club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Driftwood

When most people think of upstate New York, they either imagine bucolic landscapes or working-class towns. As natives of Binghamton, the members of Driftwood hail from a working town, but play music rooted in the land, leaning alternately into folk, old-time, country, punk, and rock, depending on their personal moods and their songs’ needs.

“It’s sometimes tough to keep any sort of focus on style or sound when you have three different songwriters,” guitarist Dan Forsyth concedes. “But it also allows us to branch out and explore in ways other bands don’t. Also, I think it’s important, as a band, to ask ourselves ‘Is this a good next step?’ I think everyone is very excited to know that it is.” Describing the Driftwood sound, banjo player Joe Kollar offers, “I consider our sound to be more of an attitude and an approach — the result of all of our influences in a completely open musical forum where the only stipulation is to use bluegrass instruments and create it from the heart.”

That’s as close to being pinned down as Driftwood ever gets. Such has always been the case for artists blurring and blending genre lines in order to innovate. Yes, they wield old-time instruments, but they do so with a punk-rock ethos. “I do not know much about punk music, but I do know that it gives me a feeling of tearing into something without inhibition,” violinist Claire Byrne says, adding, “Old-time music has the same feeling for me. The music was a release for people living extremely hard lives in harsh conditions. In this way, the two styles of music are very similar: It’s digging in and making a statement. It’s rocking out and feeling totally reborn through the song.”

Driftwood has been digging in and rocking out since their 2005 formation, playing an average of 150 shows a year. “In the beginning, we hit the road constantly with an all-or-nothing attitude,” Forsyth confides. “We were doing it with a lot of passion, but had no thoughts about long-term sustainability. Life outside of the band was minimal. One thing that I think we started to notice was, when you’re always in it, you have no perspective and you start to lose yourself in a weird way.”

As such, gigging and traveling that much can’t help but influence and inform the band, individually and collectively. In the past, they used the stage to work out arrangements of new songs. For City Lights, they used the studio. “Keeping this kind of touring schedule, we have thought of recording albums as a sort of secondary thing and considered ourselves a ‘live’ band. We learn so much on the road and this kind of work has always felt productive,” Forsyth explains. “It wasn’t until this last album that we took some time off to learn more about being in the studio. We wanted to take our time and record on our own terms.”

According to Byrne, their own terms included “taking a step forward with the production and the arrangements.” Kollar tacks “learning” on, for good measure, while Forsyth adds “good songs and bigger arrangements, and sounds than we had not previously achieved.”

When most people think of upstate New York, they either imagine bucolic landscapes or working-class towns. As natives of Binghamton, the members of Driftwood hail from a working town, but play music rooted in the land, leaning alternately into folk, old-time, country, punk, and rock, depending on their personal moods and their songs’ needs.

“It’s sometimes tough to keep any sort of focus on style or sound when you have three different songwriters,” guitarist Dan Forsyth concedes. “But it also allows us to branch out and explore in ways other bands don’t. Also, I think it’s important, as a band, to ask ourselves ‘Is this a good next step?’ I think everyone is very excited to know that it is.” Describing the Driftwood sound, banjo player Joe Kollar offers, “I consider our sound to be more of an attitude and an approach — the result of all of our influences in a completely open musical forum where the only stipulation is to use bluegrass instruments and create it from the heart.”

That’s as close to being pinned down as Driftwood ever gets. Such has always been the case for artists blurring and blending genre lines in order to innovate. Yes, they wield old-time instruments, but they do so with a punk-rock ethos. “I do not know much about punk music, but I do know that it gives me a feeling of tearing into something without inhibition,” violinist Claire Byrne says, adding, “Old-time music has the same feeling for me. The music was a release for people living extremely hard lives in harsh conditions. In this way, the two styles of music are very similar: It’s digging in and making a statement. It’s rocking out and feeling totally reborn through the song.”

Driftwood has been digging in and rocking out since their 2005 formation, playing an average of 150 shows a year. “In the beginning, we hit the road constantly with an all-or-nothing attitude,” Forsyth confides. “We were doing it with a lot of passion, but had no thoughts about long-term sustainability. Life outside of the band was minimal. One thing that I think we started to notice was, when you’re always in it, you have no perspective and you start to lose yourself in a weird way.”

As such, gigging and traveling that much can’t help but influence and inform the band, individually and collectively. In the past, they used the stage to work out arrangements of new songs. For City Lights, they used the studio. “Keeping this kind of touring schedule, we have thought of recording albums as a sort of secondary thing and considered ourselves a ‘live’ band. We learn so much on the road and this kind of work has always felt productive,” Forsyth explains. “It wasn’t until this last album that we took some time off to learn more about being in the studio. We wanted to take our time and record on our own terms.”

According to Byrne, their own terms included “taking a step forward with the production and the arrangements.” Kollar tacks “learning” on, for good measure, while Forsyth adds “good songs and bigger arrangements, and sounds than we had not previously achieved.”

(Early Show) Ben Caplan

Inspired in part by Eastern European and Jewish folk traditions, Ben Caplan mixes older musical sensibilities with his own soul, straight from his hairy heart. Lyrically, you’ve not heard the like before. Often edgy and dark, Caplan holds a mirror up to show us our nasty bits, singing about the ugliness and showing us that this darkness is the root of the sublime. His latest album release, Birds with Broken Wings, explodes with sounds both ancient and modern, with more than 30 musicians and even more instruments, combining acoustic sounds from around the world. It was listed on CBC Radio’s 50 Best Canadian Albums of 2015, reached #1 on Earshot’s National Folk/Roots/Blues chart, and was accepted into the Baker & Taylor NPR Discover Songs library. It’s all smoothly blended by the hottest international production team around. It’s uncharted territory, and Caplan’s leading the way.

Inspired in part by Eastern European and Jewish folk traditions, Ben Caplan mixes older musical sensibilities with his own soul, straight from his hairy heart. Lyrically, you’ve not heard the like before. Often edgy and dark, Caplan holds a mirror up to show us our nasty bits, singing about the ugliness and showing us that this darkness is the root of the sublime. His latest album release, Birds with Broken Wings, explodes with sounds both ancient and modern, with more than 30 musicians and even more instruments, combining acoustic sounds from around the world. It was listed on CBC Radio’s 50 Best Canadian Albums of 2015, reached #1 on Earshot’s National Folk/Roots/Blues chart, and was accepted into the Baker & Taylor NPR Discover Songs library. It’s all smoothly blended by the hottest international production team around. It’s uncharted territory, and Caplan’s leading the way.

(Late Show) Hearken / Easy Roscoe / Jon Worthy

Join Club Cafe for an evening of local and regional music.

Join Club Cafe for an evening of local and regional music.

The Last Revel / The Slocan Ramblers

The Last Revel
From the budding music scene of the Upper Midwest comes the cutting edge Front Porch Americana soundscapes of The Last Revel. This powerfully talented trio of multi-instrumentalists from Minneapolis, Minnesota so naturally blends the genres of Folk, Rockabilly, Old Time String-Band and Rock to create a sound that is as equally original as it is timeless. The Last Revel trio utilizes their multi-instrumental abilities to bring the acoustic guitar, upright bass, fiddle, 5-string banjo, harmonica, kick drum and three-part vocal harmonies together to consistently deliver “Bombastic live performances,” as well as delicate and haunting folk ballads.

With their second, self titled, album released in May of 2015, The Last Revel further demonstrates their ability to create rich and delicately textured recorded material with a modern “tip of the hat” to the storied history of American folk music.

The Slocan Ramblers
The Slocan Ramblers are Canada’s young bluegrass band to watch. Rooted in the tradition, fearlessly creative, and possessing a bold, dynamic sound, The Slocans have quickly become a leading light of Canada’s roots music scene, built on their reputation for energetic live shows, impeccable musicianship and their uncanny ability to convert anyone within earshot into a lifelong fan.

This is roots music without pretension, music intended to make you feel something, music to get you moving in a crowded bar. The Slocan Ramblers recorded Coffee Creek the same way they perform on stage: standing up, leaning into the music, and pushing harder and harder for that edge just beyond.

The Last Revel
From the budding music scene of the Upper Midwest comes the cutting edge Front Porch Americana soundscapes of The Last Revel. This powerfully talented trio of multi-instrumentalists from Minneapolis, Minnesota so naturally blends the genres of Folk, Rockabilly, Old Time String-Band and Rock to create a sound that is as equally original as it is timeless. The Last Revel trio utilizes their multi-instrumental abilities to bring the acoustic guitar, upright bass, fiddle, 5-string banjo, harmonica, kick drum and three-part vocal harmonies together to consistently deliver “Bombastic live performances,” as well as delicate and haunting folk ballads.

With their second, self titled, album released in May of 2015, The Last Revel further demonstrates their ability to create rich and delicately textured recorded material with a modern “tip of the hat” to the storied history of American folk music.

The Slocan Ramblers
The Slocan Ramblers are Canada’s young bluegrass band to watch. Rooted in the tradition, fearlessly creative, and possessing a bold, dynamic sound, The Slocans have quickly become a leading light of Canada’s roots music scene, built on their reputation for energetic live shows, impeccable musicianship and their uncanny ability to convert anyone within earshot into a lifelong fan.

This is roots music without pretension, music intended to make you feel something, music to get you moving in a crowded bar. The Slocan Ramblers recorded Coffee Creek the same way they perform on stage: standing up, leaning into the music, and pushing harder and harder for that edge just beyond.

MOVED TO MR. SMALLS THEATRE - An Evening With Spafford

VENUE CHANGE!
Due to overwhelming demand Jan 17 An Evening with Spafford has been moved to Mr. Smalls Theatre! All tickets purchased for the Club Cafe show will be honored.
On Sale Now via: http://bit.ly/0117spafford

VENUE CHANGE!
Due to overwhelming demand Jan 17 An Evening with Spafford has been moved to Mr. Smalls Theatre! All tickets purchased for the Club Cafe show will be honored.
On Sale Now via: http://bit.ly/0117spafford

Dan Bern

"With his acoustic guitar and a batch of witty and insightful songs, Dan Bern is rapidly becoming the voice of a new generation of folk music."
– NPR

"Dan Bern is a throwback, a singer-songwriter who marvels at life's beauty, fragility, and complexity with a fresh, defiantly uncompromising style. In a perfect world, he'd be as beloved as Dylan or Lennon-he's that good!" So wrote Stereophile magazine contributing editor David Sokol for that publication's popular Records To Die For feature several years back.

A remarkably prolific songsmith, Dan has released some two dozen studio albums, EPs, and live recordings since his first acclaimed Sony-distributed CD in 1997. Either fronting the prodigiously talented band Common Rotation or as a solo performer, he is comfortable and convincing, funny and topical, with an unassuming tip of the hat to the spirits Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, the Beatles, and young Bob Dylan-all while sounding thoroughly original and 21st-century. Whether writing about stepping back and appreciating the world around us ("Breathe") or celebrating the venerable voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers ("The Golden Voice of Vin Scully"), Dan's songs are always literary, sometimes funny, and often cinematic. And it's not uncommon at a Dan Bern concert to see and hear fans unabashedly singing along to one song after another with no prompting
from the stage.

Dan Bern recordings have featured a host of artists ranging from Ani DiFranco to Emmylou Harris, and he's devoted entire albums to baseball (Doubleheader), politics (My Country II), and little kids (2 Feet Tall). His singular songwriting has led to stints working on such projects as the Judd Apatow features Walk Hard-the Dewey Cox Story (starring John C. Reilly) and Get Him to the Greek (starring Russell Brand). His songs have appeared in numerous TV shows, and he recently penned the theme song for the Amazon cartoon The Stinky and Dirty Show.

Dan's new full-length studio album, Hoody, is due in early 2015. The album was recorded primarily in Los Angeles at Pehrspace in the Echo Park neighborhood. Featuring one of his most engaging and eclectic collections of songs, with support from Common Rotation, Hoody digs deeply into Dan's affinity for country, rock, and folk with a punch and poignancy rarely heard these days. And his voice has never sounded richer and more powerful. The record has a warm, organic feel, with the band usually performing together in the same room, at the same time. Beside Dan, who plays acoustic and electric guitars and some harmonica, musicians on the album include Adam Busch (drums, harmonica), Jordan Katz (trumpet, banjo), Eric Kufs (lap steel, vocals), Johnny Flaugher (bass), Eben Grace (guitar), and George Sluppick and Tripp Beam (drums). And Hoody was co-produced by Dan with his old friend Greg Prestopino, whose long list of credits includes co-writing Matthew Wilder's ubiquitous Top 5 hit, "Break My Stride" from 1983. Says Dan, "The way we recorded the stuff was a bit rough in spots, and Greg was able to massage it really well."

Hoody is filled with highlights and surprises, including "Lifeline," a stunning up-tempo country-rocker. The song, which soberly celebrates resiliency, features guest vocals by original Old Crow Medicine Show member Willie Watson and Common Rotation lap-steel guitarist Eric Kufs, who co-wrote the song with Dan. And somehow Dan holds one particularly challenging note for 20 seconds toward the end of the song. Like the thoughtful "Turn on a Dime," "Lifeline" would sound awfully good on progressive-country radio.

As would "Merle, Hank & Johnny," which not only pays homage to those country icons but to Buck Owens, Jimmie Rodgers, and George Jones (and is as loving an ode as his tip of the hat to Vin Scully on 2012's Drifter). The song is powerfully autobiographical, capped off with the sentiment that no matter what music his young daughter ultimately listens to, she's sure to hear Haggard and Williams and Cash as she grows up.

Speaking of Dan's little one, Lulu (who chipped in a few chirps on 2 Feet Tall) has a short but charming three letter cameo (singing "JFK") on "Waffle House," a hilarious live showstopper delineating one of the true dividing lines in modern-day America: "Red states got the Waffle House, blue states don't." On Hoody, the song barely clocks in at a minute-and-a-half, but Dan packs a lot into it. Another gem on Hoody is the harder rocking "Welcome," a three-minute indictment of our modern-day information overload. With an infectious melody belying the song's powerfully topical message, Dan poses the question, "What's in your wallet, and which side are you on?" On a lighter note, there's a charmingly spirited take on Johnny Cash's novel 1976 country chart-topper, "One Piece at a Time." The album closes with one of Dan's loveliest songs ever. "Sky"- with the timelessness that graces "Soul," the brilliant closing song on 2003's Fleeting Days-is a heartbreakingly beautiful love song, not just to a true love, but to life itself. "Long as I can see the sky…nothing can bring me down."

Reflecting on Hoody, Dan confides, "I feel it's a really strong record. I think it's got a lot of elements-old folk, classic country, British Invasion-but it all holds together. It's the culmination of what I've been aiming at for a long time, and also a jumping off point for everything I'm aiming to do next. I feel like the right radio stations could find a lot here to work with. I was aiming high and knew what I was after, and with a great team was able to achieve it. I hope people will hear it."

Hoody is fresh and contemporary, and certainly deserves to be heard… a lot. Dan is clearly standing on the shoulders of giants as he observes the world around him and puts all the bustle and the craziness into perspective. He's a songwriter's songwriter and a lyrical genius with a huge, optimistic heart, as anyone who's heard his songs can attest to. (Who else could write songs as diverse and pithy as "The Fifth Beatle," "Osama in Obamaland," and "Year-By-Year Home Run Totals of Barry Bonds"?)

Like we said, Dan Bern is a throwback to the days of exemplary songs and extraordinary songwriters. He's one of the very best, and we sure could use more of his kind these days.

"With his acoustic guitar and a batch of witty and insightful songs, Dan Bern is rapidly becoming the voice of a new generation of folk music."
– NPR

"Dan Bern is a throwback, a singer-songwriter who marvels at life's beauty, fragility, and complexity with a fresh, defiantly uncompromising style. In a perfect world, he'd be as beloved as Dylan or Lennon-he's that good!" So wrote Stereophile magazine contributing editor David Sokol for that publication's popular Records To Die For feature several years back.

A remarkably prolific songsmith, Dan has released some two dozen studio albums, EPs, and live recordings since his first acclaimed Sony-distributed CD in 1997. Either fronting the prodigiously talented band Common Rotation or as a solo performer, he is comfortable and convincing, funny and topical, with an unassuming tip of the hat to the spirits Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, the Beatles, and young Bob Dylan-all while sounding thoroughly original and 21st-century. Whether writing about stepping back and appreciating the world around us ("Breathe") or celebrating the venerable voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers ("The Golden Voice of Vin Scully"), Dan's songs are always literary, sometimes funny, and often cinematic. And it's not uncommon at a Dan Bern concert to see and hear fans unabashedly singing along to one song after another with no prompting
from the stage.

Dan Bern recordings have featured a host of artists ranging from Ani DiFranco to Emmylou Harris, and he's devoted entire albums to baseball (Doubleheader), politics (My Country II), and little kids (2 Feet Tall). His singular songwriting has led to stints working on such projects as the Judd Apatow features Walk Hard-the Dewey Cox Story (starring John C. Reilly) and Get Him to the Greek (starring Russell Brand). His songs have appeared in numerous TV shows, and he recently penned the theme song for the Amazon cartoon The Stinky and Dirty Show.

Dan's new full-length studio album, Hoody, is due in early 2015. The album was recorded primarily in Los Angeles at Pehrspace in the Echo Park neighborhood. Featuring one of his most engaging and eclectic collections of songs, with support from Common Rotation, Hoody digs deeply into Dan's affinity for country, rock, and folk with a punch and poignancy rarely heard these days. And his voice has never sounded richer and more powerful. The record has a warm, organic feel, with the band usually performing together in the same room, at the same time. Beside Dan, who plays acoustic and electric guitars and some harmonica, musicians on the album include Adam Busch (drums, harmonica), Jordan Katz (trumpet, banjo), Eric Kufs (lap steel, vocals), Johnny Flaugher (bass), Eben Grace (guitar), and George Sluppick and Tripp Beam (drums). And Hoody was co-produced by Dan with his old friend Greg Prestopino, whose long list of credits includes co-writing Matthew Wilder's ubiquitous Top 5 hit, "Break My Stride" from 1983. Says Dan, "The way we recorded the stuff was a bit rough in spots, and Greg was able to massage it really well."

Hoody is filled with highlights and surprises, including "Lifeline," a stunning up-tempo country-rocker. The song, which soberly celebrates resiliency, features guest vocals by original Old Crow Medicine Show member Willie Watson and Common Rotation lap-steel guitarist Eric Kufs, who co-wrote the song with Dan. And somehow Dan holds one particularly challenging note for 20 seconds toward the end of the song. Like the thoughtful "Turn on a Dime," "Lifeline" would sound awfully good on progressive-country radio.

As would "Merle, Hank & Johnny," which not only pays homage to those country icons but to Buck Owens, Jimmie Rodgers, and George Jones (and is as loving an ode as his tip of the hat to Vin Scully on 2012's Drifter). The song is powerfully autobiographical, capped off with the sentiment that no matter what music his young daughter ultimately listens to, she's sure to hear Haggard and Williams and Cash as she grows up.

Speaking of Dan's little one, Lulu (who chipped in a few chirps on 2 Feet Tall) has a short but charming three letter cameo (singing "JFK") on "Waffle House," a hilarious live showstopper delineating one of the true dividing lines in modern-day America: "Red states got the Waffle House, blue states don't." On Hoody, the song barely clocks in at a minute-and-a-half, but Dan packs a lot into it. Another gem on Hoody is the harder rocking "Welcome," a three-minute indictment of our modern-day information overload. With an infectious melody belying the song's powerfully topical message, Dan poses the question, "What's in your wallet, and which side are you on?" On a lighter note, there's a charmingly spirited take on Johnny Cash's novel 1976 country chart-topper, "One Piece at a Time." The album closes with one of Dan's loveliest songs ever. "Sky"- with the timelessness that graces "Soul," the brilliant closing song on 2003's Fleeting Days-is a heartbreakingly beautiful love song, not just to a true love, but to life itself. "Long as I can see the sky…nothing can bring me down."

Reflecting on Hoody, Dan confides, "I feel it's a really strong record. I think it's got a lot of elements-old folk, classic country, British Invasion-but it all holds together. It's the culmination of what I've been aiming at for a long time, and also a jumping off point for everything I'm aiming to do next. I feel like the right radio stations could find a lot here to work with. I was aiming high and knew what I was after, and with a great team was able to achieve it. I hope people will hear it."

Hoody is fresh and contemporary, and certainly deserves to be heard… a lot. Dan is clearly standing on the shoulders of giants as he observes the world around him and puts all the bustle and the craziness into perspective. He's a songwriter's songwriter and a lyrical genius with a huge, optimistic heart, as anyone who's heard his songs can attest to. (Who else could write songs as diverse and pithy as "The Fifth Beatle," "Osama in Obamaland," and "Year-By-Year Home Run Totals of Barry Bonds"?)

Like we said, Dan Bern is a throwback to the days of exemplary songs and extraordinary songwriters. He's one of the very best, and we sure could use more of his kind these days.

(Early Show) An Evening With Richard Shindell

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York’s Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way and expanding our sense of just what it is a song may be.
From his first record, Sparrow’s Point (1992) to his current release, Careless (September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct.
Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question. After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered “I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty.”

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York’s Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way and expanding our sense of just what it is a song may be.
From his first record, Sparrow’s Point (1992) to his current release, Careless (September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct.
Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question. After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered “I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty.”

Howie Day

Howie Day’s emotionally resonant lyrics and inventive melodies have earned him both critical praise and a legion of devoted fans. He is known for his energetic, heartfelt shows, where he connects with audiences through the strength of his songwriting and his quirky sense of humor. Day’s warm tenor voice “soars into fluttering, high registers, but also grates with real, pleading grit,” as one critic put it. After sales of over a million records and two Top 10 hits, Day is back on the road in support of his new studio album, Lanterns.

A native of Bangor, Maine, Day began playing piano at age five and guitar at age 12. By 15, he was writing his own songs and performing across New England. Shortly after graduating high school, Day became a fixture at college coffeehouses across the U.S. He wrote, financed and released his first effort, Australia, which was named Best Debut Album at the 2001 Boston Music Awards. The Boston Globe called Day “gorgeously seasoned, far beyond his years” with “a brave, beautiful singing voice.” During his relentless touring schedule, Day began experimenting with effects pedals and loop-sampling techniques as he performed, layering live percussion with vocal harmonies and guitar parts to become a veritable one-man band. He went on to sell over 30,000 copies of Australia as he navigated the independent music scene and continued to hone his craft.

After signing with Epic Records, Day released his major-label debut, Stop All The World Now, and hit the road to support it. The constant promotion paid off: Stop was certified gold in the U.S. and spawned two Top 10 radio hits: “She Says” and the platinum single “Collide.” After three subsequent years of intense worldwide touring, Day moved to Los Angeles and returned to the studio. His next release, Sound the Alarm, built on the emotionally complex spirit of its predecessor and delved into Day’s journey from indie wunderkind to platinum-selling artist. Its lead single, “Be There,” became a staple at modern AC radio.

After parting ways with Epic and relocating to New York City in 2010, Day released the Ceasefire EP on his own label, Daze. Over the next two years, as a reenergized Day toured North America, Australia and Asia, new songs began to emerge and evolve. His fourth full-length album, Lanterns, was recorded in Boston with producer and longtime friend Mike Denneen. Awash with a warm musicality and unique instrumentation, the album also features guest vocals from Aimee Mann. Lanterns was released in April 2015.

Howie Day’s emotionally resonant lyrics and inventive melodies have earned him both critical praise and a legion of devoted fans. He is known for his energetic, heartfelt shows, where he connects with audiences through the strength of his songwriting and his quirky sense of humor. Day’s warm tenor voice “soars into fluttering, high registers, but also grates with real, pleading grit,” as one critic put it. After sales of over a million records and two Top 10 hits, Day is back on the road in support of his new studio album, Lanterns.

A native of Bangor, Maine, Day began playing piano at age five and guitar at age 12. By 15, he was writing his own songs and performing across New England. Shortly after graduating high school, Day became a fixture at college coffeehouses across the U.S. He wrote, financed and released his first effort, Australia, which was named Best Debut Album at the 2001 Boston Music Awards. The Boston Globe called Day “gorgeously seasoned, far beyond his years” with “a brave, beautiful singing voice.” During his relentless touring schedule, Day began experimenting with effects pedals and loop-sampling techniques as he performed, layering live percussion with vocal harmonies and guitar parts to become a veritable one-man band. He went on to sell over 30,000 copies of Australia as he navigated the independent music scene and continued to hone his craft.

After signing with Epic Records, Day released his major-label debut, Stop All The World Now, and hit the road to support it. The constant promotion paid off: Stop was certified gold in the U.S. and spawned two Top 10 radio hits: “She Says” and the platinum single “Collide.” After three subsequent years of intense worldwide touring, Day moved to Los Angeles and returned to the studio. His next release, Sound the Alarm, built on the emotionally complex spirit of its predecessor and delved into Day’s journey from indie wunderkind to platinum-selling artist. Its lead single, “Be There,” became a staple at modern AC radio.

After parting ways with Epic and relocating to New York City in 2010, Day released the Ceasefire EP on his own label, Daze. Over the next two years, as a reenergized Day toured North America, Australia and Asia, new songs began to emerge and evolve. His fourth full-length album, Lanterns, was recorded in Boston with producer and longtime friend Mike Denneen. Awash with a warm musicality and unique instrumentation, the album also features guest vocals from Aimee Mann. Lanterns was released in April 2015.

(Early Show) WYEP Exclusive Member Show with Los Lobos - Presented by 91.3fm WYEP and Opus One

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

(Late Show) Los Lobos - Presented by 91.3fm WYEP and Opus One

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

"We're a Mexican American band, and no word describes America like immigrant. Most of us are children of immigrants, so it's perhaps natural that the songs we create celebrate America in this way." So says Louie Perez, the "poet laureate" and primary wordsmith of Los Lobos, when describing the songs on the band's new album, Gates of Gold.

The stories on Gates of Gold are snapshots of experiences that Perez and his band mates have had, based on where they are emotionally and how they respond to evolving life circumstances. "We live out loud most of the time and share our life this way, but then there are more intrinsic things that happen, and our songs are part of the way we react to them. We sit down and basically tell people what has happened. We certainly didn't start this project with aspirations to create the musical equivalent to great American literary works."

After celebrating their 40th anniversary with the cleverly titled 2013 live album Disconnected In New York City, the hard working, constantly touring band – David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin – leaps headfirst into their fifth decade with an invitation to join them as they open fresh and exciting new Gates of Gold, their first full length studio album since 2010's Tin Can Trust (a Grammy nominee for Best Americana Album) and second with Savoy/429 Records.

The dynamic songwriting, deeply poetic lyrics, thoughtful romantic and spiritual themes and eclectic blend of styles on the 11 track collection has resulted in an American saga in the rich literary tradition of legendary authors John Steinbeck and William Faulkner. Yet true to form, these typically humble musical wolves started in on the project without any grand vision or musical roadmap. Over 30 years after Los Lobos' major label breakthrough How Will The Wolf Survive? - their 1984 album that ranks #30 on Rolling Stones list of the 100 greatest albums of the 1980s – their main challenge when they get off the road and head back into the studio is, as Berlin says, "trying not to do stuff we've already done. To a certain extent, we are always drawing from the same multi-faceted paint box, and we sound like what we sound like. We're proud of what we feel is an honest body of work. We just want to keep finding new ways to say things."

In the band's early recording days - those years just before and after "La Bamba," their worldwide crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart - they prepared for album recording sessions with top producers like T-Bone Burnett with pre-production that included multiple rehearsals and "outlining" what the project was going to be. The more spontaneous approach to writing and recording that they took on their 1992 Mitchell Froom co-produced set Kiko still exists today; Rosas says, "When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work." Unlike many bands that write, gather and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it's time to record. Perez says, "We never come in with a cache of 20 songs. Our thing is to write as we're recording. It's like starting with a blank canvass every time."

The journey to Gates of Gold began with Hidalgo bringing in a batch of ideas, outlines and chord progressions with no lyrics. As he and Perez began fleshing things out, developing grooves, melodies and lyrical themes, Hidalgo, his son, drummer David, Jr. and bassist Lozano began tracking those tunes. The collection opens with the reflective, mid-tempo rocker "Made To Break Your Heart," featuring female vocalist Syd Straw, whose vibe was partially inspired by Hidalgo's love for Manassas, the early 70s blues-country-rock band created by Stephen Stills. The moody, atmospheric rocker "When We Were Free," whose lyrics of what Berlin calls "beautiful melancholy memories" are underscored with the increasing drama of booming drums and distorted electric guitars. Filled with hypnotic sound effects and cool vocal and guitar distortion (created via an eight track analog Cascam cassette recorder!), the soulful, reflective "There I Go" touches on the universal search for what Perez calls "something meaningful, though we're not always sure what it is."

Further Hidalgo/Perez collaborations include "Too Small Heart," a raw and raucous nod to both Los Lobos garage band roots and the wild abandon of Jimi Hendrix; the easy grooving folk-rocker "Song of the Sun," which taps into the elements of life (water, fire, earth) and creation myths while touching on the way we choose to live in the present; the slow burning blues/rocker "Magdalena," inspired by the Biblical Mary Magdalene and visions of flowing robes; and the folk-influenced, image rich rocker title track "Gates of Gold," whose lyrical abstractions allow for multiple earthly and spiritual interpretations.

Perez says, "When I first started listening to the original demo Dave had, the music spoke to me of rural America. The impression the lyrics give could refer to the afterlife, i.e. the "pearly gates," but I also was thinking about the immigrant experience, the promise of a new life as one travels across borders, all the thoughts a person making that daring move might have connected to the dream of what America is. Our parents all wondered what lay beyond those gates. On a personal level, it's a reflection of where my band mates and I are in our lives. We're all over 60 now and looking towards the horizon at our own mortality. We think often about what we've contributed and what's left. I don't know who the protagonist of the song is, but he's looking at those gates from a distance because what lies beyond is a mystery."

As Hidalgo and Perez began collaborating on their songs, Rosas, as per his trademark "lone wolf" songwriting approach, took his basic tracks to his home studio to complete the handful of tunes that flesh out the set. The singer, guitarist and mandolin player's pieces include the raucous and bluesy, garage band fired jam "Mis-Treater Boogie Blues," the swampy folk-rock blues lament "I Believed You So" and the swaying, sensual Latin Cumbia-styled "Poquito Para Aqui." The sole cover on Gates of Gold is the other Spanish language tune, "La Tumba," an accordion laced folk piece connected to the Mexican Norteno tradition (related to polka and corrodes) whose theme, says Perez, is very dark, "about following your lover to the tomb." It's very familiar to fans as a frequent staple of Los Lobos' live performances.

Back in 2003, when Los Lobos was celebrating the 30th Anniversary of their humble beginnings as a garage band in East L.A., Rolling Stone summed up their distinctive, diverse, freewheeling fusion of rock, blues, soul and Mexican folk music: "This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together…to see how far it can take them." Originally called Los Lobos del Este (de Los Angeles), a play on a popular norteno band called Los Lobos del Norte, the group originally came together from three separate units. Lead vocalist/guitarist Hidalgo, whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo, met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. "But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things," says Perez, the band's drummer. "Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you're going to get a haircut."

Berlin is Los Lobos' saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy winning band (Best Mexican American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded How Will the Wolf Survive? Although the album's name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band saw obvious parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots.

Perez, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music "the soundtrack of the barrio." Three decades, two more Grammys, the global success of "La Bamba" and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. They don't get in the studio as often as they did a few decades ago – Tin Can Trustcame four years after their previous album of all originals, The Town and the City – but when they do, the results are every bit as culturally rich, musically rocking and lyrically provocative as they were back in the day.

"It's not always the easiest thing finding time away from our touring schedule and families to find time to make an album," says Berlin, "but recording Gates of Gold, I have to say it's great to be back in the proverbial saddle again. It reminds us of the fun we have had making new music over the years, and it's nice to have the opportunity to create something of value."

Perez adds, "I find that the most interesting part of songwriting and tracking a new album is the differential between the way a song sounds to you at 2 a.m. and the way it may hit you when it's 11 a.m. and it reaches the light of day. We may love it just as much or we may realize we can do better. It's always a process of discovering more about ourselves and the music we love to make. It's not always easy getting started again, but I love that moment in the process when the songs start to take on their own life and we can let the kid, so to speak, run out onto the street and start figuring things out for himself. The way songs reveal themselves to us during these periods of writing and recording is my favorite part of the Los Lobos recording experience."
Louie Perez - Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals
Steve Berlin - Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica
Cesar Rosas - Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin
Conrad Lozano - Bass, Guitarron, Vocals
David Hidalgo - Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo
Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion

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