club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Valley Queen with Special Guest Skyway Man

VALLEY QUEEN Natalie Carol (vocals/guitar) - Neil Wogensen (bass/vocals) - Shawn Morones (guitar/vocals) - Mike DeLuccia (drums) The full-length debut from Los Angeles-based band Valley Queen, Supergianttakes its title from the most massive and luminous yet fastest-burning stars in the universe. “The song ‘Supergiant’ is about how we’re all made up of the same stuff as stars, and I liked the idea of tying the whole album together with that metaphor,” says Carol. “It takes all the drama you hear on the record—the aggressive, chaotic moments, and the more beautiful or quieter moments—and puts it all into a more galactic perspective.”With the album finished and ready to be released into the world, it’s now easier for Carol to take a step back and be philosophical but there were moments when it almost seemed like Supergiant would never come to light. The first iteration of Valley Queen formed not long after Carol moved to L.A. and crossed paths with Neil Wogensen through the local music scene. With Shawn Morones and drummer Gerry Doot later joining the lineup, the band named themselves Valley Queen in a nod to the region where ancient Egyptians buried their deceased matriarchs. They released the singles “In My Place”and “High Expectations,” as well as 2017 EPDestroyer to widespread critical acclaim. The band also supported artists including Laura Marling and Thao & the Get Down Stay Down on tour. Musically and creatively, they were in a place they never dreamed of. As the band’s profile grew, so did days on the road and time spent away from home. Any touring band will testify to the intensity of togetherness, tight finances, being away from significant others, physical exhaustion, unhealthy diets and habits, etc., but they were doing what they loved and it was resonating with people. The band had found their own magical pocket musically but, ultimately, the strain was too much for Morones and Doot who left the band after years on the road. They were replaced with session musicians and the band continued to win fans and play bigger rooms, but the chemistry that Carol had come to depend on was gone. The growing success earned them a record deal—a dream finally coming to fruition—but Carol was unable to find the creative cohesiveness she knew she needed to make the record. “I wondered how to record the record. I believed in myself but I had also believed in the people around me. I write these songs in solitude but Valley Queen is not my solo project. I thrived in the collaboration. I came back from these new tours feeling creatively depleted, like something important was missing.”Carol knew ultimately what needed to happen. Like a parent knowing what’s best for their child, she understood that Valley Queen was more than lyrics and
sessions musicians. It was about people, chemistry and the relationships that created such a powerful musical force to begin with. “I knew nobody else could record this record with me but our original line up. They had grown into the arrangements, had a personal understanding of what the songs were about.” Doot couldn't rejoin—the strain touring had put on his newborn baby and wife was too much for him to reconsider—and Mike DeLuccia came forward, which was a godsend. Then Carol called Morones. The time on the road had strained their relationship significantly and there was healing that needed to happen. After long discussions and sharing, they all decided it would be worth the risk to try to create this album and tell the story of what had happened. Two months later, Valley Queen was in the studio. Carol reflects, “Recording the album was a transformative experience for the band. It certainly trod the ground of the past, the difficulty and disappointment we had faced. But moving through and completing the project brought with it a sensation that the chapter was over. All of us will always be in process, we will always be learning how to better work with each other and ourselves. But a power was created in actively choosing to meet with that process.”The result is Supergiant, produced by Lewis Pesacov (Best Coast, Fool’s Gold, Nikki Lane, FIDLAR). Not surprisingly, the album emerges with raw production and relentless intensity. It’s a record that could not have been made any other way, each member bringing their own creative force and energy to every song. It’s about self-exploration, not just as an individual, but also as a collective whole. “It can be really painful and isolating to go through something that doesn’t really look like anybody else’s experience but your own,” Carol says in reflecting on Supergiant’s intensity. “But ultimately that’s part of the beautiful orchestration of being alive—instead of trying to go around that experience, you need to go fully into it. I think that’s the only way to get a deeper understanding of who we really are.”

VALLEY QUEEN Natalie Carol (vocals/guitar) - Neil Wogensen (bass/vocals) - Shawn Morones (guitar/vocals) - Mike DeLuccia (drums) The full-length debut from Los Angeles-based band Valley Queen, Supergianttakes its title from the most massive and luminous yet fastest-burning stars in the universe. “The song ‘Supergiant’ is about how we’re all made up of the same stuff as stars, and I liked the idea of tying the whole album together with that metaphor,” says Carol. “It takes all the drama you hear on the record—the aggressive, chaotic moments, and the more beautiful or quieter moments—and puts it all into a more galactic perspective.”With the album finished and ready to be released into the world, it’s now easier for Carol to take a step back and be philosophical but there were moments when it almost seemed like Supergiant would never come to light. The first iteration of Valley Queen formed not long after Carol moved to L.A. and crossed paths with Neil Wogensen through the local music scene. With Shawn Morones and drummer Gerry Doot later joining the lineup, the band named themselves Valley Queen in a nod to the region where ancient Egyptians buried their deceased matriarchs. They released the singles “In My Place”and “High Expectations,” as well as 2017 EPDestroyer to widespread critical acclaim. The band also supported artists including Laura Marling and Thao & the Get Down Stay Down on tour. Musically and creatively, they were in a place they never dreamed of. As the band’s profile grew, so did days on the road and time spent away from home. Any touring band will testify to the intensity of togetherness, tight finances, being away from significant others, physical exhaustion, unhealthy diets and habits, etc., but they were doing what they loved and it was resonating with people. The band had found their own magical pocket musically but, ultimately, the strain was too much for Morones and Doot who left the band after years on the road. They were replaced with session musicians and the band continued to win fans and play bigger rooms, but the chemistry that Carol had come to depend on was gone. The growing success earned them a record deal—a dream finally coming to fruition—but Carol was unable to find the creative cohesiveness she knew she needed to make the record. “I wondered how to record the record. I believed in myself but I had also believed in the people around me. I write these songs in solitude but Valley Queen is not my solo project. I thrived in the collaboration. I came back from these new tours feeling creatively depleted, like something important was missing.”Carol knew ultimately what needed to happen. Like a parent knowing what’s best for their child, she understood that Valley Queen was more than lyrics and
sessions musicians. It was about people, chemistry and the relationships that created such a powerful musical force to begin with. “I knew nobody else could record this record with me but our original line up. They had grown into the arrangements, had a personal understanding of what the songs were about.” Doot couldn't rejoin—the strain touring had put on his newborn baby and wife was too much for him to reconsider—and Mike DeLuccia came forward, which was a godsend. Then Carol called Morones. The time on the road had strained their relationship significantly and there was healing that needed to happen. After long discussions and sharing, they all decided it would be worth the risk to try to create this album and tell the story of what had happened. Two months later, Valley Queen was in the studio. Carol reflects, “Recording the album was a transformative experience for the band. It certainly trod the ground of the past, the difficulty and disappointment we had faced. But moving through and completing the project brought with it a sensation that the chapter was over. All of us will always be in process, we will always be learning how to better work with each other and ourselves. But a power was created in actively choosing to meet with that process.”The result is Supergiant, produced by Lewis Pesacov (Best Coast, Fool’s Gold, Nikki Lane, FIDLAR). Not surprisingly, the album emerges with raw production and relentless intensity. It’s a record that could not have been made any other way, each member bringing their own creative force and energy to every song. It’s about self-exploration, not just as an individual, but also as a collective whole. “It can be really painful and isolating to go through something that doesn’t really look like anybody else’s experience but your own,” Carol says in reflecting on Supergiant’s intensity. “But ultimately that’s part of the beautiful orchestration of being alive—instead of trying to go around that experience, you need to go fully into it. I think that’s the only way to get a deeper understanding of who we really are.”

(Early Show) Gabe Dixon

Gabe Dixon released his sophomore solo album, Turns To Gold, on April 8th, 2016. Produced by Paul Moak (Mat Kearney, Third Day), engineered by Devin Vaughan (Marc Broussard), and mastered by Brad Blackwood at Euphonics Mastering (Allison Krauss & Union Station, Luther Dickinson), the LP marks Gabe’s first official collection as an independent artist. Following the release of 2011’s One Spark, the Nashville-based troubadour changed almost everything. He was focused on starting from scratch, and parted ways with his longtime management and record label, Concord Music Group. The one thing that didn’t change was that honest, heartfelt approach to songwriting that countless fans fell in love with when he first emerged in 1999.

Turns To Gold addresses some weighty subjects—mortality, what’s important in life, and the value of love. “In many ways, my new music is about learning how to be in a committed relationship, leave immature ways behind, grow, evolve, and move on from habits that aren’t necessarily who you are anymore,” he says. The album was recorded at The Smoakstack recording studio in Berry Hill, TN with Jano Rix on drums (The Wood Brothers), Viktor Krauss on bass (Lyle Lovett), and Kris Donegan on guitar (Cam). “I wanted to go in with musicians and get performances that were inspiring and inspired, and take it from there. Producer Paul Moak was completely on the same page. We cut everything to analog tape with no click track. What results is an album that feels very natural. Since One Spark I learned to trust myself, and the sound of Turns To Gold is the most representative of who I am. It’s warm, laid-back, acoustic, and live.”

The opener and first single, “Holding Her Freedom,” out now, coasts between a shimmering piano melody, organ swell, guitar rumble, and heavenly vocal performance from Gabe. It also conveys a cinematic narrative. “It’s a story about a woman who has been burned by love, and she’s afraid to let herself be vulnerable and fall in love again,” he explains. “She’s figuratively holding her freedom like a cage. That same ‘freedom’ keeps her trapped and unable to love again.” The album’s second single, “The Way To Love Me,” features Natalie Prass and will be released on February 5th. “Natalie’s voice has the perfect delicate and vulnerable qualities that the song required,” says Gabe. “She recorded it while passing through Nashville to play the Ryman Auditorium, part of a long tour opening for Ryan Adams.”

Throughout his career, many other notable artists have taken note of and supported Gabe’s immense talents. He’s opened for and toured with the likes of Loggins & Messina, Gavin DeGraw and Delta Rae, as well as held side gigs as the keyboardist and vocalist for Paul McCartney, Alison Krause & Union Station, O.A.R. and Supertramp. His songs have received placements on major television shows including Parks and Recreation, Grey’s Anatomy, and Vampire Diaries, and his song “Find My Way” served as the title for the box office hit The Proposal starring Sandra Bullock. Fans have seen him perform twice on Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!, as well as The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and on festival stages everywhere from Bonnaroo to High Sierra Music Festival. However, it’s with Turns To Gold that listeners will hear Gabe Dixon as he always meant.

Gabe Dixon released his sophomore solo album, Turns To Gold, on April 8th, 2016. Produced by Paul Moak (Mat Kearney, Third Day), engineered by Devin Vaughan (Marc Broussard), and mastered by Brad Blackwood at Euphonics Mastering (Allison Krauss & Union Station, Luther Dickinson), the LP marks Gabe’s first official collection as an independent artist. Following the release of 2011’s One Spark, the Nashville-based troubadour changed almost everything. He was focused on starting from scratch, and parted ways with his longtime management and record label, Concord Music Group. The one thing that didn’t change was that honest, heartfelt approach to songwriting that countless fans fell in love with when he first emerged in 1999.

Turns To Gold addresses some weighty subjects—mortality, what’s important in life, and the value of love. “In many ways, my new music is about learning how to be in a committed relationship, leave immature ways behind, grow, evolve, and move on from habits that aren’t necessarily who you are anymore,” he says. The album was recorded at The Smoakstack recording studio in Berry Hill, TN with Jano Rix on drums (The Wood Brothers), Viktor Krauss on bass (Lyle Lovett), and Kris Donegan on guitar (Cam). “I wanted to go in with musicians and get performances that were inspiring and inspired, and take it from there. Producer Paul Moak was completely on the same page. We cut everything to analog tape with no click track. What results is an album that feels very natural. Since One Spark I learned to trust myself, and the sound of Turns To Gold is the most representative of who I am. It’s warm, laid-back, acoustic, and live.”

The opener and first single, “Holding Her Freedom,” out now, coasts between a shimmering piano melody, organ swell, guitar rumble, and heavenly vocal performance from Gabe. It also conveys a cinematic narrative. “It’s a story about a woman who has been burned by love, and she’s afraid to let herself be vulnerable and fall in love again,” he explains. “She’s figuratively holding her freedom like a cage. That same ‘freedom’ keeps her trapped and unable to love again.” The album’s second single, “The Way To Love Me,” features Natalie Prass and will be released on February 5th. “Natalie’s voice has the perfect delicate and vulnerable qualities that the song required,” says Gabe. “She recorded it while passing through Nashville to play the Ryman Auditorium, part of a long tour opening for Ryan Adams.”

Throughout his career, many other notable artists have taken note of and supported Gabe’s immense talents. He’s opened for and toured with the likes of Loggins & Messina, Gavin DeGraw and Delta Rae, as well as held side gigs as the keyboardist and vocalist for Paul McCartney, Alison Krause & Union Station, O.A.R. and Supertramp. His songs have received placements on major television shows including Parks and Recreation, Grey’s Anatomy, and Vampire Diaries, and his song “Find My Way” served as the title for the box office hit The Proposal starring Sandra Bullock. Fans have seen him perform twice on Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!, as well as The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and on festival stages everywhere from Bonnaroo to High Sierra Music Festival. However, it’s with Turns To Gold that listeners will hear Gabe Dixon as he always meant.

(Late Show) Your Smith (fka Caroline Smith) with Special Guest BAUM

Minneapolis native Your Smith (aka Caroline Smith), relocated to Los Angeles after signing to Pulse Recording (DRAM, Miike Snow, Gallant, et. al). Inspired by the history of Laurel Canyon and moving through a city that’s been immortalized in music throughout the ages, Smith concocted her own sound, bringing together the funk / R&B “Minneapolis Sound” of her roots and the classic songwriting of the LA folk heroes. Your Smith is currently wrapping up her debut EP, produced by Tommy English (BØRNS), Stint (Gallant, Aluna George, NAO), and Nicky Davey (Internet, Syd The Kid), arriving on Neon Gold Records (HAIM, Christine & The Queens, et. al) this spring. She also recently appeared as a featured artist on alt rapper Rejjie Snow’s debut.

Minneapolis native Your Smith (aka Caroline Smith), relocated to Los Angeles after signing to Pulse Recording (DRAM, Miike Snow, Gallant, et. al). Inspired by the history of Laurel Canyon and moving through a city that’s been immortalized in music throughout the ages, Smith concocted her own sound, bringing together the funk / R&B “Minneapolis Sound” of her roots and the classic songwriting of the LA folk heroes. Your Smith is currently wrapping up her debut EP, produced by Tommy English (BØRNS), Stint (Gallant, Aluna George, NAO), and Nicky Davey (Internet, Syd The Kid), arriving on Neon Gold Records (HAIM, Christine & The Queens, et. al) this spring. She also recently appeared as a featured artist on alt rapper Rejjie Snow’s debut.

(Early Show) Adelaide In Autumn with Ten Thousand Dollars Cash and Breaker

Adelaide in Autumn is Pittsburgh's original pop punk 'n roll band. Dave (Percussion), Nick (Vocals, Guitar) and Ryan (Guitar, Vocals, Bass) have played for over half a decade in various bands and genres. With influences rooted in Punk, Alternative, Indie and Metal, Adelaide in Autumn combines unique musicians with style that's ultimately the most catchy and entertaining band in Pittsburgh.

Adelaide in Autumn is Pittsburgh's original pop punk 'n roll band. Dave (Percussion), Nick (Vocals, Guitar) and Ryan (Guitar, Vocals, Bass) have played for over half a decade in various bands and genres. With influences rooted in Punk, Alternative, Indie and Metal, Adelaide in Autumn combines unique musicians with style that's ultimately the most catchy and entertaining band in Pittsburgh.

Jennifer Knapp

Jennifer Knapp is a Grammy-nominated songwriter, author, and advocate. Her impressive history includes selling over one million albums with her first three releases Kansas (debut 1998, Gold-certified), Lay It Down (2000), and The Way I Am (2001). She has earned four Dove Awards and two Grammy nominations. The Kansas-born musician has toured the globe with artists such as Jars of Clay and was featured on the Lilith Fair Tour in 1999 and again in 2010. Knapp has received critical acclaim for her human approach to the divine, with The Los Angeles Times calling her "a rising star" and People Magazine describing her as "an uncommonly literate songwriter."

With a considerable fan base and critical and commercial successes, Knapp walked away from music in 2002 at the height of her career. After a seven-year hiatus she returned in 2010 with a renewed passion for music showcased in her album Letting Go, which debuted at No. 73 on the Billboard Hot 200 Chart. Set Me Free followed in 2014 on Righteous Babe Records in conjunction with a memoir, Facing the Music: My Story, on Howard Books/Simon & Schuster. Her 2017 album Love Comes Back Around, produced by Viktor Krauss, pairs her fearless songwriting and strong, expressive voice with rootsy arrangements.

As the first major artist known by the Christian music world to speak openly about LGBT identity, her unique position has created opportunities for dialogue at churches and universities through her organization Inside Out Faith and on the TEDx stage at University of Nevada.

A true Renaissance woman, Knapp recently completed a master’s degree in theological studies from Vanderbilt Divinity School.

Jennifer Knapp is a Grammy-nominated songwriter, author, and advocate. Her impressive history includes selling over one million albums with her first three releases Kansas (debut 1998, Gold-certified), Lay It Down (2000), and The Way I Am (2001). She has earned four Dove Awards and two Grammy nominations. The Kansas-born musician has toured the globe with artists such as Jars of Clay and was featured on the Lilith Fair Tour in 1999 and again in 2010. Knapp has received critical acclaim for her human approach to the divine, with The Los Angeles Times calling her "a rising star" and People Magazine describing her as "an uncommonly literate songwriter."

With a considerable fan base and critical and commercial successes, Knapp walked away from music in 2002 at the height of her career. After a seven-year hiatus she returned in 2010 with a renewed passion for music showcased in her album Letting Go, which debuted at No. 73 on the Billboard Hot 200 Chart. Set Me Free followed in 2014 on Righteous Babe Records in conjunction with a memoir, Facing the Music: My Story, on Howard Books/Simon & Schuster. Her 2017 album Love Comes Back Around, produced by Viktor Krauss, pairs her fearless songwriting and strong, expressive voice with rootsy arrangements.

As the first major artist known by the Christian music world to speak openly about LGBT identity, her unique position has created opportunities for dialogue at churches and universities through her organization Inside Out Faith and on the TEDx stage at University of Nevada.

A true Renaissance woman, Knapp recently completed a master’s degree in theological studies from Vanderbilt Divinity School.

The Lil Smokies

When people see The Lil Smokies setting up their acoustic instruments, they’re often unprepared for the electric energy they generate. The band captures that same dynamic presence on their new album, Changing Shades, delivering their exceptional songwriting and bluegrass roots with the punch of a rock band.“We wanted to duplicate the energy of our live shows. It’s a perfect mixture of improvisation and composition. The record shows how fearless we’ve become in the last year,” says Andy Dunnigan, lead songwriter, singer and dobro player. They cut Changing Shades in a lighthearted, week-long session at SnowGhost Music in Whitefish, MT with engineer Brett Allen (The Avett Brothers, Kris Kristofferson, Béla Fleck) and co-producer Rob Gordon (Elephant Revival). “It was a breeze,” Dunnigan says. “Rob got us to focus on what makes each song special. We refined and recorded them live, together in one room, just like on stage.”

The first incarnation of The Lil Smokies got together in Missoula, Montana, during the winter of 2009. Through the years, the band transformed and settled into the current lineup – Scott Parker on bass; Jake Simpson on fiddle; Matt Rieger on guitar; Matt Cornette on banjo and Dunnigan on dobro. Previously, the band has won the 2015 Telluride Bluegrass Band competition and took home the 2016 IBMA Momentum Band of the Year award. They’ve also wowed fans at the High Sierra, FreshGrass, Telluride Bluegrass, Grey Fox, Del Fest, Floyd Fest and String Summit festivals, to name a few.

When people see The Lil Smokies setting up their acoustic instruments, they’re often unprepared for the electric energy they generate. The band captures that same dynamic presence on their new album, Changing Shades, delivering their exceptional songwriting and bluegrass roots with the punch of a rock band.“We wanted to duplicate the energy of our live shows. It’s a perfect mixture of improvisation and composition. The record shows how fearless we’ve become in the last year,” says Andy Dunnigan, lead songwriter, singer and dobro player. They cut Changing Shades in a lighthearted, week-long session at SnowGhost Music in Whitefish, MT with engineer Brett Allen (The Avett Brothers, Kris Kristofferson, Béla Fleck) and co-producer Rob Gordon (Elephant Revival). “It was a breeze,” Dunnigan says. “Rob got us to focus on what makes each song special. We refined and recorded them live, together in one room, just like on stage.”

The first incarnation of The Lil Smokies got together in Missoula, Montana, during the winter of 2009. Through the years, the band transformed and settled into the current lineup – Scott Parker on bass; Jake Simpson on fiddle; Matt Rieger on guitar; Matt Cornette on banjo and Dunnigan on dobro. Previously, the band has won the 2015 Telluride Bluegrass Band competition and took home the 2016 IBMA Momentum Band of the Year award. They’ve also wowed fans at the High Sierra, FreshGrass, Telluride Bluegrass, Grey Fox, Del Fest, Floyd Fest and String Summit festivals, to name a few.

Melodime with Special Guest The Brevet

Melodime is a Virginia-based band with influences in both country and rock that features emotionally charged anthems, piano driven hooks, and energetic guitar solos for a dynamic, organic sound.

Melodime, featuring Brad Rhodes (lead vocals, guitar), Sammy Duis (piano, organ, bass), Tyler Duis (drums), and Jon Wiley (guitar, mandolin, dobro), has performed over 100+ shows annually throughout the continental United States, sharing the stage with such well-known acts as Sam Hunt, Eli Young Band, A Thousand Horses, and Sister Hazel.

The band has also left its mark internationally with performances in Mexico, Canada, and Europe, all while founding and running a charity, ‘Now I Play Along Too,’ which provides musical instruments and lessons to underprivileged children in the DC area, Florida, Nepal, Kenya, and Haiti.

The band is quickly becoming a fan-favorite in the festival scene, playing five consecutive Rock Boat cruises, as well as Musikfest, Herndon Festival, Mile of Music, and other events. In their hometown of Northern Virginia, the group has performed at popular venues such as The State Theatre, 9:30 Club, The Hamilton, and Baltimore Soundstage.

Melodime will be rolling out their new album in 3 EP installments starting with the first single "Song of the Summer" on June 29th.

Melodime is a Virginia-based band with influences in both country and rock that features emotionally charged anthems, piano driven hooks, and energetic guitar solos for a dynamic, organic sound.

Melodime, featuring Brad Rhodes (lead vocals, guitar), Sammy Duis (piano, organ, bass), Tyler Duis (drums), and Jon Wiley (guitar, mandolin, dobro), has performed over 100+ shows annually throughout the continental United States, sharing the stage with such well-known acts as Sam Hunt, Eli Young Band, A Thousand Horses, and Sister Hazel.

The band has also left its mark internationally with performances in Mexico, Canada, and Europe, all while founding and running a charity, ‘Now I Play Along Too,’ which provides musical instruments and lessons to underprivileged children in the DC area, Florida, Nepal, Kenya, and Haiti.

The band is quickly becoming a fan-favorite in the festival scene, playing five consecutive Rock Boat cruises, as well as Musikfest, Herndon Festival, Mile of Music, and other events. In their hometown of Northern Virginia, the group has performed at popular venues such as The State Theatre, 9:30 Club, The Hamilton, and Baltimore Soundstage.

Melodime will be rolling out their new album in 3 EP installments starting with the first single "Song of the Summer" on June 29th.

Seth Walker

Over the past 10 years, Seth Walker has become recognized as one of the most revered modern roots artists in the United States; a three dimensional talent comprised by a gift for combining melody and lyric alongside a rich, Gospel-drenched, Southern-inflected voice with a true blue knack for getting around on the guitar. His latest studio album, Gotta Get Back, produced by Jano Rix of The Wood Brothers, is yet another masterwork that further expands upon this reputation.

Growing up on a commune in rural North Carolina, the son of classically trained musicians, Seth Walker played cello long before discovering the six-string in his 20s. When his introduction to the blues came via his Uncle Landon Walker, who was both a musician and disc jockey, his fate was forever sealed. Instantaneously, Seth was looking to artists like T-Bone Walker, Snooks Eaglin, and B.B. King as a wellspring of endless inspiration. The rest is history. He's released seven albums between 1997 and 2015; breaking into the Top 20 of the Americana charts and receiving praise from NPR, American Songwriter, No Depression and Blues Revue, among others.

In addition to extensive recording and songwriting pursuits, Seth is consistently touring and performing at venues and festivals around the world. Along with headline shows, he's been invited to open for The Mavericks, The Wood Brothers, Raul Malo, Paul Thorn and Ruthie Foster, among others.

Seth Walker is currently splitting his time between New Orleans and New York City after previously residing in Austin and Nashville. He’s used those experiences wisely, soaking up the sounds and absorbing the musical lineage of these varied places. With a bluesman’s respect for roots and tradition, coupled with an appreciation for—and successful melding of—contemporary songwriting, Seth sublimely incorporates a range of styles with warmth and grace. Perhaps Country Standard Time said it best: “If you subscribe to the Big Tent theory of Americana, then Seth Walker –with his blend of blues, gospel, pop, R&B, rock, and a dash country—just might be your poster boy.”

Over the past 10 years, Seth Walker has become recognized as one of the most revered modern roots artists in the United States; a three dimensional talent comprised by a gift for combining melody and lyric alongside a rich, Gospel-drenched, Southern-inflected voice with a true blue knack for getting around on the guitar. His latest studio album, Gotta Get Back, produced by Jano Rix of The Wood Brothers, is yet another masterwork that further expands upon this reputation.

Growing up on a commune in rural North Carolina, the son of classically trained musicians, Seth Walker played cello long before discovering the six-string in his 20s. When his introduction to the blues came via his Uncle Landon Walker, who was both a musician and disc jockey, his fate was forever sealed. Instantaneously, Seth was looking to artists like T-Bone Walker, Snooks Eaglin, and B.B. King as a wellspring of endless inspiration. The rest is history. He's released seven albums between 1997 and 2015; breaking into the Top 20 of the Americana charts and receiving praise from NPR, American Songwriter, No Depression and Blues Revue, among others.

In addition to extensive recording and songwriting pursuits, Seth is consistently touring and performing at venues and festivals around the world. Along with headline shows, he's been invited to open for The Mavericks, The Wood Brothers, Raul Malo, Paul Thorn and Ruthie Foster, among others.

Seth Walker is currently splitting his time between New Orleans and New York City after previously residing in Austin and Nashville. He’s used those experiences wisely, soaking up the sounds and absorbing the musical lineage of these varied places. With a bluesman’s respect for roots and tradition, coupled with an appreciation for—and successful melding of—contemporary songwriting, Seth sublimely incorporates a range of styles with warmth and grace. Perhaps Country Standard Time said it best: “If you subscribe to the Big Tent theory of Americana, then Seth Walker –with his blend of blues, gospel, pop, R&B, rock, and a dash country—just might be your poster boy.”

Great Lake Swimmers

2018 marks the 15th anniversary of Great Lake Swimmers. Over seven albums, multiple EPs, live broadcasts, and reissues, the Toronto-based project led by singer-songwriter Tony Dekker has established itself as a beloved indie folk act in their native Canada and beyond. The CBC has called them “a national treasure” while their music has taken them around the world, sharing a sound that is at once familiar and distinct, using the tools of folk music as the starting point to delve deeper.

It’s this contrast and evolution that brings them to their latest release, The Waves, The Wake – a metaphor for the future ahead, and the past trailing behind. Abandoning the acoustic guitar, this new collection of songs sees the group branching out to include new sounds such as harp, lute, pipe organ, woodwinds, congas and marimbas, alongside the more familiar flecks and chimes of the banjo, piano, and 12-string electric guitar. The stunning acoustics of the historic, 145 year old Bishop Cronyn Memorial Church in London, Ontario lend the atmospheric touch to the album, under the guidance of co-producer Chris Stringer (Union Sound). This record is about the songs, first and foremost, and was made with many of Toronto’s most talented players, including arrangements by Drew Jurecka and electric guitar appearances both atmospheric and spirited by Kevin Kane (Grapes Of Wrath). Long time collaborators Erik Arnesen (banjo, guitar), Bret Higgins (bass), and Josh Van Tassel (percussion) also contribute their considerable musicianship.

“The Talking Wind” opens the album solely with woodwinds and vocals, setting the tone with its scaled back, minimalist approach. Similarly sparse arrangements on “Falling Apart” pair a meditative, layered piano with an appearance by renowned harpist Mary Lattimore alongside Dekker’s haunting, plaintive vocals. Bridging the album to the group’s past work, the lonely jangle of “Alone But Not Alone” is a study in song-craft; “Side Effects” matches lyrical substance to musical motifs with its expressive vibraphone, tempo variations, and vocal effects.

But perhaps the album’s centerpiece is the entirely a cappella “Visions Of A Different World” with its ghostly, longing vocals nakedly bearing its message.

Great Lake Swimmers have twice been nominated for Juno Awards, have been shortlisted for the prestigious Polaris Prize, and won a Canadian Indie Award for Favourite Folk/Roots Artist/Group. They have shared the stage as support for such musical luminaries as Robert Plant, Feist, and Calexico, and have appeared as headliners for many of Canada’s major Folk Music festivals. Their relentless touring schedule and countless live shows have helped them develop devoted fan bases across Canada, the US, Europe, the UK and many points beyond. Mojo dubbed them “Ambient Zen Americana” and Exclaim has described them as a “cherished blend of folk and orchestral indie pop.”

2018 marks the 15th anniversary of Great Lake Swimmers. Over seven albums, multiple EPs, live broadcasts, and reissues, the Toronto-based project led by singer-songwriter Tony Dekker has established itself as a beloved indie folk act in their native Canada and beyond. The CBC has called them “a national treasure” while their music has taken them around the world, sharing a sound that is at once familiar and distinct, using the tools of folk music as the starting point to delve deeper.

It’s this contrast and evolution that brings them to their latest release, The Waves, The Wake – a metaphor for the future ahead, and the past trailing behind. Abandoning the acoustic guitar, this new collection of songs sees the group branching out to include new sounds such as harp, lute, pipe organ, woodwinds, congas and marimbas, alongside the more familiar flecks and chimes of the banjo, piano, and 12-string electric guitar. The stunning acoustics of the historic, 145 year old Bishop Cronyn Memorial Church in London, Ontario lend the atmospheric touch to the album, under the guidance of co-producer Chris Stringer (Union Sound). This record is about the songs, first and foremost, and was made with many of Toronto’s most talented players, including arrangements by Drew Jurecka and electric guitar appearances both atmospheric and spirited by Kevin Kane (Grapes Of Wrath). Long time collaborators Erik Arnesen (banjo, guitar), Bret Higgins (bass), and Josh Van Tassel (percussion) also contribute their considerable musicianship.

“The Talking Wind” opens the album solely with woodwinds and vocals, setting the tone with its scaled back, minimalist approach. Similarly sparse arrangements on “Falling Apart” pair a meditative, layered piano with an appearance by renowned harpist Mary Lattimore alongside Dekker’s haunting, plaintive vocals. Bridging the album to the group’s past work, the lonely jangle of “Alone But Not Alone” is a study in song-craft; “Side Effects” matches lyrical substance to musical motifs with its expressive vibraphone, tempo variations, and vocal effects.

But perhaps the album’s centerpiece is the entirely a cappella “Visions Of A Different World” with its ghostly, longing vocals nakedly bearing its message.

Great Lake Swimmers have twice been nominated for Juno Awards, have been shortlisted for the prestigious Polaris Prize, and won a Canadian Indie Award for Favourite Folk/Roots Artist/Group. They have shared the stage as support for such musical luminaries as Robert Plant, Feist, and Calexico, and have appeared as headliners for many of Canada’s major Folk Music festivals. Their relentless touring schedule and countless live shows have helped them develop devoted fan bases across Canada, the US, Europe, the UK and many points beyond. Mojo dubbed them “Ambient Zen Americana” and Exclaim has described them as a “cherished blend of folk and orchestral indie pop.”

(Early Show) Steve Forbert

"Compromised" is Steve Forbert's newest and from the comparative essay of the disc’s title song,(complete with catchy chorus and signature harmonica solo), to the exasperated advice for "everyman" on the album closer, “Whatever, Man,” Steve Forbert leaves no stone unturned in his exploration of life, love, turmoil and survival.

After years with local bands, Steve Forbert left his hometown of Meridian, Mississippi in his early 20s and headed for the Big Apple in search of recording deals and larger audiences. He started out playing for change at Grand Central Station and hitting every open mic night he could before eventually moving into the club scene at infamous spots like New York City’s CBGB’s. At a time when rootsy rock was fading in favor of punk edged bands such as the Ramones, Talking Heads, and Blondie, Forbert’s folk pop “Romeo’s Tune” hit #11 on the charts and brought him into the international spotlight. Critics and the public embraced his melodic and lyrical styles, a more traditional sound among the post disco punk and rock of the late ’70s and early ’80s. Always following his own instincts, Forbert says, “I’ve never been interested in changing what I do to fit popular style and needs.”

And that’s the motto he has lived by since the release of his debut album, Alive on Arrival, in 1978. Rolling Stone contributing editor David Wild recently wrote that “now or then, you would have been hard pressed to find a debut effort that was simultaneously as fresh and accomplished as Alive on Arrival. It was like a great novel by a young author who somehow managed to split the difference between Mark Twain and J. D. Salinger.”

"Compromised" is Steve Forbert's newest and from the comparative essay of the disc’s title song,(complete with catchy chorus and signature harmonica solo), to the exasperated advice for "everyman" on the album closer, “Whatever, Man,” Steve Forbert leaves no stone unturned in his exploration of life, love, turmoil and survival.

After years with local bands, Steve Forbert left his hometown of Meridian, Mississippi in his early 20s and headed for the Big Apple in search of recording deals and larger audiences. He started out playing for change at Grand Central Station and hitting every open mic night he could before eventually moving into the club scene at infamous spots like New York City’s CBGB’s. At a time when rootsy rock was fading in favor of punk edged bands such as the Ramones, Talking Heads, and Blondie, Forbert’s folk pop “Romeo’s Tune” hit #11 on the charts and brought him into the international spotlight. Critics and the public embraced his melodic and lyrical styles, a more traditional sound among the post disco punk and rock of the late ’70s and early ’80s. Always following his own instincts, Forbert says, “I’ve never been interested in changing what I do to fit popular style and needs.”

And that’s the motto he has lived by since the release of his debut album, Alive on Arrival, in 1978. Rolling Stone contributing editor David Wild recently wrote that “now or then, you would have been hard pressed to find a debut effort that was simultaneously as fresh and accomplished as Alive on Arrival. It was like a great novel by a young author who somehow managed to split the difference between Mark Twain and J. D. Salinger.”

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