attell, Rob Delaney, Christian Finnegan, Tom Green, Eddie Brill, Hari Kondabolu, Myq Kaplan, and Chris D'Elia.

Notable venues and shows she has played include Kennedy Center's Millennium Stage, Comedy Bang Bang at the Upright Citizen's Brigade (LA), the Hollywood Improv, Gotham Comedy Club, Caroline's on Broadway, Stand Up NY, the Punchline Comedy Club (SF), the Comedy Bar (Toronto), the DC Improv, the Arlington Cinema & Drafthouse, the Lincoln Lodge (Chicago), and Mottley's Comedy Club (Boston), as well as a downright upstanding gaggle of colleges.

Aparna is also an experienced improviser, having studied at Washington Improv Theater, the Upright Citizen's Brigade in both NY and LA, and the Groundlings, as well as Lesly Kahn's school of acting. She may yet perform with latent-but-powerful independent improv group Mythical Newsroom. She has also acted in various sketches, web videos and series, pilots, and short films.

Aparna Nancherla is delighted you are here. She's a comedian of the stand-up variety, but can often be seen sitting. She recently wrote for Late Night with Seth Meyers on NBC. You can also see her on the current season of Inside Amy Schumer on Comedy Central and on the upcoming season of Love on Netflix. In addition, she currently hosts the long-running popular underground New York comedy show, Whiplash at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater on Monday nights at 11 p.m.

Her artistic journey took off in Washington D.C. (it's all about the Washingtons), but she now resides in the biggest apple in the gosh darn world.

Aparna's sense of humor tends toward the dry, observational variety, but do be warned, her act runs rampant with absurdism and unregulated whimsy.

Other credits include writer and performer on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell and appearances on Conan on TBS, Meltdown with Jonah and Kumail, @midnight, and Adam Devine's House Party on Comedy Central, NBC's Last Comic Standing, Seeso's Night Train with Wyatt Cenac and Rooftop Comedy's Live From the Barrel House, VH1's "I Love the 2000s", TruTV's How to Be a Grown Up and Friends of the People, and Fuse's White Guy Talk Show. She has also done videos for Above Average, Refinery29, Funny or Die, Slate V, and MTV Other.

In addition to being a 2013 New Face at the prestigious Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal, she has also been on numerous lists such as Vulture‘s "50 Comedians You Should Know in 2015", Marie Claire‘s Funniest Women of 2015, Time Magazine‘s 140 Top Tweeters of 2014, Jezebel's Comedy Queens of 2014, Time Out NY's "10 Funniest Women in New York", Flavorpill's "11 Essential Young Comedians in New York City", LA Weekly‘s "12 Comedy Acts to Watch", Serial Optimist's "10 Comics You Must Know", and Splitsider's "10 Up-and-Coming Comedians on Each Coast". She has also been featured in in Laughspin, BUST Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Elle India, Reader's Digest, The Huffington Post, and The Washington Post Magazine.

You may have heard Aparna on the WTF Podcast with Marc Maron, the Nerdist Podcast with Chris Hardwick, NPR's "Wait, Wait…Don't Tell Me!", Radio Q on CBC, or seen her at countless festivals such as the Melbourne International Comedy Festival in Australia, SXSW, SF Sketchfest, OutsideLands, the Bridgetown Comedy Festival, and the Great American Comedy Festival.

Comics Aparna has been humbly delighted to open for include John Oliver, Tig Notaro, Paul F. Tompkins, Eugene Mirman, Maria Bamford, Kurt Braunohler & Kristen Schaal, Dave Attell, Rob Delaney, Christian Finnegan, Tom Green, Eddie Brill, Hari Kondabolu, Myq Kaplan, and Chris D'Elia.

Notable venues and shows she has played include Kennedy Center's Millennium Stage, Comedy Bang Bang at the Upright Citizen's Brigade (LA), the Hollywood Improv, Gotham Comedy Club, Caroline's on Broadway, Stand Up NY, the Punchline Comedy Club (SF), the Comedy Bar (Toronto), the DC Improv, the Arlington Cinema & Drafthouse, the Lincoln Lodge (Chicago), and Mottley's Comedy Club (Boston), as well as a downright upstanding gaggle of colleges.

Aparna is also an experienced improviser, having studied at Washington Improv Theater, the Upright Citizen's Brigade in both NY and LA, and the Groundlings, as well as Lesly Kahn's school of acting. She may yet perform with latent-but-powerful independent improv group Mythical Newsroom. She has also acted in various sketches, web videos and series, pilots, and short films.

Opus One and Burning Bridges Festival Presents Reformed Whores with Special Guest The Wreckids

If Tenacious D and Dolly Parton got drunk and had a baby, you'd get the delightfully twangy & hilariously filthy musical comedy duo Reformed Whores! Southern bred, but NYC based, Katy Frame & Marie Cecile Anderson have been featured on IFC, PBS, CBS, and many other three-letter networks. Also, they've opened for "Weird Al" Yankovic! Their sophomore album "Don't Beat Around the Bush" debuted in March 2016 on the top 20 iTunes comedy chart and their YouTube channel just hit over a million views! For more information,

If Tenacious D and Dolly Parton got drunk and had a baby, you'd get the delightfully twangy & hilariously filthy musical comedy duo Reformed Whores! Southern bred, but NYC based, Katy Frame & Marie Cecile Anderson have been featured on IFC, PBS, CBS, and many other three-letter networks. Also, they've opened for "Weird Al" Yankovic! Their sophomore album "Don't Beat Around the Bush" debuted in March 2016 on the top 20 iTunes comedy chart and their YouTube channel just hit over a million views! For more information,

Carter Hulsey / American Opera with Special Guest Vit DeBacco

Carter Hulsey
Carter Hulsey (born June 28, 1988) is an American alt-country singer songwriter from Joplin, Missouri. Being raised by his mother and father gave him daily musical exposure to the likes of Willie Nelson, Elton John, and Jerry Jeff Walker — all on vinyl, of course. At age 13, Hulsey found his father’s acoustic Guild guitar, and his long love for music finally came to a head. He started writing songs. Hulsey’s sound and talent was developed with four bands prior to his breakaway as a solo artist in 2008. Hulsey blends honest lyrics, catchy melodies, undeniable hooks, folk and rock.



Three albums and five years later, Hulsey released his newest album, Drive Out, on February 4, 2014. This album that takes a modern twist on “country” with raw emotion, a deep groove and clever storytelling. The strength of the material and performance suggest Hulsey has curated his personal sound and his music is all the better for it. The low-key folk-rock blends with an ambient sound to create a haunting and unique vibe bound to keep the listener coming back for more. Hulsey has a talent for continuing the deep felt conversation with listeners with an intentional voice for love, loss, travel and the grit of southern culture with ease. Hulsey harnesses the story, channels, and delivers to the listener.



Hulsey is known for his captivating live performance delivered with intensity and purpose. It is often lamented that this sound that cannot be captured in the studio. Hulsey’s writing style is that of the un-reliable narrator, assuming the character of others with a talent in telling their story. His concepts and narratives are inspired by great storytellers such as Steven King, Kurt Vonnegut, Jack Hit and David Sedaris with musical influence by Todd Snider, Ryan Adams, John Prine, Guy Clark, and Gillian Welch

American Opera
"If there is any hope for the future of acoustic folk music, it lies within the chest (or brain) of John Bee."
-MIDWESTAXN

"American Opera folk rock singer/songwriter may give the likes of Joe Cocker a run for his money. His songs are gritty and moody with just the right amount of edge."
-TOPIAT

"John Bee has already displayed the kind of musical chops veterans of his genre hope to possess."
-UNDER THE GUN REVIEW

"Bee's realistic songwriting tendencies come to life in waves and on a live scale, the rich storytelling is almost more astounding than anything else in recent memory."
-BLARE MAGAZINE

"It only takes one listen to be captivated by the honesty and compelling nature of his songs."
-PUPFRESH

Carter Hulsey
Carter Hulsey (born June 28, 1988) is an American alt-country singer songwriter from Joplin, Missouri. Being raised by his mother and father gave him daily musical exposure to the likes of Willie Nelson, Elton John, and Jerry Jeff Walker — all on vinyl, of course. At age 13, Hulsey found his father’s acoustic Guild guitar, and his long love for music finally came to a head. He started writing songs. Hulsey’s sound and talent was developed with four bands prior to his breakaway as a solo artist in 2008. Hulsey blends honest lyrics, catchy melodies, undeniable hooks, folk and rock.



Three albums and five years later, Hulsey released his newest album, Drive Out, on February 4, 2014. This album that takes a modern twist on “country” with raw emotion, a deep groove and clever storytelling. The strength of the material and performance suggest Hulsey has curated his personal sound and his music is all the better for it. The low-key folk-rock blends with an ambient sound to create a haunting and unique vibe bound to keep the listener coming back for more. Hulsey has a talent for continuing the deep felt conversation with listeners with an intentional voice for love, loss, travel and the grit of southern culture with ease. Hulsey harnesses the story, channels, and delivers to the listener.



Hulsey is known for his captivating live performance delivered with intensity and purpose. It is often lamented that this sound that cannot be captured in the studio. Hulsey’s writing style is that of the un-reliable narrator, assuming the character of others with a talent in telling their story. His concepts and narratives are inspired by great storytellers such as Steven King, Kurt Vonnegut, Jack Hit and David Sedaris with musical influence by Todd Snider, Ryan Adams, John Prine, Guy Clark, and Gillian Welch

American Opera
"If there is any hope for the future of acoustic folk music, it lies within the chest (or brain) of John Bee."
-MIDWESTAXN

"American Opera folk rock singer/songwriter may give the likes of Joe Cocker a run for his money. His songs are gritty and moody with just the right amount of edge."
-TOPIAT

"John Bee has already displayed the kind of musical chops veterans of his genre hope to possess."
-UNDER THE GUN REVIEW

"Bee's realistic songwriting tendencies come to life in waves and on a live scale, the rich storytelling is almost more astounding than anything else in recent memory."
-BLARE MAGAZINE

"It only takes one listen to be captivated by the honesty and compelling nature of his songs."
-PUPFRESH

91.3fm WYEP Members Only Show Featuring Tift Merrit and Special Guest Dan Getkin

For more information please visit www.wyep.org

For more information please visit www.wyep.org

Miles Nielsen & The Rusted Hearts with Special Guests Ferdinand the Bull and Blvd Shakedown

Rockford, IL-based Miles Nielsen has spent nearly a decade enthralling audiences with music that draws force from the prime years of Western-influenced rock music and classic ‘60s soul. Claiming influences as diverse as Otis Redding’s classic soul and Jellyfish’s cult power pop recordings.

Rockford, IL-based Miles Nielsen has spent nearly a decade enthralling audiences with music that draws force from the prime years of Western-influenced rock music and classic ‘60s soul. Claiming influences as diverse as Otis Redding’s classic soul and Jellyfish’s cult power pop recordings.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)