club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
(Late Show) Antz Marching - A Tribute to Dave Matthews

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Serving as veterans of the local Pittsburgh music scene, Antz Marching provide Dave Matthews fans a live experience, channeling the music, energy, passion and artistry of the original band.
Additionally, Antz Marching includes an acoustic duo set mirroring the intimate and enchanting ambience of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds. The acoustic set of Antz Marching features Matthew’s unconventional chord changes and inspiring lyrics performed by guitarist/singer Vee Sharma, and violinist Heather Pinson interprets the fast and furious musicianship of Tim Reynolds. The duet is a must see event, and welcomes all to “celebrate we will.”

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Serving as veterans of the local Pittsburgh music scene, Antz Marching provide Dave Matthews fans a live experience, channeling the music, energy, passion and artistry of the original band.
Additionally, Antz Marching includes an acoustic duo set mirroring the intimate and enchanting ambience of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds. The acoustic set of Antz Marching features Matthew’s unconventional chord changes and inspiring lyrics performed by guitarist/singer Vee Sharma, and violinist Heather Pinson interprets the fast and furious musicianship of Tim Reynolds. The duet is a must see event, and welcomes all to “celebrate we will.”

Kinky Friedman's Circus of Life Tour with Special Guest Brian Molnar

Doors will open an hour early at 6pm for extended kitchen service. Come have dinner with us before the show!

KINKY FRIEDMAN'S CIRCUS OF LIFE TOUR
The Kinkster Walks The Highwire With Release Of His All New CD

(Austin) At long last, Kinky Friedman’s second musical act begins. With the proclamation that it “is what music was, before it came homogenized, trivialized and sanitized,” Kinky is dropping his first all new cd of original tunes in four decades. Called Circus Of Life, it presents a side of Kinky that few would have suspected in the halcyon days of the Texas Jewboys, laying perhaps legit claim to the title, “The Leonard Cohen of Texas.”

And on July 3rd, he will be releasing it on his own terms and on his own Echo Hill Records label. A monster summer tour will follow in June, July, and August. Yep, Kinky is finally doing it his way. Harking to his early years, he has chosen to ignore the Nashville ethos, that all must be concertedly “radio friendly,” sweetened, and over-produced. What he and producer Brian Molnar have delivered is simply one of the most beautiful albums of this year or any other. The first single, Autographs In The Rain (Song To Willie) is already in heavy rotation on SiriusXM Outlaw Country, and there are at least four more top shelf A sides.

Speaking of Brian Molnar, he will be touring as Kinky’s opening act for most, if not all shows, promoting his new cd, Within Blue, also on the Echo Hill Records imprint. Kinky and Brian have worked a number of tours together and now deliver a seamless performance, opener to headliner.

It started with a call from Willie (Nelson, of course), who asked Kinky what he was doing at that moment. Kinky answered truthfully that he was watching Matlock, the old TV chestnut, to which Willie replied, “That is a sure sign of depression, Kinky. Turn Matlock off and start writing.”

Kinky did just that and started writing the songs he hadn’t written or even contemplated for decades, tunes like Jesus In Pajamas, Me And My Guitar, and A Dog Named Freedom. After writing several songs, Kinky called Willie to let him know how successful his advice had been. When Kinky asked Willie how he was doing, Willie replied, “A little up, a little down. By the way Kinky, what channel is Matlock on?” The Circus Of Life, by way of Matlock. Via Willie.

With Joe Cirotti on multiple instruments, and Mickey Raphael, Augie Meyers, Original Jewboy Little Jewford, Clay Meyers and Jim Beal providing amazing grace notes, not a single track on the album fails to reach its very high mark. Kinky may “just have to stick with songwriting” after all. To verify this, he’s taking it on the road, for one of the longest, most comprehensive tours of his storied career. After flash mob-style appearances in Galveston, Houston and Nacogdoches, TX, the Circus Of Life Tour begins in earnest in Pittsburgh, and rumor has it that it will continue on forever. Yes, the second act has begun. May it never end.

Doors will open an hour early at 6pm for extended kitchen service. Come have dinner with us before the show!

KINKY FRIEDMAN'S CIRCUS OF LIFE TOUR
The Kinkster Walks The Highwire With Release Of His All New CD

(Austin) At long last, Kinky Friedman’s second musical act begins. With the proclamation that it “is what music was, before it came homogenized, trivialized and sanitized,” Kinky is dropping his first all new cd of original tunes in four decades. Called Circus Of Life, it presents a side of Kinky that few would have suspected in the halcyon days of the Texas Jewboys, laying perhaps legit claim to the title, “The Leonard Cohen of Texas.”

And on July 3rd, he will be releasing it on his own terms and on his own Echo Hill Records label. A monster summer tour will follow in June, July, and August. Yep, Kinky is finally doing it his way. Harking to his early years, he has chosen to ignore the Nashville ethos, that all must be concertedly “radio friendly,” sweetened, and over-produced. What he and producer Brian Molnar have delivered is simply one of the most beautiful albums of this year or any other. The first single, Autographs In The Rain (Song To Willie) is already in heavy rotation on SiriusXM Outlaw Country, and there are at least four more top shelf A sides.

Speaking of Brian Molnar, he will be touring as Kinky’s opening act for most, if not all shows, promoting his new cd, Within Blue, also on the Echo Hill Records imprint. Kinky and Brian have worked a number of tours together and now deliver a seamless performance, opener to headliner.

It started with a call from Willie (Nelson, of course), who asked Kinky what he was doing at that moment. Kinky answered truthfully that he was watching Matlock, the old TV chestnut, to which Willie replied, “That is a sure sign of depression, Kinky. Turn Matlock off and start writing.”

Kinky did just that and started writing the songs he hadn’t written or even contemplated for decades, tunes like Jesus In Pajamas, Me And My Guitar, and A Dog Named Freedom. After writing several songs, Kinky called Willie to let him know how successful his advice had been. When Kinky asked Willie how he was doing, Willie replied, “A little up, a little down. By the way Kinky, what channel is Matlock on?” The Circus Of Life, by way of Matlock. Via Willie.

With Joe Cirotti on multiple instruments, and Mickey Raphael, Augie Meyers, Original Jewboy Little Jewford, Clay Meyers and Jim Beal providing amazing grace notes, not a single track on the album fails to reach its very high mark. Kinky may “just have to stick with songwriting” after all. To verify this, he’s taking it on the road, for one of the longest, most comprehensive tours of his storied career. After flash mob-style appearances in Galveston, Houston and Nacogdoches, TX, the Circus Of Life Tour begins in earnest in Pittsburgh, and rumor has it that it will continue on forever. Yes, the second act has begun. May it never end.

Dan Baird & Homemade Sin with Special Guest Bill Toms and Hard Rain

Dan Baird is a singer-songwriter, musician and producer best known as the lead singer and rhythm guitarist from the chart-topping 80’s rock band The Georgia Satellites. Baird formed The Georgia Satellites in 1980 and the group ultimately released the self-titled debut Georgia Satellites on Elektra. Their most successful release; the album featured the track "Keep Your Hands to Yourself” which reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and went into heavy rotation on MTV.

Baird left the band in 1990 to pursue a solo career and released his first solo album, Love Songs for the Hearing Impaired, in October 1992. "I Love You Period”, a single from the album, charted and peaked at #26 on the Billboard Hot 100. A follow up single "The One I Am" charted and peaked at #13 on Billboard's "Album Rock Tracks” chart.

In 2005, Baird began touring and recording with his band, Homemade Sin which today features two ex-members of The Georgia Satellites, Baird and drummer Mauro Magellan, along with bassist Micke Nilsson and guitarist Warner E. Hodges (of Jason & the Scorchers).

Known for their blazing high-energy live shows, Homemade Sin performs a mixture of Baird's solo material in addition to the hits and fan favorites from his years with the Georgia Satellites. The band has built a solid name and touring history across the UK and Europe.

Dan Baird is a singer-songwriter, musician and producer best known as the lead singer and rhythm guitarist from the chart-topping 80’s rock band The Georgia Satellites. Baird formed The Georgia Satellites in 1980 and the group ultimately released the self-titled debut Georgia Satellites on Elektra. Their most successful release; the album featured the track "Keep Your Hands to Yourself” which reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and went into heavy rotation on MTV.

Baird left the band in 1990 to pursue a solo career and released his first solo album, Love Songs for the Hearing Impaired, in October 1992. "I Love You Period”, a single from the album, charted and peaked at #26 on the Billboard Hot 100. A follow up single "The One I Am" charted and peaked at #13 on Billboard's "Album Rock Tracks” chart.

In 2005, Baird began touring and recording with his band, Homemade Sin which today features two ex-members of The Georgia Satellites, Baird and drummer Mauro Magellan, along with bassist Micke Nilsson and guitarist Warner E. Hodges (of Jason & the Scorchers).

Known for their blazing high-energy live shows, Homemade Sin performs a mixture of Baird's solo material in addition to the hits and fan favorites from his years with the Georgia Satellites. The band has built a solid name and touring history across the UK and Europe.

(Early Show) Sterling Waltz / Alan Getto / Morgan Erina

(Late Show) Da Funny Team and Opus One Comedy Present Boo Jones, Izzy Rhue, One Eye & Host Marcus Cox

The Felice Brothers with Special Guest Twain - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

The Felice Brothers' new album Life in the Dark, due June 24 on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band's latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers' 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once "timeless, yet tossed-off," they've released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band's DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

"The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap," James Felice says, laughing. "It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music."

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

"We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources," singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. "We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes."

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener "Aerosol Ball" - "They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there's a connection there," he says - while James Felice says listening to Neil Young's Tonight's the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

"If you listen to that record, it's fucking crazy," he says. "We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this."

He's referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on "Aerosol Ball," mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on "Triumph '73" and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of "Plunder," full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare's "Double, double toil and trouble" incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice's songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. "It's just what was going on when I was writing the songs," Ian Felice says. "It's a pretty politically charged climate right now." To say the least.

The singer's characters on "Aerosol Ball" exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while "Jack at the Asylum" catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on "Plunder." He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. "The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time," Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: "Triumph '73" follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad "Diamond Bell" tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. "It's part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits," Ian Felice says. "I think it's one of the most straight-ahead narratives I've written."

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly - "I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?'" he says - and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

"There wasn't too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music," James Felice says. "We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it."

The resulting album is more than just classic American music - it's a parable for modern America.

The Felice Brothers' new album Life in the Dark, due June 24 on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band's latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers' 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once "timeless, yet tossed-off," they've released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band's DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

"The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap," James Felice says, laughing. "It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music."

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

"We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources," singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. "We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes."

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener "Aerosol Ball" - "They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there's a connection there," he says - while James Felice says listening to Neil Young's Tonight's the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

"If you listen to that record, it's fucking crazy," he says. "We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this."

He's referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on "Aerosol Ball," mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on "Triumph '73" and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of "Plunder," full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare's "Double, double toil and trouble" incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice's songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. "It's just what was going on when I was writing the songs," Ian Felice says. "It's a pretty politically charged climate right now." To say the least.

The singer's characters on "Aerosol Ball" exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while "Jack at the Asylum" catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on "Plunder." He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. "The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time," Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: "Triumph '73" follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad "Diamond Bell" tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. "It's part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits," Ian Felice says. "I think it's one of the most straight-ahead narratives I've written."

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly - "I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?'" he says - and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

"There wasn't too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music," James Felice says. "We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it."

The resulting album is more than just classic American music - it's a parable for modern America.

Anthony Picone with Tim Vitullo and RC Allison

Anthony grew up and played music in the suburbs of New York City. He began playing the guitar at the age of 11 and started performing in bars and nightclubs by the age of 18. He shortly began playing in some of the most popular venues in New York City such as CBGB's, The Bitter End, Kenny's Castaway,Cafe Wah, Contenental and many more. For 8 years he played in one of the biggest bands in New Jersey, The Benjamins. In 2007 The Benjamins released an indie album with national distribution on Koch Music and have appeared on National TV and radio. They opened up for such acts as Cheap Trick, The Goo Goo Dolls,Third Eye Blind and more.



In 2011, he decided to quit his band and move from Hoboken NJ to Key West Florida to embark on a solo career as a musician and songwriter. The laid back lifestyle, sunshine and diverse music scene has had a huge influence on his writing. His music which is a fusion of Rock, Americana, Folk and Pop is often referred to as "Keys Rock"



In addition to engineering and producing, Anthony performs all of the vocals and most of the instruments on his recordings. Shortly after the release of his debut solo album "The Highest I've Ever Been" he was booked as an opening act for legendary rock bands such as Kansas, 38 Special and Blue Oyster Cult. Anthony continues to tour to support his music throughout the country.



Filmmaking has always been Anthony's second passion. In 2010 he wrote and directed a feature film "Long Road Home" and has since directed an independent television pilot and several music videos. He is currently writing several screen plays, television shows and documentaries



You can hear Anthony's music in regular rotation on some of the biggest FM radio stations in South Florida including Sun 103.1 FM, The Wail 99.5 FM and Pirate Radio 101.7 as well as WRSU Rutgers Radio NJ 88.7 FM

Anthony grew up and played music in the suburbs of New York City. He began playing the guitar at the age of 11 and started performing in bars and nightclubs by the age of 18. He shortly began playing in some of the most popular venues in New York City such as CBGB's, The Bitter End, Kenny's Castaway,Cafe Wah, Contenental and many more. For 8 years he played in one of the biggest bands in New Jersey, The Benjamins. In 2007 The Benjamins released an indie album with national distribution on Koch Music and have appeared on National TV and radio. They opened up for such acts as Cheap Trick, The Goo Goo Dolls,Third Eye Blind and more.



In 2011, he decided to quit his band and move from Hoboken NJ to Key West Florida to embark on a solo career as a musician and songwriter. The laid back lifestyle, sunshine and diverse music scene has had a huge influence on his writing. His music which is a fusion of Rock, Americana, Folk and Pop is often referred to as "Keys Rock"



In addition to engineering and producing, Anthony performs all of the vocals and most of the instruments on his recordings. Shortly after the release of his debut solo album "The Highest I've Ever Been" he was booked as an opening act for legendary rock bands such as Kansas, 38 Special and Blue Oyster Cult. Anthony continues to tour to support his music throughout the country.



Filmmaking has always been Anthony's second passion. In 2010 he wrote and directed a feature film "Long Road Home" and has since directed an independent television pilot and several music videos. He is currently writing several screen plays, television shows and documentaries



You can hear Anthony's music in regular rotation on some of the biggest FM radio stations in South Florida including Sun 103.1 FM, The Wail 99.5 FM and Pirate Radio 101.7 as well as WRSU Rutgers Radio NJ 88.7 FM

The Social Animals with Special Guest Jordan McLaughlin (Full Band Performance)

The Social Animals are a full time, van-living young band. They speak through elegantly sarcastic, thoughtful lyrics with memorable melodies splattered across a canvas of indie rock instrumentation. They don't do backflips at their live shows or slide across their knees into guitar solos. Instead, they play their music passionately and honestly, carrying both the intensity to move feet and the delicacy to keep them still. Between songs, their dry commentary on the status of their lives and the world around them appeals to the type of person who, perhaps, spends time actually reading through a band bio.

Releasing their debut EP, "Formative Years" in late summer of 2016, The Social Animals have laid a sturdy foundation for the character and direction of the band. Songs like "Let Me Go" marry the grittiness of an honest band cramped in a Chevy Express with the pop sensibility of Tom Petty. "I Guess In America" offers a tongue-in-cheek outlook on the process of dealing with personal sadness under the seemingly comfortable umbrella of the U.S., and the privileges (or lack thereof) that come with it.

Unlike the shaky uneasiness of their V8 engine, these boys show no signs of stopping. Climbing from the gurgling depths of Wal-Mart parking lots and rattling beer cans, the band sits calmly atop the rubble with a full-length album in their back pocket. Recorded almost completely live at Modest Mouse's "Ice Cream Party Studios," the album is poised to make 2017 the most promising year of the band's career. Produced with help from Steve Berlin (Los Lobos, Deer Tick), the album, coined "Early Twenties," builds upon the groundwork of "Formative Years" and takes the band to new places both physically and sonically.

Dedric Clark: Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar.

Tony Petersen: Harmony Vocals, Electric Guitar, Banjo.

Roger Whittet: Harmony Vocals, Bass.

Boyd Smith: Drums.

The Social Animals are a full time, van-living young band. They speak through elegantly sarcastic, thoughtful lyrics with memorable melodies splattered across a canvas of indie rock instrumentation. They don't do backflips at their live shows or slide across their knees into guitar solos. Instead, they play their music passionately and honestly, carrying both the intensity to move feet and the delicacy to keep them still. Between songs, their dry commentary on the status of their lives and the world around them appeals to the type of person who, perhaps, spends time actually reading through a band bio.

Releasing their debut EP, "Formative Years" in late summer of 2016, The Social Animals have laid a sturdy foundation for the character and direction of the band. Songs like "Let Me Go" marry the grittiness of an honest band cramped in a Chevy Express with the pop sensibility of Tom Petty. "I Guess In America" offers a tongue-in-cheek outlook on the process of dealing with personal sadness under the seemingly comfortable umbrella of the U.S., and the privileges (or lack thereof) that come with it.

Unlike the shaky uneasiness of their V8 engine, these boys show no signs of stopping. Climbing from the gurgling depths of Wal-Mart parking lots and rattling beer cans, the band sits calmly atop the rubble with a full-length album in their back pocket. Recorded almost completely live at Modest Mouse's "Ice Cream Party Studios," the album is poised to make 2017 the most promising year of the band's career. Produced with help from Steve Berlin (Los Lobos, Deer Tick), the album, coined "Early Twenties," builds upon the groundwork of "Formative Years" and takes the band to new places both physically and sonically.

Dedric Clark: Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar.

Tony Petersen: Harmony Vocals, Electric Guitar, Banjo.

Roger Whittet: Harmony Vocals, Bass.

Boyd Smith: Drums.

Banditos with Special Guests The Maplewaves

Originally from Birmingham, AL, Banditos is a group – more like a gang, actually – of six 20 somethings, nowadays operating out of Nashville, close to, and simultaneously very far away from, the gleaming towers and industry hustle of Lower Broad and Music Row.

With the rugged power of a flashy Super Chief locomotive, the Banditos’s self-titled debut album bodaciously appropriates elements of ’60s blues-fused acid rock, ZZ Top’s jangly boogie, garage punk scuzz a la Burger Records, the Drive-By Truckers’ yawp, the populist choogle of CCR, Slim Harpo’s hip shake baby groove, gut bucket Fat Possum hill country mojo and the Georgia Motherf**king Satellites. From backwoods bluegrass, to slinky nods to Muscle Shoals soul and unexpected bits of doo-wop sweetness, the Banditos recall many, but sound like no one but themselves.

The members of the band first met playing in various punk and rock ‘n’ roll projects around Birmingham at D.I.Y., all-ages venues. In 2010, singer/guitarist Corey Parsons and singer/banjo player Stephen Pierce began busking around town, and were soon asked to perform at their favorite local bar. Without a full band they invited friends Randy Wade (drums), Jeffrey Salter (guitar), and Mary Beth Richardson (vocals) to join them.

Salter and Wade studied together at music school learning classical/jazz techniques, while Richardson’s background was mostly singing in church choirs. After some apprehension from Richardson about taking the stage with an unrehearsed band, a last-minute trip to New Orleans with the group (which resulted in a stolen hotel Bible inscribed with the band’s lyrics) seemed to cure a case of the cold feet. The ensuing performance was raw and electric, and an ecstatic crowd response further cemented the members’ convictions to become a full band. The addition of bassist Danny Vines made the group complete.

The members soon moved into a house together in Birmingham and after repeated tours through Nashville decided to move the band there instead, where the music scene was bigger and more diverse. The sextet has since developed their unique and airtight sound, culminated through several years of enduring friendships and a roaddog touring schedule that has, at their count, numbered over 700 shows in the last three years.

Their selt-titled debut full-length album is layered with as much grime as it is with pinpoint songwriting and feverish technical savvy. Each song wafts new dynamics into a streamlined stylistic roots, punk and rock ‘n’ roll jet stream, the variations heard evidently through the vocal baton passing and wrenching harmonies of Parsons, Richardson, and Pierce. Each vocalist, as with each performer in the band, is given the spotlight during the course of the album’s 12 songs. And at its core, Banditos is a unified coalescence of six bright beams of light, a spiritual collaboration between friends with a singular musical vision.

Originally from Birmingham, AL, Banditos is a group – more like a gang, actually – of six 20 somethings, nowadays operating out of Nashville, close to, and simultaneously very far away from, the gleaming towers and industry hustle of Lower Broad and Music Row.

With the rugged power of a flashy Super Chief locomotive, the Banditos’s self-titled debut album bodaciously appropriates elements of ’60s blues-fused acid rock, ZZ Top’s jangly boogie, garage punk scuzz a la Burger Records, the Drive-By Truckers’ yawp, the populist choogle of CCR, Slim Harpo’s hip shake baby groove, gut bucket Fat Possum hill country mojo and the Georgia Motherf**king Satellites. From backwoods bluegrass, to slinky nods to Muscle Shoals soul and unexpected bits of doo-wop sweetness, the Banditos recall many, but sound like no one but themselves.

The members of the band first met playing in various punk and rock ‘n’ roll projects around Birmingham at D.I.Y., all-ages venues. In 2010, singer/guitarist Corey Parsons and singer/banjo player Stephen Pierce began busking around town, and were soon asked to perform at their favorite local bar. Without a full band they invited friends Randy Wade (drums), Jeffrey Salter (guitar), and Mary Beth Richardson (vocals) to join them.

Salter and Wade studied together at music school learning classical/jazz techniques, while Richardson’s background was mostly singing in church choirs. After some apprehension from Richardson about taking the stage with an unrehearsed band, a last-minute trip to New Orleans with the group (which resulted in a stolen hotel Bible inscribed with the band’s lyrics) seemed to cure a case of the cold feet. The ensuing performance was raw and electric, and an ecstatic crowd response further cemented the members’ convictions to become a full band. The addition of bassist Danny Vines made the group complete.

The members soon moved into a house together in Birmingham and after repeated tours through Nashville decided to move the band there instead, where the music scene was bigger and more diverse. The sextet has since developed their unique and airtight sound, culminated through several years of enduring friendships and a roaddog touring schedule that has, at their count, numbered over 700 shows in the last three years.

Their selt-titled debut full-length album is layered with as much grime as it is with pinpoint songwriting and feverish technical savvy. Each song wafts new dynamics into a streamlined stylistic roots, punk and rock ‘n’ roll jet stream, the variations heard evidently through the vocal baton passing and wrenching harmonies of Parsons, Richardson, and Pierce. Each vocalist, as with each performer in the band, is given the spotlight during the course of the album’s 12 songs. And at its core, Banditos is a unified coalescence of six bright beams of light, a spiritual collaboration between friends with a singular musical vision.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)