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pittsburgh, pa
The Railsplitters with Special Guest Devilish Merry

Although rooted in traditional bluegrass and old time music, The Railsplitters are pushing the boundaries of those genres in every sense. With their lush harmonies, instrumental virtuosity and non-conformist songwriting, The Railsplitters deftly demonstrate what happens when musical influences ranging from samba to hip hop merge with traditional Appalachian music.
Hailing from the Rocky Mountain front range in Boulder, CO, the Railsplitters spend their time on the road appealing to audiences all across the US and Europe. Their line-up features Lauren Stovall and her 'Emmylou-esque' vocals in the lead, Dusty Rider's melodically intricate banjo licks, Peter Sharpe's Brazilian and bluesy flare on mandolin, Joe D'Esposito's New-England and Italian inspired fiddling and the ever-so-groovy Jean-Luc Davis on the double bass.
The Railsplitters have won multiple awards including first place in the RockyGrass Band Competition in 2013. They’ve also successfully crowd-funded all three of their studio albums, including their latest, which is to be released later this year. To celebrate the fifth anniversary of the band, The Railsplitters will release the new album in late 2017 featuring 10 tracks of all new, genre bending, original music.

Although rooted in traditional bluegrass and old time music, The Railsplitters are pushing the boundaries of those genres in every sense. With their lush harmonies, instrumental virtuosity and non-conformist songwriting, The Railsplitters deftly demonstrate what happens when musical influences ranging from samba to hip hop merge with traditional Appalachian music.
Hailing from the Rocky Mountain front range in Boulder, CO, the Railsplitters spend their time on the road appealing to audiences all across the US and Europe. Their line-up features Lauren Stovall and her 'Emmylou-esque' vocals in the lead, Dusty Rider's melodically intricate banjo licks, Peter Sharpe's Brazilian and bluesy flare on mandolin, Joe D'Esposito's New-England and Italian inspired fiddling and the ever-so-groovy Jean-Luc Davis on the double bass.
The Railsplitters have won multiple awards including first place in the RockyGrass Band Competition in 2013. They’ve also successfully crowd-funded all three of their studio albums, including their latest, which is to be released later this year. To celebrate the fifth anniversary of the band, The Railsplitters will release the new album in late 2017 featuring 10 tracks of all new, genre bending, original music.

Okey Dokey + Zuli with Special Guest Caleb Kopta

Okey Dokey
You can't fully appreciate the long history of recorded music without taking the time to look at the breakups. Whether it's for good or for the season, Okey Dokey is the product of that natural reformation that occurs when musicians part ways. Fronted by visual artist Aaron Martin and The Weeks' guitarist Johny Fisher, these two former band mates made the rare decision to revisit creating music together in Fisher's small cabin about 20 miles outside of Nashville, TN. What they created was a well blended mix of everything they loved about classic Motown combined with a dash of their psychedelic storytelling roots. With the record and touring band including a revolving group of musicians from bands such as The Weeks, Rayland Baxter Band, Desert Noises, Morning Teleportation, Ron Gallo, Kansas Bible Company, Houndmouth and more, their upcoming debut album 'Love You, Mean It' has a little bit of treasure for every type of listener.

Zuli
"The Artist that's changing the indie pop game, the five-track compilation is vaguely reminiscent of a trippy, hallucinogen-fueled daydream and tinged with '70s influences and swaying summer campfire sessions" - NYLON

"On new single “Better All the Time,” the New York native provides an electric three-minute trip into a spaced out fantasy, with a trippy soundscape full of glam rock and psych-pop influences" - SPIN

"Marrying the spaciness of Electric Light Orchestra's 'Strange Magic' and the sunniness of The Beatles' 'Getting Better,' "Better All The Time" by Zuli is a dazzling piece of pop" - The Deli

"It's rare that a video in 2015 bothers to craft a narrative, and it's even rarer for one to be so unfailingly entertaining. Along with the song and its weirdo dance jangles, "Better All The Time" is violently joyful" - Flavorwire

Okey Dokey
You can't fully appreciate the long history of recorded music without taking the time to look at the breakups. Whether it's for good or for the season, Okey Dokey is the product of that natural reformation that occurs when musicians part ways. Fronted by visual artist Aaron Martin and The Weeks' guitarist Johny Fisher, these two former band mates made the rare decision to revisit creating music together in Fisher's small cabin about 20 miles outside of Nashville, TN. What they created was a well blended mix of everything they loved about classic Motown combined with a dash of their psychedelic storytelling roots. With the record and touring band including a revolving group of musicians from bands such as The Weeks, Rayland Baxter Band, Desert Noises, Morning Teleportation, Ron Gallo, Kansas Bible Company, Houndmouth and more, their upcoming debut album 'Love You, Mean It' has a little bit of treasure for every type of listener.

Zuli
"The Artist that's changing the indie pop game, the five-track compilation is vaguely reminiscent of a trippy, hallucinogen-fueled daydream and tinged with '70s influences and swaying summer campfire sessions" - NYLON

"On new single “Better All the Time,” the New York native provides an electric three-minute trip into a spaced out fantasy, with a trippy soundscape full of glam rock and psych-pop influences" - SPIN

"Marrying the spaciness of Electric Light Orchestra's 'Strange Magic' and the sunniness of The Beatles' 'Getting Better,' "Better All The Time" by Zuli is a dazzling piece of pop" - The Deli

"It's rare that a video in 2015 bothers to craft a narrative, and it's even rarer for one to be so unfailingly entertaining. Along with the song and its weirdo dance jangles, "Better All The Time" is violently joyful" - Flavorwire

(Early Show) Steelesque with Special Guest Eric Bee

Steelesque is in the promotional phase of the band's new release "Toro Toro". Steelesque has had solid 18 months providing support for the following bands/artists: The Sheepdogs, Cracker, White Denim, Edgar Winter, The Fixx and Big Country. In a relatively short period of time, Eldridge has created a jam-filled blues rock sound that has put Steelesque on the map as a Steel City band to watch, and Eldridge as an influential artist within the city’s rock culture." (Indie Rock Cafe)

"This Pittsburgh group takes its cues from “Exile on Main Street”-era Stones, which is a good place for any band to start. Steelesque adds a touch of heartland boogie and some earthy psych influences a la Phish......" Scott Mervis - Pittsburgh Post Gazette

"Steelesque plays a Southern-influenced version of blues-rock reminiscent of acts like The Black Crowes.... and catchy pop hooks that seem straight out of Ray Davies' playbook" - Pittsburgh City Paper

"...a funked up Rolling Stones- Faces smooth rhythm and raunchy feel..outstanding lyrical sense with a tongue in cheek mischievous humor" - Pittsburgh Music Magazine

Steelesque is in the promotional phase of the band's new release "Toro Toro". Steelesque has had solid 18 months providing support for the following bands/artists: The Sheepdogs, Cracker, White Denim, Edgar Winter, The Fixx and Big Country. In a relatively short period of time, Eldridge has created a jam-filled blues rock sound that has put Steelesque on the map as a Steel City band to watch, and Eldridge as an influential artist within the city’s rock culture." (Indie Rock Cafe)

"This Pittsburgh group takes its cues from “Exile on Main Street”-era Stones, which is a good place for any band to start. Steelesque adds a touch of heartland boogie and some earthy psych influences a la Phish......" Scott Mervis - Pittsburgh Post Gazette

"Steelesque plays a Southern-influenced version of blues-rock reminiscent of acts like The Black Crowes.... and catchy pop hooks that seem straight out of Ray Davies' playbook" - Pittsburgh City Paper

"...a funked up Rolling Stones- Faces smooth rhythm and raunchy feel..outstanding lyrical sense with a tongue in cheek mischievous humor" - Pittsburgh Music Magazine

Octave Cat ft. Jesse Miller (Lotus), Eli Winderman (Dopapod), Charlie Patierno with Special Guests Sweet Earth

Octave Cat started unintentionally. Jesse Miller (bassist for Lotus) and Eli Winderman (keyboardist for Dopapod) met up to play some of Jesse's modular and vintage synthesizers. They recorded parts of the session which evolved into the tracks “Limber Up” and “Spar.” They brought in Charlie Patierno to play drums on these two tracks, and Octave Cat was born. Between their already busy tour schedules, the new trio (named for the first synth that initial session started with – the rare late 70s The Cat by Octave) continued to write and record. The group’s debut self-titled album is out now.

Octave Cat started unintentionally. Jesse Miller (bassist for Lotus) and Eli Winderman (keyboardist for Dopapod) met up to play some of Jesse's modular and vintage synthesizers. They recorded parts of the session which evolved into the tracks “Limber Up” and “Spar.” They brought in Charlie Patierno to play drums on these two tracks, and Octave Cat was born. Between their already busy tour schedules, the new trio (named for the first synth that initial session started with – the rare late 70s The Cat by Octave) continued to write and record. The group’s debut self-titled album is out now.

In Tall Buildings with Special Guest Bananafish

Akinetic, the new album from Chicago songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Erik Hall’s one-man polymathic project In Tall Buildings sees its creator plunge headlong into allegories of communication, loss, impulse, vice, and mass-denialism. With the addition of producer and engineer Brian Deck (Modest Mouse, Iron & Wine) Hall crashes through the aforementioned subject matter with brightness and lucidity, yielding his most intelligent and focused songwriting yet. Working out of his house with Deck in Pilsen, Chicago, Hall’s efforts yield ten tracks of spacious and textured handmade pop, comprising one of the most sharply written and deftly recorded home-studio albums in memory.

Due out March 2nd 2018 on Western Vinyl, Akinetic could not have transpired in any other time. Since his 2015 LP, Driver, Erik Hall has produced records for ambient artist Justin Walter and labelmates Lean Year, all while touring perpetually and sowing the seeds for his own new album. Where his previous titles were natural documents of his musicianship and songcraft, Akinetic arose from deliberate intent to write in concrete pop forms, lyrically informed by what he observed of modern culture, namely its fixation on technology-driven pseudo-progress at the cost of direct communication. “Rather than merely dwell in an inviting musical bed,” Hall states, “I wanted to write songs with intentionality that would more directly declare themselves to a listener instead of just passively inviting them in.

Akinetic, the new album from Chicago songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Erik Hall’s one-man polymathic project In Tall Buildings sees its creator plunge headlong into allegories of communication, loss, impulse, vice, and mass-denialism. With the addition of producer and engineer Brian Deck (Modest Mouse, Iron & Wine) Hall crashes through the aforementioned subject matter with brightness and lucidity, yielding his most intelligent and focused songwriting yet. Working out of his house with Deck in Pilsen, Chicago, Hall’s efforts yield ten tracks of spacious and textured handmade pop, comprising one of the most sharply written and deftly recorded home-studio albums in memory.

Due out March 2nd 2018 on Western Vinyl, Akinetic could not have transpired in any other time. Since his 2015 LP, Driver, Erik Hall has produced records for ambient artist Justin Walter and labelmates Lean Year, all while touring perpetually and sowing the seeds for his own new album. Where his previous titles were natural documents of his musicianship and songcraft, Akinetic arose from deliberate intent to write in concrete pop forms, lyrically informed by what he observed of modern culture, namely its fixation on technology-driven pseudo-progress at the cost of direct communication. “Rather than merely dwell in an inviting musical bed,” Hall states, “I wanted to write songs with intentionality that would more directly declare themselves to a listener instead of just passively inviting them in.

Weaves

It’s been almost exactly a year since Weaves released their acclaimed debut LP. The self-titled album was among the most anticipated of the year, and was lauded internationally upon its release for its exuberant approach to guitar pop, which was described as “one of the most unpredictable sounds of 2016” (MTV), and “a triumphant assault on all things conventional” (i-D). It was a whirlwind year for the band who spent a nearly uninterrupted 12 months on the road, playing festivals across the globe, and touring with their fellow 2016 breakout artists Sunflower Bean and Mitski. Propelled forward by their own momentum, which they corralled like the barely contained energy of their explosive live sets, it was a transformative experience, and upon returning home to Toronto the band’s leaders, singer Jasmyn Burke and guitarist Morgan Waters, found themselves possessed by an irrepressible burst of creative energy.

“We got back from the tour with Mitski on November 22nd and I started writing November 23rd,” Burke recalls. “We spent three months writing and pretty much figured out the album in its entirety in that timeframe. With the year we had I think we really hit this sweet spot where your brain is fully ready for something new, but has absorbed all of this information and it all just spews out. You just sort of let music happen.”

Weaves entered the studio in early 2017 to begin recording what would become their sophomore LP, Wide Open (due out October 6th, 2017 on Buzz, Kanine & Memphis Industries). Assisted by engineer Leon Taheny (Austra, Fucked Up) who worked with them on their first LP, they approached the album as a highwire act – walking the line between intention and their own gleefully anarchic creative impulses.

“The recording was mostly based around live off the floor playing with all four of us, and we tried to navigate a balance between thinking and not thinking,” says Waters. “We find that we don’t really figure anything out with words or rehearsing so for the most part we just didn’t. Sometimes it’s better that we don’t try to control it and there’s something nice about allowing yourself not to be in control.”

Weaves’ freewheeling compositional style is grounded on Wide Open by Burke’s songwriting, which is both more focused and more personal than on past releases. Burke writes in disciplined bursts, which on the last record consisted of isolated sessions with a looping pedal and a guitar recorded as voice memos on her iPhone, but this time around she varied her technique, often writing on an acoustic guitar, which expanded her songwriting palette in unexpected directions. Both Burke and Waters refer to the album as their “Americana” record, and while the statement is made with tongues placed firmly in cheeks, the album, without discarding the punky pyrotechnics that defined their first LP, displays an expansive and anthemic quality in songs like the opener “#53” and the sweeping “Walkaway,” that makes it clear there’s some truth behind the idea.

“Playing so many shows people come up to you and maybe identify with a song, or just say that what you did brought them up in some way, and it made me think about the context and what it means to share your personal experiences,” says Burke. “Maybe I was hesitant to be more forward in the past but I think I needed to get over that. It felt right to try to represent my own experience in the world while knowing that everyone in my age group is poor or having a tough time with life in one way or another, so I was thinking about how to blow those feelings up into these kinds of songs. Blowing up a regular life into something like an anthem. In a way I was thinking about it like Bruce Springsteen, but in a lot of ways my experience of the world couldn’t be less like Bruce Springsteen’s.”

The record sees Burke extend herself as a performer – moving more frequently to the center of arrangements and revealing new facets of her unique and powerful singing voice – as Waters, and the band’s dynamic rhythm section of bassist Zach Bines and drummer Spencer Cole, find ways to interpret the growing diversity of her expression. From the glammy Saturday night strut of “Slicked,” to the stripped-down, pedal steel abetted torch song “Wide Open,” to the searing “Scream,” a warped duet with Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq that likely constitutes Weaves’ wildest recording to date, the album captures a band for whom exploration is a compulsion making a self-assured step into the unknown.

“In making this album I didn’t feel any pressure or any fear, and I think that might be the difference between this album and the last,” Burke reflects. “It’s been a weird year, and even on the album cover we’re in bright colors, but we’re covered in soot and we look like we came out of an explosion and I think that’s kind of the way life is. Hopefully you can bring some light to people.”

It’s been almost exactly a year since Weaves released their acclaimed debut LP. The self-titled album was among the most anticipated of the year, and was lauded internationally upon its release for its exuberant approach to guitar pop, which was described as “one of the most unpredictable sounds of 2016” (MTV), and “a triumphant assault on all things conventional” (i-D). It was a whirlwind year for the band who spent a nearly uninterrupted 12 months on the road, playing festivals across the globe, and touring with their fellow 2016 breakout artists Sunflower Bean and Mitski. Propelled forward by their own momentum, which they corralled like the barely contained energy of their explosive live sets, it was a transformative experience, and upon returning home to Toronto the band’s leaders, singer Jasmyn Burke and guitarist Morgan Waters, found themselves possessed by an irrepressible burst of creative energy.

“We got back from the tour with Mitski on November 22nd and I started writing November 23rd,” Burke recalls. “We spent three months writing and pretty much figured out the album in its entirety in that timeframe. With the year we had I think we really hit this sweet spot where your brain is fully ready for something new, but has absorbed all of this information and it all just spews out. You just sort of let music happen.”

Weaves entered the studio in early 2017 to begin recording what would become their sophomore LP, Wide Open (due out October 6th, 2017 on Buzz, Kanine & Memphis Industries). Assisted by engineer Leon Taheny (Austra, Fucked Up) who worked with them on their first LP, they approached the album as a highwire act – walking the line between intention and their own gleefully anarchic creative impulses.

“The recording was mostly based around live off the floor playing with all four of us, and we tried to navigate a balance between thinking and not thinking,” says Waters. “We find that we don’t really figure anything out with words or rehearsing so for the most part we just didn’t. Sometimes it’s better that we don’t try to control it and there’s something nice about allowing yourself not to be in control.”

Weaves’ freewheeling compositional style is grounded on Wide Open by Burke’s songwriting, which is both more focused and more personal than on past releases. Burke writes in disciplined bursts, which on the last record consisted of isolated sessions with a looping pedal and a guitar recorded as voice memos on her iPhone, but this time around she varied her technique, often writing on an acoustic guitar, which expanded her songwriting palette in unexpected directions. Both Burke and Waters refer to the album as their “Americana” record, and while the statement is made with tongues placed firmly in cheeks, the album, without discarding the punky pyrotechnics that defined their first LP, displays an expansive and anthemic quality in songs like the opener “#53” and the sweeping “Walkaway,” that makes it clear there’s some truth behind the idea.

“Playing so many shows people come up to you and maybe identify with a song, or just say that what you did brought them up in some way, and it made me think about the context and what it means to share your personal experiences,” says Burke. “Maybe I was hesitant to be more forward in the past but I think I needed to get over that. It felt right to try to represent my own experience in the world while knowing that everyone in my age group is poor or having a tough time with life in one way or another, so I was thinking about how to blow those feelings up into these kinds of songs. Blowing up a regular life into something like an anthem. In a way I was thinking about it like Bruce Springsteen, but in a lot of ways my experience of the world couldn’t be less like Bruce Springsteen’s.”

The record sees Burke extend herself as a performer – moving more frequently to the center of arrangements and revealing new facets of her unique and powerful singing voice – as Waters, and the band’s dynamic rhythm section of bassist Zach Bines and drummer Spencer Cole, find ways to interpret the growing diversity of her expression. From the glammy Saturday night strut of “Slicked,” to the stripped-down, pedal steel abetted torch song “Wide Open,” to the searing “Scream,” a warped duet with Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq that likely constitutes Weaves’ wildest recording to date, the album captures a band for whom exploration is a compulsion making a self-assured step into the unknown.

“In making this album I didn’t feel any pressure or any fear, and I think that might be the difference between this album and the last,” Burke reflects. “It’s been a weird year, and even on the album cover we’re in bright colors, but we’re covered in soot and we look like we came out of an explosion and I think that’s kind of the way life is. Hopefully you can bring some light to people.”

Marty O'Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra

This four-man orchestra seamlessly weaves trance based blues music, harkening back to John Lee Hooker and Howlin’ Wolf, with a drunken minor swing comparable to some of Tom Waits’ darker works.

Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra hail from Santa Cruz, California. The band features O’Reilly on the electrified Resonator guitar and vocals, Chris Lynch on the Fiddle, Ben Berry on upright bass, and Matt Goff joining in on the drums. Within the five years since this project started, the band is already touring nationally, internationally, and selling out venues along the West Coast and throughout the United Kingdom.

The band’s latest studio effort, Stereoscope, marks a departure from the band’s adolescent Americana roots into music that is more nuanced, challenging, and rewarding. The band has grown, and it can be heard everywhere: in Marty’s voice, in the lyrical content, in the arrangements, and in the musicianship. This album will be one that listeners can come back to again and again, taking away something different each time.

This four-man orchestra seamlessly weaves trance based blues music, harkening back to John Lee Hooker and Howlin’ Wolf, with a drunken minor swing comparable to some of Tom Waits’ darker works.

Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra hail from Santa Cruz, California. The band features O’Reilly on the electrified Resonator guitar and vocals, Chris Lynch on the Fiddle, Ben Berry on upright bass, and Matt Goff joining in on the drums. Within the five years since this project started, the band is already touring nationally, internationally, and selling out venues along the West Coast and throughout the United Kingdom.

The band’s latest studio effort, Stereoscope, marks a departure from the band’s adolescent Americana roots into music that is more nuanced, challenging, and rewarding. The band has grown, and it can be heard everywhere: in Marty’s voice, in the lyrical content, in the arrangements, and in the musicianship. This album will be one that listeners can come back to again and again, taking away something different each time.

SOLD OUT - Lightning Bolt with Special Guest Glockabelle

Over the course of its two-decade existence, Lightning Bolt has revolutionized underground rock in immeasurable ways. The duo broke the barrier between stage and audience by setting themselves up on the floor in the midst of the crowd. Their momentous live performances and the mania they inspired paved the way for similar tactics used by Dan Deacon and literally hundreds of others. Similarly, the band's recordings have always been chaotic, roaring, blown out documents that sound like they could destroy even the toughest set of speakers. Fantasy Empire, Lightning Bolt's sixth album and first in five years, is a fresh take from a band intent on pushing themselves musically and sonically while maintaining the aesthetic that has defined not only them, but an entire generation of noisemakers. It marks many firsts, most notably their first recordings made using hi-fi recording equipment at the famed Machines With Magnets, and their first album for Thrill Jockey. More than any previous album, Fantasy Empire sounds like drummer Brian Chippendale and bassist Brian Gibson are playing just a few feet away, using the clarity afforded by the studio to amplify the intensity they project. Every frantic drum hit, every fuzzed-out riff, sounds more present and tangible than ever before.

Fantasy Empire is ferocious, consuming, and is a more accurate translation of their live experience. It also shows Lightning Bolt embracing new ways to make their music even stranger. More than any previous record, Chippendale and Gibson make use of live loops and complete separation of the instruments during recording to maximize the sonic pandemonium and power. Gibson worked with Machines very carefully to get a clear yet still distorted and intense bass sound, allowing listeners to truly absorb the detail and dynamic range he displays, from the heaviest thud to the subtle melodic embellishments. Some of these songs have been in the band's live repertoire since as early as 2010, and have been refined in front of audiences for maximum impact. This is heavy, turbulent music, but it is executed with the precision of musicians that have spent years learning how to create impactful noise through the use of dynamics, melody, and rhythm.

Fantasy Empire has been in gestation for four years, with some songs having been recorded on lo-fi equipment before ultimately being scrapped. Since Early Delights was released, the band has collaborated with the Flaming Lips multiple times, and continued to tour relentlessly. 2013 saw the release of All My Relations by Black Pus, Chippendale's solo outlet, which was followed by a split LP with Oozing Wound. Chippendale, an accomplished comic artist and illustrator, created the Fantasy Empire's subtly ominous album art, and will release an upcoming book of his comics through respected imprint Drawn and Quarterly. Brian Gibson has been developing the new video game Thumper, with his own company, Drool, which will be released next year. And, of course, Lightning Bolt will be touring the US in 2015.

Over the course of its two-decade existence, Lightning Bolt has revolutionized underground rock in immeasurable ways. The duo broke the barrier between stage and audience by setting themselves up on the floor in the midst of the crowd. Their momentous live performances and the mania they inspired paved the way for similar tactics used by Dan Deacon and literally hundreds of others. Similarly, the band's recordings have always been chaotic, roaring, blown out documents that sound like they could destroy even the toughest set of speakers. Fantasy Empire, Lightning Bolt's sixth album and first in five years, is a fresh take from a band intent on pushing themselves musically and sonically while maintaining the aesthetic that has defined not only them, but an entire generation of noisemakers. It marks many firsts, most notably their first recordings made using hi-fi recording equipment at the famed Machines With Magnets, and their first album for Thrill Jockey. More than any previous album, Fantasy Empire sounds like drummer Brian Chippendale and bassist Brian Gibson are playing just a few feet away, using the clarity afforded by the studio to amplify the intensity they project. Every frantic drum hit, every fuzzed-out riff, sounds more present and tangible than ever before.

Fantasy Empire is ferocious, consuming, and is a more accurate translation of their live experience. It also shows Lightning Bolt embracing new ways to make their music even stranger. More than any previous record, Chippendale and Gibson make use of live loops and complete separation of the instruments during recording to maximize the sonic pandemonium and power. Gibson worked with Machines very carefully to get a clear yet still distorted and intense bass sound, allowing listeners to truly absorb the detail and dynamic range he displays, from the heaviest thud to the subtle melodic embellishments. Some of these songs have been in the band's live repertoire since as early as 2010, and have been refined in front of audiences for maximum impact. This is heavy, turbulent music, but it is executed with the precision of musicians that have spent years learning how to create impactful noise through the use of dynamics, melody, and rhythm.

Fantasy Empire has been in gestation for four years, with some songs having been recorded on lo-fi equipment before ultimately being scrapped. Since Early Delights was released, the band has collaborated with the Flaming Lips multiple times, and continued to tour relentlessly. 2013 saw the release of All My Relations by Black Pus, Chippendale's solo outlet, which was followed by a split LP with Oozing Wound. Chippendale, an accomplished comic artist and illustrator, created the Fantasy Empire's subtly ominous album art, and will release an upcoming book of his comics through respected imprint Drawn and Quarterly. Brian Gibson has been developing the new video game Thumper, with his own company, Drool, which will be released next year. And, of course, Lightning Bolt will be touring the US in 2015.

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Andy Picarro with Special Guest Matt Light

Born in Pittsburgh, PA and raised in central New Jersey. Andy began doing standup at the Comedy Village in New York City and was a regular at The Underground Lounge. Now residing in Pittsburgh, Andy regularly works at the Pittsburgh Improv and has opened for; Pauly Shore, Josh Blue, Todd Glass, Pete Davidson, Joey Diaz, Otto and George amongst many others. Andy has performed in many Comedy Festivals including; The Accidental Comedy Festival, Whiskey Bear Comedy Festival, The Derby City Comedy Festival, Pittsburgh Comedy Festival, Burning Bridges Comedy Festival, Cleveland Comedy Festival, Yonkers Comedy Festival, WDVE Comedy Festival and The “HIGHlarious” Comedy Festival in Seattle.

Born in Pittsburgh, PA and raised in central New Jersey. Andy began doing standup at the Comedy Village in New York City and was a regular at The Underground Lounge. Now residing in Pittsburgh, Andy regularly works at the Pittsburgh Improv and has opened for; Pauly Shore, Josh Blue, Todd Glass, Pete Davidson, Joey Diaz, Otto and George amongst many others. Andy has performed in many Comedy Festivals including; The Accidental Comedy Festival, Whiskey Bear Comedy Festival, The Derby City Comedy Festival, Pittsburgh Comedy Festival, Burning Bridges Comedy Festival, Cleveland Comedy Festival, Yonkers Comedy Festival, WDVE Comedy Festival and The “HIGHlarious” Comedy Festival in Seattle.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)