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J. Robbins (band) 'Un-Becoming / Tour 2019' with Special Guest Nightmarathons

Dischord Records released singer/guitarist/producer J. Robbins’ first full-length solo album Un-Becoming on May 31, 2019, just as J.’s best-known project Jawbox emerged from a 23-year hiatus to do a joyful reunion tour that spanned the USA. Meanwhile the post-punk-inflected rhythmic push, melodic dissonance, and contrarian lyrical catharsis of Un-Becoming has been received by many as Robbins’ strongest work to date, and this December, J. Robbins (band) will finally play a limited run of shows to support the release. The band on this tour is the same band featured on the album: drummer Pete Moffett (frequent collaborator and former drummer of Government Issue, Burning Airlines, Wool, and many others), bassist Brooks Harlan (J’s former bandmate in Office of Future Plans, but best known as the guitarist of War On Women), and cellist/guitarist Gordon Withers (and currently garnering attention for his “Jawbreaker on Cello” album, also an Office of Future Plans alumnus, featured cellist on too many albums to list).

Dischord Records released singer/guitarist/producer J. Robbins’ first full-length solo album Un-Becoming on May 31, 2019, just as J.’s best-known project Jawbox emerged from a 23-year hiatus to do a joyful reunion tour that spanned the USA. Meanwhile the post-punk-inflected rhythmic push, melodic dissonance, and contrarian lyrical catharsis of Un-Becoming has been received by many as Robbins’ strongest work to date, and this December, J. Robbins (band) will finally play a limited run of shows to support the release. The band on this tour is the same band featured on the album: drummer Pete Moffett (frequent collaborator and former drummer of Government Issue, Burning Airlines, Wool, and many others), bassist Brooks Harlan (J’s former bandmate in Office of Future Plans, but best known as the guitarist of War On Women), and cellist/guitarist Gordon Withers (and currently garnering attention for his “Jawbreaker on Cello” album, also an Office of Future Plans alumnus, featured cellist on too many albums to list).

Craig Cardiff

Craig Cardiff is a Canadian singer-songwriter. Known throughout Canada, Craig is developing a following throughout North America and into Europe. With guitar in hand, Craig can turn any setting into an intimate affair. Infusing his music and lyrics with an uncompromising humanism rarely seen in today’s production-heavy climate.

Songwriter, troubadour, Craig Cardiff builds landscapes of sound using live digital loops, bringing the room to a hush. Edged, folk, beautiful, melancholy and left leaning, one song breaks your heart, and the next one puts it back together.

Craig makes it a point to keep the relationship with his fans personal, inviting and accepting any opportunity to make his audience as much a part of the performance as he is. Don’t be surprised if one day you find yourself enjoying one of Craig’s renowned performances from the comfort of your own living room.

Craig Cardiff is a Canadian singer-songwriter. Known throughout Canada, Craig is developing a following throughout North America and into Europe. With guitar in hand, Craig can turn any setting into an intimate affair. Infusing his music and lyrics with an uncompromising humanism rarely seen in today’s production-heavy climate.

Songwriter, troubadour, Craig Cardiff builds landscapes of sound using live digital loops, bringing the room to a hush. Edged, folk, beautiful, melancholy and left leaning, one song breaks your heart, and the next one puts it back together.

Craig makes it a point to keep the relationship with his fans personal, inviting and accepting any opportunity to make his audience as much a part of the performance as he is. Don’t be surprised if one day you find yourself enjoying one of Craig’s renowned performances from the comfort of your own living room.

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents DAVID KAYE 'A Dirty Little Christmas Miracle' with Special Guest Gab Bonesso

Christmas memories are not always as cheery as a Norman Rockwell painting. David Kaye's darkly comedic holiday season assault unwraps a lifetime of presents from under the tree as he hilariously confronts ghosts of Christmas past and present. No part of the hallowed baby Jesus birthday party is safe From tortured family gatherings to unwanted gifts, A Dirty Little Christmas Miracle is replete with holiday carol sing-a-longs, naughty tales from under the mistletoe and a real-live-fake Talking Tannenbaum. This mature adult oriented show is filthier than chimney soot, so buckle up your galoshes and hold on to the reins as this sleigh load of laughs runs off the rails.

Christmas memories are not always as cheery as a Norman Rockwell painting. David Kaye's darkly comedic holiday season assault unwraps a lifetime of presents from under the tree as he hilariously confronts ghosts of Christmas past and present. No part of the hallowed baby Jesus birthday party is safe From tortured family gatherings to unwanted gifts, A Dirty Little Christmas Miracle is replete with holiday carol sing-a-longs, naughty tales from under the mistletoe and a real-live-fake Talking Tannenbaum. This mature adult oriented show is filthier than chimney soot, so buckle up your galoshes and hold on to the reins as this sleigh load of laughs runs off the rails.

(Late Show) Herbivore with Kenny Sukitch, Jackson Grey and Live Painting by Zachary Rutter

Pittsburgh Holiday Showcase featuring local musical acts Herbivore, Kenny Sukitch, and Jackson Grey. Live painting by local artist Zachary Rutter. Painting will be raffled off at the end of the night.

Pittsburgh Holiday Showcase featuring local musical acts Herbivore, Kenny Sukitch, and Jackson Grey. Live painting by local artist Zachary Rutter. Painting will be raffled off at the end of the night.

(Late Show) Smokin' Betties Burlesque Presents Have Yourself A Very Bettie Christmas

Hosted by Lilith DeVille. With Special Guests Macabre Noir, Sophie du Mal, Amoxie Villain & Askasha Lestat

Hosted by Lilith DeVille. With Special Guests Macabre Noir, Sophie du Mal, Amoxie Villain & Askasha Lestat

Shine Out in the Wild Kindness: A Tribute to David Berman & Silver Jews.

With performances by:

Sara Renberg
Eric Frankenberg, Julia Frankenberg, & Co
Joe Hale(TYL) Anna Hale(Swampwalk)
Adam Fitz
Warren Pryde, Dane Adelman, et al (TBD)
Tessa Barber & Em Fear
Jen Sabol, Scott Fry, Greg Cislon, Jerry Lyon
Glam Hand
Mike Baltzer (Benefits)

With performances by:

Sara Renberg
Eric Frankenberg, Julia Frankenberg, & Co
Joe Hale(TYL) Anna Hale(Swampwalk)
Adam Fitz
Warren Pryde, Dane Adelman, et al (TBD)
Tessa Barber & Em Fear
Jen Sabol, Scott Fry, Greg Cislon, Jerry Lyon
Glam Hand
Mike Baltzer (Benefits)

Opus One Comedy Presents Jordan Weeks with Cassi Bruno, Greg Cislon and Special Guest TBA. Hosted by Liz Tripoli.

WHY? With Special Guest Gabby's World

Yoni Wolf has spent the last two decades traveling the remote sonic terrain where underground hip hop, avant-pop, and psych-rock meet. Some of Yoni’s most compelling and critically-praised musical experiments have been issued under the moniker WHY? and his latest entry is no exception. On AOKOHIO Yoni condenses the essential elements of WHY? into a stunningly potent musical vision.

Co-produced by Yoni and his brother Josiah, AOKOHIO presents a rich palette of musical voices that emerge and disappear into a constantly shifting kaleidoscope of sound. “I wanted a wide variety of sounds. I didn’t want this album to sit in one sonic zone. I’ve always felt like too jagged of a person to be smooth in that way,” Yoni says. While the album features many notable guest contributors, from Lala Lala’s Lillie West, to Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath of Sylvan Esso, the listener’s attention remains squarely directed on Yoni’s voice and vision.

AOKOHIO finds Yoni rethinking fundamental aspects of his approach to creating and delivering his music. The album is presented as six movements comprised of two to four songs each, with some segments appearing as brief fragments that dissolve within seconds.

“When I started this project, I decided I needed to try a new approach in creating music and how I work,” Yoni reflects. “I wasn’t feeling the idea of going back in and making another ten or twelve song album. It felt arduous. It felt like too much. So I wanted to pare the process down and make it manageable. I thought, ‘Why don’t I make small five or six minute movements and finish up each movement before I move on to the next.’ That’s how I started approaching it. The whole process took over five years, I’d start working on something and set it aside for awhile. The earliest songs on this album started in 2013.“

As Yoni reimagined his approach to creating music, he also began thinking of new ways to share the music with his audience. “I initially wanted to release the music as I progressed through the project,” Yoni says. “When I finished a movement I wanted to put it up digitally on Bandcamp or Soundcloud. I just wanted to make little pieces of music and put them out there. But I had a call with my manager and the label and they said, ‘We can release stuff through time like that, but we want to do it properly.’ So the idea of the project changed after that, but it retained the integrity of working in movements. It’s definitely a very different way of working for me. I think it has yielded some interesting results.”

The concept of sharing AOKOHIO in segments over time has been preserved with the release of an accompanying visual album. “I think it’s a very artful way of putting the music out there,” Yoni explains. “It’s like a television series, it’s revealing itself slowly over time. I think it’s cool that the audience gets to hear it one piece at a time, and has to wait and digest each piece before they get the next one.”

“I knew early on that I wanted that visual element for this album,” Yoni recalls. “My brother and I have worked on video stuff our whole lives. Our dad had video equipment since we were little kids, he had an editing suite in our basement. We weren’t rich, we were actually fairly poor, but somehow he’d gotten ahold of these video editing decks and cameras. Even though my brother and I had dabbled in video as kids, it’s not what we do for a living. So we wanted to find someone, and fucking randomly a guy messaged me on Instagram and was like, ‘Hey, I like your music and I’d love to work with you.’ I looked at his work and I was like, ‘This guy is for real!’ “

The author of that fateful Instagram message was Sundance award-winning director Miles Joris-Peyrafitte. “Miles directed the first three segments of the visual album and is the mastermind of the overarching video project,” Yoni explains. Joris-Peyrafitte’s visuals cut contemporary footage of Yoni and actress Tatiana Maslany with vintage home videos documenting Yoni’s childhood life in Cincinnati. It’s a fitting juxtaposition, as Yoni’s lyrics on AOKOHIO seem to question how memory, history, and place shape our anxieties and sense of self. “I moved back to Cincinnati after living in the Bay Area for over a decade,” Yoni says. “This album is very much me thinking about my mom and dad, and my siblings.”

Yoni’s return to his Ohio hometown brought on a period of critical self-reflection. “Is there a word for bad nostalgia?” Yoni asks. “When I think of the word nostalgia, it seems like pleasant feelings and all that, but this is not really like that. It’s more about reflecting on the anxieties I’ve had since I was born. Why are they there? Is this epigenetics? Is that shit just inside of me because of the Holocaust and my relatives back then? What am I really? Why do I operate in these ways?”

Ultimately AOKOHIO sees Yoni pushing to find meaning and peace of mind in the moment, even if it’s not exactly where he wants to be. “The title is sarcastic I guess,” Yoni offers. “But it’s also wishful. A lot of my album titles have been names of maladies, like Alopecia and Mumps, Etc. I don’t want to project that into the world. You know, ‘A-OK Ohio, I’m here and it’s fine.’ It’s like a mantra, ‘A-OK Ohio, I’m here and it’s OK.’ Even though in reality, everyday I’m like, ‘I’ve got to get the hell out of Ohio.’“

AOKOHIO feels like a consequential addition to the WHY? catalog, possibly even an artistic turning point. But its creator remains circumspect when asked to comment on the album’s significance within his discography, instead preferring to characterize the work as the latest iteration of his deep commitment to his artistic practice. “I have no idea if this record is good or not,” Yoni says. “But I never really know. I know that I’ve never written a song that’s indispensable to the American songbook. But in terms of what it is, it’s a piece of art. I put blood, sweat, and tears into this album, and struggled through the creative process as I always do. As far as where this sits with the rest of my albums? I can’t answer that. I just know that my career is a lifelong career, and I’m working it. Every time it feels right, it makes me feel good.”

Yoni Wolf has spent the last two decades traveling the remote sonic terrain where underground hip hop, avant-pop, and psych-rock meet. Some of Yoni’s most compelling and critically-praised musical experiments have been issued under the moniker WHY? and his latest entry is no exception. On AOKOHIO Yoni condenses the essential elements of WHY? into a stunningly potent musical vision.

Co-produced by Yoni and his brother Josiah, AOKOHIO presents a rich palette of musical voices that emerge and disappear into a constantly shifting kaleidoscope of sound. “I wanted a wide variety of sounds. I didn’t want this album to sit in one sonic zone. I’ve always felt like too jagged of a person to be smooth in that way,” Yoni says. While the album features many notable guest contributors, from Lala Lala’s Lillie West, to Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath of Sylvan Esso, the listener’s attention remains squarely directed on Yoni’s voice and vision.

AOKOHIO finds Yoni rethinking fundamental aspects of his approach to creating and delivering his music. The album is presented as six movements comprised of two to four songs each, with some segments appearing as brief fragments that dissolve within seconds.

“When I started this project, I decided I needed to try a new approach in creating music and how I work,” Yoni reflects. “I wasn’t feeling the idea of going back in and making another ten or twelve song album. It felt arduous. It felt like too much. So I wanted to pare the process down and make it manageable. I thought, ‘Why don’t I make small five or six minute movements and finish up each movement before I move on to the next.’ That’s how I started approaching it. The whole process took over five years, I’d start working on something and set it aside for awhile. The earliest songs on this album started in 2013.“

As Yoni reimagined his approach to creating music, he also began thinking of new ways to share the music with his audience. “I initially wanted to release the music as I progressed through the project,” Yoni says. “When I finished a movement I wanted to put it up digitally on Bandcamp or Soundcloud. I just wanted to make little pieces of music and put them out there. But I had a call with my manager and the label and they said, ‘We can release stuff through time like that, but we want to do it properly.’ So the idea of the project changed after that, but it retained the integrity of working in movements. It’s definitely a very different way of working for me. I think it has yielded some interesting results.”

The concept of sharing AOKOHIO in segments over time has been preserved with the release of an accompanying visual album. “I think it’s a very artful way of putting the music out there,” Yoni explains. “It’s like a television series, it’s revealing itself slowly over time. I think it’s cool that the audience gets to hear it one piece at a time, and has to wait and digest each piece before they get the next one.”

“I knew early on that I wanted that visual element for this album,” Yoni recalls. “My brother and I have worked on video stuff our whole lives. Our dad had video equipment since we were little kids, he had an editing suite in our basement. We weren’t rich, we were actually fairly poor, but somehow he’d gotten ahold of these video editing decks and cameras. Even though my brother and I had dabbled in video as kids, it’s not what we do for a living. So we wanted to find someone, and fucking randomly a guy messaged me on Instagram and was like, ‘Hey, I like your music and I’d love to work with you.’ I looked at his work and I was like, ‘This guy is for real!’ “

The author of that fateful Instagram message was Sundance award-winning director Miles Joris-Peyrafitte. “Miles directed the first three segments of the visual album and is the mastermind of the overarching video project,” Yoni explains. Joris-Peyrafitte’s visuals cut contemporary footage of Yoni and actress Tatiana Maslany with vintage home videos documenting Yoni’s childhood life in Cincinnati. It’s a fitting juxtaposition, as Yoni’s lyrics on AOKOHIO seem to question how memory, history, and place shape our anxieties and sense of self. “I moved back to Cincinnati after living in the Bay Area for over a decade,” Yoni says. “This album is very much me thinking about my mom and dad, and my siblings.”

Yoni’s return to his Ohio hometown brought on a period of critical self-reflection. “Is there a word for bad nostalgia?” Yoni asks. “When I think of the word nostalgia, it seems like pleasant feelings and all that, but this is not really like that. It’s more about reflecting on the anxieties I’ve had since I was born. Why are they there? Is this epigenetics? Is that shit just inside of me because of the Holocaust and my relatives back then? What am I really? Why do I operate in these ways?”

Ultimately AOKOHIO sees Yoni pushing to find meaning and peace of mind in the moment, even if it’s not exactly where he wants to be. “The title is sarcastic I guess,” Yoni offers. “But it’s also wishful. A lot of my album titles have been names of maladies, like Alopecia and Mumps, Etc. I don’t want to project that into the world. You know, ‘A-OK Ohio, I’m here and it’s fine.’ It’s like a mantra, ‘A-OK Ohio, I’m here and it’s OK.’ Even though in reality, everyday I’m like, ‘I’ve got to get the hell out of Ohio.’“

AOKOHIO feels like a consequential addition to the WHY? catalog, possibly even an artistic turning point. But its creator remains circumspect when asked to comment on the album’s significance within his discography, instead preferring to characterize the work as the latest iteration of his deep commitment to his artistic practice. “I have no idea if this record is good or not,” Yoni says. “But I never really know. I know that I’ve never written a song that’s indispensable to the American songbook. But in terms of what it is, it’s a piece of art. I put blood, sweat, and tears into this album, and struggled through the creative process as I always do. As far as where this sits with the rest of my albums? I can’t answer that. I just know that my career is a lifelong career, and I’m working it. Every time it feels right, it makes me feel good.”

(Early Show) The Nerd Herders / Ali Spagnola's Power Hour Drinking Game Concert

The Nerd Herders
The Nerd Herders influences stem from the golden age of the 1990s grunge/punk/hard rock scene, as reflected in our songs. Each band member is a musical veteran of Pittsburgh, and we all have over 10 years of gig experience.

Ali Spagnola
ome experience the live Drinking Game Concert! Ali Spagnola will be playing her Power Hour Show. They play 60 of your favorite cover songs. All one minute long. Everyone cheers and drinks in between each song. Awesomeness ensues.

The Nerd Herders
The Nerd Herders influences stem from the golden age of the 1990s grunge/punk/hard rock scene, as reflected in our songs. Each band member is a musical veteran of Pittsburgh, and we all have over 10 years of gig experience.

Ali Spagnola
ome experience the live Drinking Game Concert! Ali Spagnola will be playing her Power Hour Show. They play 60 of your favorite cover songs. All one minute long. Everyone cheers and drinks in between each song. Awesomeness ensues.

(Late Show) Emerson Jay (Reunion Show)

Join Club Cafe for a very special evening featuring Emerson Jay (Reunion Show)

Join Club Cafe for a very special evening featuring Emerson Jay (Reunion Show)

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)