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Six Organs of Admittance with Special Guest Expires

In preparing for the first album of non-Hexadic Six Organs of Admittance music since 2012's Ascent, Ben Chasny had a think about what he'd be saying in his own tongue for the first time in a half-decade. As ever, a head-full of ideas were driving him to think and speak music as a spirituality superimposed onto a reality, with the ghosts of both whispering at each other. In the end, what sits in our listening ears is the sound of communion. Burning the Threshold brings a wealth of Six Organs-styled lightness into one of his sweetest musical meditations yet.
 
With a spacious acoustic soundstage, Burning the Threshold may actually more resemble 2011's Asleep on the Floodplain. Or it may more resemble Compathia, or School of the Flower. All of this is speculative, comparative, unverifyable – but our sense of what is true tells us that nobody plays acoustic music quite like Six Organs of Admittance, and that furthermore, nothing sounds so much like Burning the Threshold as Burning the Threshold.
 
Ben is in a particularly expansive mood this time around, singing and playing while thinking of Wallace Stevens, birds in the morning, anarchy, Third Ear Band, Gaston Bachelard, The Gnostics, Ronnie Lane and/or The Faces, Deleuze, Aaron Cheak, Odysseus, This Heat, Takoma Records, St Eustace, Dark Noontide and a HELL of a lot more than that, with all the thoughts affixed to a quiver of potent melodies launching forth and arcing out through dimensions, seeking infinite space.
 
The space radiates out from the album's first moment, with "Things As They Are", a song examining the life of poet Wallace Stevens. Ben's currently working on music for a theatrical work about Stevens' life set to debut in Cleveland later in 2017. The empathetic waves generated by this song resonate throughout the album, giving a new dimension to the music of Six Organs of Admittance.  
 
Like so many other Six Organs records, Burning the Threshold was created mostly solo, but features the singing talents of Alex Nielsen, Haley Fohr and Damon and Naomi; the drumming of Chris Corsano; a guitar duet with Ryley Walker, and keys and mixing from Cooper Crain. With this new music, Ben Chasny has created a potent tonic for our times. The gentleness found here, balanced on top of his classical asceticism, provides much of what we need in 2017 and beyond: love, forgiveness, reality and an ever-wider view, with the understanding of our circular path in this lifetime. Looking at the world through clear eyes beneath a knitted brow, but with a laugh rising up from its heart, Burning the Threshold brings us a powerful draught of essence.

In preparing for the first album of non-Hexadic Six Organs of Admittance music since 2012's Ascent, Ben Chasny had a think about what he'd be saying in his own tongue for the first time in a half-decade. As ever, a head-full of ideas were driving him to think and speak music as a spirituality superimposed onto a reality, with the ghosts of both whispering at each other. In the end, what sits in our listening ears is the sound of communion. Burning the Threshold brings a wealth of Six Organs-styled lightness into one of his sweetest musical meditations yet.
 
With a spacious acoustic soundstage, Burning the Threshold may actually more resemble 2011's Asleep on the Floodplain. Or it may more resemble Compathia, or School of the Flower. All of this is speculative, comparative, unverifyable – but our sense of what is true tells us that nobody plays acoustic music quite like Six Organs of Admittance, and that furthermore, nothing sounds so much like Burning the Threshold as Burning the Threshold.
 
Ben is in a particularly expansive mood this time around, singing and playing while thinking of Wallace Stevens, birds in the morning, anarchy, Third Ear Band, Gaston Bachelard, The Gnostics, Ronnie Lane and/or The Faces, Deleuze, Aaron Cheak, Odysseus, This Heat, Takoma Records, St Eustace, Dark Noontide and a HELL of a lot more than that, with all the thoughts affixed to a quiver of potent melodies launching forth and arcing out through dimensions, seeking infinite space.
 
The space radiates out from the album's first moment, with "Things As They Are", a song examining the life of poet Wallace Stevens. Ben's currently working on music for a theatrical work about Stevens' life set to debut in Cleveland later in 2017. The empathetic waves generated by this song resonate throughout the album, giving a new dimension to the music of Six Organs of Admittance.  
 
Like so many other Six Organs records, Burning the Threshold was created mostly solo, but features the singing talents of Alex Nielsen, Haley Fohr and Damon and Naomi; the drumming of Chris Corsano; a guitar duet with Ryley Walker, and keys and mixing from Cooper Crain. With this new music, Ben Chasny has created a potent tonic for our times. The gentleness found here, balanced on top of his classical asceticism, provides much of what we need in 2017 and beyond: love, forgiveness, reality and an ever-wider view, with the understanding of our circular path in this lifetime. Looking at the world through clear eyes beneath a knitted brow, but with a laugh rising up from its heart, Burning the Threshold brings us a powerful draught of essence.

Operators with Special Guest Charly Bliss

Dan Boeckner (Wolf Parade, Handsome Furs, Divine Fits) has announced the debut album for his band Operators, titled Blue Wave, out worldwide April 1st on Last Gang Records. Formed in 2013, the band features Boeckner on vocals, guitar, and synths and is joined by New Bomb Turks and Divine Fits drummer Sam Brown and electro-wiz Devojka. Produced by Graham Walsh (METZ, Alvvays, Viet Cong), much of Blue Wave was recorded in a middle of nowhere 1850s-vintage barn in southern Ontario.

Blue Wave follows the release of EP1, an upbeat, aggressively melodic collection of synth driven pop songs featuring the single “True” and gave us a taste of what was to come with the band. After a length of time on the road with the likes of Future Islands, New Pornographers and more, the band’s sound evolved from an analog post-punk project to a more live, punked out sound, with Boeckner finding himself often strapped back into his guitar. The first single “Cold Light” demonstrates the beautiful melding of both worlds. The single wil be out January 29th via all digital platforms. Listen to via Pitchfork.

Dan Boeckner has shown his diverse musical taste over the years; consequently, his decision to focus his attention on a new, electronic dance project shouldn’t be surprising as it feels like nothing more than a natural progression from the first synth he bought for the debut Wolf Parade EP, to the primarily stark, digital sounds of Handsome Furs, and now the organic, melted, deeply dance driven Operators.
Operators will be on the road this Spring, having just announced a North American tour in March and April.

Dan Boeckner (Wolf Parade, Handsome Furs, Divine Fits) has announced the debut album for his band Operators, titled Blue Wave, out worldwide April 1st on Last Gang Records. Formed in 2013, the band features Boeckner on vocals, guitar, and synths and is joined by New Bomb Turks and Divine Fits drummer Sam Brown and electro-wiz Devojka. Produced by Graham Walsh (METZ, Alvvays, Viet Cong), much of Blue Wave was recorded in a middle of nowhere 1850s-vintage barn in southern Ontario.

Blue Wave follows the release of EP1, an upbeat, aggressively melodic collection of synth driven pop songs featuring the single “True” and gave us a taste of what was to come with the band. After a length of time on the road with the likes of Future Islands, New Pornographers and more, the band’s sound evolved from an analog post-punk project to a more live, punked out sound, with Boeckner finding himself often strapped back into his guitar. The first single “Cold Light” demonstrates the beautiful melding of both worlds. The single wil be out January 29th via all digital platforms. Listen to via Pitchfork.

Dan Boeckner has shown his diverse musical taste over the years; consequently, his decision to focus his attention on a new, electronic dance project shouldn’t be surprising as it feels like nothing more than a natural progression from the first synth he bought for the debut Wolf Parade EP, to the primarily stark, digital sounds of Handsome Furs, and now the organic, melted, deeply dance driven Operators.
Operators will be on the road this Spring, having just announced a North American tour in March and April.

Bill Toms and Hard Rain (Featuring the Soulville Horns) with Special Guest The Big Bend

"Bill Toms is a poet, a soul-shouter and guitar slinger with one foot in the gutter and an eye on the heavens above. And man, does he front a great rock n' soul band!" - Will Kimbrough

The creative compulsion to write songs that stir emotion, challenge the mind, and move the tail feathers of the audience is undeniably unique in music today. His performances have become legendary in sheer power and passion. Rock and roll, soul, blues, and gospel so deep the earth moves, and the walls begin shakin’ as Bill Toms and his band start the train rollin. American music never sounded so good.

He joined Pittsburgh’s legendary band, Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers, as lead guitarist in 1987. The band’s meteoric rise into the professional music scene enabled Bill to tour the United States and Europe repeatedly. While with Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers he opened for and played with a long and impressive list of notables, such as The Band, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Little Feat and Stevie Ray Vaughn. During his 20 years of playing guitar, co-writing, and singing back-up vocals for the Houserockers, Toms recorded six studio albums and one live concert album. In 1995, the acclaimed CD, "American Babylon," was recorded and produced by Bruce Springsteen.

Bill Toms' solo performances have taken him all over the United States and Europe. In addition to his previous six studio CD's, one "Live" CD, and single EP, his latest record, the Will Kimbrough produced, "Memphis" was released to international critical acclaim in 2011

"Bill Toms is a poet, a soul-shouter and guitar slinger with one foot in the gutter and an eye on the heavens above. And man, does he front a great rock n' soul band!" - Will Kimbrough

The creative compulsion to write songs that stir emotion, challenge the mind, and move the tail feathers of the audience is undeniably unique in music today. His performances have become legendary in sheer power and passion. Rock and roll, soul, blues, and gospel so deep the earth moves, and the walls begin shakin’ as Bill Toms and his band start the train rollin. American music never sounded so good.

He joined Pittsburgh’s legendary band, Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers, as lead guitarist in 1987. The band’s meteoric rise into the professional music scene enabled Bill to tour the United States and Europe repeatedly. While with Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers he opened for and played with a long and impressive list of notables, such as The Band, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Little Feat and Stevie Ray Vaughn. During his 20 years of playing guitar, co-writing, and singing back-up vocals for the Houserockers, Toms recorded six studio albums and one live concert album. In 1995, the acclaimed CD, "American Babylon," was recorded and produced by Bruce Springsteen.

Bill Toms' solo performances have taken him all over the United States and Europe. In addition to his previous six studio CD's, one "Live" CD, and single EP, his latest record, the Will Kimbrough produced, "Memphis" was released to international critical acclaim in 2011

The Weeks with Special Guest The Lonely Biscuits

High-energy, back-to-basics rock & roll.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent 2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teenagers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were touring Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly energized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on collaboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.

Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like "Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, whenever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're going. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the autobiographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rocking out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

High-energy, back-to-basics rock & roll.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent 2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teenagers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were touring Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly energized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on collaboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.

Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like "Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, whenever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're going. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the autobiographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rocking out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

Delicate Steve with Grand Piano and Andre Costello and the Cool Minors

When the world first met Delicate Steve in 2011, Steve Marion and the band he principled were an artfully crafted fiction. Tasked with introducing Wondervisions, Delicate Steve's beguiling debut record of highly evocative and emotionally concise guitar-driven songs, Luaka Bop, the seminal David Byrne-owned New York indie label, balked. There was the music to get to; itself essentially reference-less and unqualifiedly unique. But what of the guy who created it? The guitarist who wrote the whole thing, who played every instrument. An enormous unknown talent without an attendant backstory to match the spectral and boundless qualities of his music. Enter Chuck Klosterman. The celebrated writer was brought on to completely fabricate a biography based on a band and album he was asked not to listen to. While the record racked up high praise from outlets including The New York Times and NPR, nearly everything music fans read about Delicate Steve was a fiction. Listeners were left to the music alone to determine who Steve was. As is often the case, some of the first people to recognize Delicate Steve's music were fellow artists who became vocal supporters, as the young guy from upstate New Jersey began to develop a growing fanbase in small New York clubs like Glasslands, Union Pool, and Mercury Lounge. Following the 2012 release of Positive Force, Delicate Steve had cornered the status of 'your favorite band's favorite band', as Steve himself became a fixture in and an on-demand collaborator among disparate scenes, players, and bands, making some of the most celebrated and forward thinking music today: Co-signs and work with David Byrne, Dirty Projectors, tUnE-yArDs, Mac DeMarco, Dr. Dog, and elder statesmen like Lee Ranaldo and Built to Spill. Likely the only guitarist alive who will cut records with Sondre Lerche and Death Grip's Zach Hill. Handpicked to open a sold out North American tour for Tame Impala. And most recently, providing guitar on Paul Simon's new record. These wild artistic relationships came to be because Steve happens to be one of the most talented songwriters and guitarists currently working. But they are also a direct reflection of the person, the soul of a guy any artist or fan who's met him will identify immediately. It's the same soul that fills his songs. This is Steve, Delicate Steve's first new record in 4 years, and first for the ANTI- imprint, is an articulation of this spirit. Joy. Love. Positivity. Perseverance. Meditation. A general communion with the people and world around him. Easy to call such things hackneyed in this cynical time, but in Steve's case, it’s very hard to separate the person from the art. It's real. It's pure. This, is Steve. Melody begins with the needle drop on This is Steve, and it's this hallmark as a songwriter on display in tune after tune that has defined all of Delicate Steve's work. It's his incredible capacity to write wordless songs that are impossible not to sing along to. He works in no genre, there are no words, but there is never a question as to what he is saying. Tunes like "Animals," "Help," and "Nightlife," establish their hooks immediately, and drop you with Steve as he runs alongside leopards, scales a Western peak, nurses a boozy Kingston come-down, before clocking out at under three minutes and depositing you somewhere else on
a technicolor continuum. Throughout the set, Steve's guitar melodies rise and crest, unguarded expressions of wonderment and positivity. Steve produced and played all the instruments on this record. He created it as an introduction from himself to you, and named it appropriately. If there is a question as to who This is Steve’s creator is, you'll find it imbued in these ten songs. As he has done from the start, Steve lets the music speak for itself. Without a word.

When the world first met Delicate Steve in 2011, Steve Marion and the band he principled were an artfully crafted fiction. Tasked with introducing Wondervisions, Delicate Steve's beguiling debut record of highly evocative and emotionally concise guitar-driven songs, Luaka Bop, the seminal David Byrne-owned New York indie label, balked. There was the music to get to; itself essentially reference-less and unqualifiedly unique. But what of the guy who created it? The guitarist who wrote the whole thing, who played every instrument. An enormous unknown talent without an attendant backstory to match the spectral and boundless qualities of his music. Enter Chuck Klosterman. The celebrated writer was brought on to completely fabricate a biography based on a band and album he was asked not to listen to. While the record racked up high praise from outlets including The New York Times and NPR, nearly everything music fans read about Delicate Steve was a fiction. Listeners were left to the music alone to determine who Steve was. As is often the case, some of the first people to recognize Delicate Steve's music were fellow artists who became vocal supporters, as the young guy from upstate New Jersey began to develop a growing fanbase in small New York clubs like Glasslands, Union Pool, and Mercury Lounge. Following the 2012 release of Positive Force, Delicate Steve had cornered the status of 'your favorite band's favorite band', as Steve himself became a fixture in and an on-demand collaborator among disparate scenes, players, and bands, making some of the most celebrated and forward thinking music today: Co-signs and work with David Byrne, Dirty Projectors, tUnE-yArDs, Mac DeMarco, Dr. Dog, and elder statesmen like Lee Ranaldo and Built to Spill. Likely the only guitarist alive who will cut records with Sondre Lerche and Death Grip's Zach Hill. Handpicked to open a sold out North American tour for Tame Impala. And most recently, providing guitar on Paul Simon's new record. These wild artistic relationships came to be because Steve happens to be one of the most talented songwriters and guitarists currently working. But they are also a direct reflection of the person, the soul of a guy any artist or fan who's met him will identify immediately. It's the same soul that fills his songs. This is Steve, Delicate Steve's first new record in 4 years, and first for the ANTI- imprint, is an articulation of this spirit. Joy. Love. Positivity. Perseverance. Meditation. A general communion with the people and world around him. Easy to call such things hackneyed in this cynical time, but in Steve's case, it’s very hard to separate the person from the art. It's real. It's pure. This, is Steve. Melody begins with the needle drop on This is Steve, and it's this hallmark as a songwriter on display in tune after tune that has defined all of Delicate Steve's work. It's his incredible capacity to write wordless songs that are impossible not to sing along to. He works in no genre, there are no words, but there is never a question as to what he is saying. Tunes like "Animals," "Help," and "Nightlife," establish their hooks immediately, and drop you with Steve as he runs alongside leopards, scales a Western peak, nurses a boozy Kingston come-down, before clocking out at under three minutes and depositing you somewhere else on
a technicolor continuum. Throughout the set, Steve's guitar melodies rise and crest, unguarded expressions of wonderment and positivity. Steve produced and played all the instruments on this record. He created it as an introduction from himself to you, and named it appropriately. If there is a question as to who This is Steve’s creator is, you'll find it imbued in these ten songs. As he has done from the start, Steve lets the music speak for itself. Without a word.

Vieux Farka Toure with Special Guest Last Good Tooth

Often referred to as "The Hendrix of the Sahara", Vieux Farka Touré was born in Niafunké, Mali in 1981. He is the son of legendary Malian guitar player Ali Farka Touré, who died in 2006. Ali Farka Touré came from a historical tribe of soldiers, and defied his parents in becoming a musician. When Vieux was in his teens, he declared that he also wanted to be a musician. His father dissaproved due to the pressures he had experienced being a musician. Rather, he wanted Vieux to become a soldier. But with help from family friend the kora maestro Toumani Diabaté, Vieux eventually convinced his father to give him his blessing to become a musician shortly before Ali passed.

Vieux was initially a drummer / calabash player at Mali's Institut National des Arts, but secretly began playing guitar in 2001. Ali Farka Touré was weakened with cancer when Vieux announced that he was going to record an album. Ali recorded a couple of tracks with him, and these recordings, which can be heard on Vieux's debut CD, were amongst his final ones. It has been said that the senior Touré played rough mixes of these songs when people visited him in his final days, at peace with, and proud of, his son's talent as a musician.

In 2005, Eric Herman (still Vieux's manager today) of Modiba Productions expressed an interest in producing an album for Vieux; this led to Vieux's self-titled debut album, released by World Village in 2007. Ali Farka Touré's work to tackle the problem of malaria is continued as 10% of proceeds are donated to Modiba's "Fight Malaria" campaign in Niafunké through which over 3000 mosquito nets have been delivered to children and pregnant women in the Timbuktu region of Mali. On this first album, Vieux pays homage to his father and follows Ali's musical tradition, giving new versions of the West African music that is echoed in the American blues. The album features Toumani Diabaté, as well as his late father. One of the tracks, 'Courage', is on the soundtrack of the film The First Grader (2010).

On his second record, Fondo on Six Degrees (2009), Vieux branched out and presented his own sound: while remaining true to the roots of his father's music he uses elements of rock, Latin music, and other African influences. The album received a great deal of critical acclaim from across the globe, and Vieux was clearly moving out of his father's shadow.

By June 2010, Vieux was performing at the opening concert for the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. That month Vieux also released his first live album, LIVE. His live performances are highly energized and Vieux is known for dazzling crowds with his speed and dexterity on the guitar, as well as his palpable charisma and luminous smile, both of which captivate audiences from all audiences in spite of any language barriers (though Vieux does speak 8 languages).

In 2011 Vieux released his 3rd studio album, The Secret, so named because the listener will hear the secret of the blues with a blend of generations from father to son. It was produced by guitarist Eric Krasno (of the Soulive trio) and features South African-born vocalist Dave Matthews, Derek Trucks on electric slide guitar and jazz guitarist John Scofield. The title track is the last collaboration between Vieux and his late father. With the heralded release of The Secret, Vieux Farka Touré has clearly established himself as one of the world's rare musical talents and guitar virtuosos with a distinct style that always pays homage to the past while looking towards the future.

Vieux released The Tel Aviv Session (Cumbancha) in April 2012, a collaborative project with Israeli superstar Idan Raichel dubbed 'The Touré-Raichel Collective' that has been hailed by fans and critics alike as a masterpiece and one of the best collaborative albums in the history of international music, drawing comparisons to Ali Farka Touré and Ry Cooder's legendary Talking Timbuktu album.

In 2013, Vieux Farka Touré's beautiful and critically acclaimed latest album Mon Pays was released as an homage to his homeland. Being that his native Mali had recently been splintered by territorial fighting between Tuareg and Islamic rebels since January 2012, Mon Pays was devoted to reminding the world about the beauty and culture of his native Mali. Translated as 'My Country,' this predominantly acoustic undertaking transformed into an artifact of cultural preservation. Two songs on the project -Future' and 'Peace' feature Sidiki Diabate's kora leading an emotional charge complemented by Touré's spectacular guitar work. Both tracks represent an important generational "passing of the torch" as Sidiki's father, Toumani is considered one of the greatest living kora masters and was a close friend of Vieux's father Ali. Mon Pays has been widely hailed as the most mature and lovely record yet from one of this generation's most exciting artists to come out of Mali and one of world music's true rising stars.

Vieux reunited with Idan Raichel in Paris to record, release and subsequently tour their 2nd collaborative album as The Touré-Raichel Collective in 2014. The result was yet another musical and critical triumph, titled 'The Paris Session' (Cumbancha) revered by many as not just a musical gem for the ages but a powerful testimonial to the power of art and fraternity to transcend vast cultural and political divides. In 2015, Vieux released another unexpected, genre-bending collaborative album, this time with New York-based singer Julia Easterlin, aptly titled 'Touristes'. The album shot to the top of the iTunes World chart and earned critical acclaim, including that of John Schaefer (NPR) who called it "brilliant." With each new project, Vieux expands his horizons, embraces new challenges and further entrenches his reputation as one of the world's most talented and innovative musicians.

Often referred to as "The Hendrix of the Sahara", Vieux Farka Touré was born in Niafunké, Mali in 1981. He is the son of legendary Malian guitar player Ali Farka Touré, who died in 2006. Ali Farka Touré came from a historical tribe of soldiers, and defied his parents in becoming a musician. When Vieux was in his teens, he declared that he also wanted to be a musician. His father dissaproved due to the pressures he had experienced being a musician. Rather, he wanted Vieux to become a soldier. But with help from family friend the kora maestro Toumani Diabaté, Vieux eventually convinced his father to give him his blessing to become a musician shortly before Ali passed.

Vieux was initially a drummer / calabash player at Mali's Institut National des Arts, but secretly began playing guitar in 2001. Ali Farka Touré was weakened with cancer when Vieux announced that he was going to record an album. Ali recorded a couple of tracks with him, and these recordings, which can be heard on Vieux's debut CD, were amongst his final ones. It has been said that the senior Touré played rough mixes of these songs when people visited him in his final days, at peace with, and proud of, his son's talent as a musician.

In 2005, Eric Herman (still Vieux's manager today) of Modiba Productions expressed an interest in producing an album for Vieux; this led to Vieux's self-titled debut album, released by World Village in 2007. Ali Farka Touré's work to tackle the problem of malaria is continued as 10% of proceeds are donated to Modiba's "Fight Malaria" campaign in Niafunké through which over 3000 mosquito nets have been delivered to children and pregnant women in the Timbuktu region of Mali. On this first album, Vieux pays homage to his father and follows Ali's musical tradition, giving new versions of the West African music that is echoed in the American blues. The album features Toumani Diabaté, as well as his late father. One of the tracks, 'Courage', is on the soundtrack of the film The First Grader (2010).

On his second record, Fondo on Six Degrees (2009), Vieux branched out and presented his own sound: while remaining true to the roots of his father's music he uses elements of rock, Latin music, and other African influences. The album received a great deal of critical acclaim from across the globe, and Vieux was clearly moving out of his father's shadow.

By June 2010, Vieux was performing at the opening concert for the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. That month Vieux also released his first live album, LIVE. His live performances are highly energized and Vieux is known for dazzling crowds with his speed and dexterity on the guitar, as well as his palpable charisma and luminous smile, both of which captivate audiences from all audiences in spite of any language barriers (though Vieux does speak 8 languages).

In 2011 Vieux released his 3rd studio album, The Secret, so named because the listener will hear the secret of the blues with a blend of generations from father to son. It was produced by guitarist Eric Krasno (of the Soulive trio) and features South African-born vocalist Dave Matthews, Derek Trucks on electric slide guitar and jazz guitarist John Scofield. The title track is the last collaboration between Vieux and his late father. With the heralded release of The Secret, Vieux Farka Touré has clearly established himself as one of the world's rare musical talents and guitar virtuosos with a distinct style that always pays homage to the past while looking towards the future.

Vieux released The Tel Aviv Session (Cumbancha) in April 2012, a collaborative project with Israeli superstar Idan Raichel dubbed 'The Touré-Raichel Collective' that has been hailed by fans and critics alike as a masterpiece and one of the best collaborative albums in the history of international music, drawing comparisons to Ali Farka Touré and Ry Cooder's legendary Talking Timbuktu album.

In 2013, Vieux Farka Touré's beautiful and critically acclaimed latest album Mon Pays was released as an homage to his homeland. Being that his native Mali had recently been splintered by territorial fighting between Tuareg and Islamic rebels since January 2012, Mon Pays was devoted to reminding the world about the beauty and culture of his native Mali. Translated as 'My Country,' this predominantly acoustic undertaking transformed into an artifact of cultural preservation. Two songs on the project -Future' and 'Peace' feature Sidiki Diabate's kora leading an emotional charge complemented by Touré's spectacular guitar work. Both tracks represent an important generational "passing of the torch" as Sidiki's father, Toumani is considered one of the greatest living kora masters and was a close friend of Vieux's father Ali. Mon Pays has been widely hailed as the most mature and lovely record yet from one of this generation's most exciting artists to come out of Mali and one of world music's true rising stars.

Vieux reunited with Idan Raichel in Paris to record, release and subsequently tour their 2nd collaborative album as The Touré-Raichel Collective in 2014. The result was yet another musical and critical triumph, titled 'The Paris Session' (Cumbancha) revered by many as not just a musical gem for the ages but a powerful testimonial to the power of art and fraternity to transcend vast cultural and political divides. In 2015, Vieux released another unexpected, genre-bending collaborative album, this time with New York-based singer Julia Easterlin, aptly titled 'Touristes'. The album shot to the top of the iTunes World chart and earned critical acclaim, including that of John Schaefer (NPR) who called it "brilliant." With each new project, Vieux expands his horizons, embraces new challenges and further entrenches his reputation as one of the world's most talented and innovative musicians.

Opus One & 91.3 WYEP Present Great Lake Swimmers with Special Guest Emily Rodgers

Great Lake Swimmers are thrilled to announce new tour dates on the heels of a very busy 2016 and their latest EP, Swimming Away. After successful tours in Europe and Western Canada last year as a trio, the band will be taking their 'Floating Through The Forest' show to the East Coast of Canada and the Midwestern US. The band in this formation will be revisiting the quiet side of their fourteen-year, seven-album catalogue, and have shows planned in Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. The US leg of the tour takes them through Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. Supporting the Canadian dates will be acclaimed Toronto singer-songwriter Megan Bonnell.

In the press:
"For those of you craving an album that carries a sensitive storyline by someone consistent in their craft, look no further than Canadian folk treasures Great Lake Swimmers" – Beatroute

"... (a) cherished blend of folk and orchestral indie pop" – Exclaim!

"Ambient Zen Americana" – Mojo

Great Lake Swimmers are thrilled to announce new tour dates on the heels of a very busy 2016 and their latest EP, Swimming Away. After successful tours in Europe and Western Canada last year as a trio, the band will be taking their 'Floating Through The Forest' show to the East Coast of Canada and the Midwestern US. The band in this formation will be revisiting the quiet side of their fourteen-year, seven-album catalogue, and have shows planned in Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. The US leg of the tour takes them through Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. Supporting the Canadian dates will be acclaimed Toronto singer-songwriter Megan Bonnell.

In the press:
"For those of you craving an album that carries a sensitive storyline by someone consistent in their craft, look no further than Canadian folk treasures Great Lake Swimmers" – Beatroute

"... (a) cherished blend of folk and orchestral indie pop" – Exclaim!

"Ambient Zen Americana" – Mojo

Opus One & 91.3 WYEP Present Bridget Kearney with Special Guest Fit Club

In the 12 years she has toured the world as a member of the soul-pop sensation Lake Street Dive, Bridget Kearney has gotten good at a lot of things: adjusting to jet lag, sleeping in moving vehicles, hauling her acoustic bass up and down stairs, keeping her cool in front of cameras, thousands of people and personal heroes. But the skill she has honed most obsessively is songwriting. "For me it's the best part of music," says Kearney. "That's the best feeling: after those few hours that you spend working on the song, and you have this thing that you've made, and you're like, ‘Wow. This didn't exist before. I'm so excited about what just happened.'" Now, at long last, Kearney steps into the spotlight with her first solo effort, a wry, big-hearted pop album entitled Won't Let You Down. The record, like its title, promises not to disappoint. 

Kearney grew up in Iowa City and went to college in Boston, where she double-majored in jazz bass at the New England Conservatory of Music and English at Tufts University. While still a student, she won the grand prize in the John Lennon Songwriting Contest, a harbinger of things to come. It was during this time, too, that Kearney and three of her fellow conservatory students founded Lake Street Dive. But Kearney has always been voraciously collaborative, dabbling in chamber pop with the Brooklyn group Cuddle Magic, bluegrass with the now-defunct Boston outfit Joy Kills Sorrow, and Ghanian music as part of a duo with fellow songwriter Benjamin Lazar Davis.

The recording process for Won't Let You Down began when drummer/engineer/producer Robin MacMillan invited Kearney to record a few songs at his Brooklyn studio. The sessions, which took place over the course of three years, were leisurely and experimental, free of a label-imposed deadline or a rental fee. "The answer to everything was 'Yes. Let's try it,'" Kearney remembers. 

"One of the things I like about Robin as a producer is he seems to be able to disassociate an instrument with its stylistic history and just kind of hear it for the sound it's creating," says Kearney, who played electric bass, piano, synthesizers, organ, electric guitar and acoustic guitar on Won't Let You Down. The album abounds with peculiar noises: an unidentifiable yelp, something distinctly kazoo-like, the distant whistle of a steaming kettle. Shades of The Beatles, Wilco, Fleetwood Mac and even Nick Cave can be detected, as the album swerves from ‘60s pop to ‘80s soft rock to Gothic Americana.

Won't Let You Down is the first project in which Kearney has appeared as the primary vocalist. "I've always had this affinity for singers and songs that are kind of vulnerable-sounding and flawed," she says. "I'm not a trained singer or a really powerful singer, so that's something that you can kind of use as an advantage in your writing. You can say some things that are vulnerable and personal, and I think it can come across more powerfully with a voice that's imperfect."

Kearney's lyrical talent stems from her ability to unlock the profundity in details both small and strange. She jokingly describes the song "Daniel" as being "about when you have a sexy dream about someone, and how weird that is." But in Kearney's hands the concept transforms into something at once aching and exquisite, an earnest pop concoction with a conflicted soul.

Tasked with naming her favorite song, Kearney chooses "Wash Up," a dreamy soft rock jam about running into an old lover. "It's one of my favorite kinds of songs," she says. "These crying on-the-dance-floor kinds of things, where the track is kind of bumpin', but when you listen to the lyrics you realize it's actually a sad song." "Wash Up" is classic Kearney: a light touch undergirded by dark self-awareness, and endlessly hummable.

On Won't Let You Down, buoyancy is always tempered by melancholy. But just as often, wistfulness is undercut by a twinkle in the eye.  It's "this cross section of sadness and humor," says Kearney. "When you're getting over crying, and you just start to laugh."

In the 12 years she has toured the world as a member of the soul-pop sensation Lake Street Dive, Bridget Kearney has gotten good at a lot of things: adjusting to jet lag, sleeping in moving vehicles, hauling her acoustic bass up and down stairs, keeping her cool in front of cameras, thousands of people and personal heroes. But the skill she has honed most obsessively is songwriting. "For me it's the best part of music," says Kearney. "That's the best feeling: after those few hours that you spend working on the song, and you have this thing that you've made, and you're like, ‘Wow. This didn't exist before. I'm so excited about what just happened.'" Now, at long last, Kearney steps into the spotlight with her first solo effort, a wry, big-hearted pop album entitled Won't Let You Down. The record, like its title, promises not to disappoint. 

Kearney grew up in Iowa City and went to college in Boston, where she double-majored in jazz bass at the New England Conservatory of Music and English at Tufts University. While still a student, she won the grand prize in the John Lennon Songwriting Contest, a harbinger of things to come. It was during this time, too, that Kearney and three of her fellow conservatory students founded Lake Street Dive. But Kearney has always been voraciously collaborative, dabbling in chamber pop with the Brooklyn group Cuddle Magic, bluegrass with the now-defunct Boston outfit Joy Kills Sorrow, and Ghanian music as part of a duo with fellow songwriter Benjamin Lazar Davis.

The recording process for Won't Let You Down began when drummer/engineer/producer Robin MacMillan invited Kearney to record a few songs at his Brooklyn studio. The sessions, which took place over the course of three years, were leisurely and experimental, free of a label-imposed deadline or a rental fee. "The answer to everything was 'Yes. Let's try it,'" Kearney remembers. 

"One of the things I like about Robin as a producer is he seems to be able to disassociate an instrument with its stylistic history and just kind of hear it for the sound it's creating," says Kearney, who played electric bass, piano, synthesizers, organ, electric guitar and acoustic guitar on Won't Let You Down. The album abounds with peculiar noises: an unidentifiable yelp, something distinctly kazoo-like, the distant whistle of a steaming kettle. Shades of The Beatles, Wilco, Fleetwood Mac and even Nick Cave can be detected, as the album swerves from ‘60s pop to ‘80s soft rock to Gothic Americana.

Won't Let You Down is the first project in which Kearney has appeared as the primary vocalist. "I've always had this affinity for singers and songs that are kind of vulnerable-sounding and flawed," she says. "I'm not a trained singer or a really powerful singer, so that's something that you can kind of use as an advantage in your writing. You can say some things that are vulnerable and personal, and I think it can come across more powerfully with a voice that's imperfect."

Kearney's lyrical talent stems from her ability to unlock the profundity in details both small and strange. She jokingly describes the song "Daniel" as being "about when you have a sexy dream about someone, and how weird that is." But in Kearney's hands the concept transforms into something at once aching and exquisite, an earnest pop concoction with a conflicted soul.

Tasked with naming her favorite song, Kearney chooses "Wash Up," a dreamy soft rock jam about running into an old lover. "It's one of my favorite kinds of songs," she says. "These crying on-the-dance-floor kinds of things, where the track is kind of bumpin', but when you listen to the lyrics you realize it's actually a sad song." "Wash Up" is classic Kearney: a light touch undergirded by dark self-awareness, and endlessly hummable.

On Won't Let You Down, buoyancy is always tempered by melancholy. But just as often, wistfulness is undercut by a twinkle in the eye.  It's "this cross section of sadness and humor," says Kearney. "When you're getting over crying, and you just start to laugh."

(Early Show) An Acoustic Evening With Martin Barre Band

Martin Barre has been the guitarist of Jethro Tull for 43 years, his sound and playing having been a major factor in their success. Album sales have exceeded 60 million units and they continue to be played worldwide, representing an important part of classic rock history.

Martin's guitar playing has earned him a high level of respect and recognition; he was voted 25th best solo ever in the USA and 20th best solo ever in the UK for his playing on 'Aqualung'. His playing on the album 'Crest of a Knave' earned him a Grammy award in 1988.

As well as numerous Jethro Tull albums, Martin has worked with many other artists including Paul McCartney, Phil Collins, Gary Moore, Jo Bonamassa and Chris Thompson and has shared a stage with such legends as Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin.

As Jethro Tull are taking a long break from touring, Martin has put together a band to play the "classic" music from the Tull catalogue. His band is a total commitment to give the Tull fans and a broader audience the chance to hear tracks not performed for many years. The band includes top musicians from a similar background.

Martin Barre has been the guitarist of Jethro Tull for 43 years, his sound and playing having been a major factor in their success. Album sales have exceeded 60 million units and they continue to be played worldwide, representing an important part of classic rock history.

Martin's guitar playing has earned him a high level of respect and recognition; he was voted 25th best solo ever in the USA and 20th best solo ever in the UK for his playing on 'Aqualung'. His playing on the album 'Crest of a Knave' earned him a Grammy award in 1988.

As well as numerous Jethro Tull albums, Martin has worked with many other artists including Paul McCartney, Phil Collins, Gary Moore, Jo Bonamassa and Chris Thompson and has shared a stage with such legends as Hendrix, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin.

As Jethro Tull are taking a long break from touring, Martin has put together a band to play the "classic" music from the Tull catalogue. His band is a total commitment to give the Tull fans and a broader audience the chance to hear tracks not performed for many years. The band includes top musicians from a similar background.

(Late Show) Blackbird Bullet with Special Guest Ugly Blondes

Join Club Cafe for an evening of lock rock with Blackbird Bullet and Ugly Blondes. Tickets only $7.

Join Club Cafe for an evening of lock rock with Blackbird Bullet and Ugly Blondes. Tickets only $7.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)