club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
Ruby Boots / INDIANOLA

Ruby Boots
At 14 years old, Ruby Boots -- real name Bex Chilcott -- left a conflicted home in Perth, Western Australia to do grueling work on pearling boats, and she hasn't stopped migrating since. Her nomadic streak has taken her around the world, and eventually to Nashville, TN.

Don't Talk About It charts this drifter's odyssey, tattered passport in hand. Behind her commanding and versatile voice, sharp guitar playing, and adept songwriting, Ruby Boots confidently maneuvers past the whirlwinds life has tossed on her occasionally lost highway. It's an album of hope, breakthrough, and handling the unknown challenges around the next bend.

The roads taken, the miles traveled and the voices heard during Ruby's life's trek resonate throughout Don't Talk About It. Informed as much by the wide-open landscapes of her homeland as the intimate writing circles of Nashville, the album may range far and wide but always maintains a firm sense of place. Echoes of first wave UK power pop and jangly punk intersect with the every(wo)man indie and pop-inflected muscle of Best Coast. Classic rock touchstones from T. Rex to the girl-group-wall-of-sound to personal hero Tom Petty meld with a weary poet's eye recalling Hope Sandoval.

On her Bloodshot Records debut, Ruby continues to map out a polished-yet-fearless, bare-knuckled self, previously hinted at on her last album, Solitude. In 2016, Ruby met with Lone Star state-bred studio wizards The Texas Gentlemen and the album's eventual producer Beau Bedford. The group had stopped off in Nashville on their way to back Kris Kristofferson at Newport Folk Festival and a mutual admiration society quickly coalesced. The collective pulled a handful of songs from the 40 she had waiting and began recording at their Dallas-based studio Modern Electric Sound Recorders.

The album rips right open with "It's So Cruel," strutting through the door with dual harmonic, bawdy, fuzzed-out guitars, reminiscent of a glammy, '70s southern-rock-soaked Queens of the Stone Age. It all captures the meteoric emotional flares of an adulterous relationship destined to fail. The Gentlemen spell a Stetson-hat wearing Wrecking Crew as they lay down dusty gothic vibes in the Nikki Lane co-written "I'll Make It Through," building towards a crescendoing, persevering, bright chorus. (Lane also sings background vocals on the album's title track.) On "Believe in Heaven," doo-wop beats, dark choral echoes, and a plucked string section lead into ZZ Top full-bodied rawk riffage.

But the most defining of tones come through in spirit, when on the a capella "I Am A Woman" Ruby reaches towering vocal peaks, shredding raw, putting it all out there.The song could be a traditional spiritual, as she belts: "I am a believer / Standing strong by your side / I'm the hand to hold onto / When it's too hard to try... I am a woman / Do you know what that means / You lay it all on the line / When you lay down with me."

Of the song Chilcott says, "'I Am a Woman' was conjured up amid recent events where men have spoken about, and treated women's bodies, the way no man, or woman, should. This kind of treatment toward another human being makes every nerve in my body scream. These kinds of incidents are so ingrained in our culture and are swept under the carpet at every turn -- it needs to change. As tempting as it was to just write an angry tirade I wanted to respond with integrity, so I sat with my feelings and this song emerged as a celebration of women and womanhood, of our strength and our vulnerability, all we encompass and our inner beauty, countering ignorance and vulgarity with honesty and pride and without being exclusionary to any man or woman. My hope is that we come together on this long drawn out journey. The song is the backbone to the album for me."

Don't Talk About It smoulders with a fighting spirit and pulls influence and experience -- both musically, emotionally, and beyond -- from many pins in the map, but is 10 songs harbored in the singularity that is Ruby Boots.

The album has garnered praise from Rolling Stone, Noisey, Wide Open Country, Chicago Reader, No Depression, and more.

Since the release of Don't Talk About It, Ruby Boots has performed at Willie Nelson's Luck Reunion, Stagecoach Festival, Bonnaroo, and The Long Road Festival in the UK, as well as toured with Langhorne Slim, Nikki Lane, Nicole Atkins, Ben Miller Band, and Low Cut Connie.

Indianola

"I have an almost religious belief that Mississippi is the birthplace of rock 'n' roll," says Owen Beverly, who named his
band Indianola after the small but influential delta town in his home state that produced blues artists like Albert King,
Little Arthur Duncan and B.B. King.

"It's so important to the evolution of modern rock and pop music. I think the first rock 'n' roll song ever recorded was
'That's All Right' by Arthur Crudup, who was from Forest, Mississippi, before another Mississippi boy named Elvis did
a rendition that changed the world," he says. "I can't think of any songwriters who aren't influenced by Mississippi
music, whether they know it or not."

Now based in Nashville, the Jackson native finds it more important than ever to represent those roots. One listen to
Indianola's debut full-length album, due out this fall, and it's obvious that the pressures of making it in the country
music capital haven't swayed his approach. "It's always better to be the black sheep than to get lost in the herd," he
says.

Beginning with the arena-ready anthem "1960s," Beverly wears his vintage influences on his sleeve, acknowledging
the musical past while planting the song firmly in the present with searing guitars and pounding drums.
Songs like "Want Me Back" and "Too Good To Be True" put Beverly's powerful, swooning vocals in the spotlight with
nods to artists like Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, and The Everly Brothers that nonetheless feel current.
"There's a novelty in digging up the past that feels like excavation. You end up being a filter for everything you dig."
he says. "I think using those vintage elements but throwing in some modern edge gives the recordings dimension. If
you just make music that sounds like it was written and recorded forty years ago, it turns into a period piece. So I just
try to be honest with myself, draw on all of those influences, and put them together in a way that makes them my
own."

Beverly teamed up with Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope to produce Indianola's previous EP release, 'Zero.' For the
new album, he traveled to South Carolina to record at the band's studio. Trent can be heard singing harmonies on
“Mid Century Modern.”

Indianola will showcase new music on the road this summer and fall, including dates with Shovels & Rope, Butch
Walker, and The Watson Twins. For updated list of tour dates, visit: indianolamusic.com

Ruby Boots
At 14 years old, Ruby Boots -- real name Bex Chilcott -- left a conflicted home in Perth, Western Australia to do grueling work on pearling boats, and she hasn't stopped migrating since. Her nomadic streak has taken her around the world, and eventually to Nashville, TN.

Don't Talk About It charts this drifter's odyssey, tattered passport in hand. Behind her commanding and versatile voice, sharp guitar playing, and adept songwriting, Ruby Boots confidently maneuvers past the whirlwinds life has tossed on her occasionally lost highway. It's an album of hope, breakthrough, and handling the unknown challenges around the next bend.

The roads taken, the miles traveled and the voices heard during Ruby's life's trek resonate throughout Don't Talk About It. Informed as much by the wide-open landscapes of her homeland as the intimate writing circles of Nashville, the album may range far and wide but always maintains a firm sense of place. Echoes of first wave UK power pop and jangly punk intersect with the every(wo)man indie and pop-inflected muscle of Best Coast. Classic rock touchstones from T. Rex to the girl-group-wall-of-sound to personal hero Tom Petty meld with a weary poet's eye recalling Hope Sandoval.

On her Bloodshot Records debut, Ruby continues to map out a polished-yet-fearless, bare-knuckled self, previously hinted at on her last album, Solitude. In 2016, Ruby met with Lone Star state-bred studio wizards The Texas Gentlemen and the album's eventual producer Beau Bedford. The group had stopped off in Nashville on their way to back Kris Kristofferson at Newport Folk Festival and a mutual admiration society quickly coalesced. The collective pulled a handful of songs from the 40 she had waiting and began recording at their Dallas-based studio Modern Electric Sound Recorders.

The album rips right open with "It's So Cruel," strutting through the door with dual harmonic, bawdy, fuzzed-out guitars, reminiscent of a glammy, '70s southern-rock-soaked Queens of the Stone Age. It all captures the meteoric emotional flares of an adulterous relationship destined to fail. The Gentlemen spell a Stetson-hat wearing Wrecking Crew as they lay down dusty gothic vibes in the Nikki Lane co-written "I'll Make It Through," building towards a crescendoing, persevering, bright chorus. (Lane also sings background vocals on the album's title track.) On "Believe in Heaven," doo-wop beats, dark choral echoes, and a plucked string section lead into ZZ Top full-bodied rawk riffage.

But the most defining of tones come through in spirit, when on the a capella "I Am A Woman" Ruby reaches towering vocal peaks, shredding raw, putting it all out there.The song could be a traditional spiritual, as she belts: "I am a believer / Standing strong by your side / I'm the hand to hold onto / When it's too hard to try... I am a woman / Do you know what that means / You lay it all on the line / When you lay down with me."

Of the song Chilcott says, "'I Am a Woman' was conjured up amid recent events where men have spoken about, and treated women's bodies, the way no man, or woman, should. This kind of treatment toward another human being makes every nerve in my body scream. These kinds of incidents are so ingrained in our culture and are swept under the carpet at every turn -- it needs to change. As tempting as it was to just write an angry tirade I wanted to respond with integrity, so I sat with my feelings and this song emerged as a celebration of women and womanhood, of our strength and our vulnerability, all we encompass and our inner beauty, countering ignorance and vulgarity with honesty and pride and without being exclusionary to any man or woman. My hope is that we come together on this long drawn out journey. The song is the backbone to the album for me."

Don't Talk About It smoulders with a fighting spirit and pulls influence and experience -- both musically, emotionally, and beyond -- from many pins in the map, but is 10 songs harbored in the singularity that is Ruby Boots.

The album has garnered praise from Rolling Stone, Noisey, Wide Open Country, Chicago Reader, No Depression, and more.

Since the release of Don't Talk About It, Ruby Boots has performed at Willie Nelson's Luck Reunion, Stagecoach Festival, Bonnaroo, and The Long Road Festival in the UK, as well as toured with Langhorne Slim, Nikki Lane, Nicole Atkins, Ben Miller Band, and Low Cut Connie.

Indianola

"I have an almost religious belief that Mississippi is the birthplace of rock 'n' roll," says Owen Beverly, who named his
band Indianola after the small but influential delta town in his home state that produced blues artists like Albert King,
Little Arthur Duncan and B.B. King.

"It's so important to the evolution of modern rock and pop music. I think the first rock 'n' roll song ever recorded was
'That's All Right' by Arthur Crudup, who was from Forest, Mississippi, before another Mississippi boy named Elvis did
a rendition that changed the world," he says. "I can't think of any songwriters who aren't influenced by Mississippi
music, whether they know it or not."

Now based in Nashville, the Jackson native finds it more important than ever to represent those roots. One listen to
Indianola's debut full-length album, due out this fall, and it's obvious that the pressures of making it in the country
music capital haven't swayed his approach. "It's always better to be the black sheep than to get lost in the herd," he
says.

Beginning with the arena-ready anthem "1960s," Beverly wears his vintage influences on his sleeve, acknowledging
the musical past while planting the song firmly in the present with searing guitars and pounding drums.
Songs like "Want Me Back" and "Too Good To Be True" put Beverly's powerful, swooning vocals in the spotlight with
nods to artists like Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly, and The Everly Brothers that nonetheless feel current.
"There's a novelty in digging up the past that feels like excavation. You end up being a filter for everything you dig."
he says. "I think using those vintage elements but throwing in some modern edge gives the recordings dimension. If
you just make music that sounds like it was written and recorded forty years ago, it turns into a period piece. So I just
try to be honest with myself, draw on all of those influences, and put them together in a way that makes them my
own."

Beverly teamed up with Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope to produce Indianola's previous EP release, 'Zero.' For the
new album, he traveled to South Carolina to record at the band's studio. Trent can be heard singing harmonies on
“Mid Century Modern.”

Indianola will showcase new music on the road this summer and fall, including dates with Shovels & Rope, Butch
Walker, and The Watson Twins. For updated list of tour dates, visit: indianolamusic.com

Brooke Annibale (Full Band Performance) - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Singer-songwriter/guitarist Brooke Annibale sheds a bit of her indie-acoustic skin on her newest record Hold to The Light--a pop-progressive album that offers a fusion of textured electronic and traditional (guitar, strings, keys) instrumentation with songs bearing Brooke’s keen, soulful lyricism. Produced by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive) the record features the contributions of seasoned artists Sam Kassirer on Keys; Zachariah Hickman (Ray Lamontagne) on Bass; Josh Kaufman (The National) on accompanying guitars; Sean Trischka (Molly Tuttle, Oh Pep!) on Drums; and Matt Douglas (Sylvan Esso, Mountain Goats) on Woodwinds.

Hold to The Light is an exciting evolution in Brooke’s career as a musician. Her creative roots run deep with family connected to music--her maternal grandfather founded a music store, selling instruments and sound equipment, which continues to operate today in Pittsburgh, PA. Brooke began playing guitar at 14 and since then her passion for making and performing music has taken her all over the country. She released her first full-length record, Silence Worth Breaking in 2011, produced at The Smoakstack in Nashville, followed by 2013’s EP Words in Your Eyes and 2015’s The Simple Fear.

On the road, Brooke has recently been on tour opening for Josh Ritter, Margaret Glaspy, Chadwick Stokes, Great Lake Swimmers, Jesca Hoop, Iron & Wine, Rufus Wainwright, Aoife O’Donovan, The Handsome Family and others. Her songs have been featured on Sirius XM radio in addition to being placed in multiple TV shows including Grey's Anatomy, Pretty Little Liars, Hart of Dixie, Vampire Diaries and more.

Brooke’s Club Cafe performance will feature Mark Ramsey on keys, Seth Pierson on bass, and Dan Harding on drums

Singer-songwriter/guitarist Brooke Annibale sheds a bit of her indie-acoustic skin on her newest record Hold to The Light--a pop-progressive album that offers a fusion of textured electronic and traditional (guitar, strings, keys) instrumentation with songs bearing Brooke’s keen, soulful lyricism. Produced by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive) the record features the contributions of seasoned artists Sam Kassirer on Keys; Zachariah Hickman (Ray Lamontagne) on Bass; Josh Kaufman (The National) on accompanying guitars; Sean Trischka (Molly Tuttle, Oh Pep!) on Drums; and Matt Douglas (Sylvan Esso, Mountain Goats) on Woodwinds.

Hold to The Light is an exciting evolution in Brooke’s career as a musician. Her creative roots run deep with family connected to music--her maternal grandfather founded a music store, selling instruments and sound equipment, which continues to operate today in Pittsburgh, PA. Brooke began playing guitar at 14 and since then her passion for making and performing music has taken her all over the country. She released her first full-length record, Silence Worth Breaking in 2011, produced at The Smoakstack in Nashville, followed by 2013’s EP Words in Your Eyes and 2015’s The Simple Fear.

On the road, Brooke has recently been on tour opening for Josh Ritter, Margaret Glaspy, Chadwick Stokes, Great Lake Swimmers, Jesca Hoop, Iron & Wine, Rufus Wainwright, Aoife O’Donovan, The Handsome Family and others. Her songs have been featured on Sirius XM radio in addition to being placed in multiple TV shows including Grey's Anatomy, Pretty Little Liars, Hart of Dixie, Vampire Diaries and more.

Brooke’s Club Cafe performance will feature Mark Ramsey on keys, Seth Pierson on bass, and Dan Harding on drums

(Early Show) The Suitcase Junket with Special Guest Ali McGuirk

The latest album from The Suitcase Junket, Mean Dog, Trampoline is populated by characters in various states of reverie: leaning on jukeboxes, loitering on dance floors, lying on the bottoms of empty swimming pools in the sun. Despite being deeply attuned to the chaos of the world, singer/songwriter/ multi-instrumentalist Matt Lorenz imbues those moments with joyful wonder, an endless infatuation with life’s most subtle mysteries. And as its songs alight on everything from Joan Jett to moonshine to runaway kites, Mean Dog, Trampoline makes an undeniable case for infinite curiosity as a potent antidote to jadedness and despair.

Produced by Steve Berlin (Jackie Greene, Rickie Lee Jones, Leo Kottke) of Los Lobos, Mean Dog, Trampoline marks a deliberate departure from the self-recorded, homespun approach of The Suitcase Junket’s previous efforts. In creating the album, Lorenz pulled from a fantastically patchwork sonic palette, shaping his songs with elements of jangly folk, fuzzed-out blues, oddly textured psych-rock. Engineered by Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz) and mixed by Vance Powell (Jack White, Houndmouth), Mean Dog, Trampoline rightly preserves The Suitcase Junket’s unkempt vitality, but ultimately emerges as his most powerfully direct album so far.

"I’ve been blessed in my career as a producer to have worked with some remarkable artists, but I have never worked with anyone quite like Matt Lorenz / The Suitcase Junket. Besides making the complexity of everything he does look effortless, he’s a truly gifted singer and and amazing songwriter. We had a blast making this record and I’m anxious to share it with the world."
--
Steve Berlin

The latest album from The Suitcase Junket, Mean Dog, Trampoline is populated by characters in various states of reverie: leaning on jukeboxes, loitering on dance floors, lying on the bottoms of empty swimming pools in the sun. Despite being deeply attuned to the chaos of the world, singer/songwriter/ multi-instrumentalist Matt Lorenz imbues those moments with joyful wonder, an endless infatuation with life’s most subtle mysteries. And as its songs alight on everything from Joan Jett to moonshine to runaway kites, Mean Dog, Trampoline makes an undeniable case for infinite curiosity as a potent antidote to jadedness and despair.

Produced by Steve Berlin (Jackie Greene, Rickie Lee Jones, Leo Kottke) of Los Lobos, Mean Dog, Trampoline marks a deliberate departure from the self-recorded, homespun approach of The Suitcase Junket’s previous efforts. In creating the album, Lorenz pulled from a fantastically patchwork sonic palette, shaping his songs with elements of jangly folk, fuzzed-out blues, oddly textured psych-rock. Engineered by Justin Pizzoferrato (Dinosaur Jr., Speedy Ortiz) and mixed by Vance Powell (Jack White, Houndmouth), Mean Dog, Trampoline rightly preserves The Suitcase Junket’s unkempt vitality, but ultimately emerges as his most powerfully direct album so far.

"I’ve been blessed in my career as a producer to have worked with some remarkable artists, but I have never worked with anyone quite like Matt Lorenz / The Suitcase Junket. Besides making the complexity of everything he does look effortless, he’s a truly gifted singer and and amazing songwriter. We had a blast making this record and I’m anxious to share it with the world."
--
Steve Berlin

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Mr. Steve & His Traveling Band of Alcoholic Farm Animals with Steve Swanson. Featuring Tim Wolf & Hosted by Matt Liller and Special Guests.

Comedian Steve Swanson brings his eclectic comedy show to Club Cafe.

Comedian Steve Swanson brings his eclectic comedy show to Club Cafe.

Tacocat with Special Guest Sammi Lanzetta

One of the weirdest things humans do is to classify half of all humans as niche. As though women’s shit isn’t real shit-as though menses and horses and being internet-harassed aren’t as interesting as beer-farts and monster trucks and doing the harassing. That’s why Tacocat is radical: not because a female-driven band is some baffling novelty, but because they’re a group making art about experiences in which gender is both foregrounded and neutralized. This isn’t lady stuff, it’s people stuff. It’s normal. It’s nothing and everything. It’s life.

The four actual best friends-Emily Nokes (vocals, tambourine), Eric Randall (guitar), Lelah Maupin (drums), and Bree McKenna (bass)-came together in their teens and early baby twenties and coalesced into a band eight years ago, and you can feel that they’ve built both their lives, and their sound, together. Hanging out with Tacocat and listening to Tacocat are remarkably similar experiences, like the best party you’ve ever been to, where, instead of jostling for social position, everyone just wants to eat candy and talk about Sassy Magazine, sci-fi, cultural dynamic shifts, and bad experiences with men.

Tacocat’s third studio album, Lost Time (an X-Files reference, doy), is their first with producer Erik Blood. “I would describe him generally as a beautiful wizard,” Nokes said, “who, in our opinion, took the album to the next level. Wizard level.” Blood’s sounds are wide and expansive, bringing a fullness to the band’s familiar sparkling snarl. The Tacocat of Lost Time are triumphantly youthful but also plainspoken and wise, as catchy as they are substantive. “Men Explain Things to Me” eviscerates male condescension with sarcastic surf guitar. On “The Internet,” they swat away trolls with an imperiousness so satisfying you want to transmogrify it into a sheetcake and devour it: “Your place is so low/Human mosquito.”

One of feminism’s biggest hurdles has always been that it isn’t allowed to be fun. Tacocat gives that notion precisely the credence that it deserves, ignoring it altogether and making fun, funny, unselfconscious pop songs about the shit they’re genuinely obsessing or groaning over: Plan B, night swimming, high school horse girls (“they know the different breeds of all their favorite steeds!”), the bridge-and-tunnel bros who turn their neighborhood into a toilet every weekend. And, eight years in, Tacocat have built something bigger than themselves. They’ve fostered a feminist punk scene in Seattle so fertile it’s going national and rendering the notion of the “girl band” even more laughable than it already was. There are no “girl bands” in Seattle anymore. There are just bands and everyone else. “Women,” Nokes jokes. “They’re just like us!”

-Lindy West

One of the weirdest things humans do is to classify half of all humans as niche. As though women’s shit isn’t real shit-as though menses and horses and being internet-harassed aren’t as interesting as beer-farts and monster trucks and doing the harassing. That’s why Tacocat is radical: not because a female-driven band is some baffling novelty, but because they’re a group making art about experiences in which gender is both foregrounded and neutralized. This isn’t lady stuff, it’s people stuff. It’s normal. It’s nothing and everything. It’s life.

The four actual best friends-Emily Nokes (vocals, tambourine), Eric Randall (guitar), Lelah Maupin (drums), and Bree McKenna (bass)-came together in their teens and early baby twenties and coalesced into a band eight years ago, and you can feel that they’ve built both their lives, and their sound, together. Hanging out with Tacocat and listening to Tacocat are remarkably similar experiences, like the best party you’ve ever been to, where, instead of jostling for social position, everyone just wants to eat candy and talk about Sassy Magazine, sci-fi, cultural dynamic shifts, and bad experiences with men.

Tacocat’s third studio album, Lost Time (an X-Files reference, doy), is their first with producer Erik Blood. “I would describe him generally as a beautiful wizard,” Nokes said, “who, in our opinion, took the album to the next level. Wizard level.” Blood’s sounds are wide and expansive, bringing a fullness to the band’s familiar sparkling snarl. The Tacocat of Lost Time are triumphantly youthful but also plainspoken and wise, as catchy as they are substantive. “Men Explain Things to Me” eviscerates male condescension with sarcastic surf guitar. On “The Internet,” they swat away trolls with an imperiousness so satisfying you want to transmogrify it into a sheetcake and devour it: “Your place is so low/Human mosquito.”

One of feminism’s biggest hurdles has always been that it isn’t allowed to be fun. Tacocat gives that notion precisely the credence that it deserves, ignoring it altogether and making fun, funny, unselfconscious pop songs about the shit they’re genuinely obsessing or groaning over: Plan B, night swimming, high school horse girls (“they know the different breeds of all their favorite steeds!”), the bridge-and-tunnel bros who turn their neighborhood into a toilet every weekend. And, eight years in, Tacocat have built something bigger than themselves. They’ve fostered a feminist punk scene in Seattle so fertile it’s going national and rendering the notion of the “girl band” even more laughable than it already was. There are no “girl bands” in Seattle anymore. There are just bands and everyone else. “Women,” Nokes jokes. “They’re just like us!”

-Lindy West

Run River North

When they first formed in 2011, LA-based band Run River North dubbed themselves Monsters Calling Home. Eight years later, the trio of Alex Hwang (guitar/vocals), Daniel Chae (guitar/vocals) and Sally Kang (keys/vocals) have returned to the name — this time as the title of their upcoming EP, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One,” out in May 2019.
A celebratory effort ushering in a new era for the band, after having recently evolved from a sextet to a trio, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is about finding hope in transition, discovering your voice in a sea of doubt, and deciding to dance despite sadness. “It’s learning to trust your own voice regardless of whatever's happening outside of you,” Chae says.
Since the departure of three founding band members in 2016, Run River North have fought to reclaim their identity and their sound. With that came a reckoning: The trio were steadfast on returning to their roots and rebranding again as Monsters Calling Home as a way to separate themselves from the personnel changes. Instead, the EP’s title — and the music within it — became the vehicle to move past the anger and hurt feelings. “Having to go through three breakups, it was a shitty time,” Hwang says. “I just stopped wanting to write songs that were angry. It’s a good emotion to go through but if that’s what you’re left with that’s not a healthy place to be. The songs on the EP are more representative of how do you find hope and how do you find joy even if you have a right to feel angry. How can you find a reason to dance even when everyone is telling you it’s not the right time to dance?”
Not just an Asian-American band or a group that relies on a set sonic formula, the EP continues to expand upon the band’s prior folk-leaning backbone. On lead single “Hands Up,” the band is at their most bombastic. The result of a co-writing collaboration with Hannah Hooper and Christian Zucconi of Grouplove — the duo’s first of such sessions — “Hands Up” pairs an earworm-y chorus with a front-and-center guitar melody, a second voice among Hwang’s lead bellow. Overall, the group utilizes more drum programming, dreamy synth, and dynamic production — a more expansive sonic palette.
“Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is bookended by brother-sister songs “Casina” and “Casino.” A song with roots in the band’s days as a six-piece, “Casino” was written as the group’s former members began to phase out. A wistful and rustic intro builds into a walloping chorus: “I’m stuck in this casino / not much left for me.” It’s a song which serves as catharsis when reckoning with the forces that hold us down, a song inspired by Hwang’s mother’s cancer diagnosis. “At the time it was this big middle finger to cancer or anything you felt was giving an absolute statement to people’s lives,” he says.
“Casina,” on the other hand, was borne out of a late-night studio session between Chae, Kang and their producer, Miro Markie. Aiming to re-work “Casino,” “they handed me a microphone and they were like, ‘Try singing,’” Kang remembers. Her take on the song’s chorus added an air of whimsy balancing Hwang’s belt. The pair ping-pong verses and lines, creating a push-pull of dizzying tension. “I think this may be the first song that we don’t have a lead vocalist in a song,” Chae says. “When Sally wrote her part on this song it was the first time we thought this might be something. That’s the moment I can point to that was really exciting for this EP. It’s a linchpin for this EP.
With the energy of “Casina” — and Kang finding her voice — in mind, Run River North move forward as a true collaborative effort unthwarted by ego and pretense. No longer held back by fear or discontent, Run River North persevered through pain and came out on the other side victorious wearing a newfound confidence. “It became about who is in the band,” Hwang says, “and now it feels like Sally, Daniel, and me being very comfortable in our own skin.”

When they first formed in 2011, LA-based band Run River North dubbed themselves Monsters Calling Home. Eight years later, the trio of Alex Hwang (guitar/vocals), Daniel Chae (guitar/vocals) and Sally Kang (keys/vocals) have returned to the name — this time as the title of their upcoming EP, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One,” out in May 2019.
A celebratory effort ushering in a new era for the band, after having recently evolved from a sextet to a trio, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is about finding hope in transition, discovering your voice in a sea of doubt, and deciding to dance despite sadness. “It’s learning to trust your own voice regardless of whatever's happening outside of you,” Chae says.
Since the departure of three founding band members in 2016, Run River North have fought to reclaim their identity and their sound. With that came a reckoning: The trio were steadfast on returning to their roots and rebranding again as Monsters Calling Home as a way to separate themselves from the personnel changes. Instead, the EP’s title — and the music within it — became the vehicle to move past the anger and hurt feelings. “Having to go through three breakups, it was a shitty time,” Hwang says. “I just stopped wanting to write songs that were angry. It’s a good emotion to go through but if that’s what you’re left with that’s not a healthy place to be. The songs on the EP are more representative of how do you find hope and how do you find joy even if you have a right to feel angry. How can you find a reason to dance even when everyone is telling you it’s not the right time to dance?”
Not just an Asian-American band or a group that relies on a set sonic formula, the EP continues to expand upon the band’s prior folk-leaning backbone. On lead single “Hands Up,” the band is at their most bombastic. The result of a co-writing collaboration with Hannah Hooper and Christian Zucconi of Grouplove — the duo’s first of such sessions — “Hands Up” pairs an earworm-y chorus with a front-and-center guitar melody, a second voice among Hwang’s lead bellow. Overall, the group utilizes more drum programming, dreamy synth, and dynamic production — a more expansive sonic palette.
“Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is bookended by brother-sister songs “Casina” and “Casino.” A song with roots in the band’s days as a six-piece, “Casino” was written as the group’s former members began to phase out. A wistful and rustic intro builds into a walloping chorus: “I’m stuck in this casino / not much left for me.” It’s a song which serves as catharsis when reckoning with the forces that hold us down, a song inspired by Hwang’s mother’s cancer diagnosis. “At the time it was this big middle finger to cancer or anything you felt was giving an absolute statement to people’s lives,” he says.
“Casina,” on the other hand, was borne out of a late-night studio session between Chae, Kang and their producer, Miro Markie. Aiming to re-work “Casino,” “they handed me a microphone and they were like, ‘Try singing,’” Kang remembers. Her take on the song’s chorus added an air of whimsy balancing Hwang’s belt. The pair ping-pong verses and lines, creating a push-pull of dizzying tension. “I think this may be the first song that we don’t have a lead vocalist in a song,” Chae says. “When Sally wrote her part on this song it was the first time we thought this might be something. That’s the moment I can point to that was really exciting for this EP. It’s a linchpin for this EP.
With the energy of “Casina” — and Kang finding her voice — in mind, Run River North move forward as a true collaborative effort unthwarted by ego and pretense. No longer held back by fear or discontent, Run River North persevered through pain and came out on the other side victorious wearing a newfound confidence. “It became about who is in the band,” Hwang says, “and now it feels like Sally, Daniel, and me being very comfortable in our own skin.”

Skinny Lister

As music fans we’re only ever given fragments of lives well lived, and we scrabble vicariously through them. Skinny Lister, though, have really given us as much as they can since 2009, passing the growing flagon of their experiences with every album and tour. They’ve led an endless parade gathering fans old and new, from the respected folk circuit to the riotous Download Festival, igniting pogoing mosh-pits at each. Over the past ten years they’ve travelled from rain-soaked London to the vast arteries of the USA, upgrading from narrow boat to Salty Dog Cruise, played huge tours across Europe and North America with Frank Turner, Dropkick Murphys and Flogging Molly as well as headlining themselves across festivals, sweatboxes and ever-larger venues.

After three albums taking confident steps into an ever larger world, their fourth offering, The Story Is... (produced and mixed by Barny Barnicott – Arctic Monkeys, The Enemy, The Temper Trap) takes the tales of the everyday, the minutiae of our lives, and turns them into potent pop that rings oh so true.

“The stories have been getting more and more personal as the albums have gone on,” says Daniel Heptinstall (vocals, guitar, lead songwriter) “It always helps when you sing a song for it to have some truth. They’re the words that get sung back to us the loudest.” This sentiment is running through the latest album like diesel. Lorna sings on the hyped-up ‘My Life, My Architecture’ that “all this is my achievement, all cracks have life in between them, I live this adventure”. Dan even sings about “turning blood into diamonds”, crafting his own happenings into the last few years of classic Skinny Lister songs on ‘Any Resemblance To Actual Persons, Living Or Dead, Is Purely Coincidental’. Using storytelling truths, Skinny Lister’s anthology of experiences is being told and retold every night, with every spin of a record or stream of a song. Their world expands as their songs are shared.

The Story Is… finds fables in vastly contrasting true stories. Of an arsonist setting fire to the flat below Dan’s (‘Artist Arsonist’), of the sheer annoyance felt when accidentally filling a diesel van with unleaded (‘Diesel Vehicle’) - both songs laced with insight into everyone’s feelings. Even when the songs are outside of the band’s personal experience, they are still inspired by close connections. ‘38 Minutes’ came from a friend’s Facebook post about receiving the Hawaiian ballistic missile alert in early 2018, while ‘Stop & Breathe’ is a plea to everyone to take time out when they can, based on a good friend talking after a friend sadly departed due to suicide.

Musically, the band has also scoured volumes of texture and tone. Though songs like ‘Rattle & Roar’ and ‘Sometimes So It Goes’ will be familiar to anyone who’s loved the band’s three previous albums, Forge & Flagon, Down on Deptford Broadway and The Devil, the Heart & the Fight, the band has explored a lexicon of their tastes. ‘The Shining’ takes on Blondie’s new wave disco, giving Lorna Thomas (vocals) the spotlight. Lorna takes the reins on two of the most energising songs – ‘My Life, My Architecture’ and ‘My Distraction’ – and brings her unmistakable vitality to the album. ‘38 Minutes’ spins like a top with the urgency of an impending doom, backing ‘ooohs’ like sirens, and an electric pace as if they’re outrunning the clock. They’ve turned every melodic instinct up and, along with the hooks and lyrical reality Dan has drawn, it’s a deep dip into the encyclopaedic sound of which the band are capable.

“The first album was very rooted in the folk tradition,” says Dan. “But when we wrote Down on Deptford Broadway, we were doing songs like ‘Trouble on Oxford Street’ and ‘Cathy’ and we felt at the time we were straying too far from our folk roots. Now at a show they’re some of the highlights of a set”. In that vein, the new songs move even further away from their folk origins while crossing into new territory for the band. But you will be bouncing to the spring loaded ‘My Distraction’, clapping along with the Jam-like ‘Cause for Chorus’ or skanking to the ska-jangle of ‘Second Amendment’ by the next time you see them – they are potent bursts of melodic adrenaline.

And so the torrent of touring continues for Skinny Lister in 2019, leading cross-continental parties of willing devotees, audiences getting larger as people from all walks of life and several generations – young and old, children and parents – sing, dance and cheer. These songs, stories and passionate live performances, charm and thrill a huge spectrum of gig-goers from the folk aficionado and the indie experts to the riff-addled metal fans and the furious punk kids.

The Story Is… this time, that Skinny Lister are opening their lives up more than ever before, allowing us all in and giving everyone a space to express sheer joy, relate hard to the lines that strike a chord in us, and throw ourselves into living with abandon and hope, with happiness and excitement, with stories enough to fill several lifetimes.


As music fans we’re only ever given fragments of lives well lived, and we scrabble vicariously through them. Skinny Lister, though, have really given us as much as they can since 2009, passing the growing flagon of their experiences with every album and tour. They’ve led an endless parade gathering fans old and new, from the respected folk circuit to the riotous Download Festival, igniting pogoing mosh-pits at each. Over the past ten years they’ve travelled from rain-soaked London to the vast arteries of the USA, upgrading from narrow boat to Salty Dog Cruise, played huge tours across Europe and North America with Frank Turner, Dropkick Murphys and Flogging Molly as well as headlining themselves across festivals, sweatboxes and ever-larger venues.

After three albums taking confident steps into an ever larger world, their fourth offering, The Story Is... (produced and mixed by Barny Barnicott – Arctic Monkeys, The Enemy, The Temper Trap) takes the tales of the everyday, the minutiae of our lives, and turns them into potent pop that rings oh so true.

“The stories have been getting more and more personal as the albums have gone on,” says Daniel Heptinstall (vocals, guitar, lead songwriter) “It always helps when you sing a song for it to have some truth. They’re the words that get sung back to us the loudest.” This sentiment is running through the latest album like diesel. Lorna sings on the hyped-up ‘My Life, My Architecture’ that “all this is my achievement, all cracks have life in between them, I live this adventure”. Dan even sings about “turning blood into diamonds”, crafting his own happenings into the last few years of classic Skinny Lister songs on ‘Any Resemblance To Actual Persons, Living Or Dead, Is Purely Coincidental’. Using storytelling truths, Skinny Lister’s anthology of experiences is being told and retold every night, with every spin of a record or stream of a song. Their world expands as their songs are shared.

The Story Is… finds fables in vastly contrasting true stories. Of an arsonist setting fire to the flat below Dan’s (‘Artist Arsonist’), of the sheer annoyance felt when accidentally filling a diesel van with unleaded (‘Diesel Vehicle’) - both songs laced with insight into everyone’s feelings. Even when the songs are outside of the band’s personal experience, they are still inspired by close connections. ‘38 Minutes’ came from a friend’s Facebook post about receiving the Hawaiian ballistic missile alert in early 2018, while ‘Stop & Breathe’ is a plea to everyone to take time out when they can, based on a good friend talking after a friend sadly departed due to suicide.

Musically, the band has also scoured volumes of texture and tone. Though songs like ‘Rattle & Roar’ and ‘Sometimes So It Goes’ will be familiar to anyone who’s loved the band’s three previous albums, Forge & Flagon, Down on Deptford Broadway and The Devil, the Heart & the Fight, the band has explored a lexicon of their tastes. ‘The Shining’ takes on Blondie’s new wave disco, giving Lorna Thomas (vocals) the spotlight. Lorna takes the reins on two of the most energising songs – ‘My Life, My Architecture’ and ‘My Distraction’ – and brings her unmistakable vitality to the album. ‘38 Minutes’ spins like a top with the urgency of an impending doom, backing ‘ooohs’ like sirens, and an electric pace as if they’re outrunning the clock. They’ve turned every melodic instinct up and, along with the hooks and lyrical reality Dan has drawn, it’s a deep dip into the encyclopaedic sound of which the band are capable.

“The first album was very rooted in the folk tradition,” says Dan. “But when we wrote Down on Deptford Broadway, we were doing songs like ‘Trouble on Oxford Street’ and ‘Cathy’ and we felt at the time we were straying too far from our folk roots. Now at a show they’re some of the highlights of a set”. In that vein, the new songs move even further away from their folk origins while crossing into new territory for the band. But you will be bouncing to the spring loaded ‘My Distraction’, clapping along with the Jam-like ‘Cause for Chorus’ or skanking to the ska-jangle of ‘Second Amendment’ by the next time you see them – they are potent bursts of melodic adrenaline.

And so the torrent of touring continues for Skinny Lister in 2019, leading cross-continental parties of willing devotees, audiences getting larger as people from all walks of life and several generations – young and old, children and parents – sing, dance and cheer. These songs, stories and passionate live performances, charm and thrill a huge spectrum of gig-goers from the folk aficionado and the indie experts to the riff-addled metal fans and the furious punk kids.

The Story Is… this time, that Skinny Lister are opening their lives up more than ever before, allowing us all in and giving everyone a space to express sheer joy, relate hard to the lines that strike a chord in us, and throw ourselves into living with abandon and hope, with happiness and excitement, with stories enough to fill several lifetimes.


The Tennessee Queens Tour 2019: LOLO & Garrison Starr

LOLO
From Jackson, TN, LOLO is a show-stopping singer who has "so much music flowing through [her] that it fills two people" (Associated Press). She has proven herself a venerable songwriter, from penning hits for Panic! At The Disco’s recent #1 blockbuster album to writing a New York Times raved about off-Broadway musical, “Songbird” — a perfect segue from LOLO's past role as the originator of Ilse in the critically-acclaimed smash musical “Spring Awakening.” Her album, In Loving Memory of When I Gave a Shit, is a come-to-Jesus moment for the songstress who moved back to Tennessee after exploring her path on the stages of New York and time in London - a literal reflection of LOLO's journey on the road back home, which paints the picture of a woman who is finally able to shine and be her true self. With a daring and emotionally charged voice, her music evokes a hot southern night – rough around the edges but with a velvety quality that soothes the soul.

Garrison Starr
Garrison Starr is a singer, songwriter and record producer based in Los Angeles. Her latest musical release, "What If There Is No Destination" was released June 2017. Starr has released 15 albums as a solo artist.

Known for her vibrant and impassioned live performances, Starr’s shows have been described as “marrying pop smarts and Americana grit with a voice of remarkable power and clarity”(gomemphis.com 2012).

Starr is a full time songwriter in Los Angeles whose songs have been featured on numerous TV shows and commercials. She regularly collaborates with various artists on projects and has found great success writing for TV and film.

In 2016, Starr collaborated with long time friend, Margaret Cho, and produced “American Myth.” Starr also co-wrote, played guitar and sang on the record. The album was nominated for a Grammy in the Comedy category.

Garrison's love for truth-telling, good whiskey and human connection has made her a darling of the singer-songwriter world.

She continues to tour the U.S. and Europe.

LOLO
From Jackson, TN, LOLO is a show-stopping singer who has "so much music flowing through [her] that it fills two people" (Associated Press). She has proven herself a venerable songwriter, from penning hits for Panic! At The Disco’s recent #1 blockbuster album to writing a New York Times raved about off-Broadway musical, “Songbird” — a perfect segue from LOLO's past role as the originator of Ilse in the critically-acclaimed smash musical “Spring Awakening.” Her album, In Loving Memory of When I Gave a Shit, is a come-to-Jesus moment for the songstress who moved back to Tennessee after exploring her path on the stages of New York and time in London - a literal reflection of LOLO's journey on the road back home, which paints the picture of a woman who is finally able to shine and be her true self. With a daring and emotionally charged voice, her music evokes a hot southern night – rough around the edges but with a velvety quality that soothes the soul.

Garrison Starr
Garrison Starr is a singer, songwriter and record producer based in Los Angeles. Her latest musical release, "What If There Is No Destination" was released June 2017. Starr has released 15 albums as a solo artist.

Known for her vibrant and impassioned live performances, Starr’s shows have been described as “marrying pop smarts and Americana grit with a voice of remarkable power and clarity”(gomemphis.com 2012).

Starr is a full time songwriter in Los Angeles whose songs have been featured on numerous TV shows and commercials. She regularly collaborates with various artists on projects and has found great success writing for TV and film.

In 2016, Starr collaborated with long time friend, Margaret Cho, and produced “American Myth.” Starr also co-wrote, played guitar and sang on the record. The album was nominated for a Grammy in the Comedy category.

Garrison's love for truth-telling, good whiskey and human connection has made her a darling of the singer-songwriter world.

She continues to tour the U.S. and Europe.

(Early Show) Vance Gilbert

Vance Gilbert’s BaD Dog Buffet

Can something be wry, aching, hysterical, evocative, provocative, fun, beautifully sung, and consummately played all at once? Can it?

That’d be Vance Gilbert and his transcendent new album “BaD Dog Buffet”.

With the generous assistance from a varied list of super-respected guests—including Celtic harpist/singer Aine Minogue, bluegrass boys Darol Anger and Joe Walsh Jr., jazz sax player Grace Kelly, country rock hero Roy Sludge, and guitar mainstay Kevin Barry—this talented man’s musical truth plays out shamelessly on BaD Dog Buffet.

Fully funded by his fans, the record has so far received raves reviews based solely on the material folks knew would be on it Those who know and love Vance have already enjoyed the life-loving capitulation of “God Bless Everyone,” the seething rocker “Nothing from You,” and the tonguein-cheek, happy break-up song, “Out the Way We Came In. “First Ring” is a Vance classic, a banjo love story rooted in folk whimsy, while “Kiss the Bad Boys” sounds like what would happen if Bootsy Collins and Bruce Springsteen were trapped in an elevator and ended up writing a song together. “Unfamiliar Moon,” which some may know as Vance’s signature song—a tune that landed him in the second round of auditions of TV’s “America’s Got Talent”—is revisited here in a pared down version with Anger on fiddle.

Like all great artists, Vance truly happens live. In fact he developed his reputation with his jawdropping, diverse, funny, devastating, and gorgeous live performances. Arlo Guthrie, Anita Baker, the late George Carlin have all requested Vance to be added to their bills.

Vance exploded onto the scene in the early 90’s, with buzz spreading quickly. Who was this multicultural arts teacher knocking them dead at open mics? After opening Shawn Colvin’s 1992 Fat City tour, he took much of America by storm and by surprise. “With the voice of an angel, the wit of a devil, and the guitar playing of a god, it was enough to earn him that rarity: an encore for an opener,” wrote the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in its review of a show from the Colvin tour.

Vance followed with three acclaimed albums for the Rounder/Philo label—Edgewise (1994), Fugitives (1995), and Shaking Off Gravity (1998). Then, Somerville Live (2000), was lionized by the Boston Globe as the disc “young songwriters should study the way law students cram for bar exams,” and New York’s Town and Village called One Thru Fourteen (2002), “lively, eclectic, electrifying and transcending.”

Gilbert then released a duo album with his friend Ellis Paul, entitled Side Of The Road (2003). The Boston Globe described it as “the songwriter’s most compelling work; literate, heartfelt, rippling…emotionally resonant.” The Globe placed the album on its Top 10 list that year.

Gilbert only continued on with three more albums, Angels, Castles, Covers (2006) displaying his vocal virtuosity, with sounds of Motown, the R&B of Al Green, and classic Joni Mitchell. Up On Rockfield (2008) just after a year and a half as support for George Carlin, and Old White Men.

Which brings us full circle to BaD Dog Buffet, the latest in a growing, glowing oeuvre and an evocative catalog created by a cornerstone acoustic artist.

Vance Gilbert’s BaD Dog Buffet

Can something be wry, aching, hysterical, evocative, provocative, fun, beautifully sung, and consummately played all at once? Can it?

That’d be Vance Gilbert and his transcendent new album “BaD Dog Buffet”.

With the generous assistance from a varied list of super-respected guests—including Celtic harpist/singer Aine Minogue, bluegrass boys Darol Anger and Joe Walsh Jr., jazz sax player Grace Kelly, country rock hero Roy Sludge, and guitar mainstay Kevin Barry—this talented man’s musical truth plays out shamelessly on BaD Dog Buffet.

Fully funded by his fans, the record has so far received raves reviews based solely on the material folks knew would be on it Those who know and love Vance have already enjoyed the life-loving capitulation of “God Bless Everyone,” the seething rocker “Nothing from You,” and the tonguein-cheek, happy break-up song, “Out the Way We Came In. “First Ring” is a Vance classic, a banjo love story rooted in folk whimsy, while “Kiss the Bad Boys” sounds like what would happen if Bootsy Collins and Bruce Springsteen were trapped in an elevator and ended up writing a song together. “Unfamiliar Moon,” which some may know as Vance’s signature song—a tune that landed him in the second round of auditions of TV’s “America’s Got Talent”—is revisited here in a pared down version with Anger on fiddle.

Like all great artists, Vance truly happens live. In fact he developed his reputation with his jawdropping, diverse, funny, devastating, and gorgeous live performances. Arlo Guthrie, Anita Baker, the late George Carlin have all requested Vance to be added to their bills.

Vance exploded onto the scene in the early 90’s, with buzz spreading quickly. Who was this multicultural arts teacher knocking them dead at open mics? After opening Shawn Colvin’s 1992 Fat City tour, he took much of America by storm and by surprise. “With the voice of an angel, the wit of a devil, and the guitar playing of a god, it was enough to earn him that rarity: an encore for an opener,” wrote the Fort Worth Star-Telegram in its review of a show from the Colvin tour.

Vance followed with three acclaimed albums for the Rounder/Philo label—Edgewise (1994), Fugitives (1995), and Shaking Off Gravity (1998). Then, Somerville Live (2000), was lionized by the Boston Globe as the disc “young songwriters should study the way law students cram for bar exams,” and New York’s Town and Village called One Thru Fourteen (2002), “lively, eclectic, electrifying and transcending.”

Gilbert then released a duo album with his friend Ellis Paul, entitled Side Of The Road (2003). The Boston Globe described it as “the songwriter’s most compelling work; literate, heartfelt, rippling…emotionally resonant.” The Globe placed the album on its Top 10 list that year.

Gilbert only continued on with three more albums, Angels, Castles, Covers (2006) displaying his vocal virtuosity, with sounds of Motown, the R&B of Al Green, and classic Joni Mitchell. Up On Rockfield (2008) just after a year and a half as support for George Carlin, and Old White Men.

Which brings us full circle to BaD Dog Buffet, the latest in a growing, glowing oeuvre and an evocative catalog created by a cornerstone acoustic artist.

Spencer Krug (of Moonface/Wolf Parade)

After fifteen years of writing and performing with projects like Wolf Parade,Sunset Rubdown, Moonface, Swan Lake, and Frog eyes, this prolific artist has finallydecided to release and tour the music he makes under his own name - Spencer Krug.First gaining attention in the mid 2000s as co-leader of Montreal's rock’n’roll WolfParade, then soon after as the voice and mind behind the chaotic Sunset Rubdown,Krug eventually used the now defunct Moonface as an outlet for his more experimentaland sporadic solo material. And while he still writes and sings for the recentlyreactivated Wolf Parade, there remains in him a need to express something lessrock-oriented, something more quiet and strange and introverted. So, returning to hisfirst and favorite instrument, the piano, Krug has ventured back into his own fantasticworld of pseudo-classical balladeering; poetic lyricism laced with twisted pop sensibilityand jazz mimicry. Using this template, he now releases his solo work, and tours avariety of new songs as well as those from older projects, as Spencer Krug.

After fifteen years of writing and performing with projects like Wolf Parade,Sunset Rubdown, Moonface, Swan Lake, and Frog eyes, this prolific artist has finallydecided to release and tour the music he makes under his own name - Spencer Krug.First gaining attention in the mid 2000s as co-leader of Montreal's rock’n’roll WolfParade, then soon after as the voice and mind behind the chaotic Sunset Rubdown,Krug eventually used the now defunct Moonface as an outlet for his more experimentaland sporadic solo material. And while he still writes and sings for the recentlyreactivated Wolf Parade, there remains in him a need to express something lessrock-oriented, something more quiet and strange and introverted. So, returning to hisfirst and favorite instrument, the piano, Krug has ventured back into his own fantasticworld of pseudo-classical balladeering; poetic lyricism laced with twisted pop sensibilityand jazz mimicry. Using this template, he now releases his solo work, and tours avariety of new songs as well as those from older projects, as Spencer Krug.

@clubcafelive

56-58 South 12th Street, Pittsburgh PA 15203 (In Pittsburgh’s Historic South Side)