club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
(Early Show) October Rose with Special Guest Kevin Dale

Derek Allan and Leanne Weiss formed the country music duo October Rose in 2016 after years of performing separately as solo artists. The two separately have played across the Eastern half of the United States and opened for a who's who list of top 40 country artists including Dierks Bently, Kenny Rogers, and the Stickers. Derek is originally from Pittsburgh, PA and relocated to New Jersey in early 2016. Leanne has been a Jersey native her whole life and established a strong local following with the support of NYC's only country radio station, NashFM. The duo was honored to perform on America's Morning Show in September of 2016. Their first EP "All In" is expected to be released in 2017 and will be recorded with gold-record producer Chris Badami of Portrait Recording Studios.

Derek Allan and Leanne Weiss formed the country music duo October Rose in 2016 after years of performing separately as solo artists. The two separately have played across the Eastern half of the United States and opened for a who's who list of top 40 country artists including Dierks Bently, Kenny Rogers, and the Stickers. Derek is originally from Pittsburgh, PA and relocated to New Jersey in early 2016. Leanne has been a Jersey native her whole life and established a strong local following with the support of NYC's only country radio station, NashFM. The duo was honored to perform on America's Morning Show in September of 2016. Their first EP "All In" is expected to be released in 2017 and will be recorded with gold-record producer Chris Badami of Portrait Recording Studios.

(Late Show) Airpark (Formerly of The Apache Relay) with Special Guest Herbivore

Airpark makes deconstructed pop music. Inspired by minimalism, melody and groove-heavy percussion, bandmates Michael Ford, Jr. and Ben Ford launched the group in 2016, one year after their previous project, The Apache Relay, quietly called it quits. The Apache Relay had been a large band, staffed with six members and armed with a thick, wall-of-sound approach. With Airpark, the Ford brothers sharpen their focus and scale back their arrangements, focusing on songs that pack a punch with bold, basic ingredients.

Raised in New Orleans, the Fords grew up surrounded by music, from the Crescent City's jazz to the soul of Irma Thomas and Allen Touissant. Later while living in Nashville, the two rekindled the music connection they'd kick-started back home, finding popularity - first in Tennessee, then across the country - as The Apache Relay performed alongside the likes of Jenny Lewis, Mumford & Sons and more. It was a whirlwind period that found the brothers constantly touring, forever moving and steadily swelling their sound to new heights. Michael and Ben move at a deliberately different speed with Airpark, thus finding new musical territory to explore.

Taking their cues from a wide set of influences - the rhythmic world music of Tinariwen and Lijadu Sisters; the production of Air, Damon Albarn, and Fiona Apple's The Idler Wheel; the ten-or vocal range of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham, with the occasional pop crooner delivery of Harry Nilsson - the two unveil their new direction with Air-park's debut EP, Early Works, Volume 1. On opening track "All The Time," Michael spins the autobiographical story of a musician who's starting over and swinging for the fences, finally coming to terms with his own ambition. "Now I know I need ittobe ocean-sized," he sings, backed by propulsive percussion, syncopated electric guitar and his brother's harmonies. Else-where, the two ride an abstract, atmospheric groove on "Even If," get nostalgic with "Black Light Blue," and reset the clock during the New Year's Eve breakup anthem "Plenty to Pine For."

It's a sound that targets the feet and the head. It's pop music for thinkers. It's dance music for wallflowers. And with the brothers pulling triple-duty as songwriters, multi-instrumentalists and co-producers, Early Works, Volume 1 - whose March 3, 2017 release arrives courtesy of the Fords' own label, Eugenia Hall Records - is their most forward-thinking project to date, pairing the band's growing ambition with musical chops to match.

Airpark makes deconstructed pop music. Inspired by minimalism, melody and groove-heavy percussion, bandmates Michael Ford, Jr. and Ben Ford launched the group in 2016, one year after their previous project, The Apache Relay, quietly called it quits. The Apache Relay had been a large band, staffed with six members and armed with a thick, wall-of-sound approach. With Airpark, the Ford brothers sharpen their focus and scale back their arrangements, focusing on songs that pack a punch with bold, basic ingredients.

Raised in New Orleans, the Fords grew up surrounded by music, from the Crescent City's jazz to the soul of Irma Thomas and Allen Touissant. Later while living in Nashville, the two rekindled the music connection they'd kick-started back home, finding popularity - first in Tennessee, then across the country - as The Apache Relay performed alongside the likes of Jenny Lewis, Mumford & Sons and more. It was a whirlwind period that found the brothers constantly touring, forever moving and steadily swelling their sound to new heights. Michael and Ben move at a deliberately different speed with Airpark, thus finding new musical territory to explore.

Taking their cues from a wide set of influences - the rhythmic world music of Tinariwen and Lijadu Sisters; the production of Air, Damon Albarn, and Fiona Apple's The Idler Wheel; the ten-or vocal range of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham, with the occasional pop crooner delivery of Harry Nilsson - the two unveil their new direction with Air-park's debut EP, Early Works, Volume 1. On opening track "All The Time," Michael spins the autobiographical story of a musician who's starting over and swinging for the fences, finally coming to terms with his own ambition. "Now I know I need ittobe ocean-sized," he sings, backed by propulsive percussion, syncopated electric guitar and his brother's harmonies. Else-where, the two ride an abstract, atmospheric groove on "Even If," get nostalgic with "Black Light Blue," and reset the clock during the New Year's Eve breakup anthem "Plenty to Pine For."

It's a sound that targets the feet and the head. It's pop music for thinkers. It's dance music for wallflowers. And with the brothers pulling triple-duty as songwriters, multi-instrumentalists and co-producers, Early Works, Volume 1 - whose March 3, 2017 release arrives courtesy of the Fords' own label, Eugenia Hall Records - is their most forward-thinking project to date, pairing the band's growing ambition with musical chops to match.

Gaelynn Lea / Ben de la Cour

Gaelynn Lea

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been bewitching scores of fans with her experimental and
ambient takes on fiddle music, an approach that incorporates her love of traditional tunes, songwriting, poetry and sonic exploration. Her work most recently won NPR Music's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest, a competition drawing submissions of original songs from more than 6,000 musicians across the country. Gaelynn Lea has been playing violin for over twenty years, developing an improvisational style all her own. She has performed alongside many notable Minnesota musicians over the years, including Alan Sparhawk, Charlie Parr, and Billy McLaughlin. On March 3, 2016, Gaelynn Lea was named the winner of NPR Music's second-ever Tiny Desk Contest. The video entry of her original song "Someday We'll Linger in the Sun" rose to the top of over 6,100 submissions from around the nation, chosen as the unanimous favorite among the contest's six judges. The very next week, Gaelynn performed a moving Tiny Desk Concert, at which the show's host Bob Boilen said "there was hardly a dry eye."

Gaelynn Lea's musical reach has expanded significantly because of the Tiny Desk Contest. She began a touring nationally in September 2016, and in December 2016 she performed in Europe for the first time as support for Low's Christmas tour. Gaelynn Lea will continue this musical journey well into 2017, touring throughout the US and UK.
In addition to performing, Gaelynn Lea has had a busy year in the recording studio. She released her debut solo album entitled "All the Roads that Lead Us Home" in November 2015. It pays homage to the traditional fiddle tunes and beloved standards that Gaelynn has been playing for over a decade. But of course, there is a twist! Gaelynn used her Memory Man looping pedal to create winding layers of sound underneath these familiar melodies.

She released a version of her Tiny Desk Contest winning track, "Someday We'll Linger in the Sun", on May 5, 2016.
Several months later Gaelynn recorded and released a 6-track EP titled "The Songs We Sing Along the Way", backed by guitarist Al Church. In November 2016, she followed up this EP with a full-length holiday album, "Deepest Darkness, Brightest Dawn", once again accompanied by Al Church.

In addition to performing, Gaelynn also loves to do speaking engagements about disability, overcoming challenges, and the joy of music. She has a congenital disability called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, or Brittle Bones Disease. Gaelynn is a strong voice in the disability community; she uses her music as a platform to advocate for people with disabilities and to promote positive social change. In October 2016, Gaelynn was invited to Yale to give a TEDx Talk titled "Disability and Sexuality: Forging Identity in a World that Leaves You Out". Gaelynn Lea believes society must work harder to prioritize accessibility so people with disabilities can participate fully in their communities and use their talents and gifts
without barriers or discrimination.

Ben de la Cour
"Gruff but well-read, quiet but dancing circles on one heel in the kitchen, de la Cour is the enigma, the lone picker, the troubadour, the drifter, the one man band." (The American Music Project)

Ben de la Cour has lived a different kind of life. After growing up in Brooklyn, he set out to see the world as an amateur boxer, bartender, and agricultural worker. He lived in Havana, Paris, London, Los Angeles, and New Orleans before finally settling in Nashville, and it was at Nashville's Greenland Sound that de la Cour recorded the eleven songs of perfectly crafted Americanoir that make up his second album "Midnight in Havana".

"Ben de la Cour's songs are brimming with urgent authenticity. There is thematic hardness and vulnerability throughout, but what distinguishes de la Cour's songs from lesser guitar-and-anguished-vocals hacks is the raw humanity of his delivery and the potency of his way with words." (No Depression)

Influenced by giants such as Townes Van Zandt and Warren Zevon as much as by bands like Slayer, Nick Cave and The Gun Club, Ben de la Cour has somehow managed to meld all of these influences naturally into his Americanoir canon, delivering a uniquely modern, haunting and darkly humorous sound that is all his own. Songs filled with tales of substance abuse, murder and mental illness sit in perfect juxtaposition with playful lightheartedness and an ever-present glimmer of hope. However, upon closer inspection, darkness almost always wins…an unlikely hero, but one that suits de la Cour.

"Ben de la Cour bleeds the songs he sings. Within the understated instrumentation and de la Cour's baritone voice lie stark, haunting songscapes: moody recollections that recount the journey of a life that is not always pretty, but proves better than one of mundane predictability." (Turnstyled, Junkpiled)
In May of 2016, de la Cour was selected as one of six winners of the prestigious Kerrville Folk Festival "New Folk" competition.

"Ben de la Cour is a folk musician with the songwriting acumen of a young Nick Cave and the lyrical wisdom of a vitriolic Leonard Cohen. His songs are stark, melancholic and packed with emotion and will send you collectively weak at the knees." (Fresh Deer Meat)

Gaelynn Lea

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been bewitching scores of fans with her experimental and
ambient takes on fiddle music, an approach that incorporates her love of traditional tunes, songwriting, poetry and sonic exploration. Her work most recently won NPR Music's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest, a competition drawing submissions of original songs from more than 6,000 musicians across the country. Gaelynn Lea has been playing violin for over twenty years, developing an improvisational style all her own. She has performed alongside many notable Minnesota musicians over the years, including Alan Sparhawk, Charlie Parr, and Billy McLaughlin. On March 3, 2016, Gaelynn Lea was named the winner of NPR Music's second-ever Tiny Desk Contest. The video entry of her original song "Someday We'll Linger in the Sun" rose to the top of over 6,100 submissions from around the nation, chosen as the unanimous favorite among the contest's six judges. The very next week, Gaelynn performed a moving Tiny Desk Concert, at which the show's host Bob Boilen said "there was hardly a dry eye."

Gaelynn Lea's musical reach has expanded significantly because of the Tiny Desk Contest. She began a touring nationally in September 2016, and in December 2016 she performed in Europe for the first time as support for Low's Christmas tour. Gaelynn Lea will continue this musical journey well into 2017, touring throughout the US and UK.
In addition to performing, Gaelynn Lea has had a busy year in the recording studio. She released her debut solo album entitled "All the Roads that Lead Us Home" in November 2015. It pays homage to the traditional fiddle tunes and beloved standards that Gaelynn has been playing for over a decade. But of course, there is a twist! Gaelynn used her Memory Man looping pedal to create winding layers of sound underneath these familiar melodies.

She released a version of her Tiny Desk Contest winning track, "Someday We'll Linger in the Sun", on May 5, 2016.
Several months later Gaelynn recorded and released a 6-track EP titled "The Songs We Sing Along the Way", backed by guitarist Al Church. In November 2016, she followed up this EP with a full-length holiday album, "Deepest Darkness, Brightest Dawn", once again accompanied by Al Church.

In addition to performing, Gaelynn also loves to do speaking engagements about disability, overcoming challenges, and the joy of music. She has a congenital disability called Osteogenesis Imperfecta, or Brittle Bones Disease. Gaelynn is a strong voice in the disability community; she uses her music as a platform to advocate for people with disabilities and to promote positive social change. In October 2016, Gaelynn was invited to Yale to give a TEDx Talk titled "Disability and Sexuality: Forging Identity in a World that Leaves You Out". Gaelynn Lea believes society must work harder to prioritize accessibility so people with disabilities can participate fully in their communities and use their talents and gifts
without barriers or discrimination.

Ben de la Cour
"Gruff but well-read, quiet but dancing circles on one heel in the kitchen, de la Cour is the enigma, the lone picker, the troubadour, the drifter, the one man band." (The American Music Project)

Ben de la Cour has lived a different kind of life. After growing up in Brooklyn, he set out to see the world as an amateur boxer, bartender, and agricultural worker. He lived in Havana, Paris, London, Los Angeles, and New Orleans before finally settling in Nashville, and it was at Nashville's Greenland Sound that de la Cour recorded the eleven songs of perfectly crafted Americanoir that make up his second album "Midnight in Havana".

"Ben de la Cour's songs are brimming with urgent authenticity. There is thematic hardness and vulnerability throughout, but what distinguishes de la Cour's songs from lesser guitar-and-anguished-vocals hacks is the raw humanity of his delivery and the potency of his way with words." (No Depression)

Influenced by giants such as Townes Van Zandt and Warren Zevon as much as by bands like Slayer, Nick Cave and The Gun Club, Ben de la Cour has somehow managed to meld all of these influences naturally into his Americanoir canon, delivering a uniquely modern, haunting and darkly humorous sound that is all his own. Songs filled with tales of substance abuse, murder and mental illness sit in perfect juxtaposition with playful lightheartedness and an ever-present glimmer of hope. However, upon closer inspection, darkness almost always wins…an unlikely hero, but one that suits de la Cour.

"Ben de la Cour bleeds the songs he sings. Within the understated instrumentation and de la Cour's baritone voice lie stark, haunting songscapes: moody recollections that recount the journey of a life that is not always pretty, but proves better than one of mundane predictability." (Turnstyled, Junkpiled)
In May of 2016, de la Cour was selected as one of six winners of the prestigious Kerrville Folk Festival "New Folk" competition.

"Ben de la Cour is a folk musician with the songwriting acumen of a young Nick Cave and the lyrical wisdom of a vitriolic Leonard Cohen. His songs are stark, melancholic and packed with emotion and will send you collectively weak at the knees." (Fresh Deer Meat)

An Evening With Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams

Multi-instrumentalist-vocalist Larry Campbell and singer-guitarist Teresa Williams have rocked many a venue, as both center stage performers and invaluable assets to world class acts. A shortlist of artists who've benefited from their talents, live and in studios, reads like a Who's Who of Music Icons: Bob Dylan (Larry spent eight years on the Never Ending Tour), Paul Simon, Little Feat, Hot Tuna, Phil Lesh, Emmylou Harris, Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, and, for one miraculous seven-year stretch, Levon Helm. Now, with an eponymous debut album, the couple brings it all back home. Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams may have been simmering awhile, but the timing is perfect; the eleven tracks, produced by Campbell, distill everything into a potent, infectious blend of Americana style and timeless soul, offered with a relaxed generosity that can only come from rich experience.

Larry and Teresa's story begins at New York's famed Bottom Line club in the mid 80s; she was singing country, he was playing pedal steel. It was love at first chord. "She was the real deal," native New Yorker Larry says. "None of that Urban Cowboy nonsense. And she was clock-stopping gorgeous. I was smitten." "I'd thought country music players in New York was an oxymoron," says Tennessee-born Teresa. "But he saved my life on that stage. I thanked him for bringing the heavy steel down to play just a few songs, and when we looked into each other's eyes I saw everything he is, the depth of his soul." They married soon after, setting off on their own individual highways, but always circling back to each other. Among other adventures, Teresa originated the role of country music pioneer Sara Carter in the musical Keep On the Sunny Side, and Larry achieved renown as the go-to roots music guy for sessions, tours, and pit bands, the dude who'd mastered a dizzying array of stringed instruments and styles.

The seeds for a duet project were unwittingly planted in their courting days, when Larry and Teresa sang and played with the locals under her great-great grandmother's Tennessee cedar tree, the same one under which they married. (These gatherings continue to this day.) Later, when the duo was song-swapping all night with the band in the back of Bob Dylan's tour bus, Dylan's longtime manager Jeff Kramer told Larry he was crazy not to make hay with what they had as a duo. But their schedules kept the idea on the back burner until 2005, when Levon Helm called. He'd beaten cancer, was invigorated as never before, and was putting together a band for the soon-to-be legendary Midnight Rambles at his barn-studio in Woodstock, NY. He wanted some Campbell-Williams mojo to help make the most of his surprise fourth act. This humble beginning – playing in a barn on a dirt road – inaugurated the greatest musical experience of Larry and Teresa's lives.
Larry became the unflappable leader of the shape-shifting Midnight Ramble Band, earning three Grammys for producing Levon's final three CDs; Teresa, as an indispensable band member, frequently brought the house down. Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams is an extension of that time, featuring eight originals and three covers honed on the carpet of Levon's barn, under the gaze of grateful fans. Songs like the Muscle Shoals-inflected CD opener "Surrender to Love," heart-wrenching ballad "Another One More Time," and boot-stomper "Bad Luck Charm," feature the distinctive texture of two entwining voices who've been through a lot together – the good, the bad, and the joyous.

"It was the most pure musical experience I've ever had," Larry says of their time with Levon. "It gave me the template for how to make music for the rest of my life: no egos, no agenda, no petty stuff. I looked forward to every gig I ever did with Levon, I loved doing it, and when it was over I couldn't wait for the next one. I got inspired to write more songs for Teresa and me to sing."
For Teresa, singing in the church-like space at the Midnight Rambles was full circle for her childhood discovery of the magic between an audience and an artist. "I don't remember a time not singing in front of people. I sang in church, at school, everywhere. I didn't know anything about making records. I just knew connection to an audience was everything. While standing onstage Saturday nights at Levon's – musically true north – in that intimate space, I realized: this was my dream, and I'm in it."

When performing at Jorma Kaukonen's Fur Peace Ranch in Ohio, Teresa took on Reverend Gary Davis' "Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning," infusing the apocalyptic gospel tune with show-stopping, pew-jumping fervor. Her roots as a seventh-generation Mississippi Delta cotton-farm girl rose to the surface.

The song became part of the Midnight Ramble repertoire, and captured on Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams, it's a powerful force indeed.

After Levon's 2012 passing, they grieved, celebrated his life, and got to work finishing Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams. They had the tunes, and, with drummer (and ace recording engineer) Justin Guip and Ramble Band member Byron Isaacs on bass, they had an ass-kicking, road-worthy band. Additionally, the lovefest of guests on Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams sweetened the pot considerably: Amy Helm's voice melding with Larry and Teresa's on the gorgeous Grateful Dead hymn "Attics Of My Life," Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne's rollicking touch on several tracks, and Levon himself appearing on "You're Running Wild," a tune made famous by the Louvin Brothers, now given an Orbison touch (originally recorded during Levon's Dirt Farmer sessions). Finally, it all dovetailed into place.

With Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams, this duo not only brings a lot to the table, they bring the table itself – plus the house, the still, the church, the marriage bed, the sawdust-covered floor, and abiding, unconditional love, all carried in two voices harmonizing across hills, hollers, porches, and fire escapes. Those close harmonies ride atop music made in a mountain refuge, far from the madding crowd, connected to a spirit that lives on in song.

Multi-instrumentalist-vocalist Larry Campbell and singer-guitarist Teresa Williams have rocked many a venue, as both center stage performers and invaluable assets to world class acts. A shortlist of artists who've benefited from their talents, live and in studios, reads like a Who's Who of Music Icons: Bob Dylan (Larry spent eight years on the Never Ending Tour), Paul Simon, Little Feat, Hot Tuna, Phil Lesh, Emmylou Harris, Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, and, for one miraculous seven-year stretch, Levon Helm. Now, with an eponymous debut album, the couple brings it all back home. Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams may have been simmering awhile, but the timing is perfect; the eleven tracks, produced by Campbell, distill everything into a potent, infectious blend of Americana style and timeless soul, offered with a relaxed generosity that can only come from rich experience.

Larry and Teresa's story begins at New York's famed Bottom Line club in the mid 80s; she was singing country, he was playing pedal steel. It was love at first chord. "She was the real deal," native New Yorker Larry says. "None of that Urban Cowboy nonsense. And she was clock-stopping gorgeous. I was smitten." "I'd thought country music players in New York was an oxymoron," says Tennessee-born Teresa. "But he saved my life on that stage. I thanked him for bringing the heavy steel down to play just a few songs, and when we looked into each other's eyes I saw everything he is, the depth of his soul." They married soon after, setting off on their own individual highways, but always circling back to each other. Among other adventures, Teresa originated the role of country music pioneer Sara Carter in the musical Keep On the Sunny Side, and Larry achieved renown as the go-to roots music guy for sessions, tours, and pit bands, the dude who'd mastered a dizzying array of stringed instruments and styles.

The seeds for a duet project were unwittingly planted in their courting days, when Larry and Teresa sang and played with the locals under her great-great grandmother's Tennessee cedar tree, the same one under which they married. (These gatherings continue to this day.) Later, when the duo was song-swapping all night with the band in the back of Bob Dylan's tour bus, Dylan's longtime manager Jeff Kramer told Larry he was crazy not to make hay with what they had as a duo. But their schedules kept the idea on the back burner until 2005, when Levon Helm called. He'd beaten cancer, was invigorated as never before, and was putting together a band for the soon-to-be legendary Midnight Rambles at his barn-studio in Woodstock, NY. He wanted some Campbell-Williams mojo to help make the most of his surprise fourth act. This humble beginning – playing in a barn on a dirt road – inaugurated the greatest musical experience of Larry and Teresa's lives.
Larry became the unflappable leader of the shape-shifting Midnight Ramble Band, earning three Grammys for producing Levon's final three CDs; Teresa, as an indispensable band member, frequently brought the house down. Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams is an extension of that time, featuring eight originals and three covers honed on the carpet of Levon's barn, under the gaze of grateful fans. Songs like the Muscle Shoals-inflected CD opener "Surrender to Love," heart-wrenching ballad "Another One More Time," and boot-stomper "Bad Luck Charm," feature the distinctive texture of two entwining voices who've been through a lot together – the good, the bad, and the joyous.

"It was the most pure musical experience I've ever had," Larry says of their time with Levon. "It gave me the template for how to make music for the rest of my life: no egos, no agenda, no petty stuff. I looked forward to every gig I ever did with Levon, I loved doing it, and when it was over I couldn't wait for the next one. I got inspired to write more songs for Teresa and me to sing."
For Teresa, singing in the church-like space at the Midnight Rambles was full circle for her childhood discovery of the magic between an audience and an artist. "I don't remember a time not singing in front of people. I sang in church, at school, everywhere. I didn't know anything about making records. I just knew connection to an audience was everything. While standing onstage Saturday nights at Levon's – musically true north – in that intimate space, I realized: this was my dream, and I'm in it."

When performing at Jorma Kaukonen's Fur Peace Ranch in Ohio, Teresa took on Reverend Gary Davis' "Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning," infusing the apocalyptic gospel tune with show-stopping, pew-jumping fervor. Her roots as a seventh-generation Mississippi Delta cotton-farm girl rose to the surface.

The song became part of the Midnight Ramble repertoire, and captured on Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams, it's a powerful force indeed.

After Levon's 2012 passing, they grieved, celebrated his life, and got to work finishing Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams. They had the tunes, and, with drummer (and ace recording engineer) Justin Guip and Ramble Band member Byron Isaacs on bass, they had an ass-kicking, road-worthy band. Additionally, the lovefest of guests on Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams sweetened the pot considerably: Amy Helm's voice melding with Larry and Teresa's on the gorgeous Grateful Dead hymn "Attics Of My Life," Little Feat keyboardist Bill Payne's rollicking touch on several tracks, and Levon himself appearing on "You're Running Wild," a tune made famous by the Louvin Brothers, now given an Orbison touch (originally recorded during Levon's Dirt Farmer sessions). Finally, it all dovetailed into place.

With Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams, this duo not only brings a lot to the table, they bring the table itself – plus the house, the still, the church, the marriage bed, the sawdust-covered floor, and abiding, unconditional love, all carried in two voices harmonizing across hills, hollers, porches, and fire escapes. Those close harmonies ride atop music made in a mountain refuge, far from the madding crowd, connected to a spirit that lives on in song.

(Early Show) The Buckle Downs - Album Release Party with Special Guest Donora

Led by powerhouse vocalist, Kiki Brown, The Buckle Downs sound is the culmination of many influences and blended genres, including Rock, Funk, Blues, Soul, and Jazz. Displaying both their technical musicality and uninhibited creativity, the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania based 6 piece (Vocalist Kiki Brown, Bassist Damien DeTroia, Guitarist Ernie Francestine, Keyboardist Dave Filonuk, Drummer Jonathan Gulden, and Guitarist Jon Henderson) craft a unique sound. Whether live or in studio the band delivers soaring vocal melodies, funky grooves, vintage psychedelic solos, and flavorful piano and organ lines. The band is set to release its first full length album this summer. Stay tuned!

Led by powerhouse vocalist, Kiki Brown, The Buckle Downs sound is the culmination of many influences and blended genres, including Rock, Funk, Blues, Soul, and Jazz. Displaying both their technical musicality and uninhibited creativity, the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania based 6 piece (Vocalist Kiki Brown, Bassist Damien DeTroia, Guitarist Ernie Francestine, Keyboardist Dave Filonuk, Drummer Jonathan Gulden, and Guitarist Jon Henderson) craft a unique sound. Whether live or in studio the band delivers soaring vocal melodies, funky grooves, vintage psychedelic solos, and flavorful piano and organ lines. The band is set to release its first full length album this summer. Stay tuned!

(Late Show) BobbyrocK (Featuring Justin Brescia from MTV's The Hills), Thoughts In Motion, Tori Leigh

BobbyRock is a two-piece alternative punk rock band hailing from Austin,TX. It's members include guitarist/vocalist Justin 'Bobby' Brescia, as seen on the hit reality MTV show The Hills; and drummer Steele Haspel from the band Phoenix Down.

The punk-alternative-tunes of BobbyRock breach the barriers between seventies and eighties style punk-rock and the formality of main stream hits. The time has come to experience BobbyRock.

BobbyRock is a two-piece alternative punk rock band hailing from Austin,TX. It's members include guitarist/vocalist Justin 'Bobby' Brescia, as seen on the hit reality MTV show The Hills; and drummer Steele Haspel from the band Phoenix Down.

The punk-alternative-tunes of BobbyRock breach the barriers between seventies and eighties style punk-rock and the formality of main stream hits. The time has come to experience BobbyRock.

(Early Show) Matt The Electrician

With 10 self-released CDs to his name, 20 years as an independent touring singer-songwriter under his belt, and 2 new songs written, Matt the Electrician decided to return to the format of his youth. The 45. In early 2015, Matt embarked on what turned out to be a 2-year project, writing, recording and releasing a 45rpm record every 3 to 4 months, using a different backup band for each disc, with the intent of ending up with 6 records/12 songs at the finish. "I grew up with vinyl, but by the time I was releasing music in my 20s, vinyl was dead, and I figured I would never get to hear my songs on a record player. It actually kind of bummed me out. But when vinyl made a comeback, I thought, oh this is great, I can put something out. And I was really drawn to the 45, the 7inch. That was the first recorded music I ever purchased with my own money. I always loved the deliberateness, and the ceremony that playing a 45 requires. You only listen to one song, and then you have to turn the record over, so you can’t really walk away, or do other things, it forces you to focus on the experience of the music entirely."


During the course of the project, Matt worked with 6 different bands, mostly from his hometown of Austin, TX. Bluegrass band, Wood & Wire; Electronic folk artist, Little Brave; Ethereal indie-folk songwriter, Dana Falconberry; Free jazz/folk guitarist and songwriter, Wilson Marks: Husband & wife songwriters and producers, Paul Curreri & Devon Sproule; and Heady alt-folk band, The Deer. "Each band brought their own ideas and vibe to the recording process, and it was such an inspiring experience to soak in all these different sounds and ways of playing music, and it definitely changed the way I was writing throughout the project. And, as it turned out, it even influenced the makeup of my current touring band, which is a vocal-centric trio, featuring Seela, who has sung with me for years, and Little Brave (Stephanie Macias) who I recorded the 2nd record with."


In early May of 2017, the 6th record in the series will be released, recorded with Austin's, The Deer. At the same time, Matt will be releasing a double CD of sorts, including all of the songs from the project, as well as new versions of each of the songs, recorded with his trio. "Over the last 2 years, I've been touring, often with the trio, and singing all of these songs, and the versions are different, and have evolved since the recordings, so I wanted there to be a record of that."

With 10 self-released CDs to his name, 20 years as an independent touring singer-songwriter under his belt, and 2 new songs written, Matt the Electrician decided to return to the format of his youth. The 45. In early 2015, Matt embarked on what turned out to be a 2-year project, writing, recording and releasing a 45rpm record every 3 to 4 months, using a different backup band for each disc, with the intent of ending up with 6 records/12 songs at the finish. "I grew up with vinyl, but by the time I was releasing music in my 20s, vinyl was dead, and I figured I would never get to hear my songs on a record player. It actually kind of bummed me out. But when vinyl made a comeback, I thought, oh this is great, I can put something out. And I was really drawn to the 45, the 7inch. That was the first recorded music I ever purchased with my own money. I always loved the deliberateness, and the ceremony that playing a 45 requires. You only listen to one song, and then you have to turn the record over, so you can’t really walk away, or do other things, it forces you to focus on the experience of the music entirely."


During the course of the project, Matt worked with 6 different bands, mostly from his hometown of Austin, TX. Bluegrass band, Wood & Wire; Electronic folk artist, Little Brave; Ethereal indie-folk songwriter, Dana Falconberry; Free jazz/folk guitarist and songwriter, Wilson Marks: Husband & wife songwriters and producers, Paul Curreri & Devon Sproule; and Heady alt-folk band, The Deer. "Each band brought their own ideas and vibe to the recording process, and it was such an inspiring experience to soak in all these different sounds and ways of playing music, and it definitely changed the way I was writing throughout the project. And, as it turned out, it even influenced the makeup of my current touring band, which is a vocal-centric trio, featuring Seela, who has sung with me for years, and Little Brave (Stephanie Macias) who I recorded the 2nd record with."


In early May of 2017, the 6th record in the series will be released, recorded with Austin's, The Deer. At the same time, Matt will be releasing a double CD of sorts, including all of the songs from the project, as well as new versions of each of the songs, recorded with his trio. "Over the last 2 years, I've been touring, often with the trio, and singing all of these songs, and the versions are different, and have evolved since the recordings, so I wanted there to be a record of that."

Mt. Joy with Special Guest Trevor Sensor

Mt. Joy is an Indie Folk band from Philadelphia, currently recording their first full-length album in Los Angeles, CA.
Matt Quinn (Vocals/Guitar) and Sam Cooper (Guitar) met in high school and started performing songs together in 2005.
After heading off to separate colleges, they continued to bounce song ideas off each other when they could. However, when it became clear music wasn't going to pay the rent, Sam went to law school in Philadelphia and Matt moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music management. In Matt's words, "When I moved to LA I knew I still wanted to write songs, but the realities of life made that dream seem pretty impossible." A year later in early 2016, Sam followed a job opportunity to Los Angeles. While both were working long hours, they began working on music together in their spare time. The pair recorded 4 original songs with producer Caleb Nelson in the spring of 2016 in Caleb's living room. They chose the name "Mt. Joy" as an ode to a mountain in Valley Forge National Park near Sam's childhood home.

After the records were made, the guys were proud of the songs. But, with little hope at ever reaching a large audience, Cooper took a job as a lawyer back in Philadelphia and Quinn enrolled in law school in Los Angeles.

However, that fall, their first single "Astrovan" began taking off on streaming platforms, and Matt and Sam decided to put their other careers on hold. Matt dropped out of law school and Sam left his job to focus full-time on Mt. Joy. Soon after, Michael Byrne (bass), Sotiris Eliopoulos (drums), and Andrew Butler (keys) joined and expanded the duo to a full 5-piece band.

Mt. Joy's folk rock sound can be attributed to some of the band's biggest influences: Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Grateful Dead, The Beatles, and even contemporaries such as The Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, and Vampire Weekend. After much debate, Matt and Sam agreed on their all-time favorite record: The Allman Brothers Live at Fillmore East 1971.

Mt. Joy's full EP will be out in March.

Mt. Joy is an Indie Folk band from Philadelphia, currently recording their first full-length album in Los Angeles, CA.
Matt Quinn (Vocals/Guitar) and Sam Cooper (Guitar) met in high school and started performing songs together in 2005.
After heading off to separate colleges, they continued to bounce song ideas off each other when they could. However, when it became clear music wasn't going to pay the rent, Sam went to law school in Philadelphia and Matt moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music management. In Matt's words, "When I moved to LA I knew I still wanted to write songs, but the realities of life made that dream seem pretty impossible." A year later in early 2016, Sam followed a job opportunity to Los Angeles. While both were working long hours, they began working on music together in their spare time. The pair recorded 4 original songs with producer Caleb Nelson in the spring of 2016 in Caleb's living room. They chose the name "Mt. Joy" as an ode to a mountain in Valley Forge National Park near Sam's childhood home.

After the records were made, the guys were proud of the songs. But, with little hope at ever reaching a large audience, Cooper took a job as a lawyer back in Philadelphia and Quinn enrolled in law school in Los Angeles.

However, that fall, their first single "Astrovan" began taking off on streaming platforms, and Matt and Sam decided to put their other careers on hold. Matt dropped out of law school and Sam left his job to focus full-time on Mt. Joy. Soon after, Michael Byrne (bass), Sotiris Eliopoulos (drums), and Andrew Butler (keys) joined and expanded the duo to a full 5-piece band.

Mt. Joy's folk rock sound can be attributed to some of the band's biggest influences: Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Grateful Dead, The Beatles, and even contemporaries such as The Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, and Vampire Weekend. After much debate, Matt and Sam agreed on their all-time favorite record: The Allman Brothers Live at Fillmore East 1971.

Mt. Joy's full EP will be out in March.

Bob Schneider (Full Band Performance) with Special Guest Travis Linville

Bob Schneider has reigned as a de facto king of the Austin music scene for a couple of decades
now, and while no one stays on top forever, the man shows no signs of decay in quality or
creativity. Schneider is the city's genius chameleon, mixing pop, hip-hop, folk and biting humor
with essential melodies and bloody brilliant lyrics. His joys and heartbreaks, laid bare in song,
help us understand our own.

Schneider has been a recording artist for 25 years, putting out his first record ("Party Till You're Dead") in 1991 as frontman for Joe Rockhead, a funk-rock combo in the vein of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. That band was followed by his best-known group, Ugly Americans, which toured with the Dave Matthews Band and Big Head Todd and the Monsters. Ugly Americans was a kind of alt-rock supergroup, with former members of Cracker, Poi Dog Pondering and Mojo Nixon's band.

Schneider also fronted a full-on funk ensemble that played around Austin in the late 1990s called The Scabs, at the same time he was establishing himself as a solo artist. His first solo project, "Songs Sung and Played on Guitar at the Same Time," came out in 1998, and he's gone on to record an almost inconceivably diverse and eclectic array of songs since then, with his work making it onto the soundtracks of seven major motion pictures (and one indie film).

All told, Schneider has been the singer and main songwriter on nearly 30 studio albums, and he has been named Musician of the Year six times at the Austin Music Awards. Considering the renowned strength of the music scene in Austin, that's saying something. His artistry coupled with his movie-star looks and boyish charm makes it a wonder he's not a household name around the rest of the country the way he is in Austin.
His prodigious musical output is a result of a songwriting challenge group he started 16 years ago while touring. At first, the challenge was to write one song a day, and the people doing the writing were on the tour bus with him. They'd come up with a title each morning and at the end of the day play the songs they came up with for each other.

The pace of the songwriting challenge has eased up substantially since its beginnings, going to one song a week, but the scope of the participation in the group has widened to include a lot of widely known musicians.

"We've had lots of famous folks in the game from time to time, but they usually don't last very long," Schneider says. "The exception would be Jason Mraz, who has been in the game on and off for six or seven years and is one of the most consistent songwriters in the group. Very talented and will always turn a song in. At the end of the day, though, I really only have the group as a motivation to get me to write a song each week. Otherwise, a month might go by without writing anything and that would be a shame."

The past few years, Schneider has grouped the songs he's written in a year under an album title, just to kind of keep track of when they were written. Titles for recent years have included
"Here's the Deal," "The Ever Increasing Need to Succeed," "Into the Great Unknown" and "Mental Problems." This year's theme (and the name of his current concert tour) is "The Practical Guide to Everything."

Schneider has a fantastic website where fans can listen to all of the songs from the three five- song "King Kong Suite" EPs he released last year, with humorous commentary from Schneider himself between songs. The website also has the 10 videos he created for "King Kong" songs using public-domain found footage, including the menacing "Black Mountain" video that culls scenes from Francis Ford Coppola's directorial debut.

The website also offers a chance to stream his regular Monday evening shows at Austin's Saxon Pub.
"The Saxon Pub shows are unique in the fact that I play a lot of material there that I don't play anywhere else," Schneider explains. "New stuff that I wrote that week or in the last few weeks. Really old material that we haven't played in a while. I hardly play any of the stuff that you'll hear on the road, which is a mix of the best of everything. The best new material alongside the best of my last 20 years of writing songs."

...He has an almost Dylanesque reputation for keeping things fresh, with shows so different from one another that for years he [has] recorded every show and…[sold] copies for people to purchase right after the show.

"I play a lot of cities twice a year, and I like the fact that a lot of my fans will come see me play every time I come to town, knowing that I'll be playing material they've never seen me perform and might not ever perform again," Schneider says. "I don't have any of the banter planned either, so that stuff is usually unique to that night as well. It keeps things fresh for me and allows me to play crowd favorites that I've been playing for years, but still makes the whole thing feel new overall for me and hopefully for the audience."

Bob Schneider has reigned as a de facto king of the Austin music scene for a couple of decades
now, and while no one stays on top forever, the man shows no signs of decay in quality or
creativity. Schneider is the city's genius chameleon, mixing pop, hip-hop, folk and biting humor
with essential melodies and bloody brilliant lyrics. His joys and heartbreaks, laid bare in song,
help us understand our own.

Schneider has been a recording artist for 25 years, putting out his first record ("Party Till You're Dead") in 1991 as frontman for Joe Rockhead, a funk-rock combo in the vein of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. That band was followed by his best-known group, Ugly Americans, which toured with the Dave Matthews Band and Big Head Todd and the Monsters. Ugly Americans was a kind of alt-rock supergroup, with former members of Cracker, Poi Dog Pondering and Mojo Nixon's band.

Schneider also fronted a full-on funk ensemble that played around Austin in the late 1990s called The Scabs, at the same time he was establishing himself as a solo artist. His first solo project, "Songs Sung and Played on Guitar at the Same Time," came out in 1998, and he's gone on to record an almost inconceivably diverse and eclectic array of songs since then, with his work making it onto the soundtracks of seven major motion pictures (and one indie film).

All told, Schneider has been the singer and main songwriter on nearly 30 studio albums, and he has been named Musician of the Year six times at the Austin Music Awards. Considering the renowned strength of the music scene in Austin, that's saying something. His artistry coupled with his movie-star looks and boyish charm makes it a wonder he's not a household name around the rest of the country the way he is in Austin.
His prodigious musical output is a result of a songwriting challenge group he started 16 years ago while touring. At first, the challenge was to write one song a day, and the people doing the writing were on the tour bus with him. They'd come up with a title each morning and at the end of the day play the songs they came up with for each other.

The pace of the songwriting challenge has eased up substantially since its beginnings, going to one song a week, but the scope of the participation in the group has widened to include a lot of widely known musicians.

"We've had lots of famous folks in the game from time to time, but they usually don't last very long," Schneider says. "The exception would be Jason Mraz, who has been in the game on and off for six or seven years and is one of the most consistent songwriters in the group. Very talented and will always turn a song in. At the end of the day, though, I really only have the group as a motivation to get me to write a song each week. Otherwise, a month might go by without writing anything and that would be a shame."

The past few years, Schneider has grouped the songs he's written in a year under an album title, just to kind of keep track of when they were written. Titles for recent years have included
"Here's the Deal," "The Ever Increasing Need to Succeed," "Into the Great Unknown" and "Mental Problems." This year's theme (and the name of his current concert tour) is "The Practical Guide to Everything."

Schneider has a fantastic website where fans can listen to all of the songs from the three five- song "King Kong Suite" EPs he released last year, with humorous commentary from Schneider himself between songs. The website also has the 10 videos he created for "King Kong" songs using public-domain found footage, including the menacing "Black Mountain" video that culls scenes from Francis Ford Coppola's directorial debut.

The website also offers a chance to stream his regular Monday evening shows at Austin's Saxon Pub.
"The Saxon Pub shows are unique in the fact that I play a lot of material there that I don't play anywhere else," Schneider explains. "New stuff that I wrote that week or in the last few weeks. Really old material that we haven't played in a while. I hardly play any of the stuff that you'll hear on the road, which is a mix of the best of everything. The best new material alongside the best of my last 20 years of writing songs."

...He has an almost Dylanesque reputation for keeping things fresh, with shows so different from one another that for years he [has] recorded every show and…[sold] copies for people to purchase right after the show.

"I play a lot of cities twice a year, and I like the fact that a lot of my fans will come see me play every time I come to town, knowing that I'll be playing material they've never seen me perform and might not ever perform again," Schneider says. "I don't have any of the banter planned either, so that stuff is usually unique to that night as well. It keeps things fresh for me and allows me to play crowd favorites that I've been playing for years, but still makes the whole thing feel new overall for me and hopefully for the audience."

Jesse Malin - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

It's been five years since Jesse Malin last released an album, and that only upped the stakes for this one. New York Before the War is a hymn to everything Malin believes in most: respecting your roots, grabbing the future by its throat, and creating a soundtrack for a life filled with meaning. None of those things is easy to do, especially now. In fact, that's what the war in the title is all about: the battle to create and hold onto what's worthwhile even as so many forces, both internal and in the world outside, conspire to sweep it away. At the very top of that list is music.
"I wanted to make a record that encompassed everything I've been through since I started playing hardcore when I was twelve or thirteen," Malin says. Two years ago he had completed an album "out in the country" at White Star Studio near Charlottesville, VA. But then he realized it really wasn't finished. "Late last December, just back from a tour, I found myself sitting in my studio apartment in an old, crooked building that had the words THE WAR boldly painted on its side," Malin says. "In the silence of the holidays, away from family and friends, I found myself questioning everything I believed in. Looking out the window at a broken world where our values, culture and art have become instantly disposable, I felt lost and alienated, but still yearning for something more. Turning to my music, I tried to carve out a place where I could once again exist, and I sat down and wrote the rest of this record."
He ended up with close to forty songs. "I've always been a fan of the album as an art form," Malin says, and New York Before the War is a unified statement. It opens with "The Dreamers," a haunting ballad that nearly became the album's title track. Resting on an elegant piano figure, the song evokes both the alienation and the sense of deep connection that travel can bring. Wherever you are and whomever you meet, "the blood still runs red," Malin sings. That sense of doubleness, that emotional complexity – carving your own path but desperate for connection to a larger community -- runs throughout the album. Darker meditations like "She's So Dangerous" and "Bar Life" nestle next to rockers like "Freeway" (which features a blistering solo by the MC5's Wayne Kramer) and "Turn Up the Mains" (with Alejandro Escovedo on backing vocals).
Even within individual songs a sense of openness and possibility sometimes feels inextricable from the lure of destruction. In "Death Star" a woman gains a wealthy lover who "dresses to the right," but loses her soul. The jauntily upbeat "Bent Up" is about a friend and former band mate who died of a drug overdose. It's a roses-and-thorns kind of thing. The very qualities that make you compelling and creative can spiral you down. And, as with the lure of technology today, things that feel good and make your life seem easier can also destroy you.
"I always thought of music as a lifestyle, a place to exorcise your demons, connect with others and rejoice in the lonely places," Malin says. "Somehow there's a romance and an energy to all of this."
Peter Buck contributes a vintage R.E.M.-style guitar part to "I Would Do It For You," a tale of personal loyalty filled with longing and an aching sense of conviction. "That's my favorite and maybe most honest lyric on the record," Malin says. "It's about someone from your past who tracks you down and needs something from you, and because of your history, you can't say no. I never say what it is – whether it's a crime, drugs, a sexual relationship."
Malin finished New York Before the War at the Magic Shop in Soho and Flux Studios on Avenue A . Players include guitarist Derek Cruz, who co-produced the New York sessions with Malin; bassist Catherine Popper, who has played with Ryan Adams and Jack White; and drummers Randy Schrager (Scissor Sisters) and Paul Garisto, who played on Malin's debut solo album, The Fine Art of Self-Destruction, and with the Psychedelic Furs. Guitarist Don Dilego played on and produced the sessions in Virginia.
"New York Before the War is a metaphor for surviving in an ever-changing, rapidly desensitized world, while trying to find a way to live truly," Malin says. "It's not one particular war, but a global sentiment made for these times. It's a daily battle to keep the human spirit alive. Things are moving fast and forward, and this is my life right now." – Anthony DeCurtis

It's been five years since Jesse Malin last released an album, and that only upped the stakes for this one. New York Before the War is a hymn to everything Malin believes in most: respecting your roots, grabbing the future by its throat, and creating a soundtrack for a life filled with meaning. None of those things is easy to do, especially now. In fact, that's what the war in the title is all about: the battle to create and hold onto what's worthwhile even as so many forces, both internal and in the world outside, conspire to sweep it away. At the very top of that list is music.
"I wanted to make a record that encompassed everything I've been through since I started playing hardcore when I was twelve or thirteen," Malin says. Two years ago he had completed an album "out in the country" at White Star Studio near Charlottesville, VA. But then he realized it really wasn't finished. "Late last December, just back from a tour, I found myself sitting in my studio apartment in an old, crooked building that had the words THE WAR boldly painted on its side," Malin says. "In the silence of the holidays, away from family and friends, I found myself questioning everything I believed in. Looking out the window at a broken world where our values, culture and art have become instantly disposable, I felt lost and alienated, but still yearning for something more. Turning to my music, I tried to carve out a place where I could once again exist, and I sat down and wrote the rest of this record."
He ended up with close to forty songs. "I've always been a fan of the album as an art form," Malin says, and New York Before the War is a unified statement. It opens with "The Dreamers," a haunting ballad that nearly became the album's title track. Resting on an elegant piano figure, the song evokes both the alienation and the sense of deep connection that travel can bring. Wherever you are and whomever you meet, "the blood still runs red," Malin sings. That sense of doubleness, that emotional complexity – carving your own path but desperate for connection to a larger community -- runs throughout the album. Darker meditations like "She's So Dangerous" and "Bar Life" nestle next to rockers like "Freeway" (which features a blistering solo by the MC5's Wayne Kramer) and "Turn Up the Mains" (with Alejandro Escovedo on backing vocals).
Even within individual songs a sense of openness and possibility sometimes feels inextricable from the lure of destruction. In "Death Star" a woman gains a wealthy lover who "dresses to the right," but loses her soul. The jauntily upbeat "Bent Up" is about a friend and former band mate who died of a drug overdose. It's a roses-and-thorns kind of thing. The very qualities that make you compelling and creative can spiral you down. And, as with the lure of technology today, things that feel good and make your life seem easier can also destroy you.
"I always thought of music as a lifestyle, a place to exorcise your demons, connect with others and rejoice in the lonely places," Malin says. "Somehow there's a romance and an energy to all of this."
Peter Buck contributes a vintage R.E.M.-style guitar part to "I Would Do It For You," a tale of personal loyalty filled with longing and an aching sense of conviction. "That's my favorite and maybe most honest lyric on the record," Malin says. "It's about someone from your past who tracks you down and needs something from you, and because of your history, you can't say no. I never say what it is – whether it's a crime, drugs, a sexual relationship."
Malin finished New York Before the War at the Magic Shop in Soho and Flux Studios on Avenue A . Players include guitarist Derek Cruz, who co-produced the New York sessions with Malin; bassist Catherine Popper, who has played with Ryan Adams and Jack White; and drummers Randy Schrager (Scissor Sisters) and Paul Garisto, who played on Malin's debut solo album, The Fine Art of Self-Destruction, and with the Psychedelic Furs. Guitarist Don Dilego played on and produced the sessions in Virginia.
"New York Before the War is a metaphor for surviving in an ever-changing, rapidly desensitized world, while trying to find a way to live truly," Malin says. "It's not one particular war, but a global sentiment made for these times. It's a daily battle to keep the human spirit alive. Things are moving fast and forward, and this is my life right now." – Anthony DeCurtis

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