club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Parsonsfield with Special Guest Juvenile Characteristics

“WE is not about you and me or even ‘us,’ the band. It’s about finding our way in the world one day at a time trying to live out each moment until the sun goes down.” Parsonsfield has been through the wringer of ups and downs and decided for the first time since the band’s 2011 conception to take a two-month break from touring to focus solely on recording. The result is WE, a contemplative EP filled with real life struggle and excitement. The album takes us from the joys of childhood discovery to the depression and confusion of a quarter-life crisis, and ends with dancing your way toward the darkness at the end of days.

“Everyone finds themselves searching for this theoretical ‘thing’ that is supposed to make them happy. Whether it’s a relationship or financial comfort, there’s a goal in our minds that once achieved, we’ll be able to start enjoying life,” says singer/songwriter and banjo player Chris Freeman. “Our circumstances, whether we’re rich or poor, are only half of what determines happiness. The rest is our thoughts, habits and connections with other people,” adds songwriter and mandolin player Antonio Alcorn. “WE is an inner journey to appreciate what you have, and to find happiness no matter what your lot in life.”

In a concise five songs, WE captures the band’s maturing sound, winding its way through a full range of emotions. It has as much influence from 90’s rock and 70’s R&B as it does the folk-pop material that fans have come to expect from the western Massachusetts based outfit. The album opens with a forlorn mandolin that grows into the groovy “Light of the City,” a song about profound loneliness in the most crowded place on earth. “Go Find Yourself” captures the fading of childhood excitement as you tumble down a prescribed path toward the rest of your life, realizing it won’t bring you happiness. The song takes a cosmic step back and pleads, “when love comes to find you, don’t run and hide.” The danceable, invigorating “Kick Out The Windows,” written in reaction to Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” is a resonant anthem of defiance and redemption, showcasing Parsonsfield’s enduring vein of passion.

Leading up to the recording of WE, Parsonsfield built a home studio where they retreated to workshop song ideas and experiment with recording techniques. “There were more demos and versions of these songs than any other songs we have written. It was a much more thoughtful process with 90% of our ideas not sticking. Since recording our last album, Blooming Through The Black, we scored a film and wrote instrumental music for the first time, which

opened new horizons for this record.”

When it came time to go into the studio with producer Dan Cardinal (Josh Ritter, The Low Anthem, Darlingside), Parsonsfield had more material than ever before. “Dan challenged us even further to play with sampled drums and more effected sounds giving the music more depth and mood. Although this was our first time working in a traditional recording studio, we didn’t want to lose the space that our demos had. So we made sure that songs like ‘Light of the City’ and ‘Take Me Back’ maintained that minimalism that we fell in love with on our demo.”

WE is the highly anticipated fourth release from Parsonsfield, a quintet praised for making "the most jubilant and danceable indie roots music this side of the Carolinas” (NPR). The band continues to push the boundaries of their harmony- driven grassroots origins creating their own distinctive Americana, integrating pop and bold rock flourishes along the way.

Just remember, WE is not about you and me. Freeman continues, “It’s about struggling with depression and anxiety from living in a divisive world, yet we have so much to be grateful for. It's about being at the crossroads of yesterday's dreams and tomorrow's plans.”

“WE is not about you and me or even ‘us,’ the band. It’s about finding our way in the world one day at a time trying to live out each moment until the sun goes down.” Parsonsfield has been through the wringer of ups and downs and decided for the first time since the band’s 2011 conception to take a two-month break from touring to focus solely on recording. The result is WE, a contemplative EP filled with real life struggle and excitement. The album takes us from the joys of childhood discovery to the depression and confusion of a quarter-life crisis, and ends with dancing your way toward the darkness at the end of days.

“Everyone finds themselves searching for this theoretical ‘thing’ that is supposed to make them happy. Whether it’s a relationship or financial comfort, there’s a goal in our minds that once achieved, we’ll be able to start enjoying life,” says singer/songwriter and banjo player Chris Freeman. “Our circumstances, whether we’re rich or poor, are only half of what determines happiness. The rest is our thoughts, habits and connections with other people,” adds songwriter and mandolin player Antonio Alcorn. “WE is an inner journey to appreciate what you have, and to find happiness no matter what your lot in life.”

In a concise five songs, WE captures the band’s maturing sound, winding its way through a full range of emotions. It has as much influence from 90’s rock and 70’s R&B as it does the folk-pop material that fans have come to expect from the western Massachusetts based outfit. The album opens with a forlorn mandolin that grows into the groovy “Light of the City,” a song about profound loneliness in the most crowded place on earth. “Go Find Yourself” captures the fading of childhood excitement as you tumble down a prescribed path toward the rest of your life, realizing it won’t bring you happiness. The song takes a cosmic step back and pleads, “when love comes to find you, don’t run and hide.” The danceable, invigorating “Kick Out The Windows,” written in reaction to Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” is a resonant anthem of defiance and redemption, showcasing Parsonsfield’s enduring vein of passion.

Leading up to the recording of WE, Parsonsfield built a home studio where they retreated to workshop song ideas and experiment with recording techniques. “There were more demos and versions of these songs than any other songs we have written. It was a much more thoughtful process with 90% of our ideas not sticking. Since recording our last album, Blooming Through The Black, we scored a film and wrote instrumental music for the first time, which

opened new horizons for this record.”

When it came time to go into the studio with producer Dan Cardinal (Josh Ritter, The Low Anthem, Darlingside), Parsonsfield had more material than ever before. “Dan challenged us even further to play with sampled drums and more effected sounds giving the music more depth and mood. Although this was our first time working in a traditional recording studio, we didn’t want to lose the space that our demos had. So we made sure that songs like ‘Light of the City’ and ‘Take Me Back’ maintained that minimalism that we fell in love with on our demo.”

WE is the highly anticipated fourth release from Parsonsfield, a quintet praised for making "the most jubilant and danceable indie roots music this side of the Carolinas” (NPR). The band continues to push the boundaries of their harmony- driven grassroots origins creating their own distinctive Americana, integrating pop and bold rock flourishes along the way.

Just remember, WE is not about you and me. Freeman continues, “It’s about struggling with depression and anxiety from living in a divisive world, yet we have so much to be grateful for. It's about being at the crossroads of yesterday's dreams and tomorrow's plans.”

Missy Raines & The New Hip with Special Guest Sweaty Already String Band

7 Time IBMA Bass Player of the Year, Missy Raines, who has backed greats such as Claire Lynch, Mac Weisman, Kenny Baker, and Peter Rowan, now heads up this quartet with cool grooves that are rich, layered, and lush. Accompanied by guitar, mandolin, and drums, "...Raines launches her well-tended craft off the bluegrass dock into the waters of jazz and folk, holding onto the anchor of bluegrass while pushing steadily at the boundaries of the music that engulfs her." -Country Standard Time. New Frontier, their latest album on Compass Records, features Raines' vocals throughout and has lauded her comparisons to Lucinda Williams and Rosanne Cash. The territory The New Hip covers is broad and the compass is set by Raines, planted right in the center of the stage directing with her bass every bit as much as she's playing it. Missy is currently working on her 3rd album for Compass Records to be released in 2017. This will be Raines' first all-original project.

7 Time IBMA Bass Player of the Year, Missy Raines, who has backed greats such as Claire Lynch, Mac Weisman, Kenny Baker, and Peter Rowan, now heads up this quartet with cool grooves that are rich, layered, and lush. Accompanied by guitar, mandolin, and drums, "...Raines launches her well-tended craft off the bluegrass dock into the waters of jazz and folk, holding onto the anchor of bluegrass while pushing steadily at the boundaries of the music that engulfs her." -Country Standard Time. New Frontier, their latest album on Compass Records, features Raines' vocals throughout and has lauded her comparisons to Lucinda Williams and Rosanne Cash. The territory The New Hip covers is broad and the compass is set by Raines, planted right in the center of the stage directing with her bass every bit as much as she's playing it. Missy is currently working on her 3rd album for Compass Records to be released in 2017. This will be Raines' first all-original project.

(Early Show) JD Eicher with Special Guest Hear Tonight

JD Eicher, the Youngstown, OH-area born and bred musician is set to release his new album (his first under just his name due to the very personal nature of the songs), The Middle Distance, via Rock Ridge Music on May 6, 2016. Eicher went for more of a journal entry/diary-type approach this time around, with the album being moodier, and focusing on a lot of internal struggle. Songwriting and superb singing are at the center of each track on The Middle Distance, with Eicher's Rust Belt upbringing evident as the foundation of his songwriting; Pittsburgh, not far from his hometown of Youngstown, has also embraced the performer and his music as their own.

With his band, The Goodnights, Eicher's soaring and graceful pop-rownock songcraft garnered favorable comparisons to Coldplay, Keane, The Script, The Killers, and Death Cab for Cutie. Alternative Addiction named the group one of the top 10 unsigned bands. Live, JD Eicher & the Goodnights shared the stage with such diverse and respected artists as the Dave Matthews Band, Coldplay, Train, Maroon 5, Hot Chelle Rae, Pete Yorn, Anberlin, Rod Stewart, Bryan Adams, Kelly Clarkson, Cartel, Sister Hazel, and Matt Nathanson, among many others.

JD Eicher, the Youngstown, OH-area born and bred musician is set to release his new album (his first under just his name due to the very personal nature of the songs), The Middle Distance, via Rock Ridge Music on May 6, 2016. Eicher went for more of a journal entry/diary-type approach this time around, with the album being moodier, and focusing on a lot of internal struggle. Songwriting and superb singing are at the center of each track on The Middle Distance, with Eicher's Rust Belt upbringing evident as the foundation of his songwriting; Pittsburgh, not far from his hometown of Youngstown, has also embraced the performer and his music as their own.

With his band, The Goodnights, Eicher's soaring and graceful pop-rownock songcraft garnered favorable comparisons to Coldplay, Keane, The Script, The Killers, and Death Cab for Cutie. Alternative Addiction named the group one of the top 10 unsigned bands. Live, JD Eicher & the Goodnights shared the stage with such diverse and respected artists as the Dave Matthews Band, Coldplay, Train, Maroon 5, Hot Chelle Rae, Pete Yorn, Anberlin, Rod Stewart, Bryan Adams, Kelly Clarkson, Cartel, Sister Hazel, and Matt Nathanson, among many others.

(Late Show) God Hates Unicorns / Lucid Music / Back Alley Sound

(Early Show) Heather Kropf Band with Special Guest Chris Hannigan

Heather Kropf has been a musician in Pittsburgh for almost two decades, earning acclaim for her evocative singing and songwriting. Trained in classical piano but intuitive in her approach to songwriting, she has charmed audiences with her lush, literate blend of Americana and jazz-influenced pop that captures the complexity of modern life and romance. She recently went to Nashville, enlisted noted producer/multi-instrumentalist Lex Price and a stellar cast of studio musicians, to create her fifth release "Lights" a starkly beautiful album of heart-wrenching pop songs, listed as a best album of 2017 by TribLIVE.

Kropf's honeyed vocals are reminiscent of early influences Suzanne Vega and Joni Mitchell, and her infrequent band shows feature some of Pittsburgh's finest players:

Heather Kropf | Keys, Vocals
Colter Harper | Guitar
Randall Venturini | Bass
Jeff Berman | Drums

with Chris Hannigan, special guest

Heather Kropf has been a musician in Pittsburgh for almost two decades, earning acclaim for her evocative singing and songwriting. Trained in classical piano but intuitive in her approach to songwriting, she has charmed audiences with her lush, literate blend of Americana and jazz-influenced pop that captures the complexity of modern life and romance. She recently went to Nashville, enlisted noted producer/multi-instrumentalist Lex Price and a stellar cast of studio musicians, to create her fifth release "Lights" a starkly beautiful album of heart-wrenching pop songs, listed as a best album of 2017 by TribLIVE.

Kropf's honeyed vocals are reminiscent of early influences Suzanne Vega and Joni Mitchell, and her infrequent band shows feature some of Pittsburgh's finest players:

Heather Kropf | Keys, Vocals
Colter Harper | Guitar
Randall Venturini | Bass
Jeff Berman | Drums

with Chris Hannigan, special guest

(Late Show) Dan Bubien and the Delta Struts / The Boogie Hustlers

Join Club Cafe for an evening of local music featuring Dan Bubien and the Delta Struts / The Boogie Hustlers

Join Club Cafe for an evening of local music featuring Dan Bubien and the Delta Struts / The Boogie Hustlers

Wild Pink / Adam Torres with Special Guest Evan Isaac & Jordan Kaye

Wild Pink
Wild Pink released their debut EP, Good Life, in the Summer of 2015. It was a brief but memorable introduction to the band's brand of introspective indie pop/rock. After numerous tours in support of Good Life the band hunkered down with Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz, Kindling, Sweet John Bloom) to record new songs. What grew from those sessions was actually two new releases. First and foremost, the band's debut LP, slated for release in early 2017 on Tiny Engines. But also, 4 Songs, a supplemental EP out this October, that serves to bridge the gap between releases as the band grows more expansive in their sound and ambitious in their songwriting.

Wild Pink are one of those wonderfully rare bands that sounds instantly familiar upon first listen. Yet trying to draw parallels to their influences or similar bands proves to be incredibly difficult. That remains the same as Wild Pink continue to chart their own unique course. These new songs move at their own intentional pace while the band fleshes their arrangements out further. Yet the songs never suffer, only growing more dynamic and more propulsive with this increased nuance. Wild Pink doesn't lose the warm intimacy that made the band special, it's only enhanced to a greater degree here. These are deeply personal songs about freedom, or lack thereof, about growing up and leaving your youth behind yet still clinging to those sacred scars that we hold dear. Often exercising a stream of conscious lyrical style, Wild Pink has a remarkable way of transporting you to those moments in time where the smallest detail remains etched into your being. There is a sincerity that echoes throughout these songs that is intoxicating and speaks to what makes the band so special. Wild Pink choose the road less traveled and it has served them well.

Adam Torres
Torres’ debut album Nostra Nova was initially self-released in 2006, and over the years grew from being a closely-held, sleeper f favorite in the close-knit music scene of Athens, OH (wherehe lived at the time), to earning “cult classic” status. Upon its 2015 re-release, the album received praise from outlets including The A.V. Club, Stereogum (“a stunner”), VICE (“beautiful, melancholy tunes”), Popmatters, All Music Guide, and Flavorwire, among others. “Alone Together” from Nostra Nova can be streamed here: https://soundcloud.com/adamtorres/alone-together.

Torres and his band – comprised of Thor Harris (of Swans), Aisha Burns, and Dailey Toliver – will head out on a run of U.S. dates in June. Beginning with a Daytrotter session in Davenport, IA on June 2nd, the tour will wind through the midwest and southeast before wrapping up on June 11th in Lafayette, LA. A current itinerary is below.

More information on Torres’ new album will be announced soon.

Wild Pink
Wild Pink released their debut EP, Good Life, in the Summer of 2015. It was a brief but memorable introduction to the band's brand of introspective indie pop/rock. After numerous tours in support of Good Life the band hunkered down with Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz, Kindling, Sweet John Bloom) to record new songs. What grew from those sessions was actually two new releases. First and foremost, the band's debut LP, slated for release in early 2017 on Tiny Engines. But also, 4 Songs, a supplemental EP out this October, that serves to bridge the gap between releases as the band grows more expansive in their sound and ambitious in their songwriting.

Wild Pink are one of those wonderfully rare bands that sounds instantly familiar upon first listen. Yet trying to draw parallels to their influences or similar bands proves to be incredibly difficult. That remains the same as Wild Pink continue to chart their own unique course. These new songs move at their own intentional pace while the band fleshes their arrangements out further. Yet the songs never suffer, only growing more dynamic and more propulsive with this increased nuance. Wild Pink doesn't lose the warm intimacy that made the band special, it's only enhanced to a greater degree here. These are deeply personal songs about freedom, or lack thereof, about growing up and leaving your youth behind yet still clinging to those sacred scars that we hold dear. Often exercising a stream of conscious lyrical style, Wild Pink has a remarkable way of transporting you to those moments in time where the smallest detail remains etched into your being. There is a sincerity that echoes throughout these songs that is intoxicating and speaks to what makes the band so special. Wild Pink choose the road less traveled and it has served them well.

Adam Torres
Torres’ debut album Nostra Nova was initially self-released in 2006, and over the years grew from being a closely-held, sleeper f favorite in the close-knit music scene of Athens, OH (wherehe lived at the time), to earning “cult classic” status. Upon its 2015 re-release, the album received praise from outlets including The A.V. Club, Stereogum (“a stunner”), VICE (“beautiful, melancholy tunes”), Popmatters, All Music Guide, and Flavorwire, among others. “Alone Together” from Nostra Nova can be streamed here: https://soundcloud.com/adamtorres/alone-together.

Torres and his band – comprised of Thor Harris (of Swans), Aisha Burns, and Dailey Toliver – will head out on a run of U.S. dates in June. Beginning with a Daytrotter session in Davenport, IA on June 2nd, the tour will wind through the midwest and southeast before wrapping up on June 11th in Lafayette, LA. A current itinerary is below.

More information on Torres’ new album will be announced soon.

An Evening With Robbie Fulks

Robbie Fulks is a singer, recording artist, instrumentalist, composer, and songwriter. His most recent release, 2017’s Upland Stories, earned year’s-best recognition from NPR and Rolling Stone among many others, as well as two Grammy® nominations, for folk album and American roots song (“Alabama At Night”).

Fulks was born in York, Pennsylvania, and grew up in a half-dozen small towns in southeast Pennsylvania, the North Carolina Piedmont, and the Blue Ridge area of Virginia. After 1980s stints playing with Greg Cahill’s Special Consensus Bluegrass Band and teaching at Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, Robbie worked as a staff songwriter on Music Row in Nashville (1993-1998). His early solo work includes the influential early "alternative-country" records Country Love Songs (1996) and South Mouth (1997). His music from the last several years hews mainly to acoustic instrumentation; it returns him in part to his earlier bluegrass days, and extends the boundaries of that tradition with sparely orchestrated reflections on love, the slings of time, and the troubles of common people.

Radio: multiple appearances on WSM’s “Grand Ole Opry,” PRI’s “Whadd’ya Know” and “Prairie Home Companion," NPR’s “Fresh Air,” “Mountain Stage,” and “World Cafe.” TV: PBS’s Austin City Limits; NBC’s Today, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, Later with Carson Daly, and 30 Rock. Artists who have covered his songs include Sam Bush, Kelly Hogan, Hiss Golden Messenger, Andrew Bird, Mollie O’Brien, Rosie Flores, John Cowan, and Old 97s. Festivals he’s played include Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Calgary Folk Festival, Bumbershoot, Birmingham City Stages, IBMA, Walnut Valley Festival (Winfield KS), Wakarusa (Lawrence KS), Americanafest (Nashville), Hideout Block Party, Milwaukee’s Summerfest, Taste of Chicago, Rhode Island Rhythm and Roots, Whispering Beard, and Pickathon.

Robbie Fulks is a singer, recording artist, instrumentalist, composer, and songwriter. His most recent release, 2017’s Upland Stories, earned year’s-best recognition from NPR and Rolling Stone among many others, as well as two Grammy® nominations, for folk album and American roots song (“Alabama At Night”).

Fulks was born in York, Pennsylvania, and grew up in a half-dozen small towns in southeast Pennsylvania, the North Carolina Piedmont, and the Blue Ridge area of Virginia. After 1980s stints playing with Greg Cahill’s Special Consensus Bluegrass Band and teaching at Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, Robbie worked as a staff songwriter on Music Row in Nashville (1993-1998). His early solo work includes the influential early "alternative-country" records Country Love Songs (1996) and South Mouth (1997). His music from the last several years hews mainly to acoustic instrumentation; it returns him in part to his earlier bluegrass days, and extends the boundaries of that tradition with sparely orchestrated reflections on love, the slings of time, and the troubles of common people.

Radio: multiple appearances on WSM’s “Grand Ole Opry,” PRI’s “Whadd’ya Know” and “Prairie Home Companion," NPR’s “Fresh Air,” “Mountain Stage,” and “World Cafe.” TV: PBS’s Austin City Limits; NBC’s Today, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, Later with Carson Daly, and 30 Rock. Artists who have covered his songs include Sam Bush, Kelly Hogan, Hiss Golden Messenger, Andrew Bird, Mollie O’Brien, Rosie Flores, John Cowan, and Old 97s. Festivals he’s played include Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Calgary Folk Festival, Bumbershoot, Birmingham City Stages, IBMA, Walnut Valley Festival (Winfield KS), Wakarusa (Lawrence KS), Americanafest (Nashville), Hideout Block Party, Milwaukee’s Summerfest, Taste of Chicago, Rhode Island Rhythm and Roots, Whispering Beard, and Pickathon.

Mako - Breathe Tour with Special Guest Night Lights

As the brains and heart behind electronic act Mako, Alex Seaver is single-handedly tackling his next artistic chapter. Previously a duo, alongside former DJ and bandmate Logan Light, Mako now takes on a new life as a solo act, with Seaver serving a multifaceted role as its frontman, sole producer and songwriter and driving creative force. And with the musical reinvention comes a fresh reboot in sound and style via "Breathe," the newest Mako single out Friday, December 8, on Ultra Music.

"Breathe," a velvety stroll through personal emotions and beautiful instrumentation, serves as Seaver's first official single as the newly reimagined Mako. For the track, he takes cues from various sources of inspiration and sonic styles, all the while picking up where Mako last left off on Hourglass, his debut album released December 2016 via Ultra Music. "Breathe" is thus a natural progression for Seaver, one which sees him updating and upgrading the Mako sound via percussion-powered layers, indie rock sentiments, airy electronic influences, heartfelt lyrics and a striking vocal performance from Seaver himself.

Co-produced by Seaver along with producer Scott Bruzenak, the track focuses heavily on its instrumental framework, which is simultaneously rhythmic and groove-laden while at the same time dark and atmospheric-a bittersweet love song, so to speak. "The song is built around a pained style: a personal and soft voice telling an uplifting story," says Seaver of "Breathe." "It's ultimately something that’s powerful and moving, but it doesn’t come without a little bit of pain attached to it as well." The end result is a pop track built on elegance and sophistication and filled with organic sounds and instruments.

With "Breathe" now as his musical reintroduction as Mako, Seaver is bringing the concept to life via a new live show, which he is set to take across North America on a 33-date tour running January-March 2018, including a date in Seaver's home city of San Diego. The original configuration, a four-piece band comprising of Seaver on vocals & keys, a guitarist, a violinist, and a drummer, will showcase the new wave of Mako as a live act, Seaver's first full-fledged tour as a performing unit.

"I started feeling like I couldn't communicate what I needed to communicate musically in a club setting and in that nightlife environment," says Seaver of the inspiration behind the new live Mako show. "I had to switch things up and bring in live musicians. Whenever you take your music to live musicians, they’re not going to play things mathematically. They’re going to play things with a lot of imperfections. You want to create an environment where you make those imperfections exciting, where you can decide something in the moment and have everyone onstage react to it. With the new show, I’m going to dial it up a notch."

Seaver broke into the mainstream as Mako in late 2016 with Hourglass, his debut artist album for Ultra Music. Mixing far-reaching elements from the worlds of pop, indie rock and EDM, Hourglass marked a stark shift in Mako's musical aesthetic, moving away from dance floor fodder and into a more refined approach to electronic-driven pop. In April 2017, Mako released Hourglass: The Remixes, an accompanying remix album via Ultra Records that included reworked versions of the album’s tracks from NOTD, Halcyon, Shades, Attom and many others. Hourglass also included the 2015 breakthrough single "Smoke Filled Room," which soared into pop and dance radio airplay charts via continuous support on SiriusXM's BPM and iHeartRadio's Evolution channels and landed at #1 on the Billboard Dance Airplay chart. Elsewhere, "Beam," Mako's first release, has amassed more than 50 million online views and streams since its release in December 2013. Between remixes and work for others, Mako has also racked up multiple Hype Machine #1s. SiriusXM quickly jumped onboard, anointing the act "the next big thing," and the rest of the electronic musical community followed suit. On the touring front, Mako has played high-profile festivals including Coachella, Lollapalooza, EDC Las Vegas, TomorrowWorld, Electric Forest, Electric Zoo and more, in addition to headlining club tours. To date, Mako counts over 150 million combined streams on Spotify alone and has worked with and remixed the world’s elite EDM artists including Avicii, Steve Angello, Hardwell and many others.

Outside of Mako, Seaver-a skilled, classically trained musician and composer in his own right, as well as a gifted graduate of the lauded Juilliard School in NYC—also spreads his expansive songwriting and production expertise across various multimedia disciplines. In 2015, he began writing original scores and contributing remixes for Riot Games, the world-renowned video game developer and publisher. He officially remixed "Piercing Light," theme song of the global video game, League of Legends, in 2016. Seaver also co-wrote and co-produced "Legends Never Die," the official theme song for the 2017 League of Legends World Championship; he also sang on the Alan Walker remix of the track alongside Against the Current. In November 2017, Seaver performed at the League of Legends Live concert in Beijing, China, in front of 75,000 attendees and millions more online via the event's official livestream. Additionally, Seaver has scored and created original music for independent films, TV series and several commercials.

Seaver's first full length score is for the acclaimed documentary "Soufra," the story or the first woman in Lebanon to have her own food truck. The documentary (from Morgan Spurlock’s team) is currently being screened for award consideration.

Seaver is now on the cusp of a newer, bolder artistic concept for Mako, a direction steering him toward a more authentic sound and a more personal place within. "I'm certainly going through a lot of musical changes," says Seaver of the new Mako configuration. "I needed to disappear into myself for a little bit."

It all now comes together on the new single, "Breathe," and the forthcoming live tour, which cohesively combine all of Seaver's true musical passions: a love of film and orchestral music; a passion for electronic music and songwriting; and an adoration for live bands and live musicians. Collectively, it all feeds back to the Mako sound-past, present and future.

"This year, I'm going through some big personal changes with my relationship to music, and it's all about bringing all those things together into one place," says Seaver of the future of Mako. "I'm not interested in writing the biggest singles and in being a famous person. My musical interests remain in being creatively malleable in all kinds of ways. I'm constantly pushing my own boundaries and pushing the boundaries of what you'd expect from an artist today."

-John Ochoa, November 2017

As the brains and heart behind electronic act Mako, Alex Seaver is single-handedly tackling his next artistic chapter. Previously a duo, alongside former DJ and bandmate Logan Light, Mako now takes on a new life as a solo act, with Seaver serving a multifaceted role as its frontman, sole producer and songwriter and driving creative force. And with the musical reinvention comes a fresh reboot in sound and style via "Breathe," the newest Mako single out Friday, December 8, on Ultra Music.

"Breathe," a velvety stroll through personal emotions and beautiful instrumentation, serves as Seaver's first official single as the newly reimagined Mako. For the track, he takes cues from various sources of inspiration and sonic styles, all the while picking up where Mako last left off on Hourglass, his debut album released December 2016 via Ultra Music. "Breathe" is thus a natural progression for Seaver, one which sees him updating and upgrading the Mako sound via percussion-powered layers, indie rock sentiments, airy electronic influences, heartfelt lyrics and a striking vocal performance from Seaver himself.

Co-produced by Seaver along with producer Scott Bruzenak, the track focuses heavily on its instrumental framework, which is simultaneously rhythmic and groove-laden while at the same time dark and atmospheric-a bittersweet love song, so to speak. "The song is built around a pained style: a personal and soft voice telling an uplifting story," says Seaver of "Breathe." "It's ultimately something that’s powerful and moving, but it doesn’t come without a little bit of pain attached to it as well." The end result is a pop track built on elegance and sophistication and filled with organic sounds and instruments.

With "Breathe" now as his musical reintroduction as Mako, Seaver is bringing the concept to life via a new live show, which he is set to take across North America on a 33-date tour running January-March 2018, including a date in Seaver's home city of San Diego. The original configuration, a four-piece band comprising of Seaver on vocals & keys, a guitarist, a violinist, and a drummer, will showcase the new wave of Mako as a live act, Seaver's first full-fledged tour as a performing unit.

"I started feeling like I couldn't communicate what I needed to communicate musically in a club setting and in that nightlife environment," says Seaver of the inspiration behind the new live Mako show. "I had to switch things up and bring in live musicians. Whenever you take your music to live musicians, they’re not going to play things mathematically. They’re going to play things with a lot of imperfections. You want to create an environment where you make those imperfections exciting, where you can decide something in the moment and have everyone onstage react to it. With the new show, I’m going to dial it up a notch."

Seaver broke into the mainstream as Mako in late 2016 with Hourglass, his debut artist album for Ultra Music. Mixing far-reaching elements from the worlds of pop, indie rock and EDM, Hourglass marked a stark shift in Mako's musical aesthetic, moving away from dance floor fodder and into a more refined approach to electronic-driven pop. In April 2017, Mako released Hourglass: The Remixes, an accompanying remix album via Ultra Records that included reworked versions of the album’s tracks from NOTD, Halcyon, Shades, Attom and many others. Hourglass also included the 2015 breakthrough single "Smoke Filled Room," which soared into pop and dance radio airplay charts via continuous support on SiriusXM's BPM and iHeartRadio's Evolution channels and landed at #1 on the Billboard Dance Airplay chart. Elsewhere, "Beam," Mako's first release, has amassed more than 50 million online views and streams since its release in December 2013. Between remixes and work for others, Mako has also racked up multiple Hype Machine #1s. SiriusXM quickly jumped onboard, anointing the act "the next big thing," and the rest of the electronic musical community followed suit. On the touring front, Mako has played high-profile festivals including Coachella, Lollapalooza, EDC Las Vegas, TomorrowWorld, Electric Forest, Electric Zoo and more, in addition to headlining club tours. To date, Mako counts over 150 million combined streams on Spotify alone and has worked with and remixed the world’s elite EDM artists including Avicii, Steve Angello, Hardwell and many others.

Outside of Mako, Seaver-a skilled, classically trained musician and composer in his own right, as well as a gifted graduate of the lauded Juilliard School in NYC—also spreads his expansive songwriting and production expertise across various multimedia disciplines. In 2015, he began writing original scores and contributing remixes for Riot Games, the world-renowned video game developer and publisher. He officially remixed "Piercing Light," theme song of the global video game, League of Legends, in 2016. Seaver also co-wrote and co-produced "Legends Never Die," the official theme song for the 2017 League of Legends World Championship; he also sang on the Alan Walker remix of the track alongside Against the Current. In November 2017, Seaver performed at the League of Legends Live concert in Beijing, China, in front of 75,000 attendees and millions more online via the event's official livestream. Additionally, Seaver has scored and created original music for independent films, TV series and several commercials.

Seaver's first full length score is for the acclaimed documentary "Soufra," the story or the first woman in Lebanon to have her own food truck. The documentary (from Morgan Spurlock’s team) is currently being screened for award consideration.

Seaver is now on the cusp of a newer, bolder artistic concept for Mako, a direction steering him toward a more authentic sound and a more personal place within. "I'm certainly going through a lot of musical changes," says Seaver of the new Mako configuration. "I needed to disappear into myself for a little bit."

It all now comes together on the new single, "Breathe," and the forthcoming live tour, which cohesively combine all of Seaver's true musical passions: a love of film and orchestral music; a passion for electronic music and songwriting; and an adoration for live bands and live musicians. Collectively, it all feeds back to the Mako sound-past, present and future.

"This year, I'm going through some big personal changes with my relationship to music, and it's all about bringing all those things together into one place," says Seaver of the future of Mako. "I'm not interested in writing the biggest singles and in being a famous person. My musical interests remain in being creatively malleable in all kinds of ways. I'm constantly pushing my own boundaries and pushing the boundaries of what you'd expect from an artist today."

-John Ochoa, November 2017

(Rescheduled from October 14) - Jessica Lea Mayfield with Special Guest Mal Blum and The Blums

All tickets from the original date of October 14 will be honored

"The whole record is about me taking my life back, without really realizing it," she says. "I realized I'm the only person that is going to look out for me. I have to be my main person. No one else."

Jessica Lea Mayfield might make some people uncomfortable with the level of honesty she projects on her forthcoming LP, Sorry Is Gone, but she's not going to apologize – for that, or for anything else on her complex, confessional fourth album. Recorded with producer John Agnello (Sonic Youth, Kurt Vile, Phosphorescent and Dinosaur Jr.), Sorry Is Gone is a raw document of a woman in progress; one weathering cruel storms but finally able to blame the rain itself for the flood. Written as the truth of her own poisonous marriage unfolded before her eyes, Sorry Is Gone is a record of permission. Permission to create freely, to escape what is no longer safe and to stop bearing responsibility for things done to her, not by her. As Mayfield sings on the title track, "the sorry is gone." Indeed, it is; kicked to the curb with every strum of her guitar.

Written in the years since her last solo LP, Make My Head Sing, in 2014, and her 2015 collaboration with Seth Avett, Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield Sing Elliott Smith, Sorry Is Gone became the soundtrack to a highly personal and traumatic story. The Ohio-born Mayfield was quietly enduring years of domestic abuse, smiling and touring while she hid a brewing tempest – and the bruises, too. But lyrics don't lie even as bruises fade, and they started to tell the tale of her marriage before she was even able to; songs often dark and dangerous and ready to confront and claim her life. Written primarily on an acoustic baritone guitar – out of necessity at first, in her thin-walled apartment – Mayfield started to process the years of hurt and uncertainty through words and melodies that helped her see the light in the darkness.

Though much of Make My Head Sing was written music-first, Sorry Is Gone began with those lyrics, and, so often, a path forward unfolded itself as the songs formed. "The cold hard truth is you love me too much," she sings on "Meadow," a moody, echoey moment about finally realizing someone's true colors. "The cold hard truth is you couldn't love me enough." It's a brutal line from someone who refuses to be victimized. Evoking the pathos of nineties grunge, the folk confessions of her idol, Smith, and the cool blasé of bands like Luscious Jackson, the tracks that comprise Sorry Is Gone aren't devised to make anyone comfortable but herself – but they are there to help share an emotional journal and a certain kind of healing that can only come through music.

"I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy," says Mayfield, who shaped so many of these songs in the isolation of the small apartment she shared with her husband while their marriage fell apart in her hands – in many ways, those songs pointed to the way out before she could get there herself. "That's what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word."

Recorded with Agnello at Water Music and Electric Lady Studios, Mayfield recruited a stellar group of musicians for Sorry Is Gone, including Avett on backing vocals and keys, drummer Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Sun Kil Moon), bassist Emil Amos (Grails, Holy Sons), guitarist Cameron Deyell (Sia, Streets of Laredo) and Patrick Damphier (The Mynabirds, Field Days, who produced and played on "Offa My Hands"). Together, they worked to create an ominous take on love, where hope can exist among heartbreak and the end is only as finite as we make it to be. On songs like the title track and "Bum Me Out," Mayfield bends the angelic notes of her voice over off-kilter orchestration, building an environment of warrior-style triumph; on "Safe 2 Connect 2," she takes stock of the digital world to a haunting, acoustic backdrop that gives a subtle ode to her bluegrass roots.

"Been though hell, there's no telling what might happen in my future," she sings. "All I can do is be thankful for each moment that's my own."

Mayfield has paved an unconventional lifestyle – playing in her family's bluegrass band since the age of eight, she didn't have any traditional schooling and released her first album at the age of fifteen, when she was discovered by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. Influenced by everything from that mountain sound to the modern garage, Mayfield has been able to come at songwriting from a pure perspective, lead more by her heart than any textbook. It's what makes the tracks of Sorry Is Gone so striking and visceral – there is no filter on the emotions, no rulebook and certainly no excuses for anything she's been through or the candor she fires.

"I'm not going to bite my lip on anything," she says. "If there is one thing I am going to do, it's talk and sing about what I want to. No one is going to manipulate me."

The sorry is gone, once and for all – and Sorry Is Gone is a permission slip for anyone who wants to stop apologizing for others, and start living for themselves.

All tickets from the original date of October 14 will be honored

"The whole record is about me taking my life back, without really realizing it," she says. "I realized I'm the only person that is going to look out for me. I have to be my main person. No one else."

Jessica Lea Mayfield might make some people uncomfortable with the level of honesty she projects on her forthcoming LP, Sorry Is Gone, but she's not going to apologize – for that, or for anything else on her complex, confessional fourth album. Recorded with producer John Agnello (Sonic Youth, Kurt Vile, Phosphorescent and Dinosaur Jr.), Sorry Is Gone is a raw document of a woman in progress; one weathering cruel storms but finally able to blame the rain itself for the flood. Written as the truth of her own poisonous marriage unfolded before her eyes, Sorry Is Gone is a record of permission. Permission to create freely, to escape what is no longer safe and to stop bearing responsibility for things done to her, not by her. As Mayfield sings on the title track, "the sorry is gone." Indeed, it is; kicked to the curb with every strum of her guitar.

Written in the years since her last solo LP, Make My Head Sing, in 2014, and her 2015 collaboration with Seth Avett, Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield Sing Elliott Smith, Sorry Is Gone became the soundtrack to a highly personal and traumatic story. The Ohio-born Mayfield was quietly enduring years of domestic abuse, smiling and touring while she hid a brewing tempest – and the bruises, too. But lyrics don't lie even as bruises fade, and they started to tell the tale of her marriage before she was even able to; songs often dark and dangerous and ready to confront and claim her life. Written primarily on an acoustic baritone guitar – out of necessity at first, in her thin-walled apartment – Mayfield started to process the years of hurt and uncertainty through words and melodies that helped her see the light in the darkness.

Though much of Make My Head Sing was written music-first, Sorry Is Gone began with those lyrics, and, so often, a path forward unfolded itself as the songs formed. "The cold hard truth is you love me too much," she sings on "Meadow," a moody, echoey moment about finally realizing someone's true colors. "The cold hard truth is you couldn't love me enough." It's a brutal line from someone who refuses to be victimized. Evoking the pathos of nineties grunge, the folk confessions of her idol, Smith, and the cool blasé of bands like Luscious Jackson, the tracks that comprise Sorry Is Gone aren't devised to make anyone comfortable but herself – but they are there to help share an emotional journal and a certain kind of healing that can only come through music.

"I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy," says Mayfield, who shaped so many of these songs in the isolation of the small apartment she shared with her husband while their marriage fell apart in her hands – in many ways, those songs pointed to the way out before she could get there herself. "That's what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word."

Recorded with Agnello at Water Music and Electric Lady Studios, Mayfield recruited a stellar group of musicians for Sorry Is Gone, including Avett on backing vocals and keys, drummer Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Sun Kil Moon), bassist Emil Amos (Grails, Holy Sons), guitarist Cameron Deyell (Sia, Streets of Laredo) and Patrick Damphier (The Mynabirds, Field Days, who produced and played on "Offa My Hands"). Together, they worked to create an ominous take on love, where hope can exist among heartbreak and the end is only as finite as we make it to be. On songs like the title track and "Bum Me Out," Mayfield bends the angelic notes of her voice over off-kilter orchestration, building an environment of warrior-style triumph; on "Safe 2 Connect 2," she takes stock of the digital world to a haunting, acoustic backdrop that gives a subtle ode to her bluegrass roots.

"Been though hell, there's no telling what might happen in my future," she sings. "All I can do is be thankful for each moment that's my own."

Mayfield has paved an unconventional lifestyle – playing in her family's bluegrass band since the age of eight, she didn't have any traditional schooling and released her first album at the age of fifteen, when she was discovered by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. Influenced by everything from that mountain sound to the modern garage, Mayfield has been able to come at songwriting from a pure perspective, lead more by her heart than any textbook. It's what makes the tracks of Sorry Is Gone so striking and visceral – there is no filter on the emotions, no rulebook and certainly no excuses for anything she's been through or the candor she fires.

"I'm not going to bite my lip on anything," she says. "If there is one thing I am going to do, it's talk and sing about what I want to. No one is going to manipulate me."

The sorry is gone, once and for all – and Sorry Is Gone is a permission slip for anyone who wants to stop apologizing for others, and start living for themselves.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)