club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Teen Daze + Sam OB

Teen Daze
Teen Daze is the moniker of Vancouver, British Columbia producer Jamison, whose home-recorded atmospheric synth pieces first gained acclaim when he posted them to his Tumblr account. Arcade Sound Ltd. released his debut EP, the summery yet bittersweet Four More Years, in mid-2010. Jamison played 2011's South by Southwest festival and toured Canada before his second EP, A Silent Planet (which was inspired by the time Jamison spent reading C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet during a seven-week stay in the Swiss Alps studying philosophy), arrived on the Waaga label in August 2010. Jamison also did remixes for artists such as Seven Saturdays and issued music with his other project, Two Bicycles. In mid-2011, Jamison recorded Teen Daze's first full-length, All of Us, Together, this time inspired in part by Utopian Visions, a book he discovered in a thrift store. The album was released by Lefse Records the following year; later in 2012, Jamison returned with The Inner Mansions, a more personal set of songs that also featured a cover of Brian Eno's "Always Returning." For 2013's Glacier, the producer opted for a more insular, ambient-inspired sound. Jamison drastically updated his creative process for his next album, traveling to San Francisco to record with John Vanderslice, resulting in the more organic-sounding Morning World. Paper Bag Records released the album in 2015. Jamison then started a new label called FLORA, which issued Teen Daze's Themes for Dying Earth (a return to more ambient pastures) in 2017.

Sam OB
Sam O.B. fka Obey City has a unique energy. This soft-spoken New York native is at once a producer, deejay, label boss, tastemaker and champion of the new-New York underground. He effortless handles each role with zen-like serenity-in a lost tradition of American culture, one may have said ‘suave’.

What started as casual experimentation and beat making for rappers and friends has evolved over the last 10 years into an unrelenting solo passion, resulting in a steady stream of soul-drenched bedroom music that avoids trends in favor of the enduring.

Obey is humble when it comes to just about everything, but his penchant for the sounds of soul, funk and smooth jams has instilled a vibe that has grown up alongside a rapid evolving urban musical landscape. The result is glossy, shifting dance music that seeks the weird, the unrestrained, the cleverly odd.

In the past several years he’s released a pair of sister EPs on the UK label LuckyMe (Champagne and Merlot Sounds), been featured on BBC Radio, toured the US, Japan, Australia and Europe and has begun work on an ambitious solo LP debut. He has continued collaborating with exciting new musicians and vocalists outside of his own solo endeavors.

Teen Daze
Teen Daze is the moniker of Vancouver, British Columbia producer Jamison, whose home-recorded atmospheric synth pieces first gained acclaim when he posted them to his Tumblr account. Arcade Sound Ltd. released his debut EP, the summery yet bittersweet Four More Years, in mid-2010. Jamison played 2011's South by Southwest festival and toured Canada before his second EP, A Silent Planet (which was inspired by the time Jamison spent reading C.S. Lewis' Out of the Silent Planet during a seven-week stay in the Swiss Alps studying philosophy), arrived on the Waaga label in August 2010. Jamison also did remixes for artists such as Seven Saturdays and issued music with his other project, Two Bicycles. In mid-2011, Jamison recorded Teen Daze's first full-length, All of Us, Together, this time inspired in part by Utopian Visions, a book he discovered in a thrift store. The album was released by Lefse Records the following year; later in 2012, Jamison returned with The Inner Mansions, a more personal set of songs that also featured a cover of Brian Eno's "Always Returning." For 2013's Glacier, the producer opted for a more insular, ambient-inspired sound. Jamison drastically updated his creative process for his next album, traveling to San Francisco to record with John Vanderslice, resulting in the more organic-sounding Morning World. Paper Bag Records released the album in 2015. Jamison then started a new label called FLORA, which issued Teen Daze's Themes for Dying Earth (a return to more ambient pastures) in 2017.

Sam OB
Sam O.B. fka Obey City has a unique energy. This soft-spoken New York native is at once a producer, deejay, label boss, tastemaker and champion of the new-New York underground. He effortless handles each role with zen-like serenity-in a lost tradition of American culture, one may have said ‘suave’.

What started as casual experimentation and beat making for rappers and friends has evolved over the last 10 years into an unrelenting solo passion, resulting in a steady stream of soul-drenched bedroom music that avoids trends in favor of the enduring.

Obey is humble when it comes to just about everything, but his penchant for the sounds of soul, funk and smooth jams has instilled a vibe that has grown up alongside a rapid evolving urban musical landscape. The result is glossy, shifting dance music that seeks the weird, the unrestrained, the cleverly odd.

In the past several years he’s released a pair of sister EPs on the UK label LuckyMe (Champagne and Merlot Sounds), been featured on BBC Radio, toured the US, Japan, Australia and Europe and has begun work on an ambitious solo LP debut. He has continued collaborating with exciting new musicians and vocalists outside of his own solo endeavors.

Vinyl Sunday with Special Guest Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution

Four musicians from three states took a pilgrimage to Tennessee. Magic was made, and the rock gods approved. Vinyl Sunday, a blues-rock band from Nashville Tennessee, has an authentic and unique sound inspired by the Allman Brothers band and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, mixed with ZZ Ward and the Alabama Shakes.

For their second EP "A Broken Record," the band drew inspiration from their rock and blues predecessors to track this four song masterpiece. They live tracked their EP, old school style, on Radar 24 at Tommy's Tracks in Nashville.

Vinyl Sunday has exploded since their inception in 2014, and are gaining momentum. Each member has not only found a creative outlet, but a teammate, and a lifelong friend, which is apparent when you watch them perform. With new songs on the horizon, they look forward to writing their first full length album. Catch Vinyl Sunday on tour this summer in a city near you

Four musicians from three states took a pilgrimage to Tennessee. Magic was made, and the rock gods approved. Vinyl Sunday, a blues-rock band from Nashville Tennessee, has an authentic and unique sound inspired by the Allman Brothers band and the Tedeschi Trucks Band, mixed with ZZ Ward and the Alabama Shakes.

For their second EP "A Broken Record," the band drew inspiration from their rock and blues predecessors to track this four song masterpiece. They live tracked their EP, old school style, on Radar 24 at Tommy's Tracks in Nashville.

Vinyl Sunday has exploded since their inception in 2014, and are gaining momentum. Each member has not only found a creative outlet, but a teammate, and a lifelong friend, which is apparent when you watch them perform. With new songs on the horizon, they look forward to writing their first full length album. Catch Vinyl Sunday on tour this summer in a city near you

BJ Barham - The Great 48 Tour

B.J. Barham was a long way from home when the tragedy happened.

On November 13, 2015, the singer-songwriter-raised in a small North Carolina town called Reidsville-was in the middle of his fourth European tour with American Aquarium, the rising alt-country act he'd led for nearly a decade. They were in Belgium, less than two hours from Paris, when bad news began to arrive: a series of terrorist attacks, including one in a rock club, had left more than 100 dead. Family members, friends, and the fans American Aquarium had amassed from so many years on the road immediately reached out, making sure the band had been far away.

"The onslaught of text messages, voicemails and everything that came in the next day sparked something in me," Barham remembers. "In the next two days, the entire record was written."

The record he's talking about is Rockingham, Barham's remarkable and intensely personal solo debut. Not long after the wave of well wishes had passed, Barham found himself piecing together composites of people he'd known since childhood, of those folks and places who had impacted his life in fundamental ways. He sang into his cell phone and scribbled in notebooks, stealing away for quiet moments in order to put the melodies and characters floating through his mind into song.

The shock of the moment and the distance from home seemed to give Barham a crucial perspective on the moments and circumstances that had helped shape him. Wolves, American Aquarium's much-lauded 2015 breakthrough, had contained Barham's most honest, vulnerable statements to date. But these songs took the next step, allowing Barham to share stories about those around him. In "O'Lover," he portrays a hard-working farmer forced to make some desperate decisions to support the ones he loves. In "Reidsville," named for the place he'd called his home until relocating to North Carolina's capital, he immortalized beautiful, sweet, doomed souls, stuck in love in the sort of small towns that are disintegrating all across America. You needn't have been to Reidsville to recognize these elegantly written, expertly realized protagonists.

"This is the first record I've ever made that's not autobiographical-it's fictional narrative in a very real place," Barham says. "These songs are human condition stories set in my hometown, Reidsville."

Barham made these songs his new priority. Not long after he returned stateside, he asked Bradley Cook, the musician and mentor who had co-produced Wolves, to hear them. By afternoon's end, they had hatched the plan to make Rockingham. Two months later, on January 31, Barham returned from another American Aquarium tour.

On Monday, he and the band he'd built to record Rockingham-himself, Cook, Cook's brother and multi-instrumentalist Phil Cook, drummer Kyle Keegan, American Aquarium standbys Ryan Johnson and Whit Wright-met for the first time. On Tuesday and Wednesday, they rehearsed. And on Thursday and Friday, they cut all eight songs at Durham's Overdub Lane. They mixed the results over the weekend, between the sold-out hometown shows and various festivities of American Aquarium's annual pilgrimage, Roadtrip to Raleigh. Cialis The whirlwind kept the songs simple and the recordings human, reflecting a reality much bigger and less perfect than the vacuum of a recording studio.

These tunes, after all, didn't need much tampering. Rockingham puts its scenes and scenarios front and center, the beautiful grain and twang of Barham's voice bringing it all to life. He limns lifelong romance and instantaneous tragedy during the paradoxically heartbreaking, heart-mending "Unfortunate Kind" and details the disappointments and dreams of the blue-collar laborer with "American Tobacco Company." With its acoustic guitars and pealing organs, ragged vocals and rugged characters, Rockingham is a stunning, personal portrait of small-town America, easily identifiable and familiar.

For the album's sole autobiographical moment, Barham, now happily married and sober, penned a letter of sound advice and Southern attitude to his daughter-to-be, "Madeline." It's too personal to fall under a roots-rock purview, too singular to be swallowed by a larger situation. Like all of Rockingham, it's not the sound of Barham stepping away from American Aquarium but instead stepping confidently into the thoughts, stories, and feelings of his own thirty years.

"This is just an outlet for a songwriter. It's me being able to do something different. This is like people who love their jobs, picking up hobbies," says Barham, "This is an exercise for myself."

B.J. Barham was a long way from home when the tragedy happened.

On November 13, 2015, the singer-songwriter-raised in a small North Carolina town called Reidsville-was in the middle of his fourth European tour with American Aquarium, the rising alt-country act he'd led for nearly a decade. They were in Belgium, less than two hours from Paris, when bad news began to arrive: a series of terrorist attacks, including one in a rock club, had left more than 100 dead. Family members, friends, and the fans American Aquarium had amassed from so many years on the road immediately reached out, making sure the band had been far away.

"The onslaught of text messages, voicemails and everything that came in the next day sparked something in me," Barham remembers. "In the next two days, the entire record was written."

The record he's talking about is Rockingham, Barham's remarkable and intensely personal solo debut. Not long after the wave of well wishes had passed, Barham found himself piecing together composites of people he'd known since childhood, of those folks and places who had impacted his life in fundamental ways. He sang into his cell phone and scribbled in notebooks, stealing away for quiet moments in order to put the melodies and characters floating through his mind into song.

The shock of the moment and the distance from home seemed to give Barham a crucial perspective on the moments and circumstances that had helped shape him. Wolves, American Aquarium's much-lauded 2015 breakthrough, had contained Barham's most honest, vulnerable statements to date. But these songs took the next step, allowing Barham to share stories about those around him. In "O'Lover," he portrays a hard-working farmer forced to make some desperate decisions to support the ones he loves. In "Reidsville," named for the place he'd called his home until relocating to North Carolina's capital, he immortalized beautiful, sweet, doomed souls, stuck in love in the sort of small towns that are disintegrating all across America. You needn't have been to Reidsville to recognize these elegantly written, expertly realized protagonists.

"This is the first record I've ever made that's not autobiographical-it's fictional narrative in a very real place," Barham says. "These songs are human condition stories set in my hometown, Reidsville."

Barham made these songs his new priority. Not long after he returned stateside, he asked Bradley Cook, the musician and mentor who had co-produced Wolves, to hear them. By afternoon's end, they had hatched the plan to make Rockingham. Two months later, on January 31, Barham returned from another American Aquarium tour.

On Monday, he and the band he'd built to record Rockingham-himself, Cook, Cook's brother and multi-instrumentalist Phil Cook, drummer Kyle Keegan, American Aquarium standbys Ryan Johnson and Whit Wright-met for the first time. On Tuesday and Wednesday, they rehearsed. And on Thursday and Friday, they cut all eight songs at Durham's Overdub Lane. They mixed the results over the weekend, between the sold-out hometown shows and various festivities of American Aquarium's annual pilgrimage, Roadtrip to Raleigh. Cialis The whirlwind kept the songs simple and the recordings human, reflecting a reality much bigger and less perfect than the vacuum of a recording studio.

These tunes, after all, didn't need much tampering. Rockingham puts its scenes and scenarios front and center, the beautiful grain and twang of Barham's voice bringing it all to life. He limns lifelong romance and instantaneous tragedy during the paradoxically heartbreaking, heart-mending "Unfortunate Kind" and details the disappointments and dreams of the blue-collar laborer with "American Tobacco Company." With its acoustic guitars and pealing organs, ragged vocals and rugged characters, Rockingham is a stunning, personal portrait of small-town America, easily identifiable and familiar.

For the album's sole autobiographical moment, Barham, now happily married and sober, penned a letter of sound advice and Southern attitude to his daughter-to-be, "Madeline." It's too personal to fall under a roots-rock purview, too singular to be swallowed by a larger situation. Like all of Rockingham, it's not the sound of Barham stepping away from American Aquarium but instead stepping confidently into the thoughts, stories, and feelings of his own thirty years.

"This is just an outlet for a songwriter. It's me being able to do something different. This is like people who love their jobs, picking up hobbies," says Barham, "This is an exercise for myself."

(Early Show) Mutlu

Mutlu is a soulful, singer-songwriter. A Philadelphia native and first-generation American of Turkish descent, Mutlu has already built a substantial fan base in his hometown, while winning widespread praise for his prior releases.

He's collaborated and toured extensively as a support act with legendary duo Daryl Hall & John Oates and holds the distinction of having made the most guest appearances on Daryl Hall's acclaimed, award-winning TV/Internet show "Live From Daryl's House". He's also gained considerable attention for his work with noted singer-songwriter Amos Lee, with whom he's toured extensively as a support act and backup vocalist. He was the support act on the North American leg of Joe Jackson's acclaimed "Rain" tour and has shared stages with the likes of Adele, Katy Perry, John Hiatt, Leon Russell, the Blind Boys of Alabama, Todd Rundgren, Shuggie Otis & many more.

Born Mutlu Onaral, he grew up steeped in Philadelphia's deep R&B traditions, eagerly absorbing the fundamentals of old-school soul music and incorporating it into his own musical persona. His local success led to a recording deal with Manhattan/EMI Records, which released his acclaimed 2008 debut album Livin' It, produced by the late, great T-Bone Wolk, and featuring guest appearances by Daryl Hall, Amos Lee, G. Love and Raheem DeVaughn. His latest release is the Hypnotize EP which he co-produced with songwriter/producer Darius Amendolia.

Mutlu is a soulful, singer-songwriter. A Philadelphia native and first-generation American of Turkish descent, Mutlu has already built a substantial fan base in his hometown, while winning widespread praise for his prior releases.

He's collaborated and toured extensively as a support act with legendary duo Daryl Hall & John Oates and holds the distinction of having made the most guest appearances on Daryl Hall's acclaimed, award-winning TV/Internet show "Live From Daryl's House". He's also gained considerable attention for his work with noted singer-songwriter Amos Lee, with whom he's toured extensively as a support act and backup vocalist. He was the support act on the North American leg of Joe Jackson's acclaimed "Rain" tour and has shared stages with the likes of Adele, Katy Perry, John Hiatt, Leon Russell, the Blind Boys of Alabama, Todd Rundgren, Shuggie Otis & many more.

Born Mutlu Onaral, he grew up steeped in Philadelphia's deep R&B traditions, eagerly absorbing the fundamentals of old-school soul music and incorporating it into his own musical persona. His local success led to a recording deal with Manhattan/EMI Records, which released his acclaimed 2008 debut album Livin' It, produced by the late, great T-Bone Wolk, and featuring guest appearances by Daryl Hall, Amos Lee, G. Love and Raheem DeVaughn. His latest release is the Hypnotize EP which he co-produced with songwriter/producer Darius Amendolia.

Xenia Rubinos

Vocalist and composer Xenia Rubinos crafts movingly powerful songs dipping in and out of genre and structure to create a sound that is fearlessly her own. Xenia's powerhouse vocals are at the center of her music which grows from a wide range of influences from R&B to Hip-Hop to Caribbean rhythms and jazz all delivered with a soulful punk aura. Her debut album 'Magic Trix' was released in 2013 by Ba Da Bing! Records to wide critical acclaim. Pitchfork lauded the radiant singer as "a unique new pop personality" while a profile in The New Yorker described her work as "rhythmically fierce, vocally generous music that slips through the net of any known genre." Xenia's energetic live show and presence echoes some of the larger than life iconic singers she admired as a child including Judy Garland, Nina Simone and La Lupe while her powerhouse vocals recall the pop sensibility of Mariah Carey and soulfulness of Erykah Badu. Touring the US and Europe extensively, she has played more than 150 shows both as a headliner and supporting act for such diverse bands as Man Man, Battles, Coco Rosie, and Deerhoof. Xenia has been hard at work on her follow-up full-length LP, due out Spring 2016

Vocalist and composer Xenia Rubinos crafts movingly powerful songs dipping in and out of genre and structure to create a sound that is fearlessly her own. Xenia's powerhouse vocals are at the center of her music which grows from a wide range of influences from R&B to Hip-Hop to Caribbean rhythms and jazz all delivered with a soulful punk aura. Her debut album 'Magic Trix' was released in 2013 by Ba Da Bing! Records to wide critical acclaim. Pitchfork lauded the radiant singer as "a unique new pop personality" while a profile in The New Yorker described her work as "rhythmically fierce, vocally generous music that slips through the net of any known genre." Xenia's energetic live show and presence echoes some of the larger than life iconic singers she admired as a child including Judy Garland, Nina Simone and La Lupe while her powerhouse vocals recall the pop sensibility of Mariah Carey and soulfulness of Erykah Badu. Touring the US and Europe extensively, she has played more than 150 shows both as a headliner and supporting act for such diverse bands as Man Man, Battles, Coco Rosie, and Deerhoof. Xenia has been hard at work on her follow-up full-length LP, due out Spring 2016

Missy Raines & The New Hip

Missy Raines & the New Hip - Based out of Nashville, TN, Missy Raines is considered to be one of the most respected, popular, and trailblazing figures in bluegrass today. A seven-time winner of the IBMA Bass player of the year award, she has backed greats such as Claire Lynch, Mac Weisman, Kenny Baker, and Peter Rowan. Raines now leads her own innovative and genre-bending band, The New Hip, which is a rich, jazz-tinged combination of her bluegrass roots and thick Americana. With a smoky and seductive alto, Missy Raines, heads up this quartet featuring mandolin, guitars, bass, and percussion. The territory The New Hip covers is broad and the compass is set by Raines, planted center stage, directing with her bass every bit as much as she's playing it. Missy Raines and the New Hip are currently working on their 3rd album for Compass Records, slated to be released in 2017, produced by Allison Brown -- featuring Jack Stargel, John Mailander, and Cody Martin, the sounds are lush, the groove is thick, and the songs memorable.

Missy Raines & the New Hip - Based out of Nashville, TN, Missy Raines is considered to be one of the most respected, popular, and trailblazing figures in bluegrass today. A seven-time winner of the IBMA Bass player of the year award, she has backed greats such as Claire Lynch, Mac Weisman, Kenny Baker, and Peter Rowan. Raines now leads her own innovative and genre-bending band, The New Hip, which is a rich, jazz-tinged combination of her bluegrass roots and thick Americana. With a smoky and seductive alto, Missy Raines, heads up this quartet featuring mandolin, guitars, bass, and percussion. The territory The New Hip covers is broad and the compass is set by Raines, planted center stage, directing with her bass every bit as much as she's playing it. Missy Raines and the New Hip are currently working on their 3rd album for Compass Records, slated to be released in 2017, produced by Allison Brown -- featuring Jack Stargel, John Mailander, and Cody Martin, the sounds are lush, the groove is thick, and the songs memorable.

(Late Show) Airpark (Formerly of The Apache Relay)

Airpark makes deconstructed pop music. Inspired by minimalism, melody and groove-heavy percussion, bandmates Michael Ford, Jr. and Ben Ford launched the group in 2016, one year after their previous project, The Apache Relay, quietly called it quits. The Apache Relay had been a large band, staffed with six members and armed with a thick, wall-of-sound approach. With Airpark, the Ford brothers sharpen their focus and scale back their arrangements, focusing on songs that pack a punch with bold, basic ingredients.

Raised in New Orleans, the Fords grew up surrounded by music, from the Crescent City's jazz to the soul of Irma Thomas and Allen Touissant. Later while living in Nashville, the two rekindled the music connection they'd kick-started back home, finding popularity - first in Tennessee, then across the country - as The Apache Relay performed alongside the likes of Jenny Lewis, Mumford & Sons and more. It was a whirlwind period that found the brothers constantly touring, forever moving and steadily swelling their sound to new heights. Michael and Ben move at a deliberately different speed with Airpark, thus finding new musical territory to explore.

Taking their cues from a wide set of influences - the rhythmic world music of Tinariwen and Lijadu Sisters; the production of Air, Damon Albarn, and Fiona Apple's The Idler Wheel; the ten-or vocal range of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham, with the occasional pop crooner delivery of Harry Nilsson - the two unveil their new direction with Air-park's debut EP, Early Works, Volume 1. On opening track "All The Time," Michael spins the autobiographical story of a musician who's starting over and swinging for the fences, finally coming to terms with his own ambition. "Now I know I need ittobe ocean-sized," he sings, backed by propulsive percussion, syncopated electric guitar and his brother's harmonies. Else-where, the two ride an abstract, atmospheric groove on "Even If," get nostalgic with "Black Light Blue," and reset the clock during the New Year's Eve breakup anthem "Plenty to Pine For."

It's a sound that targets the feet and the head. It's pop music for thinkers. It's dance music for wallflowers. And with the brothers pulling triple-duty as songwriters, multi-instrumentalists and co-producers, Early Works, Volume 1 - whose March 3, 2017 release arrives courtesy of the Fords' own label, Eugenia Hall Records - is their most forward-thinking project to date, pairing the band's growing ambition with musical chops to match.

Airpark makes deconstructed pop music. Inspired by minimalism, melody and groove-heavy percussion, bandmates Michael Ford, Jr. and Ben Ford launched the group in 2016, one year after their previous project, The Apache Relay, quietly called it quits. The Apache Relay had been a large band, staffed with six members and armed with a thick, wall-of-sound approach. With Airpark, the Ford brothers sharpen their focus and scale back their arrangements, focusing on songs that pack a punch with bold, basic ingredients.

Raised in New Orleans, the Fords grew up surrounded by music, from the Crescent City's jazz to the soul of Irma Thomas and Allen Touissant. Later while living in Nashville, the two rekindled the music connection they'd kick-started back home, finding popularity - first in Tennessee, then across the country - as The Apache Relay performed alongside the likes of Jenny Lewis, Mumford & Sons and more. It was a whirlwind period that found the brothers constantly touring, forever moving and steadily swelling their sound to new heights. Michael and Ben move at a deliberately different speed with Airpark, thus finding new musical territory to explore.

Taking their cues from a wide set of influences - the rhythmic world music of Tinariwen and Lijadu Sisters; the production of Air, Damon Albarn, and Fiona Apple's The Idler Wheel; the ten-or vocal range of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Fleetwood Mac's Lindsey Buckingham, with the occasional pop crooner delivery of Harry Nilsson - the two unveil their new direction with Air-park's debut EP, Early Works, Volume 1. On opening track "All The Time," Michael spins the autobiographical story of a musician who's starting over and swinging for the fences, finally coming to terms with his own ambition. "Now I know I need ittobe ocean-sized," he sings, backed by propulsive percussion, syncopated electric guitar and his brother's harmonies. Else-where, the two ride an abstract, atmospheric groove on "Even If," get nostalgic with "Black Light Blue," and reset the clock during the New Year's Eve breakup anthem "Plenty to Pine For."

It's a sound that targets the feet and the head. It's pop music for thinkers. It's dance music for wallflowers. And with the brothers pulling triple-duty as songwriters, multi-instrumentalists and co-producers, Early Works, Volume 1 - whose March 3, 2017 release arrives courtesy of the Fords' own label, Eugenia Hall Records - is their most forward-thinking project to date, pairing the band's growing ambition with musical chops to match.

(Early Show) Matt The Electrician

With 10 self-released CDs to his name, 20 years as an independent touring singer-songwriter under his belt, and 2 new songs written, Matt the Electrician decided to return to the format of his youth. The 45. In early 2015, Matt embarked on what turned out to be a 2-year project, writing, recording and releasing a 45rpm record every 3 to 4 months, using a different backup band for each disc, with the intent of ending up with 6 records/12 songs at the finish. "I grew up with vinyl, but by the time I was releasing music in my 20s, vinyl was dead, and I figured I would never get to hear my songs on a record player. It actually kind of bummed me out. But when vinyl made a comeback, I thought, oh this is great, I can put something out. And I was really drawn to the 45, the 7inch. That was the first recorded music I ever purchased with my own money. I always loved the deliberateness, and the ceremony that playing a 45 requires. You only listen to one song, and then you have to turn the record over, so you can’t really walk away, or do other things, it forces you to focus on the experience of the music entirely."


During the course of the project, Matt worked with 6 different bands, mostly from his hometown of Austin, TX. Bluegrass band, Wood & Wire; Electronic folk artist, Little Brave; Ethereal indie-folk songwriter, Dana Falconberry; Free jazz/folk guitarist and songwriter, Wilson Marks: Husband & wife songwriters and producers, Paul Curreri & Devon Sproule; and Heady alt-folk band, The Deer. "Each band brought their own ideas and vibe to the recording process, and it was such an inspiring experience to soak in all these different sounds and ways of playing music, and it definitely changed the way I was writing throughout the project. And, as it turned out, it even influenced the makeup of my current touring band, which is a vocal-centric trio, featuring Seela, who has sung with me for years, and Little Brave (Stephanie Macias) who I recorded the 2nd record with."


In early May of 2017, the 6th record in the series will be released, recorded with Austin's, The Deer. At the same time, Matt will be releasing a double CD of sorts, including all of the songs from the project, as well as new versions of each of the songs, recorded with his trio. "Over the last 2 years, I've been touring, often with the trio, and singing all of these songs, and the versions are different, and have evolved since the recordings, so I wanted there to be a record of that."

With 10 self-released CDs to his name, 20 years as an independent touring singer-songwriter under his belt, and 2 new songs written, Matt the Electrician decided to return to the format of his youth. The 45. In early 2015, Matt embarked on what turned out to be a 2-year project, writing, recording and releasing a 45rpm record every 3 to 4 months, using a different backup band for each disc, with the intent of ending up with 6 records/12 songs at the finish. "I grew up with vinyl, but by the time I was releasing music in my 20s, vinyl was dead, and I figured I would never get to hear my songs on a record player. It actually kind of bummed me out. But when vinyl made a comeback, I thought, oh this is great, I can put something out. And I was really drawn to the 45, the 7inch. That was the first recorded music I ever purchased with my own money. I always loved the deliberateness, and the ceremony that playing a 45 requires. You only listen to one song, and then you have to turn the record over, so you can’t really walk away, or do other things, it forces you to focus on the experience of the music entirely."


During the course of the project, Matt worked with 6 different bands, mostly from his hometown of Austin, TX. Bluegrass band, Wood & Wire; Electronic folk artist, Little Brave; Ethereal indie-folk songwriter, Dana Falconberry; Free jazz/folk guitarist and songwriter, Wilson Marks: Husband & wife songwriters and producers, Paul Curreri & Devon Sproule; and Heady alt-folk band, The Deer. "Each band brought their own ideas and vibe to the recording process, and it was such an inspiring experience to soak in all these different sounds and ways of playing music, and it definitely changed the way I was writing throughout the project. And, as it turned out, it even influenced the makeup of my current touring band, which is a vocal-centric trio, featuring Seela, who has sung with me for years, and Little Brave (Stephanie Macias) who I recorded the 2nd record with."


In early May of 2017, the 6th record in the series will be released, recorded with Austin's, The Deer. At the same time, Matt will be releasing a double CD of sorts, including all of the songs from the project, as well as new versions of each of the songs, recorded with his trio. "Over the last 2 years, I've been touring, often with the trio, and singing all of these songs, and the versions are different, and have evolved since the recordings, so I wanted there to be a record of that."

Mt. Joy

Mt. Joy is an Indie Folk band from Philadelphia, currently recording their first full-length album in Los Angeles, CA.
Matt Quinn (Vocals/Guitar) and Sam Cooper (Guitar) met in high school and started performing songs together in 2005.
After heading off to separate colleges, they continued to bounce song ideas off each other when they could. However, when it became clear music wasn't going to pay the rent, Sam went to law school in Philadelphia and Matt moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music management. In Matt's words, "When I moved to LA I knew I still wanted to write songs, but the realities of life made that dream seem pretty impossible." A year later in early 2016, Sam followed a job opportunity to Los Angeles. While both were working long hours, they began working on music together in their spare time. The pair recorded 4 original songs with producer Caleb Nelson in the spring of 2016 in Caleb's living room. They chose the name "Mt. Joy" as an ode to a mountain in Valley Forge National Park near Sam's childhood home.

After the records were made, the guys were proud of the songs. But, with little hope at ever reaching a large audience, Cooper took a job as a lawyer back in Philadelphia and Quinn enrolled in law school in Los Angeles.

However, that fall, their first single "Astrovan" began taking off on streaming platforms, and Matt and Sam decided to put their other careers on hold. Matt dropped out of law school and Sam left his job to focus full-time on Mt. Joy. Soon after, Michael Byrne (bass), Sotiris Eliopoulos (drums), and Andrew Butler (keys) joined and expanded the duo to a full 5-piece band.

Mt. Joy's folk rock sound can be attributed to some of the band's biggest influences: Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Grateful Dead, The Beatles, and even contemporaries such as The Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, and Vampire Weekend. After much debate, Matt and Sam agreed on their all-time favorite record: The Allman Brothers Live at Fillmore East 1971.

Mt. Joy's full EP will be out in March.

Mt. Joy is an Indie Folk band from Philadelphia, currently recording their first full-length album in Los Angeles, CA.
Matt Quinn (Vocals/Guitar) and Sam Cooper (Guitar) met in high school and started performing songs together in 2005.
After heading off to separate colleges, they continued to bounce song ideas off each other when they could. However, when it became clear music wasn't going to pay the rent, Sam went to law school in Philadelphia and Matt moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music management. In Matt's words, "When I moved to LA I knew I still wanted to write songs, but the realities of life made that dream seem pretty impossible." A year later in early 2016, Sam followed a job opportunity to Los Angeles. While both were working long hours, they began working on music together in their spare time. The pair recorded 4 original songs with producer Caleb Nelson in the spring of 2016 in Caleb's living room. They chose the name "Mt. Joy" as an ode to a mountain in Valley Forge National Park near Sam's childhood home.

After the records were made, the guys were proud of the songs. But, with little hope at ever reaching a large audience, Cooper took a job as a lawyer back in Philadelphia and Quinn enrolled in law school in Los Angeles.

However, that fall, their first single "Astrovan" began taking off on streaming platforms, and Matt and Sam decided to put their other careers on hold. Matt dropped out of law school and Sam left his job to focus full-time on Mt. Joy. Soon after, Michael Byrne (bass), Sotiris Eliopoulos (drums), and Andrew Butler (keys) joined and expanded the duo to a full 5-piece band.

Mt. Joy's folk rock sound can be attributed to some of the band's biggest influences: Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, The Grateful Dead, The Beatles, and even contemporaries such as The Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, and Vampire Weekend. After much debate, Matt and Sam agreed on their all-time favorite record: The Allman Brothers Live at Fillmore East 1971.

Mt. Joy's full EP will be out in March.

Bob Schneider (Full Band Performance) with Special Guest Travis Linville

Bob Schneider has reigned as a de facto king of the Austin music scene for a couple of decades
now, and while no one stays on top forever, the man shows no signs of decay in quality or
creativity. Schneider is the city's genius chameleon, mixing pop, hip-hop, folk and biting humor
with essential melodies and bloody brilliant lyrics. His joys and heartbreaks, laid bare in song,
help us understand our own.

Schneider has been a recording artist for 25 years, putting out his first record ("Party Till You're Dead") in 1991 as frontman for Joe Rockhead, a funk-rock combo in the vein of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. That band was followed by his best-known group, Ugly Americans, which toured with the Dave Matthews Band and Big Head Todd and the Monsters. Ugly Americans was a kind of alt-rock supergroup, with former members of Cracker, Poi Dog Pondering and Mojo Nixon's band.

Schneider also fronted a full-on funk ensemble that played around Austin in the late 1990s called The Scabs, at the same time he was establishing himself as a solo artist. His first solo project, "Songs Sung and Played on Guitar at the Same Time," came out in 1998, and he's gone on to record an almost inconceivably diverse and eclectic array of songs since then, with his work making it onto the soundtracks of seven major motion pictures (and one indie film).

All told, Schneider has been the singer and main songwriter on nearly 30 studio albums, and he has been named Musician of the Year six times at the Austin Music Awards. Considering the renowned strength of the music scene in Austin, that's saying something. His artistry coupled with his movie-star looks and boyish charm makes it a wonder he's not a household name around the rest of the country the way he is in Austin.
His prodigious musical output is a result of a songwriting challenge group he started 16 years ago while touring. At first, the challenge was to write one song a day, and the people doing the writing were on the tour bus with him. They'd come up with a title each morning and at the end of the day play the songs they came up with for each other.

The pace of the songwriting challenge has eased up substantially since its beginnings, going to one song a week, but the scope of the participation in the group has widened to include a lot of widely known musicians.

"We've had lots of famous folks in the game from time to time, but they usually don't last very long," Schneider says. "The exception would be Jason Mraz, who has been in the game on and off for six or seven years and is one of the most consistent songwriters in the group. Very talented and will always turn a song in. At the end of the day, though, I really only have the group as a motivation to get me to write a song each week. Otherwise, a month might go by without writing anything and that would be a shame."

The past few years, Schneider has grouped the songs he's written in a year under an album title, just to kind of keep track of when they were written. Titles for recent years have included
"Here's the Deal," "The Ever Increasing Need to Succeed," "Into the Great Unknown" and "Mental Problems." This year's theme (and the name of his current concert tour) is "The Practical Guide to Everything."

Schneider has a fantastic website where fans can listen to all of the songs from the three five- song "King Kong Suite" EPs he released last year, with humorous commentary from Schneider himself between songs. The website also has the 10 videos he created for "King Kong" songs using public-domain found footage, including the menacing "Black Mountain" video that culls scenes from Francis Ford Coppola's directorial debut.

The website also offers a chance to stream his regular Monday evening shows at Austin's Saxon Pub.
"The Saxon Pub shows are unique in the fact that I play a lot of material there that I don't play anywhere else," Schneider explains. "New stuff that I wrote that week or in the last few weeks. Really old material that we haven't played in a while. I hardly play any of the stuff that you'll hear on the road, which is a mix of the best of everything. The best new material alongside the best of my last 20 years of writing songs."

...He has an almost Dylanesque reputation for keeping things fresh, with shows so different from one another that for years he [has] recorded every show and…[sold] copies for people to purchase right after the show.

"I play a lot of cities twice a year, and I like the fact that a lot of my fans will come see me play every time I come to town, knowing that I'll be playing material they've never seen me perform and might not ever perform again," Schneider says. "I don't have any of the banter planned either, so that stuff is usually unique to that night as well. It keeps things fresh for me and allows me to play crowd favorites that I've been playing for years, but still makes the whole thing feel new overall for me and hopefully for the audience."

Bob Schneider has reigned as a de facto king of the Austin music scene for a couple of decades
now, and while no one stays on top forever, the man shows no signs of decay in quality or
creativity. Schneider is the city's genius chameleon, mixing pop, hip-hop, folk and biting humor
with essential melodies and bloody brilliant lyrics. His joys and heartbreaks, laid bare in song,
help us understand our own.

Schneider has been a recording artist for 25 years, putting out his first record ("Party Till You're Dead") in 1991 as frontman for Joe Rockhead, a funk-rock combo in the vein of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. That band was followed by his best-known group, Ugly Americans, which toured with the Dave Matthews Band and Big Head Todd and the Monsters. Ugly Americans was a kind of alt-rock supergroup, with former members of Cracker, Poi Dog Pondering and Mojo Nixon's band.

Schneider also fronted a full-on funk ensemble that played around Austin in the late 1990s called The Scabs, at the same time he was establishing himself as a solo artist. His first solo project, "Songs Sung and Played on Guitar at the Same Time," came out in 1998, and he's gone on to record an almost inconceivably diverse and eclectic array of songs since then, with his work making it onto the soundtracks of seven major motion pictures (and one indie film).

All told, Schneider has been the singer and main songwriter on nearly 30 studio albums, and he has been named Musician of the Year six times at the Austin Music Awards. Considering the renowned strength of the music scene in Austin, that's saying something. His artistry coupled with his movie-star looks and boyish charm makes it a wonder he's not a household name around the rest of the country the way he is in Austin.
His prodigious musical output is a result of a songwriting challenge group he started 16 years ago while touring. At first, the challenge was to write one song a day, and the people doing the writing were on the tour bus with him. They'd come up with a title each morning and at the end of the day play the songs they came up with for each other.

The pace of the songwriting challenge has eased up substantially since its beginnings, going to one song a week, but the scope of the participation in the group has widened to include a lot of widely known musicians.

"We've had lots of famous folks in the game from time to time, but they usually don't last very long," Schneider says. "The exception would be Jason Mraz, who has been in the game on and off for six or seven years and is one of the most consistent songwriters in the group. Very talented and will always turn a song in. At the end of the day, though, I really only have the group as a motivation to get me to write a song each week. Otherwise, a month might go by without writing anything and that would be a shame."

The past few years, Schneider has grouped the songs he's written in a year under an album title, just to kind of keep track of when they were written. Titles for recent years have included
"Here's the Deal," "The Ever Increasing Need to Succeed," "Into the Great Unknown" and "Mental Problems." This year's theme (and the name of his current concert tour) is "The Practical Guide to Everything."

Schneider has a fantastic website where fans can listen to all of the songs from the three five- song "King Kong Suite" EPs he released last year, with humorous commentary from Schneider himself between songs. The website also has the 10 videos he created for "King Kong" songs using public-domain found footage, including the menacing "Black Mountain" video that culls scenes from Francis Ford Coppola's directorial debut.

The website also offers a chance to stream his regular Monday evening shows at Austin's Saxon Pub.
"The Saxon Pub shows are unique in the fact that I play a lot of material there that I don't play anywhere else," Schneider explains. "New stuff that I wrote that week or in the last few weeks. Really old material that we haven't played in a while. I hardly play any of the stuff that you'll hear on the road, which is a mix of the best of everything. The best new material alongside the best of my last 20 years of writing songs."

...He has an almost Dylanesque reputation for keeping things fresh, with shows so different from one another that for years he [has] recorded every show and…[sold] copies for people to purchase right after the show.

"I play a lot of cities twice a year, and I like the fact that a lot of my fans will come see me play every time I come to town, knowing that I'll be playing material they've never seen me perform and might not ever perform again," Schneider says. "I don't have any of the banter planned either, so that stuff is usually unique to that night as well. It keeps things fresh for me and allows me to play crowd favorites that I've been playing for years, but still makes the whole thing feel new overall for me and hopefully for the audience."

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