club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
(Late Show) LoFi Delphi / Essential Machine / Standard Broadcast

Join LoFi Delphi, Essential Machine, and Standard Broadcast for an evening of power-pop goodness.
Indie pop of a certain brand—the post-emo, melodic stuff, the stuff with sweet riffs and uplifting, singalong choruses—would seem to be the province of the young and yearning. So what becomes of its proponents when they find themselves thirty-something and married? Do they give up and pack it in? Or worse: grow jaded and turn in their amps and keyboards for an acoustic and some minor chords? LoFi Delphi would say it’s not game over just yet, and they present as evidence “Tilt,” a five-song EP released in December 2017.

Bands with a strong ear for rock hooks are largely those the band cites as influences: Foo Fighters, Muse, of course The Beatles. What comes out is often in the sweet spot between the early emo of Rainer Maria and the more contemporary rock vibe of Metric, with undertones of ’80 new wave like New Order and Depeche Mode.

“Tilt” is windows-down music; it’s sing-along-in-the-car music, and it’s not-too-cool-to-feel-it music. Gallagher weaves stories between the hooks; lyrically, the songs carry narratives and imagery. They’re buoyant, but not empty.
The EP’s title track reads as an extended pinball metaphor, and ultimately, perhaps pinball is an extended metaphor for LoFi Delphi. Pinball is a game of skill, an old-school dose of serious fun. It’s an analog pleasure in a digital landscape. And just when it’s starting to look like time is running out, a skilled player can bank on earning a replay—and keep the game alive.

Join LoFi Delphi, Essential Machine, and Standard Broadcast for an evening of power-pop goodness.
Indie pop of a certain brand—the post-emo, melodic stuff, the stuff with sweet riffs and uplifting, singalong choruses—would seem to be the province of the young and yearning. So what becomes of its proponents when they find themselves thirty-something and married? Do they give up and pack it in? Or worse: grow jaded and turn in their amps and keyboards for an acoustic and some minor chords? LoFi Delphi would say it’s not game over just yet, and they present as evidence “Tilt,” a five-song EP released in December 2017.

Bands with a strong ear for rock hooks are largely those the band cites as influences: Foo Fighters, Muse, of course The Beatles. What comes out is often in the sweet spot between the early emo of Rainer Maria and the more contemporary rock vibe of Metric, with undertones of ’80 new wave like New Order and Depeche Mode.

“Tilt” is windows-down music; it’s sing-along-in-the-car music, and it’s not-too-cool-to-feel-it music. Gallagher weaves stories between the hooks; lyrically, the songs carry narratives and imagery. They’re buoyant, but not empty.
The EP’s title track reads as an extended pinball metaphor, and ultimately, perhaps pinball is an extended metaphor for LoFi Delphi. Pinball is a game of skill, an old-school dose of serious fun. It’s an analog pleasure in a digital landscape. And just when it’s starting to look like time is running out, a skilled player can bank on earning a replay—and keep the game alive.

An Evening With Roomful of Blues

For nearly half a century, Roomful of Blues has been delivering its signature blend of swing, rock ‘n’ roll, jump, blues and R&B to euphoric audiences all over the world. Blues Revuesays, “Roomful of Blues is a sheer joy...contagious, finger-popping, head-bopping grooves...the horns blast loud and proud...explosive and electrifying.” The band has earned five Grammy Award nominations and a slew of other accolades, including seven Blues Music Awards. Twice, the prestigious DownBeatInternational Critics Poll has selected them as Best Blues Band. With their masterful combination of jumping, horn-heavy blues and R&B, it’s no wonder why the great Count Basie called them “the hottest blues band I’ve ever heard.” Billboardsimply says, “Roomful is so tight and so right.”To commemorate and celebrate their 45thanniversary, the bandhosted a three-day party in March of 2013 at one of their favorite haunts, The Ocean Mist, in Matunuck, Rhode Island. The band blew the doors off the packed club, playing to roaring ovations each night. Happily, the proceedings were recorded and the resulting album, 45 Live, is among Roomful of Blues’ crowning achievements. The album is a lightning-in-a-bottle blowout, showcasing the larger-than-life vocal and instrumental power of the band. 45 Live, produced by bandleader/guitarist Chris Vachon, features fourteen songs (over an hour of music) spanning the entirety of the band’s history. The tracks were carefully chosen by Vachon, who included some of the group’s best known originals, like Dressed Up To Get Messed Up, Turn It On, Turn It Up,and That’s Right!, as well as tunes the band had previously recorded or performed with blues giants Joe Turner (Crawdad Hole), Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson (Somebody’s Got To Go) and Earl King (It All Went Down The Drain). 45 Liveis a flawlessly blended mix of rocking guitar, punching horns, room-filling vocals, serious musicianship and unbridled creativity. The results are a non-stop, hip-shaking party. It’s clear why The New Yorker described a Roomful concert as “thunderous performances that get feet stomping and hands clapping.”Roomful of Blues, according to DownBeatmagazine, “are in a class by themselves.” The band has been led since 1998 by Vachon, who, according to Guitar Player, “burns with explosive solos and a delightfully greasy sense of rhythm.” Roomful of Blues has always maintained its signature sound through great musicianship and a stellar horn section—featuring tenor and alto saxophonist (and clarinetist on 45 Live’s Jambalaya) Rich Lataille, who first joined the band in 1970. Lataille’s masterful playing can evoke either the fat-toned, honking sax of the glory days of early rock or the cool elegance of big band swing jazz.While Roomful of Blues has always been one of the tightest, most joyful blues ensembles in the world, they have never sounded fresher or stronger than with the current line-up. Along with Vachon and Lataille, the band includes vocalist Phil Pemberton, long-time tenor and baritone saxophonist Mark Earley, trumpeter Doug Woolverton, bassist John Turner, drummer Chris Rivelli and keyboardist Rusty Scott.
Roomful of Blues came together in Westerly, Rhode Island in the late 1960s when guitarist Duke Robillard and keyboardist Al Copley began exploring the swinging, jumping blues, R&B and jazz of the 1940s and 1950s. They added a horn section (including Rich Lataille) in 1970. The band’s ability to ignite a sedate crowd into a dancing frenzy solidified their reputation as the best “little big band” in New England and expanded their following into New York and Washington, D.C. In 1974, they performed with Count Basie, and a few years later legendary songwriter Doc Pomus helped them land their first record deal. In 1977, Roomful of Blues’ self-titled debut album on Island Records (reissued on Hyena Records) brought them to the attention of fans andcritics from coast to coast.Over the years there have been more than fifty Roomful of Blues members, each bringing his or her own unique talent and vision to the mix. Famed alumni include guitarist Ronnie Earl, vocalist Lou Ann Barton, vocalist/harpist Curtis Salgado, saxist/vocalist Greg Piccolo and harpist/vocalist Sugar Ray Norcia. Recording for Rounder Records’ Bullseye Blues and Varrick labels between 1980 and 2001, the band cut nine albums that won them international fame and major rock radio airplay. They’ve gigged with stars ranging from bluesmen B.B. King, Otis Rush and Stevie Ray Vaughan to rockers Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana. The band has performed in cities from coast to coast, and traveled abroad to 22 countries including Lebanon, Poland,Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, Switzerland, Turkey and Russia.In addition to their band recordings, Roomful of Blues were handpicked by legendary musicians like Jimmy Witherspoon, Jimmy McCracklin, Roy Brown, Joe Turner, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson and Earl King to back them on stage and on record. These stars of the 1940s and 1950s blues and R&B scene were the very people who created and inspired the music that Roomful still keeps vital and alive. Roomful recorded albums with Turner, Vinson and King during the 1980s, and all three recordings received Grammy nominations. The Roomful Horns backed many other artists as well, including rocker Pat Benatar on her 1991 album True Love, Canadian star Colin James on his album Colin James and the Little Big Band andStevie Ray Vaughan on his 1984 Live At Carnegie Hallalbum.Since Roomful joined the Alligator Records family in 2003, their popularity has continued to increase. Their first Alligator CD was the Grammy-nominated That’s Right!in 2003, followed by Standing Room Onlyin 2005, Raisin’ A Ruckusin 2008 and Hook, Line & Sinkerin 2010. All four albums received massive amounts of critical and popular praise and kept old and new fans flocking to see them live. Blurt magazine raves, “No group has kept the spirit of early rock and roll alive better than Roomful of Blues. The heat burns red hot...they are pure fun to listen to. They are one of America’s musical treasures.”With 45 Live, Roomful of Blues has fully captured the frenetic energy and musical power oftheir live show. The band will hit the road hard once again, so people can see and hear for themselves why The Chicago Sun-Timessaid, “This is a band on top of its game, sliding easily from big-band jazz-blues to guitar-drenched urban blues...let the party begin.”

For nearly half a century, Roomful of Blues has been delivering its signature blend of swing, rock ‘n’ roll, jump, blues and R&B to euphoric audiences all over the world. Blues Revuesays, “Roomful of Blues is a sheer joy...contagious, finger-popping, head-bopping grooves...the horns blast loud and proud...explosive and electrifying.” The band has earned five Grammy Award nominations and a slew of other accolades, including seven Blues Music Awards. Twice, the prestigious DownBeatInternational Critics Poll has selected them as Best Blues Band. With their masterful combination of jumping, horn-heavy blues and R&B, it’s no wonder why the great Count Basie called them “the hottest blues band I’ve ever heard.” Billboardsimply says, “Roomful is so tight and so right.”To commemorate and celebrate their 45thanniversary, the bandhosted a three-day party in March of 2013 at one of their favorite haunts, The Ocean Mist, in Matunuck, Rhode Island. The band blew the doors off the packed club, playing to roaring ovations each night. Happily, the proceedings were recorded and the resulting album, 45 Live, is among Roomful of Blues’ crowning achievements. The album is a lightning-in-a-bottle blowout, showcasing the larger-than-life vocal and instrumental power of the band. 45 Live, produced by bandleader/guitarist Chris Vachon, features fourteen songs (over an hour of music) spanning the entirety of the band’s history. The tracks were carefully chosen by Vachon, who included some of the group’s best known originals, like Dressed Up To Get Messed Up, Turn It On, Turn It Up,and That’s Right!, as well as tunes the band had previously recorded or performed with blues giants Joe Turner (Crawdad Hole), Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson (Somebody’s Got To Go) and Earl King (It All Went Down The Drain). 45 Liveis a flawlessly blended mix of rocking guitar, punching horns, room-filling vocals, serious musicianship and unbridled creativity. The results are a non-stop, hip-shaking party. It’s clear why The New Yorker described a Roomful concert as “thunderous performances that get feet stomping and hands clapping.”Roomful of Blues, according to DownBeatmagazine, “are in a class by themselves.” The band has been led since 1998 by Vachon, who, according to Guitar Player, “burns with explosive solos and a delightfully greasy sense of rhythm.” Roomful of Blues has always maintained its signature sound through great musicianship and a stellar horn section—featuring tenor and alto saxophonist (and clarinetist on 45 Live’s Jambalaya) Rich Lataille, who first joined the band in 1970. Lataille’s masterful playing can evoke either the fat-toned, honking sax of the glory days of early rock or the cool elegance of big band swing jazz.While Roomful of Blues has always been one of the tightest, most joyful blues ensembles in the world, they have never sounded fresher or stronger than with the current line-up. Along with Vachon and Lataille, the band includes vocalist Phil Pemberton, long-time tenor and baritone saxophonist Mark Earley, trumpeter Doug Woolverton, bassist John Turner, drummer Chris Rivelli and keyboardist Rusty Scott.
Roomful of Blues came together in Westerly, Rhode Island in the late 1960s when guitarist Duke Robillard and keyboardist Al Copley began exploring the swinging, jumping blues, R&B and jazz of the 1940s and 1950s. They added a horn section (including Rich Lataille) in 1970. The band’s ability to ignite a sedate crowd into a dancing frenzy solidified their reputation as the best “little big band” in New England and expanded their following into New York and Washington, D.C. In 1974, they performed with Count Basie, and a few years later legendary songwriter Doc Pomus helped them land their first record deal. In 1977, Roomful of Blues’ self-titled debut album on Island Records (reissued on Hyena Records) brought them to the attention of fans andcritics from coast to coast.Over the years there have been more than fifty Roomful of Blues members, each bringing his or her own unique talent and vision to the mix. Famed alumni include guitarist Ronnie Earl, vocalist Lou Ann Barton, vocalist/harpist Curtis Salgado, saxist/vocalist Greg Piccolo and harpist/vocalist Sugar Ray Norcia. Recording for Rounder Records’ Bullseye Blues and Varrick labels between 1980 and 2001, the band cut nine albums that won them international fame and major rock radio airplay. They’ve gigged with stars ranging from bluesmen B.B. King, Otis Rush and Stevie Ray Vaughan to rockers Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana. The band has performed in cities from coast to coast, and traveled abroad to 22 countries including Lebanon, Poland,Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, Switzerland, Turkey and Russia.In addition to their band recordings, Roomful of Blues were handpicked by legendary musicians like Jimmy Witherspoon, Jimmy McCracklin, Roy Brown, Joe Turner, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson and Earl King to back them on stage and on record. These stars of the 1940s and 1950s blues and R&B scene were the very people who created and inspired the music that Roomful still keeps vital and alive. Roomful recorded albums with Turner, Vinson and King during the 1980s, and all three recordings received Grammy nominations. The Roomful Horns backed many other artists as well, including rocker Pat Benatar on her 1991 album True Love, Canadian star Colin James on his album Colin James and the Little Big Band andStevie Ray Vaughan on his 1984 Live At Carnegie Hallalbum.Since Roomful joined the Alligator Records family in 2003, their popularity has continued to increase. Their first Alligator CD was the Grammy-nominated That’s Right!in 2003, followed by Standing Room Onlyin 2005, Raisin’ A Ruckusin 2008 and Hook, Line & Sinkerin 2010. All four albums received massive amounts of critical and popular praise and kept old and new fans flocking to see them live. Blurt magazine raves, “No group has kept the spirit of early rock and roll alive better than Roomful of Blues. The heat burns red hot...they are pure fun to listen to. They are one of America’s musical treasures.”With 45 Live, Roomful of Blues has fully captured the frenetic energy and musical power oftheir live show. The band will hit the road hard once again, so people can see and hear for themselves why The Chicago Sun-Timessaid, “This is a band on top of its game, sliding easily from big-band jazz-blues to guitar-drenched urban blues...let the party begin.”

(Night 1) The Builders and the Butchers with Special Guest The Hills and The Rivers

Portland-based folk rock band, The Builders and the Butchers, announce their
forthcoming album, The Spark, due out May 19th. The band’s fifth LP will be
released on Badman Recordings Co, which will be their third release with the label.
Their last album was hailed by Consequence of Sound, who said, “The Builders and
the Butchers make records the way the bards used to pass on stories. They’re poetic
and captivating, and do to songwriting what Clint Eastwood does to movies,” and
this new record follows the same, narrative-driven path.
With glowing album and show reviews coming from Pitchfork and The Wall Street
Journal, among others, their brand of folk-rock is best served live. Audiences can
look forward to lively performances, where fourth wall is broken and the audience
is able to participate in call and response sing-a- longs. Sometimes the band will
hand out instruments for fans to play, and they’ll even get down off stage to perform
right on the floor.
The Builders and The Butchers formed in 2005. Ryan Sollee fronts the band, sings
and plays guitar, joined by Willy Kunkle (bass, guitar, vocals, percussion), Justin
Baeir (drums, backup vocals, percussion) and Harvey Tumbleson (mandolin, banjo,
guitar, vocals, percussion). The Portland-based band gained a strong following after
years of playing anywhere and everywhere across the city. They quickly grew to
become one of the most exciting live bands in Portland and throughout the Pacific
Northwest.
The band toured throughout the US and Europe from 2007-2012, playing music
festivals, such as Sasquatch and Lollapalooza, and acting as support for Portugal.
The Man, Heartless Bastards, ‪Amanda Palmer‬ and Murder By Death. To support
their forthcoming release, The Spark, the band will be playing their first US and
European tour in multiple years.
This new album features a wider array of sounds and shorter, hard hitting songs,
while remaining a Builders’ record at heart. The process of creating The Spark was
the longest of any Builders’ record to date. They spent the last five years writing the
music and a year mixing. With several band members living out of state (Justin in
Colorado, Willy in Malta, Harvey in Washington and Ryan and Ray in Portland),
many parts were recorded remotely. Drums and much of the electric guitar were
recorded at Revolver Studios and the rest was laid down piece-by- piece and mixed
by Edgar McCrae at his home studio. Influences for the record range from ‪Tom
Waits‬ to ‪The White Stripes‬.

Portland-based folk rock band, The Builders and the Butchers, announce their
forthcoming album, The Spark, due out May 19th. The band’s fifth LP will be
released on Badman Recordings Co, which will be their third release with the label.
Their last album was hailed by Consequence of Sound, who said, “The Builders and
the Butchers make records the way the bards used to pass on stories. They’re poetic
and captivating, and do to songwriting what Clint Eastwood does to movies,” and
this new record follows the same, narrative-driven path.
With glowing album and show reviews coming from Pitchfork and The Wall Street
Journal, among others, their brand of folk-rock is best served live. Audiences can
look forward to lively performances, where fourth wall is broken and the audience
is able to participate in call and response sing-a- longs. Sometimes the band will
hand out instruments for fans to play, and they’ll even get down off stage to perform
right on the floor.
The Builders and The Butchers formed in 2005. Ryan Sollee fronts the band, sings
and plays guitar, joined by Willy Kunkle (bass, guitar, vocals, percussion), Justin
Baeir (drums, backup vocals, percussion) and Harvey Tumbleson (mandolin, banjo,
guitar, vocals, percussion). The Portland-based band gained a strong following after
years of playing anywhere and everywhere across the city. They quickly grew to
become one of the most exciting live bands in Portland and throughout the Pacific
Northwest.
The band toured throughout the US and Europe from 2007-2012, playing music
festivals, such as Sasquatch and Lollapalooza, and acting as support for Portugal.
The Man, Heartless Bastards, ‪Amanda Palmer‬ and Murder By Death. To support
their forthcoming release, The Spark, the band will be playing their first US and
European tour in multiple years.
This new album features a wider array of sounds and shorter, hard hitting songs,
while remaining a Builders’ record at heart. The process of creating The Spark was
the longest of any Builders’ record to date. They spent the last five years writing the
music and a year mixing. With several band members living out of state (Justin in
Colorado, Willy in Malta, Harvey in Washington and Ryan and Ray in Portland),
many parts were recorded remotely. Drums and much of the electric guitar were
recorded at Revolver Studios and the rest was laid down piece-by- piece and mixed
by Edgar McCrae at his home studio. Influences for the record range from ‪Tom
Waits‬ to ‪The White Stripes‬.

(Night 2) The Builders and the Butchers with Special Guest Locks and Dams

Portland-based folk rock band, The Builders and the Butchers, announce their
forthcoming album, The Spark, due out May 19th. The band’s fifth LP will be
released on Badman Recordings Co, which will be their third release with the label.
Their last album was hailed by Consequence of Sound, who said, “The Builders and
the Butchers make records the way the bards used to pass on stories. They’re poetic
and captivating, and do to songwriting what Clint Eastwood does to movies,” and
this new record follows the same, narrative-driven path.
With glowing album and show reviews coming from Pitchfork and The Wall Street
Journal, among others, their brand of folk-rock is best served live. Audiences can
look forward to lively performances, where fourth wall is broken and the audience
is able to participate in call and response sing-a- longs. Sometimes the band will
hand out instruments for fans to play, and they’ll even get down off stage to perform
right on the floor.
The Builders and The Butchers formed in 2005. Ryan Sollee fronts the band, sings
and plays guitar, joined by Willy Kunkle (bass, guitar, vocals, percussion), Justin
Baeir (drums, backup vocals, percussion) and Harvey Tumbleson (mandolin, banjo,
guitar, vocals, percussion). The Portland-based band gained a strong following after
years of playing anywhere and everywhere across the city. They quickly grew to
become one of the most exciting live bands in Portland and throughout the Pacific
Northwest.
The band toured throughout the US and Europe from 2007-2012, playing music
festivals, such as Sasquatch and Lollapalooza, and acting as support for Portugal.
The Man, Heartless Bastards, ‪Amanda Palmer‬ and Murder By Death. To support
their forthcoming release, The Spark, the band will be playing their first US and
European tour in multiple years.
This new album features a wider array of sounds and shorter, hard hitting songs,
while remaining a Builders’ record at heart. The process of creating The Spark was
the longest of any Builders’ record to date. They spent the last five years writing the
music and a year mixing. With several band members living out of state (Justin in
Colorado, Willy in Malta, Harvey in Washington and Ryan and Ray in Portland),
many parts were recorded remotely. Drums and much of the electric guitar were
recorded at Revolver Studios and the rest was laid down piece-by- piece and mixed
by Edgar McCrae at his home studio. Influences for the record range from ‪Tom
Waits‬ to ‪The White Stripes‬.

Portland-based folk rock band, The Builders and the Butchers, announce their
forthcoming album, The Spark, due out May 19th. The band’s fifth LP will be
released on Badman Recordings Co, which will be their third release with the label.
Their last album was hailed by Consequence of Sound, who said, “The Builders and
the Butchers make records the way the bards used to pass on stories. They’re poetic
and captivating, and do to songwriting what Clint Eastwood does to movies,” and
this new record follows the same, narrative-driven path.
With glowing album and show reviews coming from Pitchfork and The Wall Street
Journal, among others, their brand of folk-rock is best served live. Audiences can
look forward to lively performances, where fourth wall is broken and the audience
is able to participate in call and response sing-a- longs. Sometimes the band will
hand out instruments for fans to play, and they’ll even get down off stage to perform
right on the floor.
The Builders and The Butchers formed in 2005. Ryan Sollee fronts the band, sings
and plays guitar, joined by Willy Kunkle (bass, guitar, vocals, percussion), Justin
Baeir (drums, backup vocals, percussion) and Harvey Tumbleson (mandolin, banjo,
guitar, vocals, percussion). The Portland-based band gained a strong following after
years of playing anywhere and everywhere across the city. They quickly grew to
become one of the most exciting live bands in Portland and throughout the Pacific
Northwest.
The band toured throughout the US and Europe from 2007-2012, playing music
festivals, such as Sasquatch and Lollapalooza, and acting as support for Portugal.
The Man, Heartless Bastards, ‪Amanda Palmer‬ and Murder By Death. To support
their forthcoming release, The Spark, the band will be playing their first US and
European tour in multiple years.
This new album features a wider array of sounds and shorter, hard hitting songs,
while remaining a Builders’ record at heart. The process of creating The Spark was
the longest of any Builders’ record to date. They spent the last five years writing the
music and a year mixing. With several band members living out of state (Justin in
Colorado, Willy in Malta, Harvey in Washington and Ryan and Ray in Portland),
many parts were recorded remotely. Drums and much of the electric guitar were
recorded at Revolver Studios and the rest was laid down piece-by- piece and mixed
by Edgar McCrae at his home studio. Influences for the record range from ‪Tom
Waits‬ to ‪The White Stripes‬.

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Preston Lacy (From MTV's Jackass) with Matt Light

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Marcus Cox and Friends with Kevin 'Deekay' Francios, Ed Bailey and Hosted by Paige Polesnak

Cory Branan with Special Guest Chicago Farmer

ADIOS is Cory Branan’s death record. Not the cheeriest of openings, but like all of Branan’s mercurial work, it’s probably not what you think. As funny and defiant as it is touching and sad, this self-dubbed “loser’s survival kit” doesn’t spare its subjects or the listener.

Not even Branan’s deceased father is let off the hook. In the tender homage “The Vow” he drolly cites his father’s favorite banality “that’s what you get for thinking” as “probably not the best lesson for kids.” For most songwriters that would be the punchline but Branan pushes through words and, in his father’s actions, finds a kind of “genius in the effortless way he just ‘did’.”

Not all the death on ADIOS is literal mortality. “Imogene” is sung from the wreckage of a love that once “poked fun at the pain, stoked the sun in the rain” but ends with the urgent call to “act on the embers, ash won’t remember the way back to fire.”

The trademark lyrical agility is mirrored sonically. Never a genre loyalist, ADIOS finds Branan (much like his musically restless heroes Elvis Costello and Tom Waits) coloring outside the lines in sometimes startling shades of fuzz and twang. While unafraid to play it arrow-straight when called for (“The Vow,” “Equinox,” “Don’t Go”), ADIOS veers wildly from the Buddy Holly-esque rave up “I Only Know” (sung with punk notables Laura Jane Grace and Dave Hause), through the swampy “Walls, MS” to the Costello-like new wave of “Visiting Hours.”

The blistering punk of “Another Nightmare in America” bops along daring listeners to “Look away, look away, move along, nothing to see here” (the song is written from the point of view of a racist killer cop). And as the mourning singer on “Cold Blue Moonlight” shifts from paralysis to panic, the song’s jazzy drone shifts to an almost Sabbath fury. The tonal shifts are always deliberate and not just simple genre hopping; while the turns can be jarring you can trust Branan to take you somewhere unexpected.

The 14-song album was self-produced and recorded in the spring of 2016 at Tweed Studios in Oxford, MS with a tight three piece: Branan on lead vocals and guitar (both electric and acoustic); Robbie Crowell (formerly of Deer Tick) on drums and percussion, keys, and horns; and James “Haggs” Haggerty on bass. Additionally, Amanda Shires contributes on fiddle and vocals, and Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! and Dave Hause provide guest vocals.

Cory Branan has four previous full-length releases: The Hell You Say (2002, Madjack Records), 12 Songs (2006, Madjack), Mutt (2012, Bloodshot Records), and The No-Hit Wonder (2014, Bloodshot). His music has received critical praise from the likes of Rolling Stone and Rolling Stone Country, NPR All Things Considered, Noisey, Wall Street Journal, Paste Magazine, Oxford American, Consequence of Sound, Southern Living, and many others.

ADIOS is Cory Branan’s death record. Not the cheeriest of openings, but like all of Branan’s mercurial work, it’s probably not what you think. As funny and defiant as it is touching and sad, this self-dubbed “loser’s survival kit” doesn’t spare its subjects or the listener.

Not even Branan’s deceased father is let off the hook. In the tender homage “The Vow” he drolly cites his father’s favorite banality “that’s what you get for thinking” as “probably not the best lesson for kids.” For most songwriters that would be the punchline but Branan pushes through words and, in his father’s actions, finds a kind of “genius in the effortless way he just ‘did’.”

Not all the death on ADIOS is literal mortality. “Imogene” is sung from the wreckage of a love that once “poked fun at the pain, stoked the sun in the rain” but ends with the urgent call to “act on the embers, ash won’t remember the way back to fire.”

The trademark lyrical agility is mirrored sonically. Never a genre loyalist, ADIOS finds Branan (much like his musically restless heroes Elvis Costello and Tom Waits) coloring outside the lines in sometimes startling shades of fuzz and twang. While unafraid to play it arrow-straight when called for (“The Vow,” “Equinox,” “Don’t Go”), ADIOS veers wildly from the Buddy Holly-esque rave up “I Only Know” (sung with punk notables Laura Jane Grace and Dave Hause), through the swampy “Walls, MS” to the Costello-like new wave of “Visiting Hours.”

The blistering punk of “Another Nightmare in America” bops along daring listeners to “Look away, look away, move along, nothing to see here” (the song is written from the point of view of a racist killer cop). And as the mourning singer on “Cold Blue Moonlight” shifts from paralysis to panic, the song’s jazzy drone shifts to an almost Sabbath fury. The tonal shifts are always deliberate and not just simple genre hopping; while the turns can be jarring you can trust Branan to take you somewhere unexpected.

The 14-song album was self-produced and recorded in the spring of 2016 at Tweed Studios in Oxford, MS with a tight three piece: Branan on lead vocals and guitar (both electric and acoustic); Robbie Crowell (formerly of Deer Tick) on drums and percussion, keys, and horns; and James “Haggs” Haggerty on bass. Additionally, Amanda Shires contributes on fiddle and vocals, and Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! and Dave Hause provide guest vocals.

Cory Branan has four previous full-length releases: The Hell You Say (2002, Madjack Records), 12 Songs (2006, Madjack), Mutt (2012, Bloodshot Records), and The No-Hit Wonder (2014, Bloodshot). His music has received critical praise from the likes of Rolling Stone and Rolling Stone Country, NPR All Things Considered, Noisey, Wall Street Journal, Paste Magazine, Oxford American, Consequence of Sound, Southern Living, and many others.

The Nude Party with Special Guests Boa and SPISH

The Nude Party congealed as one unit in the southern mountain town of Boone, NC in 2013 and gained their namesake very literally. Bonded by isolation, house party debauchery, a religion based on pushing the limits of bad taste, and a precocious predisposition towards the Kinks, the Animals and the Velvets, they have burgeoned into a rock and roll act to be reckoned with. As the hysteria at their local shows steadily increases, so does their reputation with local law enforcement, forcing them daily more to seek employment anywhere but home. While snooping cops seeking to stamp out indiscriminate behavior scour the borders of their homestead the Nude Ranch, the group has prodigally exiled themselves and are staying scarce with a string of self booked tours and one night stands which have linked them up with with such likes as The Growlers, The Oblivians, La Luz, Night Beats, and King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard.

Their stripped down and bare bone sound, akin to the British Invasion being transplanted back into the Carolina mountains, has so far proven to have been unrecordable... until now. The secret? Sticking to the obvious and going down into a sweaty basement with a few mics, fewer clothes and a revolving door of comrades and goddesses falling by for as long as they can take the heat. Lately the Nudes have even gotten good at playing with their clothes on. However if any audience member feels the need to participate in the spirit of exhibitionism the stakes at the Party will unblinkingly be called and raised.

The Nude Party congealed as one unit in the southern mountain town of Boone, NC in 2013 and gained their namesake very literally. Bonded by isolation, house party debauchery, a religion based on pushing the limits of bad taste, and a precocious predisposition towards the Kinks, the Animals and the Velvets, they have burgeoned into a rock and roll act to be reckoned with. As the hysteria at their local shows steadily increases, so does their reputation with local law enforcement, forcing them daily more to seek employment anywhere but home. While snooping cops seeking to stamp out indiscriminate behavior scour the borders of their homestead the Nude Ranch, the group has prodigally exiled themselves and are staying scarce with a string of self booked tours and one night stands which have linked them up with with such likes as The Growlers, The Oblivians, La Luz, Night Beats, and King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard.

Their stripped down and bare bone sound, akin to the British Invasion being transplanted back into the Carolina mountains, has so far proven to have been unrecordable... until now. The secret? Sticking to the obvious and going down into a sweaty basement with a few mics, fewer clothes and a revolving door of comrades and goddesses falling by for as long as they can take the heat. Lately the Nudes have even gotten good at playing with their clothes on. However if any audience member feels the need to participate in the spirit of exhibitionism the stakes at the Party will unblinkingly be called and raised.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club with Special Guest The Armadillos

Seminal Gothic-Americana ensemble, Slim Cessna's Auto Club will be re-releasing their fourth album Cipher on June 2. This 2017 re-issue will be a double vinyl LP in a gatefold sleeve and marks the first release of the album on the Auto Club's label, SCACUNINCORPORATED. The band will be playing select MidWest dates this Summer.

Wallace Stenger may have captured the spirit of the west in his 1971 novel Angle of Repose. Jim Thompson surely exposed the lurid underbelly of the Western experience. Cormac McCarthy definitely evoked the conflicted, tortured spirit of small town life on the frontier. William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor informed all of them with a humor and soulfulness. It is that literary tradition that imbues the harrowing and celebratory sound and riveting stories of
Slim Cessna's Auto Club. Throughout its long and illustrious history, it is largely in that realm of
art that the Auto Club reveled and garnered a loyal cult following well beyond the boundaries of
The Queen City of the Plains.

Originally released in 2008, Cipher is the most cohesive SCAC album but also the most mysterious. Cipher is a deliberate puzzle loaded with coded language. The idea that braces are used to straighten crooked humanity provides a structure, but this code rewards effort to unpack the many messages it contains; many more relevant now than ever. Compared to its predecessors, this set of songs sounds more hopeful and expansive, a quality that was always there but this time out the brighter sides of the songwriting were emphasized.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club was originally formed in 1992 in Denver, Colorado by its namesake after he parted ways with The Denver Gentlemen, that grand progenitor of the peculiar strain of Gothic Americana unique to the Mile High City that also featured Jeffrey-Paul and David Eugene Edwards who’d go on to form 16 Horsepower, the latter then founding Wovenhand.

Slim’s longest running collaborators in the Auto Club have been Munly Munly and Lord Dwight Pentacost who’ve contributed both material and affected the ensemble’s stylistic vision. More recently there’ve been greater creative contributions from longtime collaborator Rebecca Vera, drummer Andrew Warner and the inclusion of upright bass player Ian O'Dougherty.

Late last year, the band released a new album after a five-year hiatus The Commandments According to SCAC. The album encompassed both the heady darkness and celebratory intensity with which the group made its name. That charmingly dusky and spare sound breathed with a new color and delicacy of feeling that perhaps sat in the background in times past.

When you get to see the Auto Club live, you'll see an already mighty band reinvigorated by a new spirit of exitement as well as by the fire that has long burned in its collective belly.

Seminal Gothic-Americana ensemble, Slim Cessna's Auto Club will be re-releasing their fourth album Cipher on June 2. This 2017 re-issue will be a double vinyl LP in a gatefold sleeve and marks the first release of the album on the Auto Club's label, SCACUNINCORPORATED. The band will be playing select MidWest dates this Summer.

Wallace Stenger may have captured the spirit of the west in his 1971 novel Angle of Repose. Jim Thompson surely exposed the lurid underbelly of the Western experience. Cormac McCarthy definitely evoked the conflicted, tortured spirit of small town life on the frontier. William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor informed all of them with a humor and soulfulness. It is that literary tradition that imbues the harrowing and celebratory sound and riveting stories of
Slim Cessna's Auto Club. Throughout its long and illustrious history, it is largely in that realm of
art that the Auto Club reveled and garnered a loyal cult following well beyond the boundaries of
The Queen City of the Plains.

Originally released in 2008, Cipher is the most cohesive SCAC album but also the most mysterious. Cipher is a deliberate puzzle loaded with coded language. The idea that braces are used to straighten crooked humanity provides a structure, but this code rewards effort to unpack the many messages it contains; many more relevant now than ever. Compared to its predecessors, this set of songs sounds more hopeful and expansive, a quality that was always there but this time out the brighter sides of the songwriting were emphasized.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club was originally formed in 1992 in Denver, Colorado by its namesake after he parted ways with The Denver Gentlemen, that grand progenitor of the peculiar strain of Gothic Americana unique to the Mile High City that also featured Jeffrey-Paul and David Eugene Edwards who’d go on to form 16 Horsepower, the latter then founding Wovenhand.

Slim’s longest running collaborators in the Auto Club have been Munly Munly and Lord Dwight Pentacost who’ve contributed both material and affected the ensemble’s stylistic vision. More recently there’ve been greater creative contributions from longtime collaborator Rebecca Vera, drummer Andrew Warner and the inclusion of upright bass player Ian O'Dougherty.

Late last year, the band released a new album after a five-year hiatus The Commandments According to SCAC. The album encompassed both the heady darkness and celebratory intensity with which the group made its name. That charmingly dusky and spare sound breathed with a new color and delicacy of feeling that perhaps sat in the background in times past.

When you get to see the Auto Club live, you'll see an already mighty band reinvigorated by a new spirit of exitement as well as by the fire that has long burned in its collective belly.

The Goddamn Gallows with Special Guests Mower and United Snakes (featuring Chuck Coles of The Creepshow and Jordan and Justin of Gallows Bound)

Spit from the heart of America's Rust Belt, arising from a night of flophouse violence. Drifting across the states, they cemented their sound in Portland, OR and later in Los Angeles, CA, where they lived in abandoned buildings, squatter camps, storage units and shoebox apartments.

In 2007, they left everything behind and spent the next 4 years living out of whatever vehicle would get them to the next town. Building upon their original sound of twanged-out, punk rock gutterbilly (Life of Sin 2004 and Gutterbillyblues 2007), they began picking up stray musicians along the way and adding to their sound; washboard, accordion, mandolin and banjo (Ghost of the Rails 2009 and 7 Devils 2011) creating a sound referred to as "hobocore", "gypsy-punk" or "americana-punk", while never being stuck in any one sound.

Enter 2018 and The Goddamn Gallows have reinvented themselves once again with The Trial. From rockabilly, psychobilly and punk rock, to bluegrass and metal, The Trial infuses disparate sounds into a new strange recipe of seamless genre bending profundities.

Chock full of impromptu antics of the shocking variety and hauntingly eclectic instrumentation, The Goddamn Gallows have made legions of fans with their legendary, live shows.

Spit from the heart of America's Rust Belt, arising from a night of flophouse violence. Drifting across the states, they cemented their sound in Portland, OR and later in Los Angeles, CA, where they lived in abandoned buildings, squatter camps, storage units and shoebox apartments.

In 2007, they left everything behind and spent the next 4 years living out of whatever vehicle would get them to the next town. Building upon their original sound of twanged-out, punk rock gutterbilly (Life of Sin 2004 and Gutterbillyblues 2007), they began picking up stray musicians along the way and adding to their sound; washboard, accordion, mandolin and banjo (Ghost of the Rails 2009 and 7 Devils 2011) creating a sound referred to as "hobocore", "gypsy-punk" or "americana-punk", while never being stuck in any one sound.

Enter 2018 and The Goddamn Gallows have reinvented themselves once again with The Trial. From rockabilly, psychobilly and punk rock, to bluegrass and metal, The Trial infuses disparate sounds into a new strange recipe of seamless genre bending profundities.

Chock full of impromptu antics of the shocking variety and hauntingly eclectic instrumentation, The Goddamn Gallows have made legions of fans with their legendary, live shows.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)