club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
(Early Show) Amy Rigby with Special Guest Lonesome Bob

The Old Guys, Amy Rigby's first solo album in a dozen years, measures the weight of heroes, home; family, friends and time. Philip Roth and Bob Dylan, CD/cassette players, touring, the wisdom of age and Walter White, groupies, Robert Altman, egg creams and mentors are paid tribute. Twelve songs written unmistakably by Amy and recorded by Wreckless Eric in upstate New York, The Old Guys is the sound of a good girl grown up, never giving up.

Amy Rigby has made a life out of writing and singing about life. With bands Last Roundup and the Shams in eighties NYC East Village to her solo debut Diary Of A Mod Housewife out of nineties Williamsburg; through a songwriting career in 2000s Nashville and during the past decade with duo partner Wreckless Eric, she’s released records on visionary independent labels Rounder, Matador, Signature Sounds and reborn Stiff Records as well as her and Eric’s own Southern Domestic Recordings. For the last twenty years she has toured the US, Canada, UK and Europe, appearing on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, World Cafe, Whad’Ya Know, All Things Considered, BBC Radio 6 Music’s Marc Riley Show and Mountain Stage. She lives with Wreckless Eric in the Hudson Valley. Her record “Dancing With Joey Ramone” is a staple of Little Steven’s Underground Garage radio show, and kitchen sink anthem “Are We Ever Gonna Have Sex Again?” is played in cafes and bars around the country by real life mod housewives and husbands.

The Old Guys will be released February 23, 2018.

The Old Guys, Amy Rigby's first solo album in a dozen years, measures the weight of heroes, home; family, friends and time. Philip Roth and Bob Dylan, CD/cassette players, touring, the wisdom of age and Walter White, groupies, Robert Altman, egg creams and mentors are paid tribute. Twelve songs written unmistakably by Amy and recorded by Wreckless Eric in upstate New York, The Old Guys is the sound of a good girl grown up, never giving up.

Amy Rigby has made a life out of writing and singing about life. With bands Last Roundup and the Shams in eighties NYC East Village to her solo debut Diary Of A Mod Housewife out of nineties Williamsburg; through a songwriting career in 2000s Nashville and during the past decade with duo partner Wreckless Eric, she’s released records on visionary independent labels Rounder, Matador, Signature Sounds and reborn Stiff Records as well as her and Eric’s own Southern Domestic Recordings. For the last twenty years she has toured the US, Canada, UK and Europe, appearing on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, World Cafe, Whad’Ya Know, All Things Considered, BBC Radio 6 Music’s Marc Riley Show and Mountain Stage. She lives with Wreckless Eric in the Hudson Valley. Her record “Dancing With Joey Ramone” is a staple of Little Steven’s Underground Garage radio show, and kitchen sink anthem “Are We Ever Gonna Have Sex Again?” is played in cafes and bars around the country by real life mod housewives and husbands.

The Old Guys will be released February 23, 2018.

(Late Show) Aris Paul Band CD Release with Special Guest Madeline Rae

Winner of the 2016 WYEP Dos Equis Songwriter Award, Aris Paul and his band, "Aris Paul & The Block Bruisers" are a group of Pittsburgh studio musicians who have come together to mix their favorite elements of alternative, roots, blues, southern rock, funk, and folk into their own guitar-heavy sound. Aris Paul has performed many popular music venues and festivals both locally and throughout the region opening for both Pittsburgh legends and nationally touring icons including Eric Sommer, Davy Knowles, Bill Toms, The Waydown Wanderers, and Raelyn Nelson. "Drive All Night" is Aris Paul's first full length offering showcasing what Aris refers to as, "an upbeat blend of Red-eyed-road music..."

Winner of the 2016 WYEP Dos Equis Songwriter Award, Aris Paul and his band, "Aris Paul & The Block Bruisers" are a group of Pittsburgh studio musicians who have come together to mix their favorite elements of alternative, roots, blues, southern rock, funk, and folk into their own guitar-heavy sound. Aris Paul has performed many popular music venues and festivals both locally and throughout the region opening for both Pittsburgh legends and nationally touring icons including Eric Sommer, Davy Knowles, Bill Toms, The Waydown Wanderers, and Raelyn Nelson. "Drive All Night" is Aris Paul's first full length offering showcasing what Aris refers to as, "an upbeat blend of Red-eyed-road music..."

(Early Show) Matt Aquiline & The Dead End Streets with Special Guest Dayshift

Singer/songwriter Matt Aquiline lived and performed in Washington, DC for nearly two decades, but he has always been of Pittsburgh first and recently returned to his hometown to raise his family and perform his music in the town where it was formed.

Aquiline began performing in Pittsburgh in the early '90s and recorded his cd, Dice Roll, at Dave World in Ambridge, PA, backed by some of Pittsburgh's best musicians including Whitey Cooper and Sam Klingensmith of Norman Nardini and the Tigers, Joe Marini of Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors and at least 1 Granati brother.

He moved to DC to further other career pursuits, where he formed the band, Kid Goat, which performed in the DC area for ten years and recorded the 2009 cd, These People Aren’t You. Kid Goat disbanded in 2013 and Aquiline returned to Pittsburgh to continue writing and performing his music there.

To help bring his sound home, Aquiline enlisted veterans of the local scene Stefan Rodriguez (Bad Attitude, Full Circle Band, Electriflyers) on Bass, Neil Carr (Scene 14, RockHeart, Gringo Zydeco) on Lead Guitar and Vocals and Bill Maruca (Sandoz, The Pawnbrokers, TheCAUSE, Billy Price) on Keys, and the youthful talents of Evan Cvejkus on Drums and Heather Catley on Vocals and Guitar. Catley and other band members have also begun contributing their own stellar original material to Aquiline's, adding even more dimension to a sound that already married folk, rock, blues, country and a little blue-eyed soul into an Americana sound that is pure Pittsburgh, with skill, authenticity and the kind of depth you develop surviving a few cold Winters.

Singer/songwriter Matt Aquiline lived and performed in Washington, DC for nearly two decades, but he has always been of Pittsburgh first and recently returned to his hometown to raise his family and perform his music in the town where it was formed.

Aquiline began performing in Pittsburgh in the early '90s and recorded his cd, Dice Roll, at Dave World in Ambridge, PA, backed by some of Pittsburgh's best musicians including Whitey Cooper and Sam Klingensmith of Norman Nardini and the Tigers, Joe Marini of Jim Donovan and the Sun King Warriors and at least 1 Granati brother.

He moved to DC to further other career pursuits, where he formed the band, Kid Goat, which performed in the DC area for ten years and recorded the 2009 cd, These People Aren’t You. Kid Goat disbanded in 2013 and Aquiline returned to Pittsburgh to continue writing and performing his music there.

To help bring his sound home, Aquiline enlisted veterans of the local scene Stefan Rodriguez (Bad Attitude, Full Circle Band, Electriflyers) on Bass, Neil Carr (Scene 14, RockHeart, Gringo Zydeco) on Lead Guitar and Vocals and Bill Maruca (Sandoz, The Pawnbrokers, TheCAUSE, Billy Price) on Keys, and the youthful talents of Evan Cvejkus on Drums and Heather Catley on Vocals and Guitar. Catley and other band members have also begun contributing their own stellar original material to Aquiline's, adding even more dimension to a sound that already married folk, rock, blues, country and a little blue-eyed soul into an Americana sound that is pure Pittsburgh, with skill, authenticity and the kind of depth you develop surviving a few cold Winters.

(Late Show) Charm & Chain / Habatat

Support local music!

Support local music!

Albert Cummings with Special Guest Robin & Bob

Entertaining audiences from his phenomenal guitar work to his incredibly impassioned lyrics and overall songwriting prowess - one thing has certainly become clear about Albert Cummings' music: He is FAR MORE than simply just the guitarist or the bluesman he's often painted as by fans and the media alike. He offers the complete package.

Though undoubtedly a masterful guitar player who burst onto the blues rock scene in the early 2000's and almost immediately began gaining praise in that realm, his latest release "Live at the '62 Center" further portrays not only his versatility as singer/songwriter and live performer but as an artist first and foremost.

This comes to fruition in the true spontaneity and creative spirit of the album, in which he put together a newly formed version of his usual trio that afternoon of the October, 2016 recording. With longtime friend and Grammy Winner Jim Gaines behind the soundboard, what comes through in both sight and sound is an incredible journey into the live performance world and true artistry of one of today's most seasoned musicians.

"His muscular guitar work is simply outstanding. He's a great blues singer as well with passion for the tunes inherent in his full throttle approach." - Rock and Blues Muse on Live at the '62 Center.

Like many greats before him who've been painted into a corner as merely great blues players, or guitar players, or singers - Cummings seeks to rise above these labels and be praised for the devotion to his overall craft as a true musician. In artist terms - he's sought to be known for the overall pallet of his music, rather than one specific color. From greats like Eric Clapton to the more recent stylings of John Mayer, his artistic integrity has allowed him to focus on the big picture, writing songs from the heart rather than catering to his specifics strengths as a singer, guitarist, or bandleader (all of which he does impeccably, however).

His musical journey began when young Albert first picked up a guitar - learning the requisite three chords from his father, but later switched over to banjo at the age of 12 after becoming a bluegrass fan. After hearing the early recordings of Stevie Ray Vaughan, he was impressed by the sheer virtuosity of the artist, and following his first chance to see him LIVE while in college in Boston he returned to the guitar with a new outlook and resolve.

At age 27, as he continued to grow in his newfound passion, he landed on the Northeast blues circuit with his first band Swamp Yankee. Then, in 1998, after walking into a Northeast Blues Society's open jam, Cummings won the right to compete in the Blues Foundation's International Blues Challenge the following year. By 2000, his debut single "The Long Way" was released to rave reviews, and began opening new doors for the artist.

His first big opportunity came in the form of a chance to work with Double Trouble, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan's rhythm section. So taken with Albert's fire and passion were bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton that they volunteered to play on and produce his solo debut recording, 2003's self-released From the Heart. Recorded in Austin, Texas, it featured Cummings fronting Double Trouble (including Reese Winans) in their first recording project since Stevie Ray's passing. Having began his musical journey in part due to Vaughan's inspiration, it seemed Cummings' passion had brought him full-circle.

Cummings' soulful and explosive approach to blues and rock then caught the attention of Blind Pig Records (Muddy Waters, Jimmy Vivino, Elvin Bishop), which signed him to a multi-album deal. On his label debut, True to Yourself, released in 2004, Cummings was again joined by bassist Tommy Shannon. Recorded by producer extraordinaire Jim Gaines (Santana, Stevie Ray, Buddy Guy), the all-original release showcased Albert's rapidly developing songwriting chops and deeply emotional vocals as well as stunning guitar pyrotechnics, fully showcasing his well-rounded talents.

Soon tours and shows with blues legends B.B. King, Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and others brought Albert's music to a much larger audience. His second release, Working Man (2006), also produced by Jim Gaines, furthered a growing focus and maturity both in Albert's stinging, incisive guitar work as well as in his fluently idiomatic songwriting - leading Billboard Magazine to exclaim "This recording is the calling card of a star who has arrived".

2008 saw his first live album "Feel So Good", recorded at the historic Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, Massachusetts which has hosted everyone from Will Rogers to Al Jolson. The audience was so enthralled and supportive they became part of the performance in a way that's rarely heard. As AllMusic put it, "It sounds like it was one hell of a party that night". Music Connection also called it "one of the best live albums recorded in a long time".

As he continued to grow, playing with the likes of legends from B.B. King (who called dubbed him "a great guitarist"), Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy, and many more - Cummings built on not only his all- around songwriting and musicianship but his guitar playing skill as well. Using his knowledge to give back to fellow guitarists wanting to advance in their craft, he released the instructional DVD "Working Man Blues Guitar" in 2011. His next album, 2012's self-released "No Regrets" followed as a return to his true musical roots, poignantly capturing the core of his influences and displaying the impact that R&B, Rock, Soul, Country, and the Blues have had on both his playing and writing. It debuted at #1 on iTunes music charts in the USA, Canada and France.

2015's "Someone Like You" was recorded in Southern California with Grammy-winning producer David Z. (Buddy Guy, Prince, Jonny Lang, Gov't Mule) at the helm. Said Z, "Albert Cummings writes, plays and sings the blues like nobody else. What a blast to watch him jell in the studio with some of the best musicians in Los Angeles." One of those musicians was Blind Pig label mate and leader of The Basic Cable Band on the Conan TV show, Jimmy Vivino, who performs on three cuts.

Now, as he continues writing and performing, relentlessly devoting effort to his craft, Cumming's is ready to continue on his ever expansive musical journey.

Entertaining audiences from his phenomenal guitar work to his incredibly impassioned lyrics and overall songwriting prowess - one thing has certainly become clear about Albert Cummings' music: He is FAR MORE than simply just the guitarist or the bluesman he's often painted as by fans and the media alike. He offers the complete package.

Though undoubtedly a masterful guitar player who burst onto the blues rock scene in the early 2000's and almost immediately began gaining praise in that realm, his latest release "Live at the '62 Center" further portrays not only his versatility as singer/songwriter and live performer but as an artist first and foremost.

This comes to fruition in the true spontaneity and creative spirit of the album, in which he put together a newly formed version of his usual trio that afternoon of the October, 2016 recording. With longtime friend and Grammy Winner Jim Gaines behind the soundboard, what comes through in both sight and sound is an incredible journey into the live performance world and true artistry of one of today's most seasoned musicians.

"His muscular guitar work is simply outstanding. He's a great blues singer as well with passion for the tunes inherent in his full throttle approach." - Rock and Blues Muse on Live at the '62 Center.

Like many greats before him who've been painted into a corner as merely great blues players, or guitar players, or singers - Cummings seeks to rise above these labels and be praised for the devotion to his overall craft as a true musician. In artist terms - he's sought to be known for the overall pallet of his music, rather than one specific color. From greats like Eric Clapton to the more recent stylings of John Mayer, his artistic integrity has allowed him to focus on the big picture, writing songs from the heart rather than catering to his specifics strengths as a singer, guitarist, or bandleader (all of which he does impeccably, however).

His musical journey began when young Albert first picked up a guitar - learning the requisite three chords from his father, but later switched over to banjo at the age of 12 after becoming a bluegrass fan. After hearing the early recordings of Stevie Ray Vaughan, he was impressed by the sheer virtuosity of the artist, and following his first chance to see him LIVE while in college in Boston he returned to the guitar with a new outlook and resolve.

At age 27, as he continued to grow in his newfound passion, he landed on the Northeast blues circuit with his first band Swamp Yankee. Then, in 1998, after walking into a Northeast Blues Society's open jam, Cummings won the right to compete in the Blues Foundation's International Blues Challenge the following year. By 2000, his debut single "The Long Way" was released to rave reviews, and began opening new doors for the artist.

His first big opportunity came in the form of a chance to work with Double Trouble, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan's rhythm section. So taken with Albert's fire and passion were bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton that they volunteered to play on and produce his solo debut recording, 2003's self-released From the Heart. Recorded in Austin, Texas, it featured Cummings fronting Double Trouble (including Reese Winans) in their first recording project since Stevie Ray's passing. Having began his musical journey in part due to Vaughan's inspiration, it seemed Cummings' passion had brought him full-circle.

Cummings' soulful and explosive approach to blues and rock then caught the attention of Blind Pig Records (Muddy Waters, Jimmy Vivino, Elvin Bishop), which signed him to a multi-album deal. On his label debut, True to Yourself, released in 2004, Cummings was again joined by bassist Tommy Shannon. Recorded by producer extraordinaire Jim Gaines (Santana, Stevie Ray, Buddy Guy), the all-original release showcased Albert's rapidly developing songwriting chops and deeply emotional vocals as well as stunning guitar pyrotechnics, fully showcasing his well-rounded talents.

Soon tours and shows with blues legends B.B. King, Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and others brought Albert's music to a much larger audience. His second release, Working Man (2006), also produced by Jim Gaines, furthered a growing focus and maturity both in Albert's stinging, incisive guitar work as well as in his fluently idiomatic songwriting - leading Billboard Magazine to exclaim "This recording is the calling card of a star who has arrived".

2008 saw his first live album "Feel So Good", recorded at the historic Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, Massachusetts which has hosted everyone from Will Rogers to Al Jolson. The audience was so enthralled and supportive they became part of the performance in a way that's rarely heard. As AllMusic put it, "It sounds like it was one hell of a party that night". Music Connection also called it "one of the best live albums recorded in a long time".

As he continued to grow, playing with the likes of legends from B.B. King (who called dubbed him "a great guitarist"), Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy, and many more - Cummings built on not only his all- around songwriting and musicianship but his guitar playing skill as well. Using his knowledge to give back to fellow guitarists wanting to advance in their craft, he released the instructional DVD "Working Man Blues Guitar" in 2011. His next album, 2012's self-released "No Regrets" followed as a return to his true musical roots, poignantly capturing the core of his influences and displaying the impact that R&B, Rock, Soul, Country, and the Blues have had on both his playing and writing. It debuted at #1 on iTunes music charts in the USA, Canada and France.

2015's "Someone Like You" was recorded in Southern California with Grammy-winning producer David Z. (Buddy Guy, Prince, Jonny Lang, Gov't Mule) at the helm. Said Z, "Albert Cummings writes, plays and sings the blues like nobody else. What a blast to watch him jell in the studio with some of the best musicians in Los Angeles." One of those musicians was Blind Pig label mate and leader of The Basic Cable Band on the Conan TV show, Jimmy Vivino, who performs on three cuts.

Now, as he continues writing and performing, relentlessly devoting effort to his craft, Cumming's is ready to continue on his ever expansive musical journey.

Postponed to November 14 - Aubrey Logan

This show has been postponed to November 14, 2018. All tickets honored.

This show has been postponed to November 14, 2018. All tickets honored.

Calliope Songwriters Open Stage at Club Cafe with Featured Performer Jeff Friedlander

No cover! Doors and sign up open at 6:45pm, the event starts at 8pm. All acts and performers welcome.

Club Cafe's monthly open stage has joined forces with Calliope and John Hayes (long time host of the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern's open mic night). All acts and genres are welcome to attend. The open stage will happen the first Tuesday of every month. We are excited to be working with John and Calliope and look forward to this next chapter in our long running, well revered open stage.

No cover! Doors and sign up open at 6:45pm, the event starts at 8pm. All acts and performers welcome.

Club Cafe's monthly open stage has joined forces with Calliope and John Hayes (long time host of the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern's open mic night). All acts and genres are welcome to attend. The open stage will happen the first Tuesday of every month. We are excited to be working with John and Calliope and look forward to this next chapter in our long running, well revered open stage.

Joe Pug with Special Guest Jason Narducy (Bob Mould Band, Split Single, Superchunk)

If the opening notes on Joe Pug’s new LP “Windfall” are a bit disorienting, his fans won’t likely be surprised. The Austin, TX singer songwriter has made a habit of defying expectations so the piano-driven “Bright Beginnings” and the atmospheric rumination of “Great Hosannas” are just further indication that he’s quite comfortable stepping outside of the guy-with-a-guitar trappings of the genre.

His rise has been as improbable as it has been impressive. After dropping out of college and taking on work as a carpenter in Chicago, he got his musical start by providing CDs for his fans to pass along to their friends. This led to a string of sold out shows and a record deal with Nashville indie Lightning Rod Records (Jason Isbell, Billy Joe Shaver). As he toured behind “Messenger” (2010) and The Great Despiser (2012) it was with a band that looked as much like a jazz trio as an Americana band. “I never quite found a live band that captured what I was aiming for until I connected with Greg [Tuohey–electric guitar] and Matt [Schuessler–upright bass]. It was an arrangement that maybe didn’t make a ton of sense on paper but 10 minutes into the first rehearsal I knew this was going to be my band.” The following years would have them on the road for over four hundred shows, including stops at Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, and The Newport Folk Festival.

The relentless grind of four years of nonstop touring had taken its toll though, and by late 2013 he was ready to call it quits. The tour that fall was a runaway success but his personal and creative lives were a different story. “It was this surreal dichotomy. Everyone kept congratulating me on how well the tour was going, and the mood was probably the best it had ever been on the road. We finally got two hotel rooms in each city instead of one. We’ve got this incredible group of die-hard fans that somehow make each show bigger than our previous trip through town. Meanwhile my relationship was in shambles and creatively I was at a dead end. There was absolutely no joy left in playing music. So we walked off stage after a particular show when I played terribly, and pulled my manager aside in the green room and told him to cancel the rest of the tour dates and that I was essentially through.”

But studio time was already scheduled and deadlines had been set for a new record, so after a few weeks Pug was back to the business of writing songs. “In retrospect, I was in a very unhealthy place. I was sitting in a room with the blinds shut and a notebook, forcing out words that weren’t there and drinking astonishing amounts of bourbon. I was looking at it as a job….as a business obligation, and that is a very slippery slope.” At that point he decided to make good on his promise from the previous tour. The album was put on indefinite hold. “I just needed to start behaving like a human being again. I needed to reconnect with my girlfriend. I needed to eat healthy food. I needed to go enjoy live music as a fan. I really needed to make sure I still loved making music, because I really had my doubts at that point.”

The resulting layoff paid dividends in spades. When Pug set up camp in Lexington KY in 2014 to record, he did so with some of the best songs he has ever written. The agenda was much simpler than previous albums. “The aim on this one was very straightforward. We wanted to capture the music just the way we play it, with minimal production. It was a very back to basics approach because ultimately that’s what I love about music, and that’s what I love about making music. I wanted to record these songs the way they were written and put them out in the world.” The result is a collection of songs that are as close as we’ve gotten to a road map to Pug’s ambitions. He has collected plenty of the requisite Dylan comparisons over his young career but on this record it’s easier to hear the sway of more contemporary influences like Josh Ritter, Ryan Adams and M.Ward.

The theme of resilience plays a central role throughout Windfall. The weary protagonist in “Veteran Fighter” wills his way further down the highway despite the gloom that seems certain to overtake him. “The Measure”, a song inspired in part by Frederic Buechner’s novel Godric, marvels at “every inch of anguish, laid out side by side” but ultimately finds that “All we’ve lost is nothing to what we’ve found.” “I never really write songs with a specific narrative in mind,” Pug explains. “When you’re sort of pushing through a dark period of your life it’s probably inevitable that some of that is going to find its way onto the page. But in the same way, by the time we were in the studio the process had become very effortless and joyful. And hopefully you can hear a lot of that on the record as well.” This duality appears perhaps most overtly in the album-closing stunner “If Still It Can’t Be Found”, which features Pat Sansone of Wilco guesting on mellotron.

If it’s not around this corner it’s around the next
If it’s not beyond this river it’s beyond the next
And if still it can’t be found
It’s prob’ly for the best

As the saying goes, “All’s well that ends well.” Joe Pug didn’t call it quits after all. He’s engaged to be married and still drinks bourbon on occasion. His new album, Windfall, will be released March 10, 2015 on Lightning Rod Records in the US and Loose Music in Europe.

If the opening notes on Joe Pug’s new LP “Windfall” are a bit disorienting, his fans won’t likely be surprised. The Austin, TX singer songwriter has made a habit of defying expectations so the piano-driven “Bright Beginnings” and the atmospheric rumination of “Great Hosannas” are just further indication that he’s quite comfortable stepping outside of the guy-with-a-guitar trappings of the genre.

His rise has been as improbable as it has been impressive. After dropping out of college and taking on work as a carpenter in Chicago, he got his musical start by providing CDs for his fans to pass along to their friends. This led to a string of sold out shows and a record deal with Nashville indie Lightning Rod Records (Jason Isbell, Billy Joe Shaver). As he toured behind “Messenger” (2010) and The Great Despiser (2012) it was with a band that looked as much like a jazz trio as an Americana band. “I never quite found a live band that captured what I was aiming for until I connected with Greg [Tuohey–electric guitar] and Matt [Schuessler–upright bass]. It was an arrangement that maybe didn’t make a ton of sense on paper but 10 minutes into the first rehearsal I knew this was going to be my band.” The following years would have them on the road for over four hundred shows, including stops at Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, and The Newport Folk Festival.

The relentless grind of four years of nonstop touring had taken its toll though, and by late 2013 he was ready to call it quits. The tour that fall was a runaway success but his personal and creative lives were a different story. “It was this surreal dichotomy. Everyone kept congratulating me on how well the tour was going, and the mood was probably the best it had ever been on the road. We finally got two hotel rooms in each city instead of one. We’ve got this incredible group of die-hard fans that somehow make each show bigger than our previous trip through town. Meanwhile my relationship was in shambles and creatively I was at a dead end. There was absolutely no joy left in playing music. So we walked off stage after a particular show when I played terribly, and pulled my manager aside in the green room and told him to cancel the rest of the tour dates and that I was essentially through.”

But studio time was already scheduled and deadlines had been set for a new record, so after a few weeks Pug was back to the business of writing songs. “In retrospect, I was in a very unhealthy place. I was sitting in a room with the blinds shut and a notebook, forcing out words that weren’t there and drinking astonishing amounts of bourbon. I was looking at it as a job….as a business obligation, and that is a very slippery slope.” At that point he decided to make good on his promise from the previous tour. The album was put on indefinite hold. “I just needed to start behaving like a human being again. I needed to reconnect with my girlfriend. I needed to eat healthy food. I needed to go enjoy live music as a fan. I really needed to make sure I still loved making music, because I really had my doubts at that point.”

The resulting layoff paid dividends in spades. When Pug set up camp in Lexington KY in 2014 to record, he did so with some of the best songs he has ever written. The agenda was much simpler than previous albums. “The aim on this one was very straightforward. We wanted to capture the music just the way we play it, with minimal production. It was a very back to basics approach because ultimately that’s what I love about music, and that’s what I love about making music. I wanted to record these songs the way they were written and put them out in the world.” The result is a collection of songs that are as close as we’ve gotten to a road map to Pug’s ambitions. He has collected plenty of the requisite Dylan comparisons over his young career but on this record it’s easier to hear the sway of more contemporary influences like Josh Ritter, Ryan Adams and M.Ward.

The theme of resilience plays a central role throughout Windfall. The weary protagonist in “Veteran Fighter” wills his way further down the highway despite the gloom that seems certain to overtake him. “The Measure”, a song inspired in part by Frederic Buechner’s novel Godric, marvels at “every inch of anguish, laid out side by side” but ultimately finds that “All we’ve lost is nothing to what we’ve found.” “I never really write songs with a specific narrative in mind,” Pug explains. “When you’re sort of pushing through a dark period of your life it’s probably inevitable that some of that is going to find its way onto the page. But in the same way, by the time we were in the studio the process had become very effortless and joyful. And hopefully you can hear a lot of that on the record as well.” This duality appears perhaps most overtly in the album-closing stunner “If Still It Can’t Be Found”, which features Pat Sansone of Wilco guesting on mellotron.

If it’s not around this corner it’s around the next
If it’s not beyond this river it’s beyond the next
And if still it can’t be found
It’s prob’ly for the best

As the saying goes, “All’s well that ends well.” Joe Pug didn’t call it quits after all. He’s engaged to be married and still drinks bourbon on occasion. His new album, Windfall, will be released March 10, 2015 on Lightning Rod Records in the US and Loose Music in Europe.

Milk & Bone with Special Guest Dizzy

Formed by Laurence Lafond-Beaulne and Camille Poliquin (both accomplished studio and touring musicians), Milk & Bone is set to release their first album, Little Mourning, in the US on April 21st, on Honeymoon. Made up of electronic textures and layered synths, Lafond-Beaulne and Poliquin's sonic universe distinguishes itself from the electro-pop genre thanks to their perfectly-paired vocal colours. Their mesmerizing harmonies look into the darker aspects of love, friendship and lust.
By combining their voices and talents, the two friends create electro-pop melodies that are both dreamy and harrowing. After charming the blogosphere and international media last year with two singles (New York and Coconut Water), the Montreal-based duo then shared the song Pressure, which made its way to Hype Machine top songs list, quickly reaching a million plays.
Milk & Bone's tightly-knit bond, palpable in concert and throughout the album, is a key part of their creative process. Lafond-Beaulne and Poliquin wrote in tandem, and their eight songs took shape once they arrived in studio with the help of producer Gabriel Gagnon, who also took part in the mixing, programming and the arrangements.

Formed by Laurence Lafond-Beaulne and Camille Poliquin (both accomplished studio and touring musicians), Milk & Bone is set to release their first album, Little Mourning, in the US on April 21st, on Honeymoon. Made up of electronic textures and layered synths, Lafond-Beaulne and Poliquin's sonic universe distinguishes itself from the electro-pop genre thanks to their perfectly-paired vocal colours. Their mesmerizing harmonies look into the darker aspects of love, friendship and lust.
By combining their voices and talents, the two friends create electro-pop melodies that are both dreamy and harrowing. After charming the blogosphere and international media last year with two singles (New York and Coconut Water), the Montreal-based duo then shared the song Pressure, which made its way to Hype Machine top songs list, quickly reaching a million plays.
Milk & Bone's tightly-knit bond, palpable in concert and throughout the album, is a key part of their creative process. Lafond-Beaulne and Poliquin wrote in tandem, and their eight songs took shape once they arrived in studio with the help of producer Gabriel Gagnon, who also took part in the mixing, programming and the arrangements.

(Early Show) *repeat repeat with Special Guest Dinosoul

Mixing the sunny swoon of sixties pop with a dark swirl of Warholian garage rock, *repeat repeat create their own geography, dreaming up songs rooted in the spirit of both coasts. Based in Nashville, TN — where frontman Jared Corder, then-drummer Andy Herrin, and keys/singer Kristyn Corder kicked off the band's career with 2014's Bad Latitude — the band looks beyond the borders of their landlocked hometown and, instead, mix California surf culture and New York street smarts into the same tracklist. They're a blend of bloom, doom, and boom. They're Dick Dale's snot-nosed grandkids.

A self-described family business, *repeat repeat was founded by Jared Corder — a former punk-rock kid raised on the sounds of Bad Religion and Black Flag. The goal was simple: to make edgy, guitar-driven music that nodded to the classic sounds of Jared's California birthplace, complete with hazy harmonies and surf-inspired arrangements. The problem? The group needed a female harmony singer, and nobody seemed to fit the bill. Things changed when the band's producer, Gregory Lattimer (Albert Hammond Jr.), suggested that Jared's wife, Kristyn, sing with the band. The fit was natural. Kristyn had grown up in and around California, listening to '60s legends like the Mamas and the Papas and The Everly Brothers. She quickly completed the band, sharing vocal duties with Jared and serving as the inspiration for much of Bad Latitude — a debut album largely written by Jared during the couple's engagement, filled with songs about love, life, and the promise of new partnerships along the way.

Floral Canyon (their sophomore release) stretches the band's musical envelope, adding depth, drive, and darkness to the sun-baked, surf-tinged pop music that's always been their bedrock. Produced once again by Lattimer, the album tackles modern culture ("Plugged In"), rocky relationships ("Mostly"), religious ideologies ("Speaker Destroyer"), and all points in between. Gluing everything together is the band's melodic, musical attack: equal parts percussive thunder, trembling organ, synth pads, coed harmonies, and wide-ranging guitar parts.

The album's name is a sly salute to California's Laurel Canyon, whose rolling hills were home to some of America's best musicians during the '60s and '70s. The SoCal salute came in handy when *repeat repeat caught the attention of notable Silverlake-based label Dangerbird Records, who agreed to release Floral Canyon in the Fall of 2017. It proved to be a busy year as the band saw the departure of Herrin to pursue other projects, a US & Canadian tour with punk sweethearts, Beach Slang, a sold out show with Neon Trees, and a slew of major festival dates including Forecastle Festival, Firefly and SXSW.

*repeat repeat’s sound is bold, bi-coastal beach pop, at once coolly current and proudly vintage. It's sugar-coated music with a raw, real, rocky center, and unmistakably *repeat repeat.

The band is vegan and share their life with 10 rescue animals including dogs, cats, a very talkative African Grey parrot, and an enormous young ex-racehorse.

They also host a popular bi-monthly podcast on iTunes and Stitcher.

-Andrew Leahey

Mixing the sunny swoon of sixties pop with a dark swirl of Warholian garage rock, *repeat repeat create their own geography, dreaming up songs rooted in the spirit of both coasts. Based in Nashville, TN — where frontman Jared Corder, then-drummer Andy Herrin, and keys/singer Kristyn Corder kicked off the band's career with 2014's Bad Latitude — the band looks beyond the borders of their landlocked hometown and, instead, mix California surf culture and New York street smarts into the same tracklist. They're a blend of bloom, doom, and boom. They're Dick Dale's snot-nosed grandkids.

A self-described family business, *repeat repeat was founded by Jared Corder — a former punk-rock kid raised on the sounds of Bad Religion and Black Flag. The goal was simple: to make edgy, guitar-driven music that nodded to the classic sounds of Jared's California birthplace, complete with hazy harmonies and surf-inspired arrangements. The problem? The group needed a female harmony singer, and nobody seemed to fit the bill. Things changed when the band's producer, Gregory Lattimer (Albert Hammond Jr.), suggested that Jared's wife, Kristyn, sing with the band. The fit was natural. Kristyn had grown up in and around California, listening to '60s legends like the Mamas and the Papas and The Everly Brothers. She quickly completed the band, sharing vocal duties with Jared and serving as the inspiration for much of Bad Latitude — a debut album largely written by Jared during the couple's engagement, filled with songs about love, life, and the promise of new partnerships along the way.

Floral Canyon (their sophomore release) stretches the band's musical envelope, adding depth, drive, and darkness to the sun-baked, surf-tinged pop music that's always been their bedrock. Produced once again by Lattimer, the album tackles modern culture ("Plugged In"), rocky relationships ("Mostly"), religious ideologies ("Speaker Destroyer"), and all points in between. Gluing everything together is the band's melodic, musical attack: equal parts percussive thunder, trembling organ, synth pads, coed harmonies, and wide-ranging guitar parts.

The album's name is a sly salute to California's Laurel Canyon, whose rolling hills were home to some of America's best musicians during the '60s and '70s. The SoCal salute came in handy when *repeat repeat caught the attention of notable Silverlake-based label Dangerbird Records, who agreed to release Floral Canyon in the Fall of 2017. It proved to be a busy year as the band saw the departure of Herrin to pursue other projects, a US & Canadian tour with punk sweethearts, Beach Slang, a sold out show with Neon Trees, and a slew of major festival dates including Forecastle Festival, Firefly and SXSW.

*repeat repeat’s sound is bold, bi-coastal beach pop, at once coolly current and proudly vintage. It's sugar-coated music with a raw, real, rocky center, and unmistakably *repeat repeat.

The band is vegan and share their life with 10 rescue animals including dogs, cats, a very talkative African Grey parrot, and an enormous young ex-racehorse.

They also host a popular bi-monthly podcast on iTunes and Stitcher.

-Andrew Leahey

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)