club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
The Weeks with Special Guest Becca Mancari

Rowdy, Raucous, Longhair Mississippi Glam Rock.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent
2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teen- agers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were tour- ing Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly ener- gized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on col- laboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.
Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like
"Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's
snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, when- ever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick
our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're go- ing. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the auto- biographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rock- ing out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damnien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

Rowdy, Raucous, Longhair Mississippi Glam Rock.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent
2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teen- agers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were tour- ing Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly ener- gized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on col- laboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.
Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like
"Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's
snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, when- ever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick
our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're go- ing. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the auto- biographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rock- ing out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damnien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

Glen Phillips

Glen Phillips has always been a courageous and inviting songwriter. During his years as lead singer of Toad the Wet Sprocket, the band’s elegant folk/pop sound and his honest, introspective lyrics helped them forge a close bond with their fans. Since starting his solo career, Phillips has pared his music down to its emotional core, concentrating on the simple truths of love and relationships, with a profound spiritual understanding.


Swallowed by the New takes on life’s difficult transitions and delivers some of the Phillips' most vulnerable songs. “I made this album during the dissolution of a 23 year marriage, Phillips says. “A major chapter of my life was coming to a close, and I discovered early on that I had to work hard to
get through the transition with compassion and clarity. These songs were a big part of that process.”


The album was recorded in May of 2015 with producer/bass player Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams), Jay Bellerose (drums), Chris Bruce (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keys) and Ruby Amanfu (vocals). The sparse arrangements are centered on Phillips’ vocals and acoustic guitar.


Shimmering electric guitar accents drift through a curtain of sighing strings on Go, a ballad that bids a poignant farewell to a lover at the end of a relationship.
“And though I want you close / This light can only glow / To

warn you far away from shore / Saying I love you, now go,”


Leaving Oldtown has the feel of a classic pop ballad, with a string section and piano supporting a poignant vocal, as Phillips describes a man, “hollow as a sparrow bone,” packing up his belongings as winter approaches.


The Easy Ones focuses on the importance of staying present when it’s not easy or simple, but necessary. Joined in harmony with his 13-year daughter, Phillips says:
“You can’t just love the easy ones / You’ve got to let them in / When you’d rather just run.”


Amnesty is a gentle rocker, with twang-heavy guitars, a funky back beat and elegant string accents, it chronicles a long journey of searching for understanding and safe harbor. “I’m here to catch some kind of spark / In every face I see / And offer amnesty.”


Held Up suggests a gospel tune being chanted by a chain gang. The stomping drumbeat and jubilant handclaps
support a vocal that faces the scales of judgment; in balance between self-recrimination and salvation.
“Brother you ain’t so broken / Sister you ain’t so small / Everybody goes together / Or nobody goes at all.”


The folk hymn Grief and Praise was inspired by writer Martin Prechtel who maintains that “grief is praising those things we love and have lost, and praise is grieving those things we love and will lose”. It sums up the philosophy of the record in no uncertain terms:
“For all that you love will be taken some day / By the angel of death or the servants of change / In a floodwater tide without rancor or rage / So sing loud while you're able / In grief and
in praise”


Swallowed by the New is full of the inviting melodies that

have always marked Phillips’ work, while his singing reaches a new degree of intimacy and immediacy. The arrangements hint at country, soul, folk, rock and classic pop, without ever sounding derivative. The emotions may be raw, but they are guided by Phillips’ steady vocals towards healing and renewal.




Phillips started Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, when he was still in high school. He was as surprised as anyone when
their low-key folk rock landed them on the pop charts. When the band members decided to go their separate ways, Phillips began a solo career with Abulum followed by Winter Pays for Summer, Mr. Lemons and Secrets of the New Explorers. Always open to new projects and unlikely collaborations, he’s toured and recorded with Works Progress Administration, a band that included members of Nickel Creek, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Elvis Costello’s Attractions; Mutual Admiration Society with Nickel Creek; Remote Tree Children, an experimental project with John Askew and Plover, with Neilson Hubbard and Garrison Starr.


His acoustic duo tour to support Swallowed by the New
starts in October and will continue through the spring of
2017. “I enjoy the spontaneity of acoustic performance, where I can take the show wherever it needs to go and follow the lead of an audience instead of following a set list.
There’s more talking, more stories, and more of a loose feel. The subject matter is on the serious side, but I feel like the perspective is ultimately positive. Life is about changes, no matter how we may try and pretend otherwise. This album is all about learning how to face change.”

Glen Phillips has always been a courageous and inviting songwriter. During his years as lead singer of Toad the Wet Sprocket, the band’s elegant folk/pop sound and his honest, introspective lyrics helped them forge a close bond with their fans. Since starting his solo career, Phillips has pared his music down to its emotional core, concentrating on the simple truths of love and relationships, with a profound spiritual understanding.


Swallowed by the New takes on life’s difficult transitions and delivers some of the Phillips' most vulnerable songs. “I made this album during the dissolution of a 23 year marriage, Phillips says. “A major chapter of my life was coming to a close, and I discovered early on that I had to work hard to
get through the transition with compassion and clarity. These songs were a big part of that process.”


The album was recorded in May of 2015 with producer/bass player Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams), Jay Bellerose (drums), Chris Bruce (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keys) and Ruby Amanfu (vocals). The sparse arrangements are centered on Phillips’ vocals and acoustic guitar.


Shimmering electric guitar accents drift through a curtain of sighing strings on Go, a ballad that bids a poignant farewell to a lover at the end of a relationship.
“And though I want you close / This light can only glow / To

warn you far away from shore / Saying I love you, now go,”


Leaving Oldtown has the feel of a classic pop ballad, with a string section and piano supporting a poignant vocal, as Phillips describes a man, “hollow as a sparrow bone,” packing up his belongings as winter approaches.


The Easy Ones focuses on the importance of staying present when it’s not easy or simple, but necessary. Joined in harmony with his 13-year daughter, Phillips says:
“You can’t just love the easy ones / You’ve got to let them in / When you’d rather just run.”


Amnesty is a gentle rocker, with twang-heavy guitars, a funky back beat and elegant string accents, it chronicles a long journey of searching for understanding and safe harbor. “I’m here to catch some kind of spark / In every face I see / And offer amnesty.”


Held Up suggests a gospel tune being chanted by a chain gang. The stomping drumbeat and jubilant handclaps
support a vocal that faces the scales of judgment; in balance between self-recrimination and salvation.
“Brother you ain’t so broken / Sister you ain’t so small / Everybody goes together / Or nobody goes at all.”


The folk hymn Grief and Praise was inspired by writer Martin Prechtel who maintains that “grief is praising those things we love and have lost, and praise is grieving those things we love and will lose”. It sums up the philosophy of the record in no uncertain terms:
“For all that you love will be taken some day / By the angel of death or the servants of change / In a floodwater tide without rancor or rage / So sing loud while you're able / In grief and
in praise”


Swallowed by the New is full of the inviting melodies that

have always marked Phillips’ work, while his singing reaches a new degree of intimacy and immediacy. The arrangements hint at country, soul, folk, rock and classic pop, without ever sounding derivative. The emotions may be raw, but they are guided by Phillips’ steady vocals towards healing and renewal.




Phillips started Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, when he was still in high school. He was as surprised as anyone when
their low-key folk rock landed them on the pop charts. When the band members decided to go their separate ways, Phillips began a solo career with Abulum followed by Winter Pays for Summer, Mr. Lemons and Secrets of the New Explorers. Always open to new projects and unlikely collaborations, he’s toured and recorded with Works Progress Administration, a band that included members of Nickel Creek, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Elvis Costello’s Attractions; Mutual Admiration Society with Nickel Creek; Remote Tree Children, an experimental project with John Askew and Plover, with Neilson Hubbard and Garrison Starr.


His acoustic duo tour to support Swallowed by the New
starts in October and will continue through the spring of
2017. “I enjoy the spontaneity of acoustic performance, where I can take the show wherever it needs to go and follow the lead of an audience instead of following a set list.
There’s more talking, more stories, and more of a loose feel. The subject matter is on the serious side, but I feel like the perspective is ultimately positive. Life is about changes, no matter how we may try and pretend otherwise. This album is all about learning how to face change.”

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa feat. Napoleon Murphy Brock and Denny Walley

Project/Object is the longest continually touring alumni-based Zappa tribute band in the world. For nearly twenty five years they have toured and performed Zappa music with more of his bandmates than anyone other than Zappa himself. Project/Object tours of the USA, Canada & Europe have paved the way for a rich variety of excellent, contemporary Zappa tribute acts.



Project/Object is the band that brought most of the currently touring Zappa alumni out of retirement and onto the road. To date, almost twenty musicians, from every era of Zappa’s history, have performed with Project/Object. The band is back on the road with a short tour that reunites old bandmates Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley. The setlist features material that they performed on tour together with Frank, as well as Zappa classics and faves from other albums they did with him.



Napoleon Murphy Brock, the frontman for Zappa’s early seventies bands, first appeared on the breakthrough album Apostrophe (‘), then handled lead vocals and sax for the incredibly popular Roxy and Elsewhere. His vocals on One Size Fits All are legendary, and he appeared with Denny Walley on the iconic Bongo Fury, which documents Zappa’s 1975 collaborative tour with his old friend Captain Beefheart. Brock went on to tour with fellow Zappa alum George Duke, and with Duke reached new heights in the hugely popular George Duke Band. Napoleon later provided harmony vocals for Sheik Yerbouti, one of Zappa’s biggest selling albums. He also appears on Thingfish and You Can’t Do That Onstage Anymore - Helsinki.



Denny Walley, a key member of Zappa’s mid 70s and early 80s tours, is the band member that goes back the furthest with Frank - they met during the 8th grade! Denny brought his incendiary slide guitar work to many Zappa tours and albums, splitting time as Captain Beefheart’s slide guitarist as well. Denny appears on what is arguably Beefheart’s greatest work: Bat Chain Puller, and on Zappa favorites like Joe’s Garage and You Are What You Is. Denny not only performed with Zappa on SNL a few times, but later became a set-builder for the show!

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa feat. Napoleon Murphy Brock and Denny Walley

Project/Object is the longest continually touring alumni-based Zappa tribute band in the world. For nearly twenty five years they have toured and performed Zappa music with more of his bandmates than anyone other than Zappa himself. Project/Object tours of the USA, Canada & Europe have paved the way for a rich variety of excellent, contemporary Zappa tribute acts.



Project/Object is the band that brought most of the currently touring Zappa alumni out of retirement and onto the road. To date, almost twenty musicians, from every era of Zappa’s history, have performed with Project/Object. The band is back on the road with a short tour that reunites old bandmates Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley. The setlist features material that they performed on tour together with Frank, as well as Zappa classics and faves from other albums they did with him.



Napoleon Murphy Brock, the frontman for Zappa’s early seventies bands, first appeared on the breakthrough album Apostrophe (‘), then handled lead vocals and sax for the incredibly popular Roxy and Elsewhere. His vocals on One Size Fits All are legendary, and he appeared with Denny Walley on the iconic Bongo Fury, which documents Zappa’s 1975 collaborative tour with his old friend Captain Beefheart. Brock went on to tour with fellow Zappa alum George Duke, and with Duke reached new heights in the hugely popular George Duke Band. Napoleon later provided harmony vocals for Sheik Yerbouti, one of Zappa’s biggest selling albums. He also appears on Thingfish and You Can’t Do That Onstage Anymore - Helsinki.



Denny Walley, a key member of Zappa’s mid 70s and early 80s tours, is the band member that goes back the furthest with Frank - they met during the 8th grade! Denny brought his incendiary slide guitar work to many Zappa tours and albums, splitting time as Captain Beefheart’s slide guitarist as well. Denny appears on what is arguably Beefheart’s greatest work: Bat Chain Puller, and on Zappa favorites like Joe’s Garage and You Are What You Is. Denny not only performed with Zappa on SNL a few times, but later became a set-builder for the show!

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Patrick Sweany with Special Guest Angela Perley & The Howling Moons

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he'll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He's a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing 'em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn't his ability to copy - it's his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby "Blue" Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It's no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad's extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide - with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn't stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed him to form a band.

After 7 critically acclaimed records (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He's played premiere festivals (Newport Folk Fest, Merlefest, Montreal Jazz Fest, Telluride Blues & Brews) and supported international acts such as The Black Keys, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna, and others on tour.

His forthcoming record, Ancient Noise, comes out in Spring 2018. It was recordedat historic Sam Phillips Recording by acclaimed producer/engineer Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margot Price) and features an all-star backing band: Ken Coomer on drums (ex-Wilco), Ted Pecchio on bass (Doyle Bramhall II, Susan Tedeschi), and the legendary Charles Hodges on keys (Al Green). Ancient Noise is a great amalgam of Sweany's evolving sounds, from the gritty blues of the openers "Old Time Ways" and "Up & Down," to the piano-based ballad "Country Loving." "We also added a lot more funk to this record," says Sweany. "There's a definite nod to the Deep South 70s sound of Allen Toussaint productions and Little Feat jams."

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he'll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He's a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing 'em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn't his ability to copy - it's his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby "Blue" Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It's no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad's extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide - with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn't stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed him to form a band.

After 7 critically acclaimed records (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He's played premiere festivals (Newport Folk Fest, Merlefest, Montreal Jazz Fest, Telluride Blues & Brews) and supported international acts such as The Black Keys, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna, and others on tour.

His forthcoming record, Ancient Noise, comes out in Spring 2018. It was recordedat historic Sam Phillips Recording by acclaimed producer/engineer Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margot Price) and features an all-star backing band: Ken Coomer on drums (ex-Wilco), Ted Pecchio on bass (Doyle Bramhall II, Susan Tedeschi), and the legendary Charles Hodges on keys (Al Green). Ancient Noise is a great amalgam of Sweany's evolving sounds, from the gritty blues of the openers "Old Time Ways" and "Up & Down," to the piano-based ballad "Country Loving." "We also added a lot more funk to this record," says Sweany. "There's a definite nod to the Deep South 70s sound of Allen Toussaint productions and Little Feat jams."

Gun Hill Royals / Tim Vitullo Band

If soul happens to put his thumb out there, hell... there's room in the back. For Gun Hill Royals, music is a brotherhood, music is sacred, and damn it all, that’s how it's gonna be.

--

Tim Vitullo is a bit different.

A promising singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Vitullo decided to return home to both Pittsburgh, PA and his blues influences to record Josephine & Assorted Train Songs, his debut studio LP. This comes after poising himself as an exciting, young jazz artist in State College, PA with the release of This is the Thing! in 2012.

With his latest statement, Vitullo mixes the best of his blues, rock, and pop influences to present a dozen examples of "adult alternative album rock." Songs like "Josephine" are concise and accessible with a smooth delivery and a sly sense of humor. Ballads "Letters" and "A Different Kind of Blue" are earnest experiments in confessional-style songwriting flanked by dense vocal and horn arrangements. Further, burners "Interstate Jesus," "Black & White Wonderful," and "Pretty Good" flash the guitar prowess that has been Vitullo's calling card since his earliest musical ventures.

Josephine & Assorted Train Songs was produced, engineered, and mixed by singer/songwriter and producer Steven Foxbury in Pittsburgh, PA. Recorded entirely at Foxbury's Yellow Couch Studio, the LP is a home-grown display of some of the city's most promising young talents.

If soul happens to put his thumb out there, hell... there's room in the back. For Gun Hill Royals, music is a brotherhood, music is sacred, and damn it all, that’s how it's gonna be.

--

Tim Vitullo is a bit different.

A promising singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Vitullo decided to return home to both Pittsburgh, PA and his blues influences to record Josephine & Assorted Train Songs, his debut studio LP. This comes after poising himself as an exciting, young jazz artist in State College, PA with the release of This is the Thing! in 2012.

With his latest statement, Vitullo mixes the best of his blues, rock, and pop influences to present a dozen examples of "adult alternative album rock." Songs like "Josephine" are concise and accessible with a smooth delivery and a sly sense of humor. Ballads "Letters" and "A Different Kind of Blue" are earnest experiments in confessional-style songwriting flanked by dense vocal and horn arrangements. Further, burners "Interstate Jesus," "Black & White Wonderful," and "Pretty Good" flash the guitar prowess that has been Vitullo's calling card since his earliest musical ventures.

Josephine & Assorted Train Songs was produced, engineered, and mixed by singer/songwriter and producer Steven Foxbury in Pittsburgh, PA. Recorded entirely at Foxbury's Yellow Couch Studio, the LP is a home-grown display of some of the city's most promising young talents.

(Early Show) The Damaged Pies - Last One Out Shuts the Lights 30th Anniversary Show Benefiting WhyHunger

Since its' inception, Damaged Pies has played and recorded at some of the most legendary venues in world. From CBGB's in New York City to the Whisky a-go-go in L.A., from Liverpool's Cavern to Sun Studio in Memphis to Trident Studios in London, from Farm Aid Eve in Hershey to The Surf Ballroom in Iowa, from Damaged Pies Day in Pittsburgh to Toronto to Philly, from Athens to Boston, from Wrigley Field to Three Rivers Stadium from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco to the Wheeling Jamboree to Nashville and all points in between, Damaged Pies has been one of rock and roll's most durable and well-traveled acts.

Damaged Pies/ Steve Bodner has also been honored with the Jefferson Award for Public Service. The Damaged Pies current single to benefit WhyHUnger's Artists Against Hunger and Poverty is entitled Same Circus, Different Town and features David Hentschel (Elton John, Genesis) and covert art by Bernie Taupin (Elton John).

The Damaged Pies new album, The Stars on a Summer’s Night, is available now on Amazon, I-Tunes, CD Baby and Spotify and features cover art, And Blue by Bernie Taupin. One of the tracks, We Must Learn to Live Together features the words of Civil Rights Leader and Georgia State Representative John Lewis.

Musicians for Hunger Relief's new song, Louder Than Concorde features Rock and Roll Legends Adam Marsland (The Beach Boys, Wilson Phillips), Spooner Oldham (Aretha Franklin, Crosby Stills, Nash and Young, Percy Sledge) and Caleb Quaye (Elton John, Hall and Oates).

Damaged Pies has opened for former Beatle Pete Best, Marshall Crenshaw, Alejandro Escovedo, Pegi Young (Neil’s wife), James McCartney, The Atomic Punks, Peter Case, former Eagle Don Felder, Peter Mulvey, John Hall (Orleans) Wayne “The Train” Hancock and Jen Chapin.

Damaged Pies is a member of WhyHunger's Artists Against Hunger & Poverty, The Recording Academy, Pittsburgh Legends Awards and ASCAP. Damaged Pies also founded Pittsburgh Musicians for Hunger Relief. The Damaged Pies Steve Bodner is also a District Advocate for The Recording Academy/ The Grammys.
Damaged Pies movie Same Circus, Different Town is available on You Tube.

Since its' inception, Damaged Pies has played and recorded at some of the most legendary venues in world. From CBGB's in New York City to the Whisky a-go-go in L.A., from Liverpool's Cavern to Sun Studio in Memphis to Trident Studios in London, from Farm Aid Eve in Hershey to The Surf Ballroom in Iowa, from Damaged Pies Day in Pittsburgh to Toronto to Philly, from Athens to Boston, from Wrigley Field to Three Rivers Stadium from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco to the Wheeling Jamboree to Nashville and all points in between, Damaged Pies has been one of rock and roll's most durable and well-traveled acts.

Damaged Pies/ Steve Bodner has also been honored with the Jefferson Award for Public Service. The Damaged Pies current single to benefit WhyHUnger's Artists Against Hunger and Poverty is entitled Same Circus, Different Town and features David Hentschel (Elton John, Genesis) and covert art by Bernie Taupin (Elton John).

The Damaged Pies new album, The Stars on a Summer’s Night, is available now on Amazon, I-Tunes, CD Baby and Spotify and features cover art, And Blue by Bernie Taupin. One of the tracks, We Must Learn to Live Together features the words of Civil Rights Leader and Georgia State Representative John Lewis.

Musicians for Hunger Relief's new song, Louder Than Concorde features Rock and Roll Legends Adam Marsland (The Beach Boys, Wilson Phillips), Spooner Oldham (Aretha Franklin, Crosby Stills, Nash and Young, Percy Sledge) and Caleb Quaye (Elton John, Hall and Oates).

Damaged Pies has opened for former Beatle Pete Best, Marshall Crenshaw, Alejandro Escovedo, Pegi Young (Neil’s wife), James McCartney, The Atomic Punks, Peter Case, former Eagle Don Felder, Peter Mulvey, John Hall (Orleans) Wayne “The Train” Hancock and Jen Chapin.

Damaged Pies is a member of WhyHunger's Artists Against Hunger & Poverty, The Recording Academy, Pittsburgh Legends Awards and ASCAP. Damaged Pies also founded Pittsburgh Musicians for Hunger Relief. The Damaged Pies Steve Bodner is also a District Advocate for The Recording Academy/ The Grammys.
Damaged Pies movie Same Circus, Different Town is available on You Tube.

(Late Show) Joanna Lowe & The Broken Word / Working Breed

Joanna's Spoken Word Poetry simmers, steeps, and boils over original soundscapes ranging from the violent to the divine.

Working Breed is a scintillating quartet that writes original and eclectic Art Rock full of surprises. Their unique musical compositions are formed with a rock base that is interwoven by elements of jazz, blues, reggae, and many other genre themes. Lead vocalist Erika J C Laing ranges from torch singer to sopranic, and is surrounded on stage by a bevvy of musical instruments that are tastefully interspersed amongst the solid foundation set by Mike Dugan on guitar, Jonah Petrelli on bass, and Kieran Bittles on drums. The result is an engaging performance unlike any other in Pittsburgh or elsewhere, as the audience is continuously dazzled by the shifting nature of the music and playful incorporation of instruments often atypical to a rock group, such as trombone, trumpet, musical saw, synthy keys, and more. Their adventurous energy is infectious, and their performance an experience!

Joanna's Spoken Word Poetry simmers, steeps, and boils over original soundscapes ranging from the violent to the divine.

Working Breed is a scintillating quartet that writes original and eclectic Art Rock full of surprises. Their unique musical compositions are formed with a rock base that is interwoven by elements of jazz, blues, reggae, and many other genre themes. Lead vocalist Erika J C Laing ranges from torch singer to sopranic, and is surrounded on stage by a bevvy of musical instruments that are tastefully interspersed amongst the solid foundation set by Mike Dugan on guitar, Jonah Petrelli on bass, and Kieran Bittles on drums. The result is an engaging performance unlike any other in Pittsburgh or elsewhere, as the audience is continuously dazzled by the shifting nature of the music and playful incorporation of instruments often atypical to a rock group, such as trombone, trumpet, musical saw, synthy keys, and more. Their adventurous energy is infectious, and their performance an experience!

(Early Show) Diana Chittester (Paradox CD Release Tour) with Special Guest Avi Diamond

Diana Chittester stands alone on stage with an arsenal of acoustic guitars. Her solo show is brought to life with signature percussive multi-part playing, mimicking a full band on a solo acoustic guitar, without the help of loopers or other technological tricks. Blending intelligent and articulate lyrics, Diana's personal stories and vulnerability shared on stage resonates with audiences.

Music Connection Magazine noted her “intelligent and articulate lyrics” on the review of her first full-length album, In This Skin (2012). Dubbed a “Guitar God” by Skinny Devil Magazine and “a complex guitar acrobat” by ArtVoice Magazine, in 2017 she was invited to perform on the "Cellar Sessions" series recorded live at City Winery in NYC. Diana tours regularly in the US and Canada including folk-rock venues such as The Ark, Music Box Supper Club, Rockwood Music Hall and Performing Art Centers across the MidWest. She's opened for many iconic songwriters like Colin Hay, Kim Richey, Melissa Ferrick, LP, Jennifer Batten, Chris Trapper (Push Stars) and Kelly Richey to name few.

In early 2017, Diana toured with Canadian Juno-nominated songwriter, Royal Wood, through 10 cities in 12 days performing at the most prestigious folk venues such as The Ark, Rockwood Music Hall, Club Passim, World Cafe Live, Ludlow Garage, Music Box Supper Club and more.

Currently, Diana is recording new music for her upcoming album titled Paradox due out May 2018 while also teaching educational workshops at high schools and colleges.

Diana Chittester stands alone on stage with an arsenal of acoustic guitars. Her solo show is brought to life with signature percussive multi-part playing, mimicking a full band on a solo acoustic guitar, without the help of loopers or other technological tricks. Blending intelligent and articulate lyrics, Diana's personal stories and vulnerability shared on stage resonates with audiences.

Music Connection Magazine noted her “intelligent and articulate lyrics” on the review of her first full-length album, In This Skin (2012). Dubbed a “Guitar God” by Skinny Devil Magazine and “a complex guitar acrobat” by ArtVoice Magazine, in 2017 she was invited to perform on the "Cellar Sessions" series recorded live at City Winery in NYC. Diana tours regularly in the US and Canada including folk-rock venues such as The Ark, Music Box Supper Club, Rockwood Music Hall and Performing Art Centers across the MidWest. She's opened for many iconic songwriters like Colin Hay, Kim Richey, Melissa Ferrick, LP, Jennifer Batten, Chris Trapper (Push Stars) and Kelly Richey to name few.

In early 2017, Diana toured with Canadian Juno-nominated songwriter, Royal Wood, through 10 cities in 12 days performing at the most prestigious folk venues such as The Ark, Rockwood Music Hall, Club Passim, World Cafe Live, Ludlow Garage, Music Box Supper Club and more.

Currently, Diana is recording new music for her upcoming album titled Paradox due out May 2018 while also teaching educational workshops at high schools and colleges.

(Late Show) Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts / Demos Papadimas and His Band

Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts put a contemporary spin on soulful roots music. Driven by the dynamic guitar playing duo of Shawn Mazzei and Dan Bubien, along with Bubien’s soulful gritty vocals. Their signature sound is highlighted by the precision playing and deep toned-full sound of drummer Mark Pollera and glued together by Christian Caputo’s steady, groove oriented bass playing.

Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts put a contemporary spin on soulful roots music. Driven by the dynamic guitar playing duo of Shawn Mazzei and Dan Bubien, along with Bubien’s soulful gritty vocals. Their signature sound is highlighted by the precision playing and deep toned-full sound of drummer Mark Pollera and glued together by Christian Caputo’s steady, groove oriented bass playing.

Mipso with Special Guest Courtney Hartman

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso – Jacob Sharp (mandolin, vocals), Wood Robinson (bass, vocals), Joseph Terrell (guitar, vocals), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle, vocals) – release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular”(Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes. Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn. Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run.

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso – Jacob Sharp (mandolin, vocals), Wood Robinson (bass, vocals), Joseph Terrell (guitar, vocals), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle, vocals) – release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular”(Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes. Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn. Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)