club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
All Them Witches (Night 2) with Special Guest Handsome Jack - Presented by Opus One & WPTS Radio

"Sleeping through the war - this is what we're doing. There are so many terrible things going on in the world and we're just staring at our phones, and we don't see it so we don't care." Having just come in from practicing in the desert, Charles Michael Parks, singer/bassist for All Them Witches, elaborates on the very heavy times in which we all live. Parks and his bandmates - Ben McLeod, Allan Van Cleave and Robby Staebler - are enjoying a brief respite from the endless tour that saw them visit Europe three times in 2016. We've been talking for nearly ten minutes about Einstein's Theory of Relativity, among other things, before we cut through the cosmic fog that surrounds their new album Sleeping Through The War.

"It's tough to get past all the cat videos."

From their earliest days, there has a been a current in All Them Witches' music that has come from outside the continuum of our collective perceptions. On 2013's Lightning at the Door they drew a bigger chalk circle in the center of the crossroads and conjured a haunting occult- blues. On 2015's New West Records debut Dying Surfer Meets His Maker they dove the depths of oceanic canyons and surfaced with a shining psychedelia. Sleeping Through The War is the next step in that progression.

"We write in every way possible," says Parks. "There's no limitations on it, no I'm going to come to it with this song and this is how it's going to go. It's more like stretching your arms out and seeing who can grab what and seeing what fits together from there.

"This is the most I've ever sang on a record, so my writing process was a little bit different than on the other ones. We weren't relying on long, drawn out jam sections we were putting more of a storyline into the songs.

"The songs are catchier, they're faster and there's more singing. Or talking. Or whatever I'm doing."
The result is evidence of the adventure, beauty, and excitement that lies on the other side of the galaxy. The fundamental laws that govern Sleeping Through The War are the same fundamentals that have made ATW a cult favorite - big fuzz, deep grooves, cosmic vision - but the journey through the wormhole has brought something else.

"It's more brain than body," says Parks. "Everybody kind of knows where they are going even if nobody knows where the song is going. We're good at juggling the torch around, making sure everyone gets to play...

"Allan has this really unique approach to playing Rhodes. Robby's drums sound weird in soundcheck he has all of these weird tones but he knows where he's putting them in the mix himself. I have a weird bass tone, but somehow it clicks. We didn't come into it trying to blend our sounds together. That comes from relying on something you already have, relying on something that has its own unique personality."

Years of jamming their way across the country have elevated their performance. Years of interacting with audiences has made their songcraft more responsive. Years of psychic interactions between band members has lead them into a sonic-space headier, more dynamic than any equation could have predicted. In the five years since their formation, over hundreds of performances and thousands of miles travelled, All Them Witches have expanded their corporeality, absorbing ideas both audible and philosophical that push at the thin veil of existence. With three albums that each gained more heft than the one before, All Them Witches has accrued such an immense heaviness that when producer Dave Cobb entered their orbit the very nature of their reality was warped beyond recognition.

"We wrote it in about six days," says guitarist Ben McLeod. "Wherein the past we would have just gone ahead and recorded and written in the studio, we were like nah we're going to do it with Dave, let's be prepared."

"And Eddie Spear, the engineer, he loves doing 8 track records. We obviously didn't make an 8 track record [laughs] but in the back of our minds we were like this guy is gonna think we're a joke if we're doing all of this overdubbing shit. We wanted a record that you could crank. And we wanted girl backup singers."

It might seem like an odd detail - Erin Rae, Caitlin Rose and Tristen add a classic rock flourish, at odds with their earlier catalogs - but it makes sense within the context of the songs and within the context of their career. All Them Witches are at their Ummagumma moment, their Tres Hombres, their Bare Trees. They brought in a mellotron. Their sense of sonic experimentation is so finely honed that even the oddest, toughest moments are warm and relatable.

"We're trying to get to something better - not necessarily just as musicians - but as people," Parks explains. "I've always said that as we change as people, our music changes, that's why we can never make the same records. I can't be in one of those bands. I hope you'll never hear about ‘another predictable album from All Them Witches.' There's no art in that."

Their sound has become so expansive you can her echoes of Dr. John's Gris-Gris and the glacial expanses of Sigur Ros, the fire and brimstone of Appalachian snake charmers and the meditative om of the East. It's the same balance of preparation and improvisation that helped drummer Robby Staebler conjure Sleeping Through The War's vibrant and foreboding cover.

"I'm really into weird, film cameras and that was the original direction of the cover," says Staebler. "Then Ben told me - after working on this for weeks straight, doing all of these layouts, scanning things, looking for old negatives digging things up - he told me ‘Eh, this is kinda boring, dude'. And for 30 seconds I was really fucking pissed.

"But I knew he was right. I knew it wasn't what the record needed and so I just channeled some crazy Chi and the record cover came out. I just stopped thinking about stuff and got out film-negative dyes - for retouching films, it works really great on watercolor paper too - and the rest of it just came together. I found the channel."

Their musicianship is so dialed in, so fluid and adaptable that the most technically complex and sonically detailed passages are fun and fulfilling. All Them Witches are progressing but they have no intention of leaving anyone behind. In a world where so many are distracted and disengaged All Them Witches are seeking to connect on a more visceral, more human level.

"The hardest part was the song "Bruce Lee" - originally the song had this long introduction and not a lot of singing, just a long instrumental," McLeod explains. "And Dave stopped us, had us come into the control room and said, ‘Guys, this is the kind of song that when people hear this they are going to want to listen to the rest of the record. You want people to hear the record and this song is your opportunity.'

"It was weird at first, we were like, but but this is how the song goes with the long intro and stuff. We played with some splices and it ended up being what it is now and I think it is groo-oovy."

Lead single "Bruce Lee" is a perfect distillation of the All Them Witches aesthetic - whirlwind guitars, way out vocals and propulsive rhythms that recall Springsteen's late-night power drives as much as they do Kyuss riding into the blood-red sunset. "Don't Bring Me Coffee" is an aggro blast of anthemic, 120 Minutes-grade powerfuzz, that toys with the power dynamic between the beautiful and the ugly.

"Alabaster" feels like William S. Burroughs intoning to South Bronx breakdancers while the album closer "Internet" sees the band slip so far behind the beat it feels like they've slipped from the grasp of space-time itself. These tracks make the case that the gravity of All Them Witches is warping the space-time in which we all exist and that Sleeping Through The War is the sort of heaviness these weird times demand.

"If everybody would look out for everybody we wouldn't have any problems," says Parks. "If everybody had enough space to breath we wouldn't have any problems...the hardest part is that everybody wants to be happy but nobody knows how to get there."

"Sleeping through the war - this is what we're doing. There are so many terrible things going on in the world and we're just staring at our phones, and we don't see it so we don't care." Having just come in from practicing in the desert, Charles Michael Parks, singer/bassist for All Them Witches, elaborates on the very heavy times in which we all live. Parks and his bandmates - Ben McLeod, Allan Van Cleave and Robby Staebler - are enjoying a brief respite from the endless tour that saw them visit Europe three times in 2016. We've been talking for nearly ten minutes about Einstein's Theory of Relativity, among other things, before we cut through the cosmic fog that surrounds their new album Sleeping Through The War.

"It's tough to get past all the cat videos."

From their earliest days, there has a been a current in All Them Witches' music that has come from outside the continuum of our collective perceptions. On 2013's Lightning at the Door they drew a bigger chalk circle in the center of the crossroads and conjured a haunting occult- blues. On 2015's New West Records debut Dying Surfer Meets His Maker they dove the depths of oceanic canyons and surfaced with a shining psychedelia. Sleeping Through The War is the next step in that progression.

"We write in every way possible," says Parks. "There's no limitations on it, no I'm going to come to it with this song and this is how it's going to go. It's more like stretching your arms out and seeing who can grab what and seeing what fits together from there.

"This is the most I've ever sang on a record, so my writing process was a little bit different than on the other ones. We weren't relying on long, drawn out jam sections we were putting more of a storyline into the songs.

"The songs are catchier, they're faster and there's more singing. Or talking. Or whatever I'm doing."
The result is evidence of the adventure, beauty, and excitement that lies on the other side of the galaxy. The fundamental laws that govern Sleeping Through The War are the same fundamentals that have made ATW a cult favorite - big fuzz, deep grooves, cosmic vision - but the journey through the wormhole has brought something else.

"It's more brain than body," says Parks. "Everybody kind of knows where they are going even if nobody knows where the song is going. We're good at juggling the torch around, making sure everyone gets to play...

"Allan has this really unique approach to playing Rhodes. Robby's drums sound weird in soundcheck he has all of these weird tones but he knows where he's putting them in the mix himself. I have a weird bass tone, but somehow it clicks. We didn't come into it trying to blend our sounds together. That comes from relying on something you already have, relying on something that has its own unique personality."

Years of jamming their way across the country have elevated their performance. Years of interacting with audiences has made their songcraft more responsive. Years of psychic interactions between band members has lead them into a sonic-space headier, more dynamic than any equation could have predicted. In the five years since their formation, over hundreds of performances and thousands of miles travelled, All Them Witches have expanded their corporeality, absorbing ideas both audible and philosophical that push at the thin veil of existence. With three albums that each gained more heft than the one before, All Them Witches has accrued such an immense heaviness that when producer Dave Cobb entered their orbit the very nature of their reality was warped beyond recognition.

"We wrote it in about six days," says guitarist Ben McLeod. "Wherein the past we would have just gone ahead and recorded and written in the studio, we were like nah we're going to do it with Dave, let's be prepared."

"And Eddie Spear, the engineer, he loves doing 8 track records. We obviously didn't make an 8 track record [laughs] but in the back of our minds we were like this guy is gonna think we're a joke if we're doing all of this overdubbing shit. We wanted a record that you could crank. And we wanted girl backup singers."

It might seem like an odd detail - Erin Rae, Caitlin Rose and Tristen add a classic rock flourish, at odds with their earlier catalogs - but it makes sense within the context of the songs and within the context of their career. All Them Witches are at their Ummagumma moment, their Tres Hombres, their Bare Trees. They brought in a mellotron. Their sense of sonic experimentation is so finely honed that even the oddest, toughest moments are warm and relatable.

"We're trying to get to something better - not necessarily just as musicians - but as people," Parks explains. "I've always said that as we change as people, our music changes, that's why we can never make the same records. I can't be in one of those bands. I hope you'll never hear about ‘another predictable album from All Them Witches.' There's no art in that."

Their sound has become so expansive you can her echoes of Dr. John's Gris-Gris and the glacial expanses of Sigur Ros, the fire and brimstone of Appalachian snake charmers and the meditative om of the East. It's the same balance of preparation and improvisation that helped drummer Robby Staebler conjure Sleeping Through The War's vibrant and foreboding cover.

"I'm really into weird, film cameras and that was the original direction of the cover," says Staebler. "Then Ben told me - after working on this for weeks straight, doing all of these layouts, scanning things, looking for old negatives digging things up - he told me ‘Eh, this is kinda boring, dude'. And for 30 seconds I was really fucking pissed.

"But I knew he was right. I knew it wasn't what the record needed and so I just channeled some crazy Chi and the record cover came out. I just stopped thinking about stuff and got out film-negative dyes - for retouching films, it works really great on watercolor paper too - and the rest of it just came together. I found the channel."

Their musicianship is so dialed in, so fluid and adaptable that the most technically complex and sonically detailed passages are fun and fulfilling. All Them Witches are progressing but they have no intention of leaving anyone behind. In a world where so many are distracted and disengaged All Them Witches are seeking to connect on a more visceral, more human level.

"The hardest part was the song "Bruce Lee" - originally the song had this long introduction and not a lot of singing, just a long instrumental," McLeod explains. "And Dave stopped us, had us come into the control room and said, ‘Guys, this is the kind of song that when people hear this they are going to want to listen to the rest of the record. You want people to hear the record and this song is your opportunity.'

"It was weird at first, we were like, but but this is how the song goes with the long intro and stuff. We played with some splices and it ended up being what it is now and I think it is groo-oovy."

Lead single "Bruce Lee" is a perfect distillation of the All Them Witches aesthetic - whirlwind guitars, way out vocals and propulsive rhythms that recall Springsteen's late-night power drives as much as they do Kyuss riding into the blood-red sunset. "Don't Bring Me Coffee" is an aggro blast of anthemic, 120 Minutes-grade powerfuzz, that toys with the power dynamic between the beautiful and the ugly.

"Alabaster" feels like William S. Burroughs intoning to South Bronx breakdancers while the album closer "Internet" sees the band slip so far behind the beat it feels like they've slipped from the grasp of space-time itself. These tracks make the case that the gravity of All Them Witches is warping the space-time in which we all exist and that Sleeping Through The War is the sort of heaviness these weird times demand.

"If everybody would look out for everybody we wouldn't have any problems," says Parks. "If everybody had enough space to breath we wouldn't have any problems...the hardest part is that everybody wants to be happy but nobody knows how to get there."

Pitch Talks - Behind The Scenes Stories From Sports Media Featuring Joe Block, Rob Rossi, Travis Sawchik, John Perrotto, Rob Biertempfel and Stephen Nesbitt

Pitch Talks is a casual baseball conference for real fans.
Featuring Joe Block, Rob Rossi, Travis Sawchik, John Perrotto, Rob Biertempfel and Stephen Nesbitt

Pitch Talks is a casual baseball conference for real fans.
Featuring Joe Block, Rob Rossi, Travis Sawchik, John Perrotto, Rob Biertempfel and Stephen Nesbitt

The Mulligan Brothers with Special Guest The Armadillos Presented by Opus One and Music Night On Jupiter

The Mulligan Brothers is an Americana Folk-Rock band from Mobile, Alabama. In golfers' terms, a "mulligan" is a second chance, and the band represents a second chance for each member of The Mulligan Brothers. Veterans of other bands, this is where they found the music they always wanted to play.
 
The songwriting and warm, honest, straight-to-the heart voice of lead singer of Ross Newell draws listeners into the group's signature sound, where the harmonies of Greg DeLuca, Ben Leininger and Melody Duncan make the songs soar or haunt from the shadows. De Luca plays drums and Leininger is on the bass. Fiddler Melody Duncan recently joined the band, bringing a female voice and perspective.

The Mulligan Brothers have released two albums, The Mulligan Brothers and Via Portland (recorded in Portland with Grammy-winning producer Steve Berlin) and will soon release a Live from The Netherlands album, recorded during the recent tour that included shows at the famed Paradiso in Amsterdam and a spot on The Ramblin’ Roots Festival in Utrecht. They currently have over three million plays on Spotify, including over 1 million of the song Lay Here.

The band kicked off 2017 with a return to the prestigious 30A Songwriter Festival in Florida, an appearance on Music City Roots Nashville, and return to Ireland for January-February tour dates followed by a spot on Cayamo 2017 - A journey Through Song, a 7 day Roots Music Cruise in the company of such artists as Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell and Steve Earle. This is followed by a third appearance at New Orleans Jazz Fest, a 3 week Scandinavian tour and dates all across the U.S

The Mulligan Brothers is an Americana Folk-Rock band from Mobile, Alabama. In golfers' terms, a "mulligan" is a second chance, and the band represents a second chance for each member of The Mulligan Brothers. Veterans of other bands, this is where they found the music they always wanted to play.
 
The songwriting and warm, honest, straight-to-the heart voice of lead singer of Ross Newell draws listeners into the group's signature sound, where the harmonies of Greg DeLuca, Ben Leininger and Melody Duncan make the songs soar or haunt from the shadows. De Luca plays drums and Leininger is on the bass. Fiddler Melody Duncan recently joined the band, bringing a female voice and perspective.

The Mulligan Brothers have released two albums, The Mulligan Brothers and Via Portland (recorded in Portland with Grammy-winning producer Steve Berlin) and will soon release a Live from The Netherlands album, recorded during the recent tour that included shows at the famed Paradiso in Amsterdam and a spot on The Ramblin’ Roots Festival in Utrecht. They currently have over three million plays on Spotify, including over 1 million of the song Lay Here.

The band kicked off 2017 with a return to the prestigious 30A Songwriter Festival in Florida, an appearance on Music City Roots Nashville, and return to Ireland for January-February tour dates followed by a spot on Cayamo 2017 - A journey Through Song, a 7 day Roots Music Cruise in the company of such artists as Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell and Steve Earle. This is followed by a third appearance at New Orleans Jazz Fest, a 3 week Scandinavian tour and dates all across the U.S

(Early Show) Joe Zelek Band

A decade or so into chasing songs from rust belt dive bars to huge festival stages to the streets of Music City, the Joe Zelek Band had become a regional success story with songs playing on radio stations across the country.

But struggling with a sense of disconnect from the muse, the Ohio-based singer/songwriter did what any business-savvy musician on the brink of breakthrough success would do: blew the whole damn thing up and went on sabbatical.

Fast forward through a couple years of side projects, feeding chickens, making music for TV shows (Duck Dynasty, The Wahlburgers), assembling a bare bones recoring studio and breathing in inspirational locales from California to Carolina, Zelek is now on the road back to his natural habitat armed with a J-45, gut string banjo, a few Special 20's, one shitty old kick drum, two kindred musical spirits and a collection of tunes that clearly display a renewed intensity and authenticity.

Enter the Alaskan cowboy Carl Besece on harmonica and all manner of stringed instrument with his kinetic, authentic stage presence.

And the wild and wonderful West-by-God-Virginian Scotty Harkness with his 70's-tinged moving bass lines and signature background vocal.

"I started jamming with Carl and Scotty out in the barn and God said it was good."

The result is JZB v2.0...

Song driven, foot stompin’ American music from the Ohio/West Virginia line.

"Joe's music is definitely country, sprinkled with sounds of his native Appalachia. But there's also a bit of a "Rock Star" attitude that filters in giving him a sound all his own." -Chuck Dauphin, Music News Nashville

A decade or so into chasing songs from rust belt dive bars to huge festival stages to the streets of Music City, the Joe Zelek Band had become a regional success story with songs playing on radio stations across the country.

But struggling with a sense of disconnect from the muse, the Ohio-based singer/songwriter did what any business-savvy musician on the brink of breakthrough success would do: blew the whole damn thing up and went on sabbatical.

Fast forward through a couple years of side projects, feeding chickens, making music for TV shows (Duck Dynasty, The Wahlburgers), assembling a bare bones recoring studio and breathing in inspirational locales from California to Carolina, Zelek is now on the road back to his natural habitat armed with a J-45, gut string banjo, a few Special 20's, one shitty old kick drum, two kindred musical spirits and a collection of tunes that clearly display a renewed intensity and authenticity.

Enter the Alaskan cowboy Carl Besece on harmonica and all manner of stringed instrument with his kinetic, authentic stage presence.

And the wild and wonderful West-by-God-Virginian Scotty Harkness with his 70's-tinged moving bass lines and signature background vocal.

"I started jamming with Carl and Scotty out in the barn and God said it was good."

The result is JZB v2.0...

Song driven, foot stompin’ American music from the Ohio/West Virginia line.

"Joe's music is definitely country, sprinkled with sounds of his native Appalachia. But there's also a bit of a "Rock Star" attitude that filters in giving him a sound all his own." -Chuck Dauphin, Music News Nashville

(Late Show) What's Missing / After 87 / Curse Words

Local and regional (WV) Punk, ska and rock from What's Missing, After 87 and Curse Words.

Local and regional (WV) Punk, ska and rock from What's Missing, After 87 and Curse Words.

Marshall Crenshaw y Los Straitjackets.

Marshall Crenshaw y Los Straitjackets combines the shared sensibilities of a pop-rock maestro & a band of guitar-wielding masked marauders.

Marshall Crenshaw learned to tune a guitar at age ten and has been making music ever since. His first big break came in 1978 playing the role of John Lennon in "Beatlemania" on Broadway. Over the course of a career that's spanned nearly four decades, 13 albums, Grammy and Golden Globe nominations, film and TV appearances (Buddy Holly in "La Bamba") and thousands of performances, Crenshaw's musical output has maintained a consistent fidelity to the qualities of artfulness, craftsmanship and passion, and his efforts have been rewarded with the devotion of a broad and remarkably loyal fan base.

"Although he was seen as a latter-day Buddy Holly at the outset, he soon proved too talented and original to be anyone but himself." - Trouser Press

Los Straitjackets are the leading practitioners of the lost art of the guitar instrumental. Using the music of The Ventures, The Shadows, Link Wray and Dick Dale as a jumping off point, the band has taken their unique, high energy brand of original rock & roll around the world. Clad in their trademark Lucha Libre Mexican wrestling masks, the "Jackets" have delivered their trademark guitar licks to 16 albums, thousands of concerts and dozens of films and TV shows.

"...novelty is a key ingredient, but it’s elevated by the band's good-natured sincerity and skill." -NPR World Cafe

Marshall Crenshaw y Los Straitjackets combines the shared sensibilities of a pop-rock maestro & a band of guitar-wielding masked marauders.

Marshall Crenshaw learned to tune a guitar at age ten and has been making music ever since. His first big break came in 1978 playing the role of John Lennon in "Beatlemania" on Broadway. Over the course of a career that's spanned nearly four decades, 13 albums, Grammy and Golden Globe nominations, film and TV appearances (Buddy Holly in "La Bamba") and thousands of performances, Crenshaw's musical output has maintained a consistent fidelity to the qualities of artfulness, craftsmanship and passion, and his efforts have been rewarded with the devotion of a broad and remarkably loyal fan base.

"Although he was seen as a latter-day Buddy Holly at the outset, he soon proved too talented and original to be anyone but himself." - Trouser Press

Los Straitjackets are the leading practitioners of the lost art of the guitar instrumental. Using the music of The Ventures, The Shadows, Link Wray and Dick Dale as a jumping off point, the band has taken their unique, high energy brand of original rock & roll around the world. Clad in their trademark Lucha Libre Mexican wrestling masks, the "Jackets" have delivered their trademark guitar licks to 16 albums, thousands of concerts and dozens of films and TV shows.

"...novelty is a key ingredient, but it’s elevated by the band's good-natured sincerity and skill." -NPR World Cafe

Thomas Wynn & The Believers with Special Guests Rosi Golan and Jordan McLaughlin

A combination of blistering rock and southern soul, sibling-led Thomas Wynn and The Believers is a 6-piece fiery ensemble dubbed by Soundboard as "Southern Rock Muscle ~ Soulful Rock n' Blues." Gibson-sponsored from Orlando, Florida, TW&TB is known for their powerful LIVE performances playing the original music circuit and making "believers" wherever they go. The band personifies a new era that truly crosses generations with just really, really, really good music. If you like Tom Petty, The Band, The Black Crowes, CCR & Pink Floyd, you'll love The Believers!

For the sixth consecutive year, Thomas Wynn and The Believers repeatedly reigns as Central Florida's #1 Rock Band. Orlando Weekly's Best of Orlando Readers' Choice again crowned TW&TB as their Rock favorite (plus #1 Folk/Country Band and #2 singer-songwriter accolades for the band's namesake TW.)

Wynn's spirit-moving vocals, passionate lyrics, and emotional delivery are uniquely supported by sister Olivia's engaging and captivating voice and presence. Her strong vocal harmonies (the other lead) and wide-eyed response is the perfect companion to her brother's yearning banshee cries. The duo calls their perfect blend "blood harmonies"; the press calls the tandem thunder "their secret weapon." Backed by an explosive tight band, they've crafted a new vein of rock -- gritty, yet pure uplifting Soul Rock, a mixture of the classics, R&B and gospel -- creating a sound that has an identity of its own.

Georgia Music Hall Of Famer Alan Walden says, "One of the newest, brightest, tightest, smoothest, most energetic bands to ever come through." Reax Music Magazine states "For once, you have a Florida band that is truly Florida. They look like Florida, they sound like Florida - with a touch of Molly Hatchett, The Band, Neil Young, and The Black Crowes. Not fad hipster, not transplant Florida, but Florida Florida. These guys are on the leading edge of creating a new southern rock scene." Best New Bands writes, "They embody everything authentic and raw."

Hailing from a musical family, the siblings are heavily influenced by their father, Tom Wynn, the original drummer of the country-rockers Cowboy, one of Macon-based Capricorn Studio's (Allman Brothers Band, Marshall Tucker Band, Elvin Bishop, Wet Willie) legendary bands from the 1970s. His influence, as well as their faith and church upbringing, undoubtedly shaped their songwriting and musical interests. Their deeply-rooted principles certainly laid the foundation for what the Wynns bring to The Believers' sound.

Their musical history begins with The Wynn Brothers Band (2005-2008) -- the first family endeavor co-led with older brother Jordan ( bass guitar) that also included Papa Wynn on drums. The band released Feel the Good (2006), the title track a signature song still performed today. But when marriages and other separate goals emerged, the Brothers' band became defunct . . . but by mid 2009, a new direction and desire to continue birthed the band as it's known today, with Thomas and Olivia at the helm . . .

Their debut album The Reason (2009), produced by Tony Battaglia, is a strong, well-crafted studio sampling of Wynn's ability as a unique songwriter, the lyrics and vocals captured perfectly; the band's choice to self-produce their sophomoric album, Brothers and Sisters (2012), for some, was a truer representation of the emotion and intensity experienced in their live performances. Believers' classics are found on both recordings.

The current lineup has stabilized and matured with even more cohesiveness over the last two years (albeit harmonica player "Bell" has been a staple since the inception). The band welcomed Dave Wagner (bass) and Ryan Miranda (drums) in 2012 and keyboardist Colin Fei as recently as early 2014. The band has already tracked a third album, set to be released around the new year 2015.

A combination of blistering rock and southern soul, sibling-led Thomas Wynn and The Believers is a 6-piece fiery ensemble dubbed by Soundboard as "Southern Rock Muscle ~ Soulful Rock n' Blues." Gibson-sponsored from Orlando, Florida, TW&TB is known for their powerful LIVE performances playing the original music circuit and making "believers" wherever they go. The band personifies a new era that truly crosses generations with just really, really, really good music. If you like Tom Petty, The Band, The Black Crowes, CCR & Pink Floyd, you'll love The Believers!

For the sixth consecutive year, Thomas Wynn and The Believers repeatedly reigns as Central Florida's #1 Rock Band. Orlando Weekly's Best of Orlando Readers' Choice again crowned TW&TB as their Rock favorite (plus #1 Folk/Country Band and #2 singer-songwriter accolades for the band's namesake TW.)

Wynn's spirit-moving vocals, passionate lyrics, and emotional delivery are uniquely supported by sister Olivia's engaging and captivating voice and presence. Her strong vocal harmonies (the other lead) and wide-eyed response is the perfect companion to her brother's yearning banshee cries. The duo calls their perfect blend "blood harmonies"; the press calls the tandem thunder "their secret weapon." Backed by an explosive tight band, they've crafted a new vein of rock -- gritty, yet pure uplifting Soul Rock, a mixture of the classics, R&B and gospel -- creating a sound that has an identity of its own.

Georgia Music Hall Of Famer Alan Walden says, "One of the newest, brightest, tightest, smoothest, most energetic bands to ever come through." Reax Music Magazine states "For once, you have a Florida band that is truly Florida. They look like Florida, they sound like Florida - with a touch of Molly Hatchett, The Band, Neil Young, and The Black Crowes. Not fad hipster, not transplant Florida, but Florida Florida. These guys are on the leading edge of creating a new southern rock scene." Best New Bands writes, "They embody everything authentic and raw."

Hailing from a musical family, the siblings are heavily influenced by their father, Tom Wynn, the original drummer of the country-rockers Cowboy, one of Macon-based Capricorn Studio's (Allman Brothers Band, Marshall Tucker Band, Elvin Bishop, Wet Willie) legendary bands from the 1970s. His influence, as well as their faith and church upbringing, undoubtedly shaped their songwriting and musical interests. Their deeply-rooted principles certainly laid the foundation for what the Wynns bring to The Believers' sound.

Their musical history begins with The Wynn Brothers Band (2005-2008) -- the first family endeavor co-led with older brother Jordan ( bass guitar) that also included Papa Wynn on drums. The band released Feel the Good (2006), the title track a signature song still performed today. But when marriages and other separate goals emerged, the Brothers' band became defunct . . . but by mid 2009, a new direction and desire to continue birthed the band as it's known today, with Thomas and Olivia at the helm . . .

Their debut album The Reason (2009), produced by Tony Battaglia, is a strong, well-crafted studio sampling of Wynn's ability as a unique songwriter, the lyrics and vocals captured perfectly; the band's choice to self-produce their sophomoric album, Brothers and Sisters (2012), for some, was a truer representation of the emotion and intensity experienced in their live performances. Believers' classics are found on both recordings.

The current lineup has stabilized and matured with even more cohesiveness over the last two years (albeit harmonica player "Bell" has been a staple since the inception). The band welcomed Dave Wagner (bass) and Ryan Miranda (drums) in 2012 and keyboardist Colin Fei as recently as early 2014. The band has already tracked a third album, set to be released around the new year 2015.

Teen Daze + Sam OB

Teen Daze
Teen Daze is the moniker of Vancouver, British Columbia producer Jamison, whose home-recorded atmospheric synth pieces first gained acclaim when he posted them to his Tumblr account. Arcade Sound Ltd. released his debut EP, the summery yet bittersweet Four More Years, in mid-2010. Jamison played 2011's South by Southwest festival and toured Canada before his second EP, A Silent Planet (which was inspired by the time Jamison spent reading C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet during a seven-week stay in the Swiss Alps studying philosophy), arrived on the Waaga label in August 2010. Jamison also did remixes for artists such as Seven Saturdays and issued music with his other project, Two Bicycles. In mid-2011, Jamison recorded Teen Daze's first full-length, All of Us, Together, this time inspired in part by Utopian Visions, a book he discovered in a thrift store. The album was released by Lefse Records the following year; later in 2012, Jamison returned with The Inner Mansions, a more personal set of songs that also featured a cover of Brian Eno's "Always Returning." For 2013's Glacier, the producer opted for a more insular, ambient-inspired sound. Jamison drastically updated his creative process for his next album, traveling to San Francisco to record with John Vanderslice, resulting in the more organic-sounding Morning World. Paper Bag Records released the album in 2015. Jamison then started a new label called FLORA, which issued Teen Daze's Themes for Dying Earth (a return to more ambient pastures) in 2017.

Sam OB
Sam O.B. fka Obey City has a unique energy. This soft-spoken New York native is at once a producer, deejay, label boss, tastemaker and champion of the new-New York underground. He effortless handles each role with zen-like serenity-in a lost tradition of American culture, one may have said ‘suave’.

What started as casual experimentation and beat making for rappers and friends has evolved over the last 10 years into an unrelenting solo passion, resulting in a steady stream of soul-drenched bedroom music that avoids trends in favor of the enduring.

Obey is humble when it comes to just about everything, but his penchant for the sounds of soul, funk and smooth jams has instilled a vibe that has grown up alongside a rapid evolving urban musical landscape. The result is glossy, shifting dance music that seeks the weird, the unrestrained, the cleverly odd.

In the past several years he’s released a pair of sister EPs on the UK label LuckyMe (Champagne and Merlot Sounds), been featured on BBC Radio, toured the US, Japan, Australia and Europe and has begun work on an ambitious solo LP debut. He has continued collaborating with exciting new musicians and vocalists outside of his own solo endeavors.

Teen Daze
Teen Daze is the moniker of Vancouver, British Columbia producer Jamison, whose home-recorded atmospheric synth pieces first gained acclaim when he posted them to his Tumblr account. Arcade Sound Ltd. released his debut EP, the summery yet bittersweet Four More Years, in mid-2010. Jamison played 2011's South by Southwest festival and toured Canada before his second EP, A Silent Planet (which was inspired by the time Jamison spent reading C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet during a seven-week stay in the Swiss Alps studying philosophy), arrived on the Waaga label in August 2010. Jamison also did remixes for artists such as Seven Saturdays and issued music with his other project, Two Bicycles. In mid-2011, Jamison recorded Teen Daze's first full-length, All of Us, Together, this time inspired in part by Utopian Visions, a book he discovered in a thrift store. The album was released by Lefse Records the following year; later in 2012, Jamison returned with The Inner Mansions, a more personal set of songs that also featured a cover of Brian Eno's "Always Returning." For 2013's Glacier, the producer opted for a more insular, ambient-inspired sound. Jamison drastically updated his creative process for his next album, traveling to San Francisco to record with John Vanderslice, resulting in the more organic-sounding Morning World. Paper Bag Records released the album in 2015. Jamison then started a new label called FLORA, which issued Teen Daze's Themes for Dying Earth (a return to more ambient pastures) in 2017.

Sam OB
Sam O.B. fka Obey City has a unique energy. This soft-spoken New York native is at once a producer, deejay, label boss, tastemaker and champion of the new-New York underground. He effortless handles each role with zen-like serenity-in a lost tradition of American culture, one may have said ‘suave’.

What started as casual experimentation and beat making for rappers and friends has evolved over the last 10 years into an unrelenting solo passion, resulting in a steady stream of soul-drenched bedroom music that avoids trends in favor of the enduring.

Obey is humble when it comes to just about everything, but his penchant for the sounds of soul, funk and smooth jams has instilled a vibe that has grown up alongside a rapid evolving urban musical landscape. The result is glossy, shifting dance music that seeks the weird, the unrestrained, the cleverly odd.

In the past several years he’s released a pair of sister EPs on the UK label LuckyMe (Champagne and Merlot Sounds), been featured on BBC Radio, toured the US, Japan, Australia and Europe and has begun work on an ambitious solo LP debut. He has continued collaborating with exciting new musicians and vocalists outside of his own solo endeavors.

Vinyl Sunday with Special Guest Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution

Four musicians from three states took a pilgrimage to Tennessee. Magic was made, and the rock gods approved. Vinyl Sunday, a blues-rock band from Nashville Tennessee, has an authentic and unique sound inspired by the Allman Brothers band and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, mixed with ZZ Ward and the Alabama Shakes.

For their second EP "A Broken Record," the band drew inspiration from their rock and blues predecessors to track this four song masterpiece. They live tracked their EP, old school style, on Radar 24 at Tommy's Tracks in Nashville.

Vinyl Sunday has exploded since their inception in 2014, and are gaining momentum. Each member has not only found a creative outlet, but a teammate, and a lifelong friend, which is apparent when you watch them perform. With new songs on the horizon, they look forward to writing their first full length album. Catch Vinyl Sunday on tour this summer in a city near you

Four musicians from three states took a pilgrimage to Tennessee. Magic was made, and the rock gods approved. Vinyl Sunday, a blues-rock band from Nashville Tennessee, has an authentic and unique sound inspired by the Allman Brothers band and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, mixed with ZZ Ward and the Alabama Shakes.

For their second EP "A Broken Record," the band drew inspiration from their rock and blues predecessors to track this four song masterpiece. They live tracked their EP, old school style, on Radar 24 at Tommy's Tracks in Nashville.

Vinyl Sunday has exploded since their inception in 2014, and are gaining momentum. Each member has not only found a creative outlet, but a teammate, and a lifelong friend, which is apparent when you watch them perform. With new songs on the horizon, they look forward to writing their first full length album. Catch Vinyl Sunday on tour this summer in a city near you

BJ Barham - The Great 48 Tour with Special Guest Paul Joseph of Wine and Spirit

B.J. Barham was a long way from home when the tragedy happened.

On November 13, 2015, the singer-songwriter-raised in a small North Carolina town called Reidsville-was in the middle of his fourth European tour with American Aquarium, the rising alt-country act he'd led for nearly a decade. They were in Belgium, less than two hours from Paris, when bad news began to arrive: a series of terrorist attacks, including one in a rock club, had left more than 100 dead. Family members, friends, and the fans American Aquarium had amassed from so many years on the road immediately reached out, making sure the band had been far away.

"The onslaught of text messages, voicemails and everything that came in the next day sparked something in me," Barham remembers. "In the next two days, the entire record was written."

The record he's talking about is Rockingham, Barham's remarkable and intensely personal solo debut. Not long after the wave of well wishes had passed, Barham found himself piecing together composites of people he'd known since childhood, of those folks and places who had impacted his life in fundamental ways. He sang into his cell phone and scribbled in notebooks, stealing away for quiet moments in order to put the melodies and characters floating through his mind into song.

The shock of the moment and the distance from home seemed to give Barham a crucial perspective on the moments and circumstances that had helped shape him. Wolves, American Aquarium's much-lauded 2015 breakthrough, had contained Barham's most honest, vulnerable statements to date. But these songs took the next step, allowing Barham to share stories about those around him. In "O'Lover," he portrays a hard-working farmer forced to make some desperate decisions to support the ones he loves. In "Reidsville," named for the place he'd called his home until relocating to North Carolina's capital, he immortalized beautiful, sweet, doomed souls, stuck in love in the sort of small towns that are disintegrating all across America. You needn't have been to Reidsville to recognize these elegantly written, expertly realized protagonists.

"This is the first record I've ever made that's not autobiographical-it's fictional narrative in a very real place," Barham says. "These songs are human condition stories set in my hometown, Reidsville."

Barham made these songs his new priority. Not long after he returned stateside, he asked Bradley Cook, the musician and mentor who had co-produced Wolves, to hear them. By afternoon's end, they had hatched the plan to make Rockingham. Two months later, on January 31, Barham returned from another American Aquarium tour.

On Monday, he and the band he'd built to record Rockingham-himself, Cook, Cook's brother and multi-instrumentalist Phil Cook, drummer Kyle Keegan, American Aquarium standbys Ryan Johnson and Whit Wright-met for the first time. On Tuesday and Wednesday, they rehearsed. And on Thursday and Friday, they cut all eight songs at Durham's Overdub Lane. They mixed the results over the weekend, between the sold-out hometown shows and various festivities of American Aquarium's annual pilgrimage, Roadtrip to Raleigh. Cialis The whirlwind kept the songs simple and the recordings human, reflecting a reality much bigger and less perfect than the vacuum of a recording studio.

These tunes, after all, didn't need much tampering. Rockingham puts its scenes and scenarios front and center, the beautiful grain and twang of Barham's voice bringing it all to life. He limns lifelong romance and instantaneous tragedy during the paradoxically heartbreaking, heart-mending "Unfortunate Kind" and details the disappointments and dreams of the blue-collar laborer with "American Tobacco Company." With its acoustic guitars and pealing organs, ragged vocals and rugged characters, Rockingham is a stunning, personal portrait of small-town America, easily identifiable and familiar.

For the album's sole autobiographical moment, Barham, now happily married and sober, penned a letter of sound advice and Southern attitude to his daughter-to-be, "Madeline." It's too personal to fall under a roots-rock purview, too singular to be swallowed by a larger situation. Like all of Rockingham, it's not the sound of Barham stepping away from American Aquarium but instead stepping confidently into the thoughts, stories, and feelings of his own thirty years.

"This is just an outlet for a songwriter. It's me being able to do something different. This is like people who love their jobs, picking up hobbies," says Barham, "This is an exercise for myself."

B.J. Barham was a long way from home when the tragedy happened.

On November 13, 2015, the singer-songwriter-raised in a small North Carolina town called Reidsville-was in the middle of his fourth European tour with American Aquarium, the rising alt-country act he'd led for nearly a decade. They were in Belgium, less than two hours from Paris, when bad news began to arrive: a series of terrorist attacks, including one in a rock club, had left more than 100 dead. Family members, friends, and the fans American Aquarium had amassed from so many years on the road immediately reached out, making sure the band had been far away.

"The onslaught of text messages, voicemails and everything that came in the next day sparked something in me," Barham remembers. "In the next two days, the entire record was written."

The record he's talking about is Rockingham, Barham's remarkable and intensely personal solo debut. Not long after the wave of well wishes had passed, Barham found himself piecing together composites of people he'd known since childhood, of those folks and places who had impacted his life in fundamental ways. He sang into his cell phone and scribbled in notebooks, stealing away for quiet moments in order to put the melodies and characters floating through his mind into song.

The shock of the moment and the distance from home seemed to give Barham a crucial perspective on the moments and circumstances that had helped shape him. Wolves, American Aquarium's much-lauded 2015 breakthrough, had contained Barham's most honest, vulnerable statements to date. But these songs took the next step, allowing Barham to share stories about those around him. In "O'Lover," he portrays a hard-working farmer forced to make some desperate decisions to support the ones he loves. In "Reidsville," named for the place he'd called his home until relocating to North Carolina's capital, he immortalized beautiful, sweet, doomed souls, stuck in love in the sort of small towns that are disintegrating all across America. You needn't have been to Reidsville to recognize these elegantly written, expertly realized protagonists.

"This is the first record I've ever made that's not autobiographical-it's fictional narrative in a very real place," Barham says. "These songs are human condition stories set in my hometown, Reidsville."

Barham made these songs his new priority. Not long after he returned stateside, he asked Bradley Cook, the musician and mentor who had co-produced Wolves, to hear them. By afternoon's end, they had hatched the plan to make Rockingham. Two months later, on January 31, Barham returned from another American Aquarium tour.

On Monday, he and the band he'd built to record Rockingham-himself, Cook, Cook's brother and multi-instrumentalist Phil Cook, drummer Kyle Keegan, American Aquarium standbys Ryan Johnson and Whit Wright-met for the first time. On Tuesday and Wednesday, they rehearsed. And on Thursday and Friday, they cut all eight songs at Durham's Overdub Lane. They mixed the results over the weekend, between the sold-out hometown shows and various festivities of American Aquarium's annual pilgrimage, Roadtrip to Raleigh. Cialis The whirlwind kept the songs simple and the recordings human, reflecting a reality much bigger and less perfect than the vacuum of a recording studio.

These tunes, after all, didn't need much tampering. Rockingham puts its scenes and scenarios front and center, the beautiful grain and twang of Barham's voice bringing it all to life. He limns lifelong romance and instantaneous tragedy during the paradoxically heartbreaking, heart-mending "Unfortunate Kind" and details the disappointments and dreams of the blue-collar laborer with "American Tobacco Company." With its acoustic guitars and pealing organs, ragged vocals and rugged characters, Rockingham is a stunning, personal portrait of small-town America, easily identifiable and familiar.

For the album's sole autobiographical moment, Barham, now happily married and sober, penned a letter of sound advice and Southern attitude to his daughter-to-be, "Madeline." It's too personal to fall under a roots-rock purview, too singular to be swallowed by a larger situation. Like all of Rockingham, it's not the sound of Barham stepping away from American Aquarium but instead stepping confidently into the thoughts, stories, and feelings of his own thirty years.

"This is just an outlet for a songwriter. It's me being able to do something different. This is like people who love their jobs, picking up hobbies," says Barham, "This is an exercise for myself."

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)