club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Chris Smither with Special Guest Zak Trojano

CALL ME LUCKY is the new record from Chris Smither and is his first set of brand new originals in six years (March 2018 | Signature Sounds/Mighty Albert). Recorded at the gorgeous Blue Rock Studio in the Texas foothills. Packed with Smither trademark songs that offer commentary on the human condition with a wink of an eye and pulls from deep in the soul and a couple of surprise covers that remind us of Chris' deftness as a song interpreter as he makes the songs his own. CALL ME LUCKY features longtime producer and multi-instrumentalist David Goodrich, drummer Billy Conway (Morphine), Matt Lorenz (aka The Suitcase Junket), Mike Meadows, and engineer Keith Gary. They went into the session to record ten songs. What they ended up with is a double record: Disc 1 features the eight originals and two covers they started with; Disc 2 catapults some of the very same songs into another dimension. Essentially Smither covering Smither.

Fans from around the world continue to fill concert halls, music clubs, and festivals ready for the Smither experience. Reviewers including those from the Associated Press, NPR, Mojo, and The New York Times agree that Smither remains a significant songwriter and an electrifying guitarist — an American original — as he draws deeply from folk and blues, modern poets and philosophers. And with CALL ME LUCKY he keeps doing just that.

CALL ME LUCKY is the new record from Chris Smither and is his first set of brand new originals in six years (March 2018 | Signature Sounds/Mighty Albert). Recorded at the gorgeous Blue Rock Studio in the Texas foothills. Packed with Smither trademark songs that offer commentary on the human condition with a wink of an eye and pulls from deep in the soul and a couple of surprise covers that remind us of Chris' deftness as a song interpreter as he makes the songs his own. CALL ME LUCKY features longtime producer and multi-instrumentalist David Goodrich, drummer Billy Conway (Morphine), Matt Lorenz (aka The Suitcase Junket), Mike Meadows, and engineer Keith Gary. They went into the session to record ten songs. What they ended up with is a double record: Disc 1 features the eight originals and two covers they started with; Disc 2 catapults some of the very same songs into another dimension. Essentially Smither covering Smither.

Fans from around the world continue to fill concert halls, music clubs, and festivals ready for the Smither experience. Reviewers including those from the Associated Press, NPR, Mojo, and The New York Times agree that Smither remains a significant songwriter and an electrifying guitarist — an American original — as he draws deeply from folk and blues, modern poets and philosophers. And with CALL ME LUCKY he keeps doing just that.

Smooth Hound Smith with Special Guest Millgroves Crossing

Smooth Hound Smith is a foot stompin’ American roots duo comprised of “one-man-band” Zack Smith (guitars/vocals/foot drums/harmonicas/banjo) and Caitlin Doyle (vocals/percussion). Established in 2012, and based in East Nashville, TN, they record and perform a varied and unique style of folky, garage-infused rhythm & blues. Using primal foot percussion, complex, fuzzed-out, finger-picked guitar patterns, warbled harmonicas, tasty harmonies and A LOT of tambourine, they are able to create something rugged and visceral- a modern interpretation of early blues, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll music that harkens back to the traditions of hazy front porch folk songs as well as raucous back-alley juke joints.

The duo has traveled over 150,000 road miles, playing over 800 shows across America, Europe, and Canada, all in the last five years. In addition to their own headlining shows, they have toured as support for bands such as the Dixie Chicks (25 dates in the US and Canada in 2016/2017), The Record Company, and Jamestown Revival.

Their eponymous debut album garnered attention from media outlets such as Nashville’s independent radio, WRLT Lightning 100, as well as publications like American Songwriter and RELIX Magazine. They were also selected over thousands of other bands to perform at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, headlined by Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, and more. In addition, the music of Smooth Hound Smith has been featured on CMT’s Nashville, MTV’s The Real World and the Esquire Network.

Smooth Hound Smith’s second full-length album, Sweet Tennessee Honey, was released in 2016, and features appearances by Natalie Maines (Dixie Chicks), Sarah Jarosz, and Jano Rix (The Wood Brothers). They continue to tour heavily while working on new material for a third full-length album, expected to be released in 2018.

Smooth Hound Smith is a foot stompin’ American roots duo comprised of “one-man-band” Zack Smith (guitars/vocals/foot drums/harmonicas/banjo) and Caitlin Doyle (vocals/percussion). Established in 2012, and based in East Nashville, TN, they record and perform a varied and unique style of folky, garage-infused rhythm & blues. Using primal foot percussion, complex, fuzzed-out, finger-picked guitar patterns, warbled harmonicas, tasty harmonies and A LOT of tambourine, they are able to create something rugged and visceral- a modern interpretation of early blues, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll music that harkens back to the traditions of hazy front porch folk songs as well as raucous back-alley juke joints.

The duo has traveled over 150,000 road miles, playing over 800 shows across America, Europe, and Canada, all in the last five years. In addition to their own headlining shows, they have toured as support for bands such as the Dixie Chicks (25 dates in the US and Canada in 2016/2017), The Record Company, and Jamestown Revival.

Their eponymous debut album garnered attention from media outlets such as Nashville’s independent radio, WRLT Lightning 100, as well as publications like American Songwriter and RELIX Magazine. They were also selected over thousands of other bands to perform at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, headlined by Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, and more. In addition, the music of Smooth Hound Smith has been featured on CMT’s Nashville, MTV’s The Real World and the Esquire Network.

Smooth Hound Smith’s second full-length album, Sweet Tennessee Honey, was released in 2016, and features appearances by Natalie Maines (Dixie Chicks), Sarah Jarosz, and Jano Rix (The Wood Brothers). They continue to tour heavily while working on new material for a third full-length album, expected to be released in 2018.

Canceled - The Huntress and Holder of Hands with Special Guest Pairdown

Due to scheduling issues beyond our control, the artist has canceled this date. Refunds are available at point of purchase. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Due to scheduling issues beyond our control, the artist has canceled this date. Refunds are available at point of purchase. We apologize for any inconvenience.

(Early Show) Lee Robinson & ISKA

Lee Robinson has been blending his improvisations with different styles of music for years. His performances have given generation of listeners a broader appreciation for music.

Along with his talented groups "Iska and Unspunt Orkestra" they provide powerful performances that transport their listeners on a multi-dimensional musical journey through jazz styles of, contemporary, funk, classical and original compositions.

Lee Robinson has been blending his improvisations with different styles of music for years. His performances have given generation of listeners a broader appreciation for music.

Along with his talented groups "Iska and Unspunt Orkestra" they provide powerful performances that transport their listeners on a multi-dimensional musical journey through jazz styles of, contemporary, funk, classical and original compositions.

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Bait and Switch, Miniature Table Concert, Lorenzo's Oil and Special Guests

Bait & Switch has been going at it in Pittsburgh, PA since around 2006. Comprised of two members, Sean G. Donaldson and Addi Twigg, the duo will twist your favorite pop songs into something so terrible and beautiful that you won’t want to look away.

The pair has performed at charity events, variety shows, comedy gigs, and even weddings — but has become something of an unofficial darling of the Pittsburgh improv comedy scene. Bait & Switch performs frequently at Pitt’s Friday Nite Improvs, the city’s only all audience-participation improv show, and we have made pals with Hustlebot, Pittsburgh’s tallest improv comedy troupe.

Though most of our time is spent on warping the styles of various pop songs, we have been known to make the occasional “traditional” parody (changing the lyrics of the song) on behalf of local sports fans. That’s right, we’re Steelers and Penguin fans! Wait, what do you mean Pittsburgh has a baseball team?

Bait & Switch will try almost anything once - just ask us nicely!

Bait & Switch has been going at it in Pittsburgh, PA since around 2006. Comprised of two members, Sean G. Donaldson and Addi Twigg, the duo will twist your favorite pop songs into something so terrible and beautiful that you won’t want to look away.

The pair has performed at charity events, variety shows, comedy gigs, and even weddings — but has become something of an unofficial darling of the Pittsburgh improv comedy scene. Bait & Switch performs frequently at Pitt’s Friday Nite Improvs, the city’s only all audience-participation improv show, and we have made pals with Hustlebot, Pittsburgh’s tallest improv comedy troupe.

Though most of our time is spent on warping the styles of various pop songs, we have been known to make the occasional “traditional” parody (changing the lyrics of the song) on behalf of local sports fans. That’s right, we’re Steelers and Penguin fans! Wait, what do you mean Pittsburgh has a baseball team?

Bait & Switch will try almost anything once - just ask us nicely!

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present

The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

The best of burlesque and variety from around the world.

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present

The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

The best of burlesque and variety from around the world.

The Tillers / Lost Dog Street Band

The Tillers
The Tillers have been thumping their own distinctive sound of string band style folk music for a decade, riding it all over the country and across the sea. Four studio albums and one live record have won them praise as modern folk storytellers of the national soundscape.

Lost Dog Street Band
Lost Dog Street Band tours the country each year, delivering their story through song in venues nationwide. Drawing from years of lonely tramping, and more than one tragic loss, Lost Dog Street Band has crafted a distinct sound that is best described as ‘dark country’. In the same vein as country-legend Guy Clark, Benjamin Tod weaves his melodies and lyrics together to offer listeners an unapologetically raw and authentic account of the human experience.

The Tillers
The Tillers have been thumping their own distinctive sound of string band style folk music for a decade, riding it all over the country and across the sea. Four studio albums and one live record have won them praise as modern folk storytellers of the national soundscape.

Lost Dog Street Band
Lost Dog Street Band tours the country each year, delivering their story through song in venues nationwide. Drawing from years of lonely tramping, and more than one tragic loss, Lost Dog Street Band has crafted a distinct sound that is best described as ‘dark country’. In the same vein as country-legend Guy Clark, Benjamin Tod weaves his melodies and lyrics together to offer listeners an unapologetically raw and authentic account of the human experience.

Matthew Logan Vasquez with Special Guest Parker Gispert (of The Whigs)

Matthew Logan Vasquez is feeling optimistic.

That's not necessarily apparent the first time you spin his new full-length solo album. Each track on Matthew Logan Does What He Wants feels urgent and intense. Impatient landlords, financial woes and other frustrations fan the agitation embedded in the opening track, "Same." Isolation darkens the brooding images of "From Behind The Glass." Death takes a bow on "The Fighter." Vasquez can't help but juxtapose the celebration of "Fatherhood" with a lament that "we ain't got the money to pay the hospital." The music enhances this impression. As fans of his work with Delta Spirit and Middle Brother know well, Vasquez knows how to fuse passion and poetry in his writing and then ignite this volatile mix with extraordinarily expressive singing. In this sense he stands as a peer and a worthy successor to those who influenced him as an up-and-coming artist - Neil Young, Kurt Cobain, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed and others often mentioned, none of them known for their upbeat, sunny lyrics. With the 2016 release Solicitor Returns. "That last record had a sarcastic, darker tone. The new one is just as hard-hitting and wide-ranging but with a more positive message." This becomes clearer when you replay Does What He Wants and listen more carefully. On the surface, "Tall Man" unfolds as a journey into self-destruction. But at the end, the subject of the story is repeating "I know I can change," each time with escalating emotion as brought to life in Vasquez's searing vocal. "Bad things happen in the song," he acknowledges. "But it all leads to an epiphany. And that is positive. The truth rarely comes to you in an easy way - not unless you're a wiser person than I am. "My point is that life is a struggle," Vasquez continues. "But how can you have optimism and hope if you don't have something negative? Context is what makes it meaningful." For Vasquez, context involves drawing from dramatically different settings. Growing up in Texas and along the California coast, hunkering down for years in Brooklyn as he finessed his music in a more pressurized urban context and then heading back to Austin to put all the pieces together, he took note of the differences and similarities these places offered. During much of that time he channeled his experiences into Delta Spirit, whose albums inspired critics to laud the band as "restless and defiant" (Paste), its music infused by "waves of measured ferocity" (Uncut) and "significant depth" (Austin Chronicle). Vasquez was actually in the process of writing for a projected upcoming Delta Spirit project early last year when he began to think that it might be more appropriate to focus instead on his next solo effort. "I was imagining a new Delta Spirit album as I was writing," he says. "But I began to realize that's not exactly where I'm at right now. The band isn't broken up but it's not coming back right now. I started to feel like Rhett Miller, who had to go away from the Old 97s for a while so he could get tap into his creativity and come back to the band in a new and healthy way." To keep his path clear and work on his own terms, Vasquez built a studio in his home for this past year - a trailer parked about an hour west of Austin. Here, in Texas Hill Country, surrounded by evergreen oak trees, he wrote and recorded basic tracks and then brought in singer Kam Franklin from The Suffers and Shakey Graves drummer Christopher Booshada to add parts as needed. For backup vocals and string parts, he worked long-distance via sound files with the Parkington Sisters, who he performed with during a Middle Brother set at last year's Newport Folk Festival. "They performed a miracle, giving me a 3-D depth that makes the tracks they appear on jump out of the speakers," he insists. In final form, Does What He Wants is like a hall of mirrors, each capturing a different image of one self-aware and restlessly creative individual. The pure finger-picked acoustic guitar that sets up vivid stories on "The Informant" and "Tall Man," the retro textures of "Headed West" (which, Vasquez points out, were actually played on real strings by the Parkingtons), the lofting melody that evokes Roy Orbison ("the greatest singer in the history of singers," Vasquez opines), the waterfall of harmonies in "The Fighter" - This music is diverse yet unified, which of course was a priority for its author. And, in the end, it turns out to feel pretty optimistic after all - a perfect statement for these times and possibly for some time to come.

Matthew Logan Vasquez is feeling optimistic.

That's not necessarily apparent the first time you spin his new full-length solo album. Each track on Matthew Logan Does What He Wants feels urgent and intense. Impatient landlords, financial woes and other frustrations fan the agitation embedded in the opening track, "Same." Isolation darkens the brooding images of "From Behind The Glass." Death takes a bow on "The Fighter." Vasquez can't help but juxtapose the celebration of "Fatherhood" with a lament that "we ain't got the money to pay the hospital." The music enhances this impression. As fans of his work with Delta Spirit and Middle Brother know well, Vasquez knows how to fuse passion and poetry in his writing and then ignite this volatile mix with extraordinarily expressive singing. In this sense he stands as a peer and a worthy successor to those who influenced him as an up-and-coming artist - Neil Young, Kurt Cobain, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed and others often mentioned, none of them known for their upbeat, sunny lyrics. With the 2016 release Solicitor Returns. "That last record had a sarcastic, darker tone. The new one is just as hard-hitting and wide-ranging but with a more positive message." This becomes clearer when you replay Does What He Wants and listen more carefully. On the surface, "Tall Man" unfolds as a journey into self-destruction. But at the end, the subject of the story is repeating "I know I can change," each time with escalating emotion as brought to life in Vasquez's searing vocal. "Bad things happen in the song," he acknowledges. "But it all leads to an epiphany. And that is positive. The truth rarely comes to you in an easy way - not unless you're a wiser person than I am. "My point is that life is a struggle," Vasquez continues. "But how can you have optimism and hope if you don't have something negative? Context is what makes it meaningful." For Vasquez, context involves drawing from dramatically different settings. Growing up in Texas and along the California coast, hunkering down for years in Brooklyn as he finessed his music in a more pressurized urban context and then heading back to Austin to put all the pieces together, he took note of the differences and similarities these places offered. During much of that time he channeled his experiences into Delta Spirit, whose albums inspired critics to laud the band as "restless and defiant" (Paste), its music infused by "waves of measured ferocity" (Uncut) and "significant depth" (Austin Chronicle). Vasquez was actually in the process of writing for a projected upcoming Delta Spirit project early last year when he began to think that it might be more appropriate to focus instead on his next solo effort. "I was imagining a new Delta Spirit album as I was writing," he says. "But I began to realize that's not exactly where I'm at right now. The band isn't broken up but it's not coming back right now. I started to feel like Rhett Miller, who had to go away from the Old 97s for a while so he could get tap into his creativity and come back to the band in a new and healthy way." To keep his path clear and work on his own terms, Vasquez built a studio in his home for this past year - a trailer parked about an hour west of Austin. Here, in Texas Hill Country, surrounded by evergreen oak trees, he wrote and recorded basic tracks and then brought in singer Kam Franklin from The Suffers and Shakey Graves drummer Christopher Booshada to add parts as needed. For backup vocals and string parts, he worked long-distance via sound files with the Parkington Sisters, who he performed with during a Middle Brother set at last year's Newport Folk Festival. "They performed a miracle, giving me a 3-D depth that makes the tracks they appear on jump out of the speakers," he insists. In final form, Does What He Wants is like a hall of mirrors, each capturing a different image of one self-aware and restlessly creative individual. The pure finger-picked acoustic guitar that sets up vivid stories on "The Informant" and "Tall Man," the retro textures of "Headed West" (which, Vasquez points out, were actually played on real strings by the Parkingtons), the lofting melody that evokes Roy Orbison ("the greatest singer in the history of singers," Vasquez opines), the waterfall of harmonies in "The Fighter" - This music is diverse yet unified, which of course was a priority for its author. And, in the end, it turns out to feel pretty optimistic after all - a perfect statement for these times and possibly for some time to come.

Western Centuries with Special Guest Juvenile Characteristics

When did country music start to sound the same? The first generation of country artists borrowed from everything around them: Appalachian stringband music, Texas fiddle traditions, cowboy songs, Delta blues. In an era of unprecedented access to our musical pasts, shouldn’t country music be even more diverse than it was in its infancy? Honky-tonk supergroup Western Centuries, back with a new album in 2018, surely understands this. They aren’t bound by any dictum to write songs in a modern country, or even a retro country style; instead they’re taking their own personal influences as three very different songwriters and fusing it into a sound that moves beyond the constraints of country. Part of the reason they can make music with this range of influences is because of their roots in city life. Both Cahalen Morrison and Ethan Lawton, two of the three principal songwriters, live in Seattle’s diverse South end, and the third songwriter, Jim Miller, spends most of his time in and around New York City. The urban landscape is rarely mentioned in country music, but it makes for a refreshing sound that draws as easily from modern R&B as it does George Jones. It helps too that the album was recorded and co-produced by acclaimed musician and Grammy-winning producer Joel Savoy in Eunice, Louisiana, where local Cajun and Creole artists have always been adept at marrying old country sounds with R&B and rock n roll.

With Songs from the Deluge, out April 6, 2018 on Free Dirt Records, Western Centuries brings three songwriting voices together into a more unified sound than ever before. Over the past year of heavy touring (since the release of their last album), they’ve pushed each other hard as songwriters. But with a band this well tested on the road, it’s the sonic and lyrical places where each artist’s styles depart that’s most interesting.

Ethan Lawton, known for his earlier work in Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers, loves to pen imaginative parables about people living at extremes. "Wild You Run" by Lawton tells the story of watching someone you love deteriorate with a crippling addiction. The subject chases his temptation, but loses his soul as Lawton cries out helplessly "I won't tell mama what you done, go have your fun....” Lawton's "My Own Private Honky Tonk" is a rambunctious new take on the drinkin' alone narrative which finds Lawton dancing and playing music until the downstairs neighbors call. It's a boogie-woogie flavored tune à la Fats Domino that highlights the upright bass work of Nokosee Fields, the band's newest member. With the opening track, “Far From Home,” Lawton wails "mother, dear mother, won't you spin a yarn about the way things were.” It's about the dark days that young men found abroad in Vietnam and the personal wars they had to fight when they returned back home.

Cahalen Morrison, known for his earlier duo work with Eli West, is the country boy to Lawton's urban cowboy, inspired by his love for cowboy poetry and the New Mexican desert where he grew up. He's got a knack for bending words around stories until they're as funny as they are tragic, as fantastic as they are real. His songs grow like mesquite in the desert; they twist and turn. On "Earthly Justice," Morrison sings of barflys and their troubles, remarking sardonically "if earthly justice just don't get them in the end, there's always a heavenly trial on its way" as vocal harmonies and pedal steel two step all around him. On Morrison’s album closer "Warm Guns,” he waxes quixotic about loss in love, singing in Spanish about being a victim of his own flaws.

Jim Miller, known for his earlier work with Donna the Buffalo, is the resident psychedelic poet. Like the best country songwriters, Miller's sense of communion with nature turns his songs into works of magical realism. On "Wild Birds", a song about a road-bound band, he consults the moss, befriends the tide, and survives fire all while asking for prayers to guide his band home to the end of their migration. "Borrow Time" features Louisiana accordion legend Roddie Romero, and the album's best harmonies between the three lead singers. Some of his most beautiful lines happen on "Time Does The Rest" as he sings "Your heart knows what’s best / Hold her close, the lips will confess / Let it rise let it fall, time does the rest".

Western Centuries’ music crosses vastly differing geographies–the city, the southwest, the metaphysical. And their musical influences are equally as diverse. Together, they weave a tapestry of western music, without sacrificing their hard-earned country dancehall sound. Songs from the Deluge will levitate heavy hearts, turn spilled beer into ballads, and bring country music home as literate, epic odysseys from parts unknown.

When did country music start to sound the same? The first generation of country artists borrowed from everything around them: Appalachian stringband music, Texas fiddle traditions, cowboy songs, Delta blues. In an era of unprecedented access to our musical pasts, shouldn’t country music be even more diverse than it was in its infancy? Honky-tonk supergroup Western Centuries, back with a new album in 2018, surely understands this. They aren’t bound by any dictum to write songs in a modern country, or even a retro country style; instead they’re taking their own personal influences as three very different songwriters and fusing it into a sound that moves beyond the constraints of country. Part of the reason they can make music with this range of influences is because of their roots in city life. Both Cahalen Morrison and Ethan Lawton, two of the three principal songwriters, live in Seattle’s diverse South end, and the third songwriter, Jim Miller, spends most of his time in and around New York City. The urban landscape is rarely mentioned in country music, but it makes for a refreshing sound that draws as easily from modern R&B as it does George Jones. It helps too that the album was recorded and co-produced by acclaimed musician and Grammy-winning producer Joel Savoy in Eunice, Louisiana, where local Cajun and Creole artists have always been adept at marrying old country sounds with R&B and rock n roll.

With Songs from the Deluge, out April 6, 2018 on Free Dirt Records, Western Centuries brings three songwriting voices together into a more unified sound than ever before. Over the past year of heavy touring (since the release of their last album), they’ve pushed each other hard as songwriters. But with a band this well tested on the road, it’s the sonic and lyrical places where each artist’s styles depart that’s most interesting.

Ethan Lawton, known for his earlier work in Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers, loves to pen imaginative parables about people living at extremes. "Wild You Run" by Lawton tells the story of watching someone you love deteriorate with a crippling addiction. The subject chases his temptation, but loses his soul as Lawton cries out helplessly "I won't tell mama what you done, go have your fun....” Lawton's "My Own Private Honky Tonk" is a rambunctious new take on the drinkin' alone narrative which finds Lawton dancing and playing music until the downstairs neighbors call. It's a boogie-woogie flavored tune à la Fats Domino that highlights the upright bass work of Nokosee Fields, the band's newest member. With the opening track, “Far From Home,” Lawton wails "mother, dear mother, won't you spin a yarn about the way things were.” It's about the dark days that young men found abroad in Vietnam and the personal wars they had to fight when they returned back home.

Cahalen Morrison, known for his earlier duo work with Eli West, is the country boy to Lawton's urban cowboy, inspired by his love for cowboy poetry and the New Mexican desert where he grew up. He's got a knack for bending words around stories until they're as funny as they are tragic, as fantastic as they are real. His songs grow like mesquite in the desert; they twist and turn. On "Earthly Justice," Morrison sings of barflys and their troubles, remarking sardonically "if earthly justice just don't get them in the end, there's always a heavenly trial on its way" as vocal harmonies and pedal steel two step all around him. On Morrison’s album closer "Warm Guns,” he waxes quixotic about loss in love, singing in Spanish about being a victim of his own flaws.

Jim Miller, known for his earlier work with Donna the Buffalo, is the resident psychedelic poet. Like the best country songwriters, Miller's sense of communion with nature turns his songs into works of magical realism. On "Wild Birds", a song about a road-bound band, he consults the moss, befriends the tide, and survives fire all while asking for prayers to guide his band home to the end of their migration. "Borrow Time" features Louisiana accordion legend Roddie Romero, and the album's best harmonies between the three lead singers. Some of his most beautiful lines happen on "Time Does The Rest" as he sings "Your heart knows what’s best / Hold her close, the lips will confess / Let it rise let it fall, time does the rest".

Western Centuries’ music crosses vastly differing geographies–the city, the southwest, the metaphysical. And their musical influences are equally as diverse. Together, they weave a tapestry of western music, without sacrificing their hard-earned country dancehall sound. Songs from the Deluge will levitate heavy hearts, turn spilled beer into ballads, and bring country music home as literate, epic odysseys from parts unknown.

St. Dude with The Ugly Blondes and Action Camp

Indie Rock dudes got Stoned or Stoner Rock dudes got Indied or we just listened to a bunch of different sh*t.

Indie Rock dudes got Stoned or Stoner Rock dudes got Indied or we just listened to a bunch of different sh*t.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)