club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Derek Webb with Special Guest Dan Getkin

A 20+ year veteran of the music industry, Derek Webb has sold millions of albums as a founding member of Texas based folk/rock band Caedmon’s Call, and ruffled political & spiritual feathers alike as a solo artist.

He is also Co-Founder of the revolutionary tribe building platform NoiseTrade, and founder of middleclassmusician.com, teaching musicians to make a living.

A 20+ year veteran of the music industry, Derek Webb has sold millions of albums as a founding member of Texas based folk/rock band Caedmon’s Call, and ruffled political & spiritual feathers alike as a solo artist.

He is also Co-Founder of the revolutionary tribe building platform NoiseTrade, and founder of middleclassmusician.com, teaching musicians to make a living.

Rebirth Brass Band

Whether seen on HBO’s Treme or at their legendary Tuesday night gig at The Maple Leaf, Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band is a true New Orleans institution. Formed in 1983 by the Frazier brothers, the band has evolved from playing the streets of the French Quarter to playing festivals and stages all over the world. While committed to upholding the tradition of brass bands, they have also extended themselves into the realms of funk and hip-hop to create their signature sound. “Rebirth can be precise whenever it wants to,” says The New York Times, “but it’s more like a party than a machine. It’s a working model of the New Orleans musical ethos: as long as everybody knows what they’re doing, anyone can cut loose.” In the wake of the sometimes-stringent competition among New Orleans brass bands, Rebirth is the undisputed leader of the pack, and they show no signs of slowing down.

Following the Grammy-winning Rebirth of New Orleans, Rebirth Brass Band is at it again with Move Your Body, an infectious, groove-laden collection of hip-shakers sure to saturate the dance floor.

Rollicking originals like "Who's Rockin, Who's Rollin'"? and "Take 'Em to the Moon" reaffirm the band's position as head of the brass throne while the rasta-esque "On My Way" and leave-nothing-to-the-imagination lyrics of "HBNS" showcase the unit's talent for penning unabashed party starters.

Boasting a mastery of Rebirth's signature "heavy funk" sound, Move Your Body pushes and swings, leaving behind an 11 track thumbprint, approved by the Frazier brothers themselves, of a sultry Tuesday night spent dancing on their home court at the Maple Leaf Bar in New Orleans.

Whether seen on HBO’s Treme or at their legendary Tuesday night gig at The Maple Leaf, Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band is a true New Orleans institution. Formed in 1983 by the Frazier brothers, the band has evolved from playing the streets of the French Quarter to playing festivals and stages all over the world. While committed to upholding the tradition of brass bands, they have also extended themselves into the realms of funk and hip-hop to create their signature sound. “Rebirth can be precise whenever it wants to,” says The New York Times, “but it’s more like a party than a machine. It’s a working model of the New Orleans musical ethos: as long as everybody knows what they’re doing, anyone can cut loose.” In the wake of the sometimes-stringent competition among New Orleans brass bands, Rebirth is the undisputed leader of the pack, and they show no signs of slowing down.

Following the Grammy-winning Rebirth of New Orleans, Rebirth Brass Band is at it again with Move Your Body, an infectious, groove-laden collection of hip-shakers sure to saturate the dance floor.

Rollicking originals like "Who's Rockin, Who's Rollin'"? and "Take 'Em to the Moon" reaffirm the band's position as head of the brass throne while the rasta-esque "On My Way" and leave-nothing-to-the-imagination lyrics of "HBNS" showcase the unit's talent for penning unabashed party starters.

Boasting a mastery of Rebirth's signature "heavy funk" sound, Move Your Body pushes and swings, leaving behind an 11 track thumbprint, approved by the Frazier brothers themselves, of a sultry Tuesday night spent dancing on their home court at the Maple Leaf Bar in New Orleans.

(Early Show) Frame & Mantle 'Lost Under Nighttime Sky Vinyl Release Show' with Special Guest Heron

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Dan LaMorte with Special Guest Zach Petrovich

Dan LaMorte is a New York City based stand up comedian and comedy writer. He’s a former panelist of FOX's Red Eye, performed on the 2017 season of AXS TV's Gotham Comedy Live and the 2018 season of NextVR’s Live from Gotham Comedy. In 2017 he released his first album Not Enough Pieces through On Tour Records. The album got plenty of love on the iTunes comedy charts, it was met with great reviews and a lengthy stay as the top selling stand up album. Not Enough Pieces remains a popular play on SiriusXM's Raw Dog Channel and has reached over 125,000 streams on Spotify. Dan’s first special “Infect Me Once” is being released with Comedy Dynamics and BroBible this summer. It was filmed at Zanies in Chicago and will lead into Dan’s 2019 “Infect Me Once” Tour in September. Joining Dan on tour will be New York's Michael Terry & Maggie Crane.

Dan LaMorte is a New York City based stand up comedian and comedy writer. He’s a former panelist of FOX's Red Eye, performed on the 2017 season of AXS TV's Gotham Comedy Live and the 2018 season of NextVR’s Live from Gotham Comedy. In 2017 he released his first album Not Enough Pieces through On Tour Records. The album got plenty of love on the iTunes comedy charts, it was met with great reviews and a lengthy stay as the top selling stand up album. Not Enough Pieces remains a popular play on SiriusXM's Raw Dog Channel and has reached over 125,000 streams on Spotify. Dan’s first special “Infect Me Once” is being released with Comedy Dynamics and BroBible this summer. It was filmed at Zanies in Chicago and will lead into Dan’s 2019 “Infect Me Once” Tour in September. Joining Dan on tour will be New York's Michael Terry & Maggie Crane.

Padraig Stevens with Leo Moran (Of The Saw Doctors) with Special Guest Mark Dignam

“Greetings from Padraig in Tuam, Ireland.
I was happy enough, enjoying my days. Sitting at home and writing songs. Then Leo arrived one day, wondering if I would be interested in doing a few little gigs with him.
He had enjoyed playing the shows he had done with Anto – and later with Davy – but now he just wanted to play his guitar, and ‘would I sing some of my songs’, he said.
This sounded good to me, so we started in February 2017 with gigs in The Kings Head, Galway and Campbell’s Tavern near Headford, both local venues.
We got a great welcome at the shows, the audience enjoyed them, so did we! We did a few more gigs, things were getting better.
Then we discovered we really needed to get some of our music recorded to let people know what to expect when they came to see us play. We went to Sun Street Studio Tuam where our old friend Ken Ralph whipped our sound into shape. With Leo steering we eventually released an album of songs called ‘News from the Old Country.’ Have a listen!
https://newsfromtheoldcountry.hearnow.com/

“Greetings from Padraig in Tuam, Ireland.
I was happy enough, enjoying my days. Sitting at home and writing songs. Then Leo arrived one day, wondering if I would be interested in doing a few little gigs with him.
He had enjoyed playing the shows he had done with Anto – and later with Davy – but now he just wanted to play his guitar, and ‘would I sing some of my songs’, he said.
This sounded good to me, so we started in February 2017 with gigs in The Kings Head, Galway and Campbell’s Tavern near Headford, both local venues.
We got a great welcome at the shows, the audience enjoyed them, so did we! We did a few more gigs, things were getting better.
Then we discovered we really needed to get some of our music recorded to let people know what to expect when they came to see us play. We went to Sun Street Studio Tuam where our old friend Ken Ralph whipped our sound into shape. With Leo steering we eventually released an album of songs called ‘News from the Old Country.’ Have a listen!
https://newsfromtheoldcountry.hearnow.com/

SOLD OUT - Dave Hause & The Mermaid with Special Guest Mercy Union- Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Life is a struggle. Even when things go our way, it’s a constant swim against the tide, kicking against the current in the hope we’ll eventually find the shore. That’s the premise behind Dave Hause’s fourth album, Kick. Kicking was the first thing he saw his newborn twins do and it’s something he himself has been doing all his life. His career as a musician has spanned two decades, and his songs have always been a quest for personal survival – about pushing through against the odds – but his perspective shifted dramatically after the November 2016 election.

This installment, out April 12th on Rise/BMG, finds Hause carrying on in the voice and tradition of classic American songwriters by tackling topics of hope, depression, global warming, a crumbling democracy, and growing old. These complex notions weave together with a joyous sing-along cadence that creates a soundtrack for the broken American dream. “The shift in American culture became really acute right as we put out my last album,” Hause explains. “All this great stuff was happening for me personally but with this backdrop of American ideals and American culture seemingly caving in.”

Those conflicting feelings sparked some deep, soul-searching conversations between Hause and his brother, whom he calls his musical soulmate, and Kick came together as the brothers worked more collaboratively than ever before, with Tim in Philadelphia and Dave in Santa Barbara. Over numerous Face Time sessions, voice notes and many, many calls, the pair found the album’s purpose and focus. “If the glaciers are melting, what’s the point?” asked Hause. “When the tide seems to be pulling you towards a black hole, what do you do? And I asked Tim that question and he said ‘You kick against it. I don’t know what else to do.’”

That sense of hope and defiance permeates this record from beginning to end. “Saboteurs” takes issue with the systems in place that value profits over well-being, while “Warpaint” serves as both a tribute to the women in Hause’s life as well as a moody call-to-arms. And on “The Ditch”, the record’s first single, Dave and Tim tackle mental health issues head-on, marking the first time in their respective careers that they’ve openly discussed their own struggles with depression.

One catalyst for doing so was the sudden and tragic loss of friend and musical inspiration Scott Hutchison. The Frightened Rabbit frontman took his own life in 2018, prompting the brothers to write about finding – and coming back to – a sense of meaning and purpose again after going through their own battles. Understandably, that track’s themes of finding the will to stick it out and make the best of where you are, quickly became a major keystone of the album.
“I think those ideas show up in almost every song in some capacity,” Hause says. Beyond the personal lyrics, the concept of ‘If I can’t make it out of this ditch, I better make a home of it’ can be applied globally. “There is comfort in desperation when you know that other people experience it too, and together you can both sing it and sing through it. As I listen back, I hope it offers more comfort than desperation. I hope we got that balance right.”

The brothers credit a busy touring schedule for their ability to write with more understanding and empathy, two qualities that are found in abundance on these 10 songs. Like many Americans, Hause believed the 2016 election divided people to create an “us versus them” mentality, but if you look closer it’s just really people trying to survive. He felt it was important to write about the things that were happening to the people “who have to get up and go to work every day.” That, Hause says, is when he and his brother really dug in. “It was about figuring out how to find the light that comes through the crack in everything,” he says.

This album doesn’t sugarcoat either the personal problems or the global challenges at its center. At the core of this record there remains a vivid humanity and a hope that things can – and will – get better, even if it seems like the odds are stacked against us. After all, when the only alternative is to drown, the first step towards survival is to kick.

Life is a struggle. Even when things go our way, it’s a constant swim against the tide, kicking against the current in the hope we’ll eventually find the shore. That’s the premise behind Dave Hause’s fourth album, Kick. Kicking was the first thing he saw his newborn twins do and it’s something he himself has been doing all his life. His career as a musician has spanned two decades, and his songs have always been a quest for personal survival – about pushing through against the odds – but his perspective shifted dramatically after the November 2016 election.

This installment, out April 12th on Rise/BMG, finds Hause carrying on in the voice and tradition of classic American songwriters by tackling topics of hope, depression, global warming, a crumbling democracy, and growing old. These complex notions weave together with a joyous sing-along cadence that creates a soundtrack for the broken American dream. “The shift in American culture became really acute right as we put out my last album,” Hause explains. “All this great stuff was happening for me personally but with this backdrop of American ideals and American culture seemingly caving in.”

Those conflicting feelings sparked some deep, soul-searching conversations between Hause and his brother, whom he calls his musical soulmate, and Kick came together as the brothers worked more collaboratively than ever before, with Tim in Philadelphia and Dave in Santa Barbara. Over numerous Face Time sessions, voice notes and many, many calls, the pair found the album’s purpose and focus. “If the glaciers are melting, what’s the point?” asked Hause. “When the tide seems to be pulling you towards a black hole, what do you do? And I asked Tim that question and he said ‘You kick against it. I don’t know what else to do.’”

That sense of hope and defiance permeates this record from beginning to end. “Saboteurs” takes issue with the systems in place that value profits over well-being, while “Warpaint” serves as both a tribute to the women in Hause’s life as well as a moody call-to-arms. And on “The Ditch”, the record’s first single, Dave and Tim tackle mental health issues head-on, marking the first time in their respective careers that they’ve openly discussed their own struggles with depression.

One catalyst for doing so was the sudden and tragic loss of friend and musical inspiration Scott Hutchison. The Frightened Rabbit frontman took his own life in 2018, prompting the brothers to write about finding – and coming back to – a sense of meaning and purpose again after going through their own battles. Understandably, that track’s themes of finding the will to stick it out and make the best of where you are, quickly became a major keystone of the album.
“I think those ideas show up in almost every song in some capacity,” Hause says. Beyond the personal lyrics, the concept of ‘If I can’t make it out of this ditch, I better make a home of it’ can be applied globally. “There is comfort in desperation when you know that other people experience it too, and together you can both sing it and sing through it. As I listen back, I hope it offers more comfort than desperation. I hope we got that balance right.”

The brothers credit a busy touring schedule for their ability to write with more understanding and empathy, two qualities that are found in abundance on these 10 songs. Like many Americans, Hause believed the 2016 election divided people to create an “us versus them” mentality, but if you look closer it’s just really people trying to survive. He felt it was important to write about the things that were happening to the people “who have to get up and go to work every day.” That, Hause says, is when he and his brother really dug in. “It was about figuring out how to find the light that comes through the crack in everything,” he says.

This album doesn’t sugarcoat either the personal problems or the global challenges at its center. At the core of this record there remains a vivid humanity and a hope that things can – and will – get better, even if it seems like the odds are stacked against us. After all, when the only alternative is to drown, the first step towards survival is to kick.

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Matteo Lane

MATTEO LANE is a New York-based comedian whose stand-up special can be seen on Netflix’s THE COMEDY LINEUP. He’s also currently developing a half hour pilot at Comedy Central, and the host of the Snapchat series WE GOT ISSUES. He has performed stand up on THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT, LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS, Comedy Central’s ADAM DEVINE’S HOUSE PARTY and THE COMEDY JAM, as well as HBO’s CRASHING. Fluent in five languages and with a singing range of six octaves, Matteo lived in Italy as an oil painter and opera singer before starting his comedy career.

MATTEO LANE is a New York-based comedian whose stand-up special can be seen on Netflix’s THE COMEDY LINEUP. He’s also currently developing a half hour pilot at Comedy Central, and the host of the Snapchat series WE GOT ISSUES. He has performed stand up on THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT, LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS, Comedy Central’s ADAM DEVINE’S HOUSE PARTY and THE COMEDY JAM, as well as HBO’s CRASHING. Fluent in five languages and with a singing range of six octaves, Matteo lived in Italy as an oil painter and opera singer before starting his comedy career.

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Matteo Lane

MATTEO LANE is a New York-based comedian whose stand-up special can be seen on Netflix’s THE COMEDY LINEUP. He’s also currently developing a half hour pilot at Comedy Central, and the host of the Snapchat series WE GOT ISSUES. He has performed stand up on THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT, LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS, Comedy Central’s ADAM DEVINE’S HOUSE PARTY and THE COMEDY JAM, as well as HBO’s CRASHING. Fluent in five languages and with a singing range of six octaves, Matteo lived in Italy as an oil painter and opera singer before starting his comedy career.

MATTEO LANE is a New York-based comedian whose stand-up special can be seen on Netflix’s THE COMEDY LINEUP. He’s also currently developing a half hour pilot at Comedy Central, and the host of the Snapchat series WE GOT ISSUES. He has performed stand up on THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT, LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS, Comedy Central’s ADAM DEVINE’S HOUSE PARTY and THE COMEDY JAM, as well as HBO’s CRASHING. Fluent in five languages and with a singing range of six octaves, Matteo lived in Italy as an oil painter and opera singer before starting his comedy career.

(Early Show) Becca Mancari with Special Guest Frances Cone

Becca Mancari is rewriting the rules.
Born in Staten Island, New York, to an Italian-Irish preacher and a Puerto Rican
mother, Mancari has lived a life of transition - from working as a janitor in South
Florida, to writing songs with train hoppers in the Blue Ridge Mountains and
seeking spirituality in India. But it was her time in Virginia and Nashville where
she found roots where she could evolve personally and musically to a seasoned
artist beyond her years.
Her anticipated debut album, Good Woman, is hauntingly lonesome, with dustcloud swells of electric guitar and don't-look-back lyrics revealing scenes from
Mancari’s well-travelled story. Since her music is the landscape of all she's seen,
Good Woman evokes the sound of city grit and the mountain music of her youth,
swirling into a fresh, nostalgic sound.
In reference to her evolving sound, Mancari explains that on
Good Woman, “We played with atmospheric tones and textures, with a lot of
space-like reverb, to create a sort of soundscape.” It's these planetary frontiers,
along with the powerful fragility in her voice, that make Mancari's music stand
beyond easy categorizations.
Perhaps more striking than Mancari’s sound is the tender honesty and
vulnerability present in each of her songs. Ann Powers describes Mancari’s
writing as "lyrical and raw," commenting on the "great personality in her songs."
Her strong sense of self enables her to be a spokeswoman to the outcast and the
misfit, helping her redefine the categories that so often divide people.
As a gay woman in the south, she has had to face her own set of divisions and
has fought hard to reconcile her spiritual beliefs with her sexuality. Though she’s
faced her own struggles, she has only emerged stronger: When Mancari sings,
she shines with charisma and compassion. She walks the line between the
masculine and the feminine, and it is this spirit that is paving a new path in music
today.
After two years of touring worldwide, a new record is soon to be finished. The
new album focuses on themes of forgiveness and acceptance while remaining
light and exhilarating. Zac Farro, from HalfNoise and Paramore, is producing the
record, adding a rhythmic depth to Becca’s storytelling.

Becca Mancari is rewriting the rules.
Born in Staten Island, New York, to an Italian-Irish preacher and a Puerto Rican
mother, Mancari has lived a life of transition - from working as a janitor in South
Florida, to writing songs with train hoppers in the Blue Ridge Mountains and
seeking spirituality in India. But it was her time in Virginia and Nashville where
she found roots where she could evolve personally and musically to a seasoned
artist beyond her years.
Her anticipated debut album, Good Woman, is hauntingly lonesome, with dustcloud swells of electric guitar and don't-look-back lyrics revealing scenes from
Mancari’s well-travelled story. Since her music is the landscape of all she's seen,
Good Woman evokes the sound of city grit and the mountain music of her youth,
swirling into a fresh, nostalgic sound.
In reference to her evolving sound, Mancari explains that on
Good Woman, “We played with atmospheric tones and textures, with a lot of
space-like reverb, to create a sort of soundscape.” It's these planetary frontiers,
along with the powerful fragility in her voice, that make Mancari's music stand
beyond easy categorizations.
Perhaps more striking than Mancari’s sound is the tender honesty and
vulnerability present in each of her songs. Ann Powers describes Mancari’s
writing as "lyrical and raw," commenting on the "great personality in her songs."
Her strong sense of self enables her to be a spokeswoman to the outcast and the
misfit, helping her redefine the categories that so often divide people.
As a gay woman in the south, she has had to face her own set of divisions and
has fought hard to reconcile her spiritual beliefs with her sexuality. Though she’s
faced her own struggles, she has only emerged stronger: When Mancari sings,
she shines with charisma and compassion. She walks the line between the
masculine and the feminine, and it is this spirit that is paving a new path in music
today.
After two years of touring worldwide, a new record is soon to be finished. The
new album focuses on themes of forgiveness and acceptance while remaining
light and exhilarating. Zac Farro, from HalfNoise and Paramore, is producing the
record, adding a rhythmic depth to Becca’s storytelling.

(Late Show) Craig Finn & the Uptown Controllers with Special Guest Paul Luc- Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

The first week of 2018, I entered Isokon Studio with Josh Kaufman and Joe Russo to start work on I Need A New War.

Going in, I saw this record as the third part of a trilogy. Thematically, this was the third group of songs that I had written about smaller moments -- people trying to stay afloat in modern times, attempting to find connection, achieving tiny triumphs and frustrating let downs in their day to day lives.

Also, this was the third record in a row that I'd made with these musicians, along with engineer D. James Goodwin, following Faith in the Future (2015) and We All Want The Same Things (2017).

There is a level of creative comfort present due to having done so much work with Josh and Joe over the last five years. We speak the same language about parts and arrangements. We work quickly. We try things, nix them, move on to new things. Songs change a lot in the room. Things end up a long way from where they started. It's fun and rewarding. It's light on its feet.

Our challenge was to make something that felt emotionally and spiritually connected to the last two records, while offering a different perspective. The music needed to cast different shadows. The stories needed to shine a light in different corners.

The first session yielded four songs. The first song we recorded was “Magic Marker,” which seemed to set a mood and a character for the record. We got together a few more times over the first half of the year and recorded a bunch more songs. The record began revealing itself to us, as it always does. We brought in friends to color the songs with horns (Stuart Bogie, Raymond Mason, Dave Nelson) and back up vocals (Annie Nero, Cassandra Jenkins). We put the final touches on it and mixed it as 2018 came to a close.

We named it I Need A New War, after a lyric in the song “Grant at Galena.”

To me, the end result both connects to the previous two records and also sets itself apart -- the three albums together look at the same people, but from different angles. Faith in the Future is an album about perseverance, trusting that salvation is ahead if you work and believe. We All Want The Same Things is about making connections with other people, trying to form bonds and partnerships to help rise above the mundane and chaotic parts of life and love. I Need a New War is about people trying to respond to modern times, trying to keep pace with a world that might be moving faster than they are.

The characters in these songs put forth varying responses to the change happening around them. They deal with the inevitability of getting older, while trying not to get left behind. They try to get by. They move to bigger cities. They crawl back home. They look for love. They look for escape. They seek help. They seek answers. They formulate plans. They try to outlive past mistakes.

Mostly, they do their best.

And more so than any of my previous records, these songs turn the lens on New York City -- my home for the last 18 years. NYC itself is a city of constant change, throwing its own considerable weight on the people who live there. A number of these songs reflect on the inevitability of the city's forward motion.

And, perhaps, forward motion is everything. The characters in the songs on this record, and the last two, are trying to keep up and keep their heads above water. They succeed or they don't, but their stories are the tales of their attempts at pushing ahead.

And so, with my own push forward, I feel lucky and excited to be sharing these songs and stories.

Because I have Faith In The Future. and We All Want The Same Things. and I Need a New War.
cf
1.9.19

The first week of 2018, I entered Isokon Studio with Josh Kaufman and Joe Russo to start work on I Need A New War.

Going in, I saw this record as the third part of a trilogy. Thematically, this was the third group of songs that I had written about smaller moments -- people trying to stay afloat in modern times, attempting to find connection, achieving tiny triumphs and frustrating let downs in their day to day lives.

Also, this was the third record in a row that I'd made with these musicians, along with engineer D. James Goodwin, following Faith in the Future (2015) and We All Want The Same Things (2017).

There is a level of creative comfort present due to having done so much work with Josh and Joe over the last five years. We speak the same language about parts and arrangements. We work quickly. We try things, nix them, move on to new things. Songs change a lot in the room. Things end up a long way from where they started. It's fun and rewarding. It's light on its feet.

Our challenge was to make something that felt emotionally and spiritually connected to the last two records, while offering a different perspective. The music needed to cast different shadows. The stories needed to shine a light in different corners.

The first session yielded four songs. The first song we recorded was “Magic Marker,” which seemed to set a mood and a character for the record. We got together a few more times over the first half of the year and recorded a bunch more songs. The record began revealing itself to us, as it always does. We brought in friends to color the songs with horns (Stuart Bogie, Raymond Mason, Dave Nelson) and back up vocals (Annie Nero, Cassandra Jenkins). We put the final touches on it and mixed it as 2018 came to a close.

We named it I Need A New War, after a lyric in the song “Grant at Galena.”

To me, the end result both connects to the previous two records and also sets itself apart -- the three albums together look at the same people, but from different angles. Faith in the Future is an album about perseverance, trusting that salvation is ahead if you work and believe. We All Want The Same Things is about making connections with other people, trying to form bonds and partnerships to help rise above the mundane and chaotic parts of life and love. I Need a New War is about people trying to respond to modern times, trying to keep pace with a world that might be moving faster than they are.

The characters in these songs put forth varying responses to the change happening around them. They deal with the inevitability of getting older, while trying not to get left behind. They try to get by. They move to bigger cities. They crawl back home. They look for love. They look for escape. They seek help. They seek answers. They formulate plans. They try to outlive past mistakes.

Mostly, they do their best.

And more so than any of my previous records, these songs turn the lens on New York City -- my home for the last 18 years. NYC itself is a city of constant change, throwing its own considerable weight on the people who live there. A number of these songs reflect on the inevitability of the city's forward motion.

And, perhaps, forward motion is everything. The characters in the songs on this record, and the last two, are trying to keep up and keep their heads above water. They succeed or they don't, but their stories are the tales of their attempts at pushing ahead.

And so, with my own push forward, I feel lucky and excited to be sharing these songs and stories.

Because I have Faith In The Future. and We All Want The Same Things. and I Need a New War.
cf
1.9.19

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