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(Late Show) Joey Harkum Band (of Pasadena) with Special Guest Living With Monsters

Joey Harkum is a singer songwriter hailing from Pasadena, MD. For over a decade, Joey has performed all around the country as the lead singer of the band Pasadena. Joey has a unique way of connecting with his fans through deep, poignant lyrics which tell stories of happiness, love, loss and sadness. Joey is currently embarking on his first solo venture and will be touring the nation performing his own special brand of americana, folk rock.

Joey Harkum is a singer songwriter hailing from Pasadena, MD. For over a decade, Joey has performed all around the country as the lead singer of the band Pasadena. Joey has a unique way of connecting with his fans through deep, poignant lyrics which tell stories of happiness, love, loss and sadness. Joey is currently embarking on his first solo venture and will be touring the nation performing his own special brand of americana, folk rock.

SASAMI with Special Guest Empath

If you’ve ever drafted an overly long text to someone and decided against sending it, then you’ll probably hear something of yourself in SASAMI, out March 2019 on Domino. “It’s a mix of a diary and a collection of letters, written but never sent, to people I’ve been intimately involved with in one way or another,” explains Los Angeles songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sasami Ashworth, aka SASAMI, who wrote the album’s ten tautly melodic rock tracks over the course of a year on tour, playing keys and guitar with Cherry Glazerr. “Ok, maybe they’re more like over-dramatic drafts of texts that you compose in the Notes section of your iPhone, but either way, they come from a place of getting something off my chest.” In an Instagram post announcing the release of “Callous,” a haunting ballad chronicling the disintegration of a relationship over wrenching guitar wails, she sums up the inspiration behind her engrossingly confessional debut more bluntly: “Everyone I fucked and who fucked me last year.”

Originating as a string of demos she recorded straight to her iPad on tour, the songs poured out of Ashworth in stream-of-consciousness fashion, tracking the thrills, disappointments, and non-starters of a year spent newly single and on the road. In many ways, though, they were the culmination of decades of hard work. After a studying piano as a child, she picked up the French horn in middle school, and has been playing music pretty much every day since—first as a long-time conservatory kid with her sights on a career as a classical French horn player, and later as an elementary school music teacher, running around a classroom, making up songs and dances, and directing rag-tag orchestras full of glockenspiels and bongos.

Where studying classical music and jazz had been an exercise in creating note-perfect renditions of other people’s music, teaching, quite literally, required her to improvise. “You have to juggle so many skills when you teach,” she says. “You have to be a musician and a babysitter and a clown—and secretly be teaching. “If you can keep like 30 kids with tambourines entertained, [doing it for] a room full of drunk adults at a rock show is nothing.”

It didn’t take long for Ashworth to start dipping her toe into pop music. A growing obsession with the noisy catharsis of post-punk and shoegaze and nights out with her brother Joo-Joo, a veteran of the Los Angeles indie rock scene who plays in the band Froth, led her to playing synth and guitar in the group Dirt Dress. In the past half-decade, she’s worn basically every hat that a working musician can wear, scoring films and commercials, producing for and playing on other people’s albums, and doing string, horn, and vocal arrangements for artists like Curtis Harding, Wild Nothing, and Vagabon.

But it wasn’t until March of 2017, about midway-through a two-and-a-half year stint recording and touring with Cherry Glazerr, that she felt the urge to sit down and write songs of her own. “I had just ended a year and a half relationship— a pretty serious relationship, that came right after another serious relationship,” she says. “It was just like a beginning of a new life cycle in a lot of ways—the beginning of my new single life, and also constantly being on tour, and being in this band all the time. And so I felt like I needed to write. I was just super emotional.”

At first, she viewed writing songs mostly as an opportunity to sharpen her guitar skills. Eventually, since she was on tour most of the time, she decided to forgo rent on an apartment and use the money to pay for studio time whenever she was back in Los Angeles, figuring that she might as well learn her way around an analog studio. Though the material she was working on was deeply personal, the record that would emerge from those sessions—co-produced by Joo Joo and Studio 22’s Thomas Dolas, who also engineered and mixed SASAMI—is largely the sound of Ashworth having fun in the studio with her friends. Devendra Banhart and Beach Fossils’ Dustin Payseur make appearances as “male back-up vocalists,” and Joo Joo—her professed “guitar hero”—and Froth bandmate Cameron Allen fill in guitar and drums, respectively. “Adult Contemporary,” a spacey reverie reflecting the existential uncertainty of our current moment, features an all-star crew of badass Los Angeles women, including French singer-songwriter and actress Soko on vocals, Hand Habits’ Meg Duffy on guitar, Alvvays drummer Sheridan Riley on drums, and Anna Butters on electric and standup bass.

SASAMI is the sound of Ashworth reveling in the warmth and magic of analog recording— experimenting with different guitar tones and amplifier placements, embracing the imperfections that arise when you record on a 16-track and reconstruing them as strengths. Her years studying music theory and classical performance shine through in the tiny details that pepper SASAMI at every turn—from the sly bending of a guitar note on opener “I Was a Window,” to the expressive pause before the instrumental breakdown on “Pacify My Heart.” Unlike your typical four-chord rock songs, her colorful arrangements draw from a classical technique called voice leading, where the different elements of a song (from voice, to keys, to bass) form distinct, interweaving melodic lines.

Just like her notoriously irreverent stage banter, Ashworth says her relationship to music, and to playing instruments, “comes from a place of love and playfulness and joy”—and it’s something you can hear at every moment of SASAMI, even as the emotional journey it traces veers into more introspective territory. “Jealousy,” a smoky, minor-key number with a sinister choir of chirpy back-up vocals, celebrates the freedom of living life on your own terms as a single person, even as it makes those around you uncomfortable. “Free,” a softly strummed duet with Devendra Banhart, captures the pain of finally feeling ready to open up to someone new, only to discover that they aren’t on the same page. “Not the Time,” an open-road rocker with crunchy shoegaze guitars and sweeping synths, explores the bittersweet feeling of realizing that your love for someone is reciprocated, even if the timing and geography don’t add up. “It's not the time or place for us,” she sings in her wispy alto. “But you said that you would save some space for us.”

If SASAMI tells a story, it’s one about the surprising ways that one’s relationships—with lovers, with friends, with oneself—can shift in a single year. And it’s one that doesn’t really have a solid conclusion or takeaway—other than the realization “that your status of being in a relationship or not doesn’t actually define whether you feel whole,” as Sasami describes it. “It's about whether you feel grounded or not. Whether you feel at peace or not.”

It’s inspiring to hear a woman who spent years playing other people’s music finally tell her own story. And it’s a feeling she says she wants to pay forward, just as her students and so many women in her life—like recent tourmates Mitski, Snail Mail, and Japanese Breakfast—have empowered her. Which is another way of saying that even in its saddest moments, SASAMI will put a little bounce in your step. Extra points if you decide to put on a clown costume and dance around in the street, as Ashworth does is the video for "Not the Time."

If you’ve ever drafted an overly long text to someone and decided against sending it, then you’ll probably hear something of yourself in SASAMI, out March 2019 on Domino. “It’s a mix of a diary and a collection of letters, written but never sent, to people I’ve been intimately involved with in one way or another,” explains Los Angeles songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sasami Ashworth, aka SASAMI, who wrote the album’s ten tautly melodic rock tracks over the course of a year on tour, playing keys and guitar with Cherry Glazerr. “Ok, maybe they’re more like over-dramatic drafts of texts that you compose in the Notes section of your iPhone, but either way, they come from a place of getting something off my chest.” In an Instagram post announcing the release of “Callous,” a haunting ballad chronicling the disintegration of a relationship over wrenching guitar wails, she sums up the inspiration behind her engrossingly confessional debut more bluntly: “Everyone I fucked and who fucked me last year.”

Originating as a string of demos she recorded straight to her iPad on tour, the songs poured out of Ashworth in stream-of-consciousness fashion, tracking the thrills, disappointments, and non-starters of a year spent newly single and on the road. In many ways, though, they were the culmination of decades of hard work. After a studying piano as a child, she picked up the French horn in middle school, and has been playing music pretty much every day since—first as a long-time conservatory kid with her sights on a career as a classical French horn player, and later as an elementary school music teacher, running around a classroom, making up songs and dances, and directing rag-tag orchestras full of glockenspiels and bongos.

Where studying classical music and jazz had been an exercise in creating note-perfect renditions of other people’s music, teaching, quite literally, required her to improvise. “You have to juggle so many skills when you teach,” she says. “You have to be a musician and a babysitter and a clown—and secretly be teaching. “If you can keep like 30 kids with tambourines entertained, [doing it for] a room full of drunk adults at a rock show is nothing.”

It didn’t take long for Ashworth to start dipping her toe into pop music. A growing obsession with the noisy catharsis of post-punk and shoegaze and nights out with her brother Joo-Joo, a veteran of the Los Angeles indie rock scene who plays in the band Froth, led her to playing synth and guitar in the group Dirt Dress. In the past half-decade, she’s worn basically every hat that a working musician can wear, scoring films and commercials, producing for and playing on other people’s albums, and doing string, horn, and vocal arrangements for artists like Curtis Harding, Wild Nothing, and Vagabon.

But it wasn’t until March of 2017, about midway-through a two-and-a-half year stint recording and touring with Cherry Glazerr, that she felt the urge to sit down and write songs of her own. “I had just ended a year and a half relationship— a pretty serious relationship, that came right after another serious relationship,” she says. “It was just like a beginning of a new life cycle in a lot of ways—the beginning of my new single life, and also constantly being on tour, and being in this band all the time. And so I felt like I needed to write. I was just super emotional.”

At first, she viewed writing songs mostly as an opportunity to sharpen her guitar skills. Eventually, since she was on tour most of the time, she decided to forgo rent on an apartment and use the money to pay for studio time whenever she was back in Los Angeles, figuring that she might as well learn her way around an analog studio. Though the material she was working on was deeply personal, the record that would emerge from those sessions—co-produced by Joo Joo and Studio 22’s Thomas Dolas, who also engineered and mixed SASAMI—is largely the sound of Ashworth having fun in the studio with her friends. Devendra Banhart and Beach Fossils’ Dustin Payseur make appearances as “male back-up vocalists,” and Joo Joo—her professed “guitar hero”—and Froth bandmate Cameron Allen fill in guitar and drums, respectively. “Adult Contemporary,” a spacey reverie reflecting the existential uncertainty of our current moment, features an all-star crew of badass Los Angeles women, including French singer-songwriter and actress Soko on vocals, Hand Habits’ Meg Duffy on guitar, Alvvays drummer Sheridan Riley on drums, and Anna Butters on electric and standup bass.

SASAMI is the sound of Ashworth reveling in the warmth and magic of analog recording— experimenting with different guitar tones and amplifier placements, embracing the imperfections that arise when you record on a 16-track and reconstruing them as strengths. Her years studying music theory and classical performance shine through in the tiny details that pepper SASAMI at every turn—from the sly bending of a guitar note on opener “I Was a Window,” to the expressive pause before the instrumental breakdown on “Pacify My Heart.” Unlike your typical four-chord rock songs, her colorful arrangements draw from a classical technique called voice leading, where the different elements of a song (from voice, to keys, to bass) form distinct, interweaving melodic lines.

Just like her notoriously irreverent stage banter, Ashworth says her relationship to music, and to playing instruments, “comes from a place of love and playfulness and joy”—and it’s something you can hear at every moment of SASAMI, even as the emotional journey it traces veers into more introspective territory. “Jealousy,” a smoky, minor-key number with a sinister choir of chirpy back-up vocals, celebrates the freedom of living life on your own terms as a single person, even as it makes those around you uncomfortable. “Free,” a softly strummed duet with Devendra Banhart, captures the pain of finally feeling ready to open up to someone new, only to discover that they aren’t on the same page. “Not the Time,” an open-road rocker with crunchy shoegaze guitars and sweeping synths, explores the bittersweet feeling of realizing that your love for someone is reciprocated, even if the timing and geography don’t add up. “It's not the time or place for us,” she sings in her wispy alto. “But you said that you would save some space for us.”

If SASAMI tells a story, it’s one about the surprising ways that one’s relationships—with lovers, with friends, with oneself—can shift in a single year. And it’s one that doesn’t really have a solid conclusion or takeaway—other than the realization “that your status of being in a relationship or not doesn’t actually define whether you feel whole,” as Sasami describes it. “It's about whether you feel grounded or not. Whether you feel at peace or not.”

It’s inspiring to hear a woman who spent years playing other people’s music finally tell her own story. And it’s a feeling she says she wants to pay forward, just as her students and so many women in her life—like recent tourmates Mitski, Snail Mail, and Japanese Breakfast—have empowered her. Which is another way of saying that even in its saddest moments, SASAMI will put a little bounce in your step. Extra points if you decide to put on a clown costume and dance around in the street, as Ashworth does is the video for "Not the Time."

Allman Brown with Special Guest Aisha Badru

Allman Brown is a London-based singer-songwriter influenced by the likes of Bon Iver, James Vincent McMorrow, and Sufjan Stevens. Since announcing himself onto the scene in 2013 with the 'Sons And Daughters' EP (the lead track of which recently surpassed 3.5 million streams on Spotify), he has built a solid fanbase on both sides of the Atlantic through a number of his songs being featured on notable TV dramas in both the UK and US. His debut Album '1000 Years' is available now.

Allman Brown is a London-based singer-songwriter influenced by the likes of Bon Iver, James Vincent McMorrow, and Sufjan Stevens. Since announcing himself onto the scene in 2013 with the 'Sons And Daughters' EP (the lead track of which recently surpassed 3.5 million streams on Spotify), he has built a solid fanbase on both sides of the Atlantic through a number of his songs being featured on notable TV dramas in both the UK and US. His debut Album '1000 Years' is available now.

The Felice Brothers with Special Guest Johnathan Rice

The Felice Brothers’ album, Life in the Dark, out on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band’s latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers’ 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once “timeless, yet tossed-off,” they’ve released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band’s DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

“The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap,” James Felice says, laughing. “It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music.”

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

“We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources,” singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. “We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes.”

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener “Aerosol Ball” — “They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there’s a connection there,” he says — while James Felice says listening to Neil Young’s Tonight’s the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

“If you listen to that record, it’s fucking crazy,” he says. “We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this.”

He’s referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on “Aerosol Ball,” mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on “Triumph ’73” and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of “Plunder,” full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare’s “Double, double toil and trouble” incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice’s songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. “It’s just what was going on when I was writing the songs,” Ian Felice says. “It’s a pretty politically charged climate right now.” To say the least.

The singer’s characters on “Aerosol Ball” exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while “Jack at the Asylum” catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on “Plunder.” He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. “The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time,” Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: “Triumph ’73” follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad “Diamond Bell” tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. “It’s part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits,” Ian Felice says. “I think it’s one of the most straight-ahead narratives I’ve written.”

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly — “I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?’” he says — and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

“There wasn’t too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music,” James Felice says. “We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it.”

The resulting album is more than just classic American music — it’s a parable for modern America.

The Felice Brothers’ album, Life in the Dark, out on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band’s latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers’ 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once “timeless, yet tossed-off,” they’ve released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band’s DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

“The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap,” James Felice says, laughing. “It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music.”

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

“We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources,” singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. “We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes.”

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener “Aerosol Ball” — “They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there’s a connection there,” he says — while James Felice says listening to Neil Young’s Tonight’s the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

“If you listen to that record, it’s fucking crazy,” he says. “We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this.”

He’s referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on “Aerosol Ball,” mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on “Triumph ’73” and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of “Plunder,” full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare’s “Double, double toil and trouble” incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice’s songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. “It’s just what was going on when I was writing the songs,” Ian Felice says. “It’s a pretty politically charged climate right now.” To say the least.

The singer’s characters on “Aerosol Ball” exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while “Jack at the Asylum” catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on “Plunder.” He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. “The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time,” Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: “Triumph ’73” follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad “Diamond Bell” tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. “It’s part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits,” Ian Felice says. “I think it’s one of the most straight-ahead narratives I’ve written.”

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly — “I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?’” he says — and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

“There wasn’t too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music,” James Felice says. “We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it.”

The resulting album is more than just classic American music — it’s a parable for modern America.

Strand of Oaks with Special Guest Apex Manor - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

“When I was writing these songs, every day I would walk on the beach and I was completely alone and overwhelmed by fear...but then I realized how there really aren’t any rules for who you are, who you’ll become, or who you think you need to be. Eraserlandis just that. It’s death to ego, and rebirth to anything or anyone you want to be.” In December 2017, Tim Showalter was uncertain about his next record and the shape it would eventually take. With no new songs writtenand lacking any clear vision,he wasunprepared for the message he would receive from his friend Carl Broemel, the conversation that would follow, and the album that would become Eraserland.Leading off with standout track “Weird Ways” and hispowerful declaration of“I don’t feel it anymore,” EraserlandtracesShowalter’s evolution from apprehension to creative awakening, carving out a new and compelling future for Strand of Oaks."This project seemed to just fall together naturally,” said Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. “I felt drawn to Tim’s positive energy and his albums...I threw it out there that I’d be happy to help in any way I could with the record." Broemel quickly reignited Showalter's interest in what would become Strand of Oaks’ sixth full-length studio release, and within 24 hours, My Morning Jacket members Patrick Hallahan(drums), Bo Koster(keys), and Tom Blankenship(bass)were also on board.Revived by the support of Broemel and his bandmates, Showalter felt thepressure to deliver songs worthy of musicians he had admired long before and after a 2015 Oaks/MMJ tour. So in February 2018, hespent two weeks alone in Wildwood, New Jersey writing and demoing all of the songs that would eventually comprise Eraserland.And in April, he went into the studio to record with Kevin Ratterman at La La Land Studios in Louisville, Kentucky, and with Broemel, Hallahan, Koster, and Blankenship as his band. Jason Isbell also contributed his Hendrix-esqueguitar work to Eraserland, while singer/songwriter Emma Ruth Rundle provided gorgeous vocals. Every song was recorded live, with all musicians playing together in one room and working to bring Showalter’s ideas to fruition. “I remember sitting next to Tim and Kevin listening to the final mixes with tears rolling down my cheeks,” said Hallahan. “From start to finish, this one came from the heart.”Each song on Eraserlandsustains an openness and sensitivity that is enthralling, bolstered by the exceptional musicians there to realize it and rekindle Showalter’s passion for music-making. The album finds Showalter successfully channeling the full spectrum of sounds within the Strand of Oaks discography, from fast, synthy tracks like “Hyperspace Blues” to epic burner “Visions, the gorgeous ballad “Keys,” and his devastating acoustic performance on “Wild and Willing.”But Eraserland also has moments of pure, upbeat exuberance, most notably on“Ruby,” a rollicking, understated anthem driven by buoyant piano and one of Showalter’s most infectious melodies to date.Isbell’s magnificentshredding is showcasedon “Moon Landing,” Eraserland’s preeminent off-the-wall groove, while thealbum’s title trackfinds Showalter resurrectinghis long-dormant alter ego Pope Killdragon for a striking, synth-laden duet with Rundle. But in many ways, “Forever Chords” is the definitive track on Showalter’s magnum opus, and the manifestation of everything he hoped to achieve on this record and for Strand of Oaks as a whole.“When I finished writing ‘Forever Chords,’ I felt like this is either the last song I ever need to write, or the
rebirthof Strand of Oaks.” Poignant and heart-rending, “Forever Chords” gradually buildstoward an emotional release rooted in our own universal fears about mortality, personal legacy, and music as asaving force.But it’s that firstEraserlandline, “I don’t feel it anymore,” that sets a stunning precedent for the most affecting and fully-formed album Strand of Oaks has ever released. Because despite whatever doubts or reservations Showalter had going into the process, he crafted a series of songs so perfectly matched to the musicians supporting it, and so emboldened by his own doubts and insecurities, that the result is glittering, powerful, and impassioned, a moving rock and roll saga that feelssubstantial and deeply satisfying, vulnerable and self-assured.

“When I was writing these songs, every day I would walk on the beach and I was completely alone and overwhelmed by fear...but then I realized how there really aren’t any rules for who you are, who you’ll become, or who you think you need to be. Eraserlandis just that. It’s death to ego, and rebirth to anything or anyone you want to be.” In December 2017, Tim Showalter was uncertain about his next record and the shape it would eventually take. With no new songs writtenand lacking any clear vision,he wasunprepared for the message he would receive from his friend Carl Broemel, the conversation that would follow, and the album that would become Eraserland.Leading off with standout track “Weird Ways” and hispowerful declaration of“I don’t feel it anymore,” EraserlandtracesShowalter’s evolution from apprehension to creative awakening, carving out a new and compelling future for Strand of Oaks."This project seemed to just fall together naturally,” said Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. “I felt drawn to Tim’s positive energy and his albums...I threw it out there that I’d be happy to help in any way I could with the record." Broemel quickly reignited Showalter's interest in what would become Strand of Oaks’ sixth full-length studio release, and within 24 hours, My Morning Jacket members Patrick Hallahan(drums), Bo Koster(keys), and Tom Blankenship(bass)were also on board.Revived by the support of Broemel and his bandmates, Showalter felt thepressure to deliver songs worthy of musicians he had admired long before and after a 2015 Oaks/MMJ tour. So in February 2018, hespent two weeks alone in Wildwood, New Jersey writing and demoing all of the songs that would eventually comprise Eraserland.And in April, he went into the studio to record with Kevin Ratterman at La La Land Studios in Louisville, Kentucky, and with Broemel, Hallahan, Koster, and Blankenship as his band. Jason Isbell also contributed his Hendrix-esqueguitar work to Eraserland, while singer/songwriter Emma Ruth Rundle provided gorgeous vocals. Every song was recorded live, with all musicians playing together in one room and working to bring Showalter’s ideas to fruition. “I remember sitting next to Tim and Kevin listening to the final mixes with tears rolling down my cheeks,” said Hallahan. “From start to finish, this one came from the heart.”Each song on Eraserlandsustains an openness and sensitivity that is enthralling, bolstered by the exceptional musicians there to realize it and rekindle Showalter’s passion for music-making. The album finds Showalter successfully channeling the full spectrum of sounds within the Strand of Oaks discography, from fast, synthy tracks like “Hyperspace Blues” to epic burner “Visions, the gorgeous ballad “Keys,” and his devastating acoustic performance on “Wild and Willing.”But Eraserland also has moments of pure, upbeat exuberance, most notably on“Ruby,” a rollicking, understated anthem driven by buoyant piano and one of Showalter’s most infectious melodies to date.Isbell’s magnificentshredding is showcasedon “Moon Landing,” Eraserland’s preeminent off-the-wall groove, while thealbum’s title trackfinds Showalter resurrectinghis long-dormant alter ego Pope Killdragon for a striking, synth-laden duet with Rundle. But in many ways, “Forever Chords” is the definitive track on Showalter’s magnum opus, and the manifestation of everything he hoped to achieve on this record and for Strand of Oaks as a whole.“When I finished writing ‘Forever Chords,’ I felt like this is either the last song I ever need to write, or the
rebirthof Strand of Oaks.” Poignant and heart-rending, “Forever Chords” gradually buildstoward an emotional release rooted in our own universal fears about mortality, personal legacy, and music as asaving force.But it’s that firstEraserlandline, “I don’t feel it anymore,” that sets a stunning precedent for the most affecting and fully-formed album Strand of Oaks has ever released. Because despite whatever doubts or reservations Showalter had going into the process, he crafted a series of songs so perfectly matched to the musicians supporting it, and so emboldened by his own doubts and insecurities, that the result is glittering, powerful, and impassioned, a moving rock and roll saga that feelssubstantial and deeply satisfying, vulnerable and self-assured.

Wilderado with Special Guest Duncan Fellows

WilderadoAn arresting confluence of soaring melodies, lush harmonies, and driving indie rock, the EP is the band’s most collaborative work yet, bearing the distinctive writing influence and unique sonic sensibilities of all four members (lead singer/guitarist Max Rainer, bassist/vocalist Colton Dearing, guitarist/vocalist Tyler Wimpee, and drummer Justin Kila). Recorded with production mastermind Phil Ek (Father John Misty, Fleet Foxes), ‘Favors’ marks the dawn of a new era for Tulsa rockers Wilderado, as their already-epic sound pushes into more nuanced and mature territory than ever before.

From the slow-and-steady build of ‘You Don’t Love Me” to the explosive power “Siren,” the collection elevates the grandeur and drama of the band’s arrangements without sacrificing any of the grit or muscle behind it. “We wanted big guitars, big cymbals, big drums, big vocals, but we still wanted it to come across pretty,” explains Rainer. Indeed, beauty is the EP’s hallmark: the beauty of radical honesty, the beauty of self-actualization, the beauty of metamorphosis. The songs offer up candid slices of self-reflection, unafraid look critically in the mirror as they juxtapose magnificent musical arrangements with lacerating lyrics and heartrending deliveries, but ultimately, they’re not about judgment at all. Instead, the music celebrates the growth that comes from turning weakness into strength, from pushing beyond the boundaries what previously seemed possible in order to fully become yourself.

‘Favors’ follows a pair of EPs—‘Misty Shrub’ and ‘Latigo’—and a collection of singles released to widespread critical acclaim, with Consequence of Sound hailing Wilderado’s music as “glorious” and Paste lauding its “South-Central Americana-meets-Laurel Canyon vibe.” Praise across the pond was similarly effusive, with NME highlighting the band’s “impressive harmonies” and Clash falling for their “natural grace.” The tunes racked up more than 15 million streams on Spotify and helped the group earn festival performances from Bonnaroo to Sasquatch in addition to dates with Band of Horses, Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie, Judah & The Lion, and more.

Duncan Fellows
On the sweltering, quiet corner of Duncan Lane there stood a wide one-story house with six bedrooms and fourteen inhabitants. During the summer of 2012 the house's AC system failed, leaving the residents languid and dazed. The landlord was of disconnected affect and refused to repair the life-giving rotating fan... thus, great strife befell the house. Roaches began an invasion of the east wing, advancing at great speed to the kitchen trash. It was here that Colin Harman and Cullen Trevino first met and began to write songs. Not long after, the band Duncan Fellows formed.
After independently releasing two EPs, Twelve Months Older (2013) and Marrow (2015), the Fellows hit the road with Houndmouth through the southeast and Joseph on a run of sold out dates along the west coast. Eager to release new music, DF went into the studio in early 2017 to record their debut LP Both Sides of the Ceiling, resulting in a multidimensional shift both sonically and personally for the band.
The release of Both Sides of the Ceiling in August 2017 revealed a fresh upbeat sound that catapulted them to the forefront of the Austin indie music scene. Rooted in catchy riffs and candid harmonies, their newfound sound has seen airplay on hometown favorite KUTX as well as Spotify’s Feel Good Indie Rock playlist with nearly a million followers. Fan favorite and lead single "Fresh Squeezed" packed a punch on streaming platforms garnering over a million plays, showcasing the band's versatility from contemplative to tongue-in-cheek lyricism.
Their effortlessly charismatic stage presence and high energy sets led to a U.S. tour with Middle Kids in addition to their massive debut at hometown music festival Austin City Limits 2018. Riding off of the success of Both Sides of the Ceiling, they hit the road with Post Animal + Ron Gallo in February 2019 and plan to continue touring and release new music in the Spring.

WilderadoAn arresting confluence of soaring melodies, lush harmonies, and driving indie rock, the EP is the band’s most collaborative work yet, bearing the distinctive writing influence and unique sonic sensibilities of all four members (lead singer/guitarist Max Rainer, bassist/vocalist Colton Dearing, guitarist/vocalist Tyler Wimpee, and drummer Justin Kila). Recorded with production mastermind Phil Ek (Father John Misty, Fleet Foxes), ‘Favors’ marks the dawn of a new era for Tulsa rockers Wilderado, as their already-epic sound pushes into more nuanced and mature territory than ever before.

From the slow-and-steady build of ‘You Don’t Love Me” to the explosive power “Siren,” the collection elevates the grandeur and drama of the band’s arrangements without sacrificing any of the grit or muscle behind it. “We wanted big guitars, big cymbals, big drums, big vocals, but we still wanted it to come across pretty,” explains Rainer. Indeed, beauty is the EP’s hallmark: the beauty of radical honesty, the beauty of self-actualization, the beauty of metamorphosis. The songs offer up candid slices of self-reflection, unafraid look critically in the mirror as they juxtapose magnificent musical arrangements with lacerating lyrics and heartrending deliveries, but ultimately, they’re not about judgment at all. Instead, the music celebrates the growth that comes from turning weakness into strength, from pushing beyond the boundaries what previously seemed possible in order to fully become yourself.

‘Favors’ follows a pair of EPs—‘Misty Shrub’ and ‘Latigo’—and a collection of singles released to widespread critical acclaim, with Consequence of Sound hailing Wilderado’s music as “glorious” and Paste lauding its “South-Central Americana-meets-Laurel Canyon vibe.” Praise across the pond was similarly effusive, with NME highlighting the band’s “impressive harmonies” and Clash falling for their “natural grace.” The tunes racked up more than 15 million streams on Spotify and helped the group earn festival performances from Bonnaroo to Sasquatch in addition to dates with Band of Horses, Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie, Judah & The Lion, and more.

Duncan Fellows
On the sweltering, quiet corner of Duncan Lane there stood a wide one-story house with six bedrooms and fourteen inhabitants. During the summer of 2012 the house's AC system failed, leaving the residents languid and dazed. The landlord was of disconnected affect and refused to repair the life-giving rotating fan... thus, great strife befell the house. Roaches began an invasion of the east wing, advancing at great speed to the kitchen trash. It was here that Colin Harman and Cullen Trevino first met and began to write songs. Not long after, the band Duncan Fellows formed.
After independently releasing two EPs, Twelve Months Older (2013) and Marrow (2015), the Fellows hit the road with Houndmouth through the southeast and Joseph on a run of sold out dates along the west coast. Eager to release new music, DF went into the studio in early 2017 to record their debut LP Both Sides of the Ceiling, resulting in a multidimensional shift both sonically and personally for the band.
The release of Both Sides of the Ceiling in August 2017 revealed a fresh upbeat sound that catapulted them to the forefront of the Austin indie music scene. Rooted in catchy riffs and candid harmonies, their newfound sound has seen airplay on hometown favorite KUTX as well as Spotify’s Feel Good Indie Rock playlist with nearly a million followers. Fan favorite and lead single "Fresh Squeezed" packed a punch on streaming platforms garnering over a million plays, showcasing the band's versatility from contemplative to tongue-in-cheek lyricism.
Their effortlessly charismatic stage presence and high energy sets led to a U.S. tour with Middle Kids in addition to their massive debut at hometown music festival Austin City Limits 2018. Riding off of the success of Both Sides of the Ceiling, they hit the road with Post Animal + Ron Gallo in February 2019 and plan to continue touring and release new music in the Spring.

Ruby Boots / INDIANOLA

Ruby Boots
At 14 years old, Ruby Boots -- real name Bex Chilcott -- left a conflicted home in Perth, Western Australia to do grueling work on pearling boats, and she hasn't stopped migrating since. Her nomadic streak has taken her around the world, and eventually to Nashville, TN.

Don't Talk About It charts this drifter's odyssey, tattered passport in hand. Behind her commanding and versatile voice, sharp guitar playing, and adept songwriting, Ruby Boots confidently maneuvers past the whirlwinds life has tossed on her occasionally lost highway. It's an album of hope, breakthrough, and handling the unknown challenges around the next bend.

The roads taken, the miles traveled and the voices heard during Ruby's life's trek resonate throughout Don't Talk About It. Informed as much by the wide-open landscapes of her homeland as the intimate writing circles of Nashville, the album may range far and wide but always maintains a firm sense of place. Echoes of first wave UK power pop and jangly punk intersect with the every(wo)man indie and pop-inflected muscle of Best Coast. Classic rock touchstones from T. Rex to the girl-group-wall-of-sound to personal hero Tom Petty meld with a weary poet's eye recalling Hope Sandoval.

On her Bloodshot Records debut, Ruby continues to map out a polished-yet-fearless, bare-knuckled self, previously hinted at on her last album, Solitude. In 2016, Ruby met with Lone Star state-bred studio wizards The Texas Gentlemen and the album's eventual producer Beau Bedford. The group had stopped off in Nashville on their way to back Kris Kristofferson at Newport Folk Festival and a mutual admiration society quickly coalesced. The collective pulled a handful of songs from the 40 she had waiting and began recording at their Dallas-based studio Modern Electric Sound Recorders.

The album rips right open with "It's So Cruel," strutting through the door with dual harmonic, bawdy, fuzzed-out guitars, reminiscent of a glammy, '70s southern-rock-soaked Queens of the Stone Age. It all captures the meteoric emotional flares of an adulterous relationship destined to fail. The Gentlemen spell a Stetson-hat wearing Wrecking Crew as they lay down dusty gothic vibes in the Nikki Lane co-written "I'll Make It Through," building towards a crescendoing, persevering, bright chorus. (Lane also sings background vocals on the album's title track.) On "Believe in Heaven," doo-wop beats, dark choral echoes, and a plucked string section lead into ZZ Top full-bodied rawk riffage.

But the most defining of tones come through in spirit, when on the a capella "I Am A Woman" Ruby reaches towering vocal peaks, shredding raw, putting it all out there.The song could be a traditional spiritual, as she belts: "I am a believer / Standing strong by your side / I'm the hand to hold onto / When it's too hard to try... I am a woman / Do you know what that means / You lay it all on the line / When you lay down with me."

Of the song Chilcott says, "'I Am a Woman' was conjured up amid recent events where men have spoken about, and treated women's bodies, the way no man, or woman, should. This kind of treatment toward another human being makes every nerve in my body scream. These kinds of incidents are so ingrained in our culture and are swept under the carpet at every turn -- it needs to change. As tempting as it was to just write an angry tirade I wanted to respond with integrity, so I sat with my feelings and this song emerged as a celebration of women and womanhood, of our strength and our vulnerability, all we encompass and our inner beauty, countering ignorance and vulgarity with honesty and pride and without being exclusionary to any man or woman. My hope is that we come together on this long drawn out journey. The song is the backbone to the album for me."

Don't Talk About It smoulders with a fighting spirit and pulls influence and experience -- both musically, emotionally, and beyond -- from many pins in the map, but is 10 songs harbored in the singularity that is Ruby Boots.

The album has garnered praise from Rolling Stone, Noisey, Wide Open Country, Chicago Reader, No Depression, and more.

Since the release of Don't Talk About It, Ruby Boots has performed at Willie Nelson's Luck Reunion, Stagecoach Festival, Bonnaroo, and The Long Road Festival in the UK, as well as toured with Langhorne Slim, Nikki Lane, Nicole Atkins, Ben Miller Band, and Low Cut Connie.

Indianola

"I have an almost religious belief that Mississippi is the birthplace of rock 'n' roll," says Owen Beverly, who named his
band Indianola after the small but influential delta town in his home state that produced blues artists like Albert King,
Little Arthur Duncan and B.B. King.

"It's so important to the evolution of modern rock and pop music. I think the first rock 'n' roll song ever recorded was
'That's All Right' by Arthur Crudup, who was from Forest, Mississippi, before another Mississippi boy named Elvis did
a rendition that changed the world," he says. "I can't think of any songwriters who aren't influenced by Mississippi
music, whether they know it or not."

Now based in Nashville, the Jackson native finds it more important than ever to represent those roots. One listen to
Indianola's debut full-length album, due out this fall, and it's obvious that the pressures of making it in the country
music capital haven't swayed his approach. "It's always better to be the black sheep than to get lost in the herd," he
says.

Beginning with the arena-ready anthem "1960s," Beverly wears his vintage influences on his sleeve, acknowledging
the musical past while planting the song firmly in the present with searing guitars and pounding drums.
Songs like "Want Me Back" and "Too Good To Be True" put Beverly's powerful, swooning vocals in the spotlight with
nods to artists like Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, and The Everly Brothers that nonetheless feel current.
"There's a novelty in digging up the past that feels like excavation. You end up being a filter for everything you dig."
he says. "I think using those vintage elements but throwing in some modern edge gives the recordings dimension. If
you just make music that sounds like it was written and recorded forty years ago, it turns into a period piece. So I just
try to be honest with myself, draw on all of those influences, and put them together in a way that makes them my
own."

Beverly teamed up with Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope to produce Indianola's previous EP release, 'Zero.' For the
new album, he traveled to South Carolina to record at the band's studio. Trent can be heard singing harmonies on
“Mid Century Modern.”

Indianola will showcase new music on the road this summer and fall, including dates with Shovels & Rope, Butch
Walker, and The Watson Twins. For updated list of tour dates, visit: indianolamusic.com

Ruby Boots
At 14 years old, Ruby Boots -- real name Bex Chilcott -- left a conflicted home in Perth, Western Australia to do grueling work on pearling boats, and she hasn't stopped migrating since. Her nomadic streak has taken her around the world, and eventually to Nashville, TN.

Don't Talk About It charts this drifter's odyssey, tattered passport in hand. Behind her commanding and versatile voice, sharp guitar playing, and adept songwriting, Ruby Boots confidently maneuvers past the whirlwinds life has tossed on her occasionally lost highway. It's an album of hope, breakthrough, and handling the unknown challenges around the next bend.

The roads taken, the miles traveled and the voices heard during Ruby's life's trek resonate throughout Don't Talk About It. Informed as much by the wide-open landscapes of her homeland as the intimate writing circles of Nashville, the album may range far and wide but always maintains a firm sense of place. Echoes of first wave UK power pop and jangly punk intersect with the every(wo)man indie and pop-inflected muscle of Best Coast. Classic rock touchstones from T. Rex to the girl-group-wall-of-sound to personal hero Tom Petty meld with a weary poet's eye recalling Hope Sandoval.

On her Bloodshot Records debut, Ruby continues to map out a polished-yet-fearless, bare-knuckled self, previously hinted at on her last album, Solitude. In 2016, Ruby met with Lone Star state-bred studio wizards The Texas Gentlemen and the album's eventual producer Beau Bedford. The group had stopped off in Nashville on their way to back Kris Kristofferson at Newport Folk Festival and a mutual admiration society quickly coalesced. The collective pulled a handful of songs from the 40 she had waiting and began recording at their Dallas-based studio Modern Electric Sound Recorders.

The album rips right open with "It's So Cruel," strutting through the door with dual harmonic, bawdy, fuzzed-out guitars, reminiscent of a glammy, '70s southern-rock-soaked Queens of the Stone Age. It all captures the meteoric emotional flares of an adulterous relationship destined to fail. The Gentlemen spell a Stetson-hat wearing Wrecking Crew as they lay down dusty gothic vibes in the Nikki Lane co-written "I'll Make It Through," building towards a crescendoing, persevering, bright chorus. (Lane also sings background vocals on the album's title track.) On "Believe in Heaven," doo-wop beats, dark choral echoes, and a plucked string section lead into ZZ Top full-bodied rawk riffage.

But the most defining of tones come through in spirit, when on the a capella "I Am A Woman" Ruby reaches towering vocal peaks, shredding raw, putting it all out there.The song could be a traditional spiritual, as she belts: "I am a believer / Standing strong by your side / I'm the hand to hold onto / When it's too hard to try... I am a woman / Do you know what that means / You lay it all on the line / When you lay down with me."

Of the song Chilcott says, "'I Am a Woman' was conjured up amid recent events where men have spoken about, and treated women's bodies, the way no man, or woman, should. This kind of treatment toward another human being makes every nerve in my body scream. These kinds of incidents are so ingrained in our culture and are swept under the carpet at every turn -- it needs to change. As tempting as it was to just write an angry tirade I wanted to respond with integrity, so I sat with my feelings and this song emerged as a celebration of women and womanhood, of our strength and our vulnerability, all we encompass and our inner beauty, countering ignorance and vulgarity with honesty and pride and without being exclusionary to any man or woman. My hope is that we come together on this long drawn out journey. The song is the backbone to the album for me."

Don't Talk About It smoulders with a fighting spirit and pulls influence and experience -- both musically, emotionally, and beyond -- from many pins in the map, but is 10 songs harbored in the singularity that is Ruby Boots.

The album has garnered praise from Rolling Stone, Noisey, Wide Open Country, Chicago Reader, No Depression, and more.

Since the release of Don't Talk About It, Ruby Boots has performed at Willie Nelson's Luck Reunion, Stagecoach Festival, Bonnaroo, and The Long Road Festival in the UK, as well as toured with Langhorne Slim, Nikki Lane, Nicole Atkins, Ben Miller Band, and Low Cut Connie.

Indianola

"I have an almost religious belief that Mississippi is the birthplace of rock 'n' roll," says Owen Beverly, who named his
band Indianola after the small but influential delta town in his home state that produced blues artists like Albert King,
Little Arthur Duncan and B.B. King.

"It's so important to the evolution of modern rock and pop music. I think the first rock 'n' roll song ever recorded was
'That's All Right' by Arthur Crudup, who was from Forest, Mississippi, before another Mississippi boy named Elvis did
a rendition that changed the world," he says. "I can't think of any songwriters who aren't influenced by Mississippi
music, whether they know it or not."

Now based in Nashville, the Jackson native finds it more important than ever to represent those roots. One listen to
Indianola's debut full-length album, due out this fall, and it's obvious that the pressures of making it in the country
music capital haven't swayed his approach. "It's always better to be the black sheep than to get lost in the herd," he
says.

Beginning with the arena-ready anthem "1960s," Beverly wears his vintage influences on his sleeve, acknowledging
the musical past while planting the song firmly in the present with searing guitars and pounding drums.
Songs like "Want Me Back" and "Too Good To Be True" put Beverly's powerful, swooning vocals in the spotlight with
nods to artists like Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, and The Everly Brothers that nonetheless feel current.
"There's a novelty in digging up the past that feels like excavation. You end up being a filter for everything you dig."
he says. "I think using those vintage elements but throwing in some modern edge gives the recordings dimension. If
you just make music that sounds like it was written and recorded forty years ago, it turns into a period piece. So I just
try to be honest with myself, draw on all of those influences, and put them together in a way that makes them my
own."

Beverly teamed up with Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope to produce Indianola's previous EP release, 'Zero.' For the
new album, he traveled to South Carolina to record at the band's studio. Trent can be heard singing harmonies on
“Mid Century Modern.”

Indianola will showcase new music on the road this summer and fall, including dates with Shovels & Rope, Butch
Walker, and The Watson Twins. For updated list of tour dates, visit: indianolamusic.com

Brooke Annibale (Full Band Performance) with Special Guest Morgan Erina - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Singer-songwriter/guitarist Brooke Annibale sheds a bit of her indie-acoustic skin on her newest record Hold to The Light--a pop-progressive album that offers a fusion of textured electronic and traditional (guitar, strings, keys) instrumentation with songs bearing Brooke’s keen, soulful lyricism. Produced by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive) the record features the contributions of seasoned artists Sam Kassirer on Keys; Zachariah Hickman (Ray Lamontagne) on Bass; Josh Kaufman (The National) on accompanying guitars; Sean Trischka (Molly Tuttle, Oh Pep!) on Drums; and Matt Douglas (Sylvan Esso, Mountain Goats) on Woodwinds.

Hold to The Light is an exciting evolution in Brooke’s career as a musician. Her creative roots run deep with family connected to music--her maternal grandfather founded a music store, selling instruments and sound equipment, which continues to operate today in Pittsburgh, PA. Brooke began playing guitar at 14 and since then her passion for making and performing music has taken her all over the country. She released her first full-length record, Silence Worth Breaking in 2011, produced at The Smoakstack in Nashville, followed by 2013’s EP Words in Your Eyes and 2015’s The Simple Fear.

On the road, Brooke has recently been on tour opening for Josh Ritter, Margaret Glaspy, Chadwick Stokes, Great Lake Swimmers, Jesca Hoop, Iron & Wine, Rufus Wainwright, Aoife O’Donovan, The Handsome Family and others. Her songs have been featured on Sirius XM radio in addition to being placed in multiple TV shows including Grey's Anatomy, Pretty Little Liars, Hart of Dixie, Vampire Diaries and more.

Brooke’s Club Cafe performance will feature Mark Ramsey on keys, Seth Pierson on bass, and Dan Harding on drums

Singer-songwriter/guitarist Brooke Annibale sheds a bit of her indie-acoustic skin on her newest record Hold to The Light--a pop-progressive album that offers a fusion of textured electronic and traditional (guitar, strings, keys) instrumentation with songs bearing Brooke’s keen, soulful lyricism. Produced by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive) the record features the contributions of seasoned artists Sam Kassirer on Keys; Zachariah Hickman (Ray Lamontagne) on Bass; Josh Kaufman (The National) on accompanying guitars; Sean Trischka (Molly Tuttle, Oh Pep!) on Drums; and Matt Douglas (Sylvan Esso, Mountain Goats) on Woodwinds.

Hold to The Light is an exciting evolution in Brooke’s career as a musician. Her creative roots run deep with family connected to music--her maternal grandfather founded a music store, selling instruments and sound equipment, which continues to operate today in Pittsburgh, PA. Brooke began playing guitar at 14 and since then her passion for making and performing music has taken her all over the country. She released her first full-length record, Silence Worth Breaking in 2011, produced at The Smoakstack in Nashville, followed by 2013’s EP Words in Your Eyes and 2015’s The Simple Fear.

On the road, Brooke has recently been on tour opening for Josh Ritter, Margaret Glaspy, Chadwick Stokes, Great Lake Swimmers, Jesca Hoop, Iron & Wine, Rufus Wainwright, Aoife O’Donovan, The Handsome Family and others. Her songs have been featured on Sirius XM radio in addition to being placed in multiple TV shows including Grey's Anatomy, Pretty Little Liars, Hart of Dixie, Vampire Diaries and more.

Brooke’s Club Cafe performance will feature Mark Ramsey on keys, Seth Pierson on bass, and Dan Harding on drums

(Early Show) The Suitcase Junket with Special Guest Ali McGuirk

The latest album from The Suitcase Junket, Mean Dog, Trampoline is populated by characters in various states of reverie: leaning on jukeboxes, loitering on dance floors, lying on the bottoms of empty swimming pools in the sun. Despite being deeply attuned to the chaos of the world, singer/songwriter/ multi-instrumentalist Matt Lorenz imbues those moments with joyful wonder, an endless infatuation with life’s most subtle mysteries. And as its songs alight on everything from Joan Jett to moonshine to runaway kites, Mean Dog, Trampoline makes an undeniable case for infinite curiosity as a potent antidote to jadedness and despair.

Produced by Steve Berlin (Jackie Greene, Rickie Lee Jones, Leo Kottke) of Los Lobos, Mean Dog, Trampoline marks a deliberate departure from the self-recorded, homespun approach of The Suitcase Junket’s previous efforts. In creating the album, Lorenz pulled from a fantastically patchwork sonic palette, shaping his songs with elements of jangly folk, fuzzed-out blues, oddly textured psych-rock. Engineered by Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz) and mixed by Vance Powell (Jack White, Houndmouth), Mean Dog, Trampoline rightly preserves The Suitcase Junket’s unkempt vitality, but ultimately emerges as his most powerfully direct album so far.

"I’ve been blessed in my career as a producer to have worked with some remarkable artists, but I have never worked with anyone quite like Matt Lorenz / The Suitcase Junket. Besides making the complexity of everything he does look effortless, he’s a truly gifted singer and and amazing songwriter. We had a blast making this record and I’m anxious to share it with the world."
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Steve Berlin

The latest album from The Suitcase Junket, Mean Dog, Trampoline is populated by characters in various states of reverie: leaning on jukeboxes, loitering on dance floors, lying on the bottoms of empty swimming pools in the sun. Despite being deeply attuned to the chaos of the world, singer/songwriter/ multi-instrumentalist Matt Lorenz imbues those moments with joyful wonder, an endless infatuation with life’s most subtle mysteries. And as its songs alight on everything from Joan Jett to moonshine to runaway kites, Mean Dog, Trampoline makes an undeniable case for infinite curiosity as a potent antidote to jadedness and despair.

Produced by Steve Berlin (Jackie Greene, Rickie Lee Jones, Leo Kottke) of Los Lobos, Mean Dog, Trampoline marks a deliberate departure from the self-recorded, homespun approach of The Suitcase Junket’s previous efforts. In creating the album, Lorenz pulled from a fantastically patchwork sonic palette, shaping his songs with elements of jangly folk, fuzzed-out blues, oddly textured psych-rock. Engineered by Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz) and mixed by Vance Powell (Jack White, Houndmouth), Mean Dog, Trampoline rightly preserves The Suitcase Junket’s unkempt vitality, but ultimately emerges as his most powerfully direct album so far.

"I’ve been blessed in my career as a producer to have worked with some remarkable artists, but I have never worked with anyone quite like Matt Lorenz / The Suitcase Junket. Besides making the complexity of everything he does look effortless, he’s a truly gifted singer and and amazing songwriter. We had a blast making this record and I’m anxious to share it with the world."
--
Steve Berlin

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Mr. Steve & His Traveling Band of Alcoholic Farm Animals with Steve Swanson. Featuring Tim Wolf & Hosted by Matt Liller and Special Guests.

Comedian Steve Swanson brings his eclectic comedy show to Club Cafe.

Comedian Steve Swanson brings his eclectic comedy show to Club Cafe.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)