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Matthew Perryman Jones with Special Guest Molly Parden

A performing songwriter by trade, Matthew Perryman Jones is actually a seeker, at heart. With each entry in his discography, his musical and moral compass points toward an artistic horizon he has yet to explore. Sometimes, he turns his gaze to examine his own inner world. Other times, he looks to the inspirations found in the letters Vincent Van Gogh penned to his brother Theo, in the idea of duende as proffered by Federico García Lorca, and in the poetic verses of Sufi poets Hafiz and Rumi.

Of his most recent release, American Songwriter wrote that, “MPJ’s songwriting acumen could easily be used as a musical template to demonstrate how less can be so much more. [He] sounds cinematic and slowly worms its way inside your brain, feasts upon your emotions, and ultimately burrows down into your soul.” It could be said that Matthew makes soul music — not based on how it sounds, but on where it originates and where it resides.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Matthew grew up in Georgia and cut his artistic teeth in the Atlanta music scene before heading north to Nashville. His debut release, Nowhere Else But Here, dropped in 2000, followed by three subsequent albums — Throwing Punches in the Dark (2006), Swallow the Sea (2008), and Land of the Living (2012) — and three additional EPs as well as a handful of singles. Songs from across his catalog have been featured in dozens of film and TV placements, and tours have taken him across the U.S. and abroad to share stages with legends like Shawn Colvin and Patty Griffin, as well as the Ten Out of Tenn songwriter collective of which he is a part.

Now, Matthew is gearing up to release his fifth album, alongside producer Josh Kaler, focused on genius loci — the spirit of place. Written across the country throughout 2017, and funded by generous fans contributing to a Pledge Music campaign, the record was finished in early 2018. As he chases the ever-retreating horizon, Jones will stop, listen, and capture when and what the spirit of each place calls out to him.

A performing songwriter by trade, Matthew Perryman Jones is actually a seeker, at heart. With each entry in his discography, his musical and moral compass points toward an artistic horizon he has yet to explore. Sometimes, he turns his gaze to examine his own inner world. Other times, he looks to the inspirations found in the letters Vincent Van Gogh penned to his brother Theo, in the idea of duende as proffered by Federico García Lorca, and in the poetic verses of Sufi poets Hafiz and Rumi.

Of his most recent release, American Songwriter wrote that, “MPJ’s songwriting acumen could easily be used as a musical template to demonstrate how less can be so much more. [He] sounds cinematic and slowly worms its way inside your brain, feasts upon your emotions, and ultimately burrows down into your soul.” It could be said that Matthew makes soul music — not based on how it sounds, but on where it originates and where it resides.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Matthew grew up in Georgia and cut his artistic teeth in the Atlanta music scene before heading north to Nashville. His debut release, Nowhere Else But Here, dropped in 2000, followed by three subsequent albums — Throwing Punches in the Dark (2006), Swallow the Sea (2008), and Land of the Living (2012) — and three additional EPs as well as a handful of singles. Songs from across his catalog have been featured in dozens of film and TV placements, and tours have taken him across the U.S. and abroad to share stages with legends like Shawn Colvin and Patty Griffin, as well as the Ten Out of Tenn songwriter collective of which he is a part.

Now, Matthew is gearing up to release his fifth album, alongside producer Josh Kaler, focused on genius loci — the spirit of place. Written across the country throughout 2017, and funded by generous fans contributing to a Pledge Music campaign, the record was finished in early 2018. As he chases the ever-retreating horizon, Jones will stop, listen, and capture when and what the spirit of each place calls out to him.

An Evening With Jill Sobule

Nostalgia can be wonderful and amazing. It's OK to look back. But then you gotta get the fuck out of there." So says singer-songwriter Jill Sobule, explaining the theme of her new album, Nostalgia Kills.

On Nostalgia Kills(out September 14 on Jill's own Pinko Records), the woman hailed by The New York Timesfor making "grown-up music for an adolescent age" turns her warm wit and poet's eye on herself more than ever before, revisiting moments from throughout her life that made her into the person she is today. It's an especially poignant look back at childhood - "exorcising some junior high school demons," as she puts it.

Looking back is a new experience for Jill Sobule. Ever since she first caught mainstream attention with her 1995 song "I Kissed a Girl" - the first song about same-sex romance ever to crack the Billboard Top 20 (and no relation to the later Katy Perry tune) - she's always pushed forward, exploring new sounds and subject matter with each passing album and refusing to be pigeonholed by her early hits (which also include the ‘90s alt-rock anthem "Supermodel," featured in an iconic scene in the film Clueless).

Along the way, Jill has shared stages with the likes of Billy Bragg, Cyndi Lauper and Warren Zevon, written music for TV and theater, and been a pioneer in the art of crowdfunding, raising so much money for her 2009 album California Yearsthat a then-unknown startup called Kickstarter came to her for advice. She's also been active in numerous social and political causes, performing at prisons as part of Wayne Kramer's Jail Guitar Doors project, playing dates with Lady Parts Justice's "Vagical Mystery Tour," and curating Monster Protest Jams Vol. 1, featuring protest songs by Tom Morello, Billy Bragg, Boots Riley, Amanda Palmer, Jackson Browne and many other great artists - including Jill's own "When They Say We Want Our America Back, What the F#@k Do They Mean?", which traces the history of anti-immigrant sentiment in America.

For Nostalgia Kills, Jill worked with her good friend, Australian singer-songwriter Ben Lee, to cull the album's 11 songs from a collection of over 100, representing nearly a decade's worth of material accumulated since the release of California Years. In turning those songs into an album, she received a little extra motivation from an unlikely source.
"I was at an industry party," she recalls. "And I heard this total douche saying, you know, once someone reaches the age of 40, they can't write a good song. And I went up to him and I was like, ‘You don't know me, but you're an idiot.'"
Making it her mission to prove her new nemesis wrong, Jill took the songs into Lee's home studio in Los Angeles with a supporting cast of players that included John Doe (X), Wayne Kramer (The MC5), Petra Haden (That Dog), Roger Joseph Manning Jr. (Jellyfish), Robin Eaton (Jill's long time collaborator and co-writer) and Richard Barone (The Bongos). "This was done with a lot of friends," she says. "It was very organic." Many of the final mixes even contain elements of the original demos, recorded with various apps on Jill's iPad.

Right from the jump, Nostalgia Kills proves that this songwriter, despite being a few years north of 40, is still at the peak of her powers. How many artists of any age can write a song like "I Don't Wanna Wake Up," an Old Testament head trip inspired by a bad breakup, the death of a parent, and microdosing mushrooms? Let alone have the nerve to make it their album's opening track?

From there, Nostalgia Kills explores its titular theme through a collection of songs that ponder the past without ever lapsing into easy sentimentality. "I Put My Headphones On," as catchy as anything in Jill's catalog, captures the cozy feeling of tuning out the outside world with a favorite record. "Almost Great" is a ukulele-laced ode to youthful brushes with success and adult battles with procrastination. "Forbidden Thoughts of Youth" is a beautifully rendered portrait of adolescent unrequited love, as Jill looks back at her first gay crush ("an incredible combination of Marcia Brady and future meth-smoking biker chick").

"Headphones" and "Forbidden Thoughts" will be part of #Fuck7thGrade, a one-woman show about "the worst year of my life," andjust the latest of Jill's many forays into theater. Nostalgia Kills features new versions of several of Jill's best songs for the stage: "There's Nothing I Can Do" is a defiant breakup anthem from the off-off-Broadway musical Prozak and the Platypus, sung from the perspective of a rebellious 17-year-old girl. "25 Cents" is from Times Square, a new musical based on the 1980 cult film of the same name - and Jill's own memories of visiting New York City as a teenager, back when the city was still "scary and fascinating and full of junkies." And the gorgeous ballad "Tomorrow Is Breaking My Heart" is one of several original songs Jill wrote for a new adaptation of Yentl, Isaac Bashevis Singer's tale of gender-bending romance later made famous by Barbra Streisand's film adaptation.

There are two versions of "Tomorrow Is Breaking" co-written with long time collaborator on Nostalgia Kills- a mournful duet with John Doe, and a special bonus track version featuring an amateur musician Nicolas Ford, who made a pledge to the Nostalgia KillsKickstarter campaign in which the prize was to sing a duet with Jill. "I decided to do it in a different style with a piano and he kicked ass," she says proudly of Nicholas' crooning accompaniment.

Nostalgia Kills' bonus tracks also include "The Donor Song," on which Jill gives shout-outs to her Kickstarter backers (including Avengersdirector and Buffy the Vampire Slayercreator Joss Whedon, whom Jill calls "my personal lord and savior" because he donated at the highest level), as well as lovely covers of The Stairsteps' soul classic "O-o-h Child" and "Don't Let Us Get Sick," a heartbreakingly beautiful, late-career ballad by Jill's friend and mentor, Warren Zevon, with whom she tour shortly before his death in 2003. "He used to come out during my set to sing ‘I Kissed a Girl' with me," Jill remembers. "He would always wink at me when we would sing ‘They can have their diamonds and we'll have are pearls' to let me know he got the clitoral reference."

For all its graceful, funny and heartbreaking explorations of awkward youth and grown-up regrets, Nostalgia Killsis as of-the-moment as anything in Jill Sobule's catalog. Through her own experiences, she explores issues our society still collectively struggles with (LGBTQ rights, teen mental health, our unhealthy obsession with staying forever young) and gently skewers our tendency to dwell on the past at the expense of addressing the present. As she sings on the title track: "We look at ourselves in a long row of mirrors/We get smaller and smaller with each passing year/We have to keep moving or die."

Nostalgia can be wonderful and amazing. It's OK to look back. But then you gotta get the fuck out of there." So says singer-songwriter Jill Sobule, explaining the theme of her new album, Nostalgia Kills.

On Nostalgia Kills(out September 14 on Jill's own Pinko Records), the woman hailed by The New York Timesfor making "grown-up music for an adolescent age" turns her warm wit and poet's eye on herself more than ever before, revisiting moments from throughout her life that made her into the person she is today. It's an especially poignant look back at childhood - "exorcising some junior high school demons," as she puts it.

Looking back is a new experience for Jill Sobule. Ever since she first caught mainstream attention with her 1995 song "I Kissed a Girl" - the first song about same-sex romance ever to crack the Billboard Top 20 (and no relation to the later Katy Perry tune) - she's always pushed forward, exploring new sounds and subject matter with each passing album and refusing to be pigeonholed by her early hits (which also include the ‘90s alt-rock anthem "Supermodel," featured in an iconic scene in the film Clueless).

Along the way, Jill has shared stages with the likes of Billy Bragg, Cyndi Lauper and Warren Zevon, written music for TV and theater, and been a pioneer in the art of crowdfunding, raising so much money for her 2009 album California Yearsthat a then-unknown startup called Kickstarter came to her for advice. She's also been active in numerous social and political causes, performing at prisons as part of Wayne Kramer's Jail Guitar Doors project, playing dates with Lady Parts Justice's "Vagical Mystery Tour," and curating Monster Protest Jams Vol. 1, featuring protest songs by Tom Morello, Billy Bragg, Boots Riley, Amanda Palmer, Jackson Browne and many other great artists - including Jill's own "When They Say We Want Our America Back, What the F#@k Do They Mean?", which traces the history of anti-immigrant sentiment in America.

For Nostalgia Kills, Jill worked with her good friend, Australian singer-songwriter Ben Lee, to cull the album's 11 songs from a collection of over 100, representing nearly a decade's worth of material accumulated since the release of California Years. In turning those songs into an album, she received a little extra motivation from an unlikely source.
"I was at an industry party," she recalls. "And I heard this total douche saying, you know, once someone reaches the age of 40, they can't write a good song. And I went up to him and I was like, ‘You don't know me, but you're an idiot.'"
Making it her mission to prove her new nemesis wrong, Jill took the songs into Lee's home studio in Los Angeles with a supporting cast of players that included John Doe (X), Wayne Kramer (The MC5), Petra Haden (That Dog), Roger Joseph Manning Jr. (Jellyfish), Robin Eaton (Jill's long time collaborator and co-writer) and Richard Barone (The Bongos). "This was done with a lot of friends," she says. "It was very organic." Many of the final mixes even contain elements of the original demos, recorded with various apps on Jill's iPad.

Right from the jump, Nostalgia Kills proves that this songwriter, despite being a few years north of 40, is still at the peak of her powers. How many artists of any age can write a song like "I Don't Wanna Wake Up," an Old Testament head trip inspired by a bad breakup, the death of a parent, and microdosing mushrooms? Let alone have the nerve to make it their album's opening track?

From there, Nostalgia Kills explores its titular theme through a collection of songs that ponder the past without ever lapsing into easy sentimentality. "I Put My Headphones On," as catchy as anything in Jill's catalog, captures the cozy feeling of tuning out the outside world with a favorite record. "Almost Great" is a ukulele-laced ode to youthful brushes with success and adult battles with procrastination. "Forbidden Thoughts of Youth" is a beautifully rendered portrait of adolescent unrequited love, as Jill looks back at her first gay crush ("an incredible combination of Marcia Brady and future meth-smoking biker chick").

"Headphones" and "Forbidden Thoughts" will be part of #Fuck7thGrade, a one-woman show about "the worst year of my life," andjust the latest of Jill's many forays into theater. Nostalgia Kills features new versions of several of Jill's best songs for the stage: "There's Nothing I Can Do" is a defiant breakup anthem from the off-off-Broadway musical Prozak and the Platypus, sung from the perspective of a rebellious 17-year-old girl. "25 Cents" is from Times Square, a new musical based on the 1980 cult film of the same name - and Jill's own memories of visiting New York City as a teenager, back when the city was still "scary and fascinating and full of junkies." And the gorgeous ballad "Tomorrow Is Breaking My Heart" is one of several original songs Jill wrote for a new adaptation of Yentl, Isaac Bashevis Singer's tale of gender-bending romance later made famous by Barbra Streisand's film adaptation.

There are two versions of "Tomorrow Is Breaking" co-written with long time collaborator on Nostalgia Kills- a mournful duet with John Doe, and a special bonus track version featuring an amateur musician Nicolas Ford, who made a pledge to the Nostalgia KillsKickstarter campaign in which the prize was to sing a duet with Jill. "I decided to do it in a different style with a piano and he kicked ass," she says proudly of Nicholas' crooning accompaniment.

Nostalgia Kills' bonus tracks also include "The Donor Song," on which Jill gives shout-outs to her Kickstarter backers (including Avengersdirector and Buffy the Vampire Slayercreator Joss Whedon, whom Jill calls "my personal lord and savior" because he donated at the highest level), as well as lovely covers of The Stairsteps' soul classic "O-o-h Child" and "Don't Let Us Get Sick," a heartbreakingly beautiful, late-career ballad by Jill's friend and mentor, Warren Zevon, with whom she tour shortly before his death in 2003. "He used to come out during my set to sing ‘I Kissed a Girl' with me," Jill remembers. "He would always wink at me when we would sing ‘They can have their diamonds and we'll have are pearls' to let me know he got the clitoral reference."

For all its graceful, funny and heartbreaking explorations of awkward youth and grown-up regrets, Nostalgia Killsis as of-the-moment as anything in Jill Sobule's catalog. Through her own experiences, she explores issues our society still collectively struggles with (LGBTQ rights, teen mental health, our unhealthy obsession with staying forever young) and gently skewers our tendency to dwell on the past at the expense of addressing the present. As she sings on the title track: "We look at ourselves in a long row of mirrors/We get smaller and smaller with each passing year/We have to keep moving or die."

An Evening With Albert Cummings

Entertaining audiences from his phenomenal guitar work to his incredibly impassioned lyrics and overall songwriting prowess - one thing has certainly become clear about Albert Cummings’ music: He is FAR MORE than simply just the guitarist or the bluesman he’s often painted as by fans and the media alike. He offers the complete package.


Though undoubtedly a masterful guitar player who burst onto the blues rock scene in the early
2000’s and almost immediately began gaining praise in that realm, his latest release “Live at the ‘62 Center” further portrays not only his versatility as singer/songwriter and live performer but as an artist first and foremost.


This comes to fruition in the true spontaneity and creative spirit of the album, in which he put together a newly formed version of his usual trio that afternoon of the October, 2016 recording. With longtime friend and Grammy Winner Jim Gaines behind the soundboard, what comes through in both sight and sound is an incredible journey into the live performance world and true artistry of one of today’s most seasoned musicians.


“His muscular guitar work is simply outstanding. He’s a great blues singer as well with passion for the tunes inherent in his full throttle approach.” - Rock and Blues Muse on Live at the ‘62
Center


Like many greats before him who’ve been painted into a corner as merely great blues players, or guitar players, or singers - Cummings seeks to rise above these labels and be praised for the devotion to his overall craft as a true musician. In artist terms - he’s sought to be known for the overall pallet of his music, rather than one specific color. From greats like Eric Clapton to
the more recent stylings of John Mayer, his artistic integrity has allowed him to focus on the big picture, writing songs from the heart rather than catering to his specifics strengths as a singer, guitarist, or bandleader (all of which he does impeccably, however).


His musical journey began when young Albert first picked up a guitar - learning the requisite three chords from his father, but later switched over to banjo at the age of 12 after becoming a bluegrass fan. After hearing the early recordings of Stevie Ray Vaughan, he was impressed by the sheer virtuosity of the artist, and following his first chance to see him LIVE while in college in Boston he returned to the guitar with a new outlook and resolve.


At age 27, as he continued to grow in his newfound passion, he landed on the Northeast blues circuit with his first band Swamp Yankee. Then, in 1998, after walking into a Northeast Blues Society’s open jam, Cummings won the right to compete in the Blues Foundation’s International Blues Challenge the following year. By 2000, his debut single “The Long Way”
was released to rave reviews, and began opening new doors for the artist.


His first big opportunity came in the form of a chance to work with Double Trouble, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan’s rhythm section. So taken with Albert’s fire and passion were bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton that they volunteered to play on and produce his solo debut recording, 2003’s self-released From the Heart. Recorded in Austin, Texas, it featured Cummings fronting Double Trouble (including Reese Winans) in their first recording project since Stevie Ray’s passing. Having began his musical journey in part due to Vaughan’s inspiration, it seemed Cummings’ passion had brought him full-circle.


Cummings’ soulful and explosive approach to blues and rock then caught the attention of Blind Pig Records (Muddy Waters, Jimmy Vivino, Elvin Bishop), which signed him to a multi-album deal. On his label debut, True to Yourself, released in 2004, Cummings was again joined by bassist Tommy Shannon. Recorded by producer extraordinaire Jim Gaines (Santana, Stevie Ray, Buddy Guy), the all-original release showcased Albert’s rapidly developing songwriting chops and deeply emotional vocals as well as stunning guitar pyrotechnics, fully showcasing his well-rounded talents.


Soon tours and shows with blues legends B.B. King, Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and others brought Albert’s music to a much larger audience.


His second release, Working Man (2006), also produced by Jim Gaines, furthered a growing focus and maturity both in Albert’s stinging, incisive guitar work as well as in his fluently idiomatic songwriting - leading Billboard Magazine to exclaim “This recording is the calling card of a star who has arrived”.


2008 saw his first live album “Feel So Good”, recorded at the historic Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, Massachusetts which has hosted everyone from Will Rogers to Al Jolson. The audience was so enthralled and supportive they became part of the performance in a way
that’s rarely heard. As AllMusic put it, “It sounds like it was one hell of a party that night”. Music
Connection also called it “one of the best live albums recorded in a long time”.


As he continued to grow, playing with the likes of legends from B.B. King (who called dubbed him “a great guitarist”), Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy, and many more - Cummings built on not only his all-around songwriting and musicianship but his guitar playing skill as well. Using his knowledge to give back to fellow guitarists wanting to advance in their craft, he released the instructional DVD “Working Man Blues Guitar” in 2011. His next album, 2012’s self-released “No Regrets” followed as a return to his true musical roots, poignantly capturing the core of his influences and displaying the impact that R&B, Rock, Soul, Country, and the Blues have had on both his playing and writing. It debuted at #1 on iTunes music charts in the USA, Canada and France.


2015’s “Someone Like You” was recorded in Southern California with Grammy-winning producer David Z. (Buddy Guy, Prince, Jonny Lang, Gov’t Mule) at the helm. Said Z, “Albert Cummings writes, plays and sings the blues like nobody else. What a blast to watch him jell in the studio with some of the best musicians in Los Angeles.” One of those musicians was Blind Pig label mate and leader of The Basic Cable Band on the Conan TV show, Jimmy Vivino, who performs on three cuts.

Now, as he continues writing and performing, relentlessly devoting effort to his craft, Cumming’s is ready to continue on his ever expansive musical journey.

Entertaining audiences from his phenomenal guitar work to his incredibly impassioned lyrics and overall songwriting prowess - one thing has certainly become clear about Albert Cummings’ music: He is FAR MORE than simply just the guitarist or the bluesman he’s often painted as by fans and the media alike. He offers the complete package.


Though undoubtedly a masterful guitar player who burst onto the blues rock scene in the early
2000’s and almost immediately began gaining praise in that realm, his latest release “Live at the ‘62 Center” further portrays not only his versatility as singer/songwriter and live performer but as an artist first and foremost.


This comes to fruition in the true spontaneity and creative spirit of the album, in which he put together a newly formed version of his usual trio that afternoon of the October, 2016 recording. With longtime friend and Grammy Winner Jim Gaines behind the soundboard, what comes through in both sight and sound is an incredible journey into the live performance world and true artistry of one of today’s most seasoned musicians.


“His muscular guitar work is simply outstanding. He’s a great blues singer as well with passion for the tunes inherent in his full throttle approach.” - Rock and Blues Muse on Live at the ‘62
Center


Like many greats before him who’ve been painted into a corner as merely great blues players, or guitar players, or singers - Cummings seeks to rise above these labels and be praised for the devotion to his overall craft as a true musician. In artist terms - he’s sought to be known for the overall pallet of his music, rather than one specific color. From greats like Eric Clapton to
the more recent stylings of John Mayer, his artistic integrity has allowed him to focus on the big picture, writing songs from the heart rather than catering to his specifics strengths as a singer, guitarist, or bandleader (all of which he does impeccably, however).


His musical journey began when young Albert first picked up a guitar - learning the requisite three chords from his father, but later switched over to banjo at the age of 12 after becoming a bluegrass fan. After hearing the early recordings of Stevie Ray Vaughan, he was impressed by the sheer virtuosity of the artist, and following his first chance to see him LIVE while in college in Boston he returned to the guitar with a new outlook and resolve.


At age 27, as he continued to grow in his newfound passion, he landed on the Northeast blues circuit with his first band Swamp Yankee. Then, in 1998, after walking into a Northeast Blues Society’s open jam, Cummings won the right to compete in the Blues Foundation’s International Blues Challenge the following year. By 2000, his debut single “The Long Way”
was released to rave reviews, and began opening new doors for the artist.


His first big opportunity came in the form of a chance to work with Double Trouble, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan’s rhythm section. So taken with Albert’s fire and passion were bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton that they volunteered to play on and produce his solo debut recording, 2003’s self-released From the Heart. Recorded in Austin, Texas, it featured Cummings fronting Double Trouble (including Reese Winans) in their first recording project since Stevie Ray’s passing. Having began his musical journey in part due to Vaughan’s inspiration, it seemed Cummings’ passion had brought him full-circle.


Cummings’ soulful and explosive approach to blues and rock then caught the attention of Blind Pig Records (Muddy Waters, Jimmy Vivino, Elvin Bishop), which signed him to a multi-album deal. On his label debut, True to Yourself, released in 2004, Cummings was again joined by bassist Tommy Shannon. Recorded by producer extraordinaire Jim Gaines (Santana, Stevie Ray, Buddy Guy), the all-original release showcased Albert’s rapidly developing songwriting chops and deeply emotional vocals as well as stunning guitar pyrotechnics, fully showcasing his well-rounded talents.


Soon tours and shows with blues legends B.B. King, Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and others brought Albert’s music to a much larger audience.


His second release, Working Man (2006), also produced by Jim Gaines, furthered a growing focus and maturity both in Albert’s stinging, incisive guitar work as well as in his fluently idiomatic songwriting - leading Billboard Magazine to exclaim “This recording is the calling card of a star who has arrived”.


2008 saw his first live album “Feel So Good”, recorded at the historic Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, Massachusetts which has hosted everyone from Will Rogers to Al Jolson. The audience was so enthralled and supportive they became part of the performance in a way
that’s rarely heard. As AllMusic put it, “It sounds like it was one hell of a party that night”. Music
Connection also called it “one of the best live albums recorded in a long time”.


As he continued to grow, playing with the likes of legends from B.B. King (who called dubbed him “a great guitarist”), Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy, and many more - Cummings built on not only his all-around songwriting and musicianship but his guitar playing skill as well. Using his knowledge to give back to fellow guitarists wanting to advance in their craft, he released the instructional DVD “Working Man Blues Guitar” in 2011. His next album, 2012’s self-released “No Regrets” followed as a return to his true musical roots, poignantly capturing the core of his influences and displaying the impact that R&B, Rock, Soul, Country, and the Blues have had on both his playing and writing. It debuted at #1 on iTunes music charts in the USA, Canada and France.


2015’s “Someone Like You” was recorded in Southern California with Grammy-winning producer David Z. (Buddy Guy, Prince, Jonny Lang, Gov’t Mule) at the helm. Said Z, “Albert Cummings writes, plays and sings the blues like nobody else. What a blast to watch him jell in the studio with some of the best musicians in Los Angeles.” One of those musicians was Blind Pig label mate and leader of The Basic Cable Band on the Conan TV show, Jimmy Vivino, who performs on three cuts.

Now, as he continues writing and performing, relentlessly devoting effort to his craft, Cumming’s is ready to continue on his ever expansive musical journey.

(Early Show) Opus One and Good Effort Comedy Presents Comedy in the Southside Featuring Tyrel Smithson, Shaun McCarthy, Daniel Ferrere, Ron Renwick and Alex Homyak. Hosted by Matt Parsons

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents James Phelps, Vanessa St Clair, James J Hamilton, Christina McNeese, Mike Sasson, Helen Wildy, Collin Chamberlain and Hosted By Garrett Titlebaum

Bill Toms and Hard Rain - 20th Anniversary (featuring The Soulville Horns) with Special Guest Soulful Femme (featuring Stevee Wellons and Cheryl Rinovato)

hile it’s hard to put a finger on any one sound that defines “American music,” the compositions of Bill Toms are as close a template as any. The Pittsburgh native, along with his band Hard Rain, delivers a sound that takes the greatest of America’s most beloved genres and melds them into a poetic representation of the best the country has to offer.

With his ninth full-length studio release, Good For My Soul (street date October 27), Toms channels a foot-stomping, wall-shaking blend of soul, blues, gospel, and rock vibes, all brought together with his lyrical specialty -- stories of everyday men and women doing their best to stay ahead while still managing to keep a dream or two in their heads.

Soaring horns, gritty licks, toe-tapping rhythms, and Toms’ own rough-hewn vocals will draw listeners in, as well as well-deserved comparisons to the greats such as Dr. John, Little Feat, Springsteen, Joe Tex, The Blasters, Otis Redding, and Rufus Thomas.

“The idea of a horn section behind my songs has been something I’ve thought about for a while,” explains Toms. “Albert King, and all the Stax artists come to mind when I think of what true rhythm and blues can do. I wanted a piece of that; creating dynamics, and drama within the song; and fostering the deep emotion that a great horn section can give. The words also needed this place-- in order to be fully interpreted as the representation of ‘my America,’ and the people who make up my small part of this world.”

Good For My Soul was recorded in February 2017 by Oscar-winning composer Rick Witkowski, who also co-produced the set with Will Kimbrough (Rodney Crowell, Todd Snider). Both artists have collaborated with Toms frequently on parts of his earlier catalog.

Toms launched his musical career in 1987 as lead guitarist of Pittsburgh’s legendary band Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers, During that period, he opened for and played with such legendary names as The Band, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Little Feat, and Stevie Ray Vaughn. While playing guitar, co-writing, and adding backup vocals for the Houserockers, Toms and the band recorded six studio albums and one live concert album. In 1995, The Houserockers released American Babylon, which was recorded and produced by Springsteen himself.

As a solo artist, Toms has opened for the likes of Buddy Guy, Levon Helm, Marshall Crenshaw, The Kennedys, Steve Forbert, and Ellis Paul. He’s plotting a string of regional east coast dates to support Good For My Soul, as well as a full European tour in 2018.

hile it’s hard to put a finger on any one sound that defines “American music,” the compositions of Bill Toms are as close a template as any. The Pittsburgh native, along with his band Hard Rain, delivers a sound that takes the greatest of America’s most beloved genres and melds them into a poetic representation of the best the country has to offer.

With his ninth full-length studio release, Good For My Soul (street date October 27), Toms channels a foot-stomping, wall-shaking blend of soul, blues, gospel, and rock vibes, all brought together with his lyrical specialty -- stories of everyday men and women doing their best to stay ahead while still managing to keep a dream or two in their heads.

Soaring horns, gritty licks, toe-tapping rhythms, and Toms’ own rough-hewn vocals will draw listeners in, as well as well-deserved comparisons to the greats such as Dr. John, Little Feat, Springsteen, Joe Tex, The Blasters, Otis Redding, and Rufus Thomas.

“The idea of a horn section behind my songs has been something I’ve thought about for a while,” explains Toms. “Albert King, and all the Stax artists come to mind when I think of what true rhythm and blues can do. I wanted a piece of that; creating dynamics, and drama within the song; and fostering the deep emotion that a great horn section can give. The words also needed this place-- in order to be fully interpreted as the representation of ‘my America,’ and the people who make up my small part of this world.”

Good For My Soul was recorded in February 2017 by Oscar-winning composer Rick Witkowski, who also co-produced the set with Will Kimbrough (Rodney Crowell, Todd Snider). Both artists have collaborated with Toms frequently on parts of his earlier catalog.

Toms launched his musical career in 1987 as lead guitarist of Pittsburgh’s legendary band Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers, During that period, he opened for and played with such legendary names as The Band, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Little Feat, and Stevie Ray Vaughn. While playing guitar, co-writing, and adding backup vocals for the Houserockers, Toms and the band recorded six studio albums and one live concert album. In 1995, The Houserockers released American Babylon, which was recorded and produced by Springsteen himself.

As a solo artist, Toms has opened for the likes of Buddy Guy, Levon Helm, Marshall Crenshaw, The Kennedys, Steve Forbert, and Ellis Paul. He’s plotting a string of regional east coast dates to support Good For My Soul, as well as a full European tour in 2018.

Sound of Ceres with Special Guests A Low Rose Trellis and Come Holy Spirit

"There is no one true self. With every choice you make, your story changes. Between the potential and the actual, there exist an infinite number of variations on who you have been.

The mysterious tale of The Twin, the second full-length from Sound of Ceres, exists in myriad permutations, too: a new album, a mesmerizing live show, videos, an Alastair Reynolds short story… and others in-between. Sound of Ceres' creative cohort of authors, composers, and illusionists traveled from a snowy Alpine retreat to the outer limits of deep space to bring you The Twin.

While their 2016 debut Nostalgia for Infinity responded to the hugeness of time and space, now Sound of Ceres explore the strangeness of being just one human outcome amidst an infinitude of possibilities.

The adventure begins with one of the great works of 20th century German literature, The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann. As Ryan Hover read the tale of Hans Castorp (named for one of the twins of Gemini), whose life as a shipbuilder gets sidetracked by a visit to a rest home in the Swiss Alps, new chords, melodies, and lyrical ideas seized his imagination. Elements from the novel – the snow and isolation of the mountains, echoes of Grimm's Fairy Tales, a fixation with the number seven – took on a new form as the fantastic universe of The Twin took shape.

Karen Hover and Ryan gave voice to early versions of the songs, exploring the sound of words even as they teased out lyrical ideas. Rough sketches were dispatched to band mates Derrick Bozich, Jacob Graham, and Ben Phelan, and then Ryan fashioned their instrumental contributions into new arrangements.

But just as Hans in The Magic Mountain undergoes a great transformation as from the flatlands through the narrow gauge to the Alps, The Twin underwent great changes as it began to travel – in this case, to Iceland.

Ryan, Karen, and Jacob arrived at the Reykjavik studio of producer Alex Somers (Sigur Rós, Julianna Barwick) with the original mixes of what seemed like more-or- less finished songs. And then they went through a different door. Guitars and harpsichords gave way to more analog synthesizers and melodic percussion. As the music's dynamic range grew wider, timbres chilled, and more layers of vocals were woven into the background, a new twin of The Twin emerged.

The Twin opens with the hypnotic "Gemini Scenic," analog keyboards and pulsating drums lifting up Karen's hazy, layered vocals; the intensity ebbs and flows, propelling the listener deeper into the album's mysterious sonic universe. "Mercury's Moods" clicks and hisses like some steam-powered alien machine, while "The Twin" underpins harp glissandi and Ryan's voice with crisp, dry snare hits. Hints of '60s exotica, '70s AM radio, and even symphonic grandeur weave through layers of rippling synths and shifting rhythms. Ideas drawn from the past and future fold together, creating a sound that exists outside any particular time or trend.

In concert, The Twin evolves and changes nightly; no two versions of this immersive audio-visual experience are alike. Lasers and fiber optics pierce the darkness and smoke, creating a web of ever-changing constellations. Stars, circles, and double- helixes dance around the band, bouncing off reflective costumes and outstretched hands. Responding fluidly to each unique environment where they perform, Sound of Ceres transport the audience into the heart of the great cosmos via a mystifying display of lights and effects, coupled with hypnotizing sound.

Just as the various members of Sound of Ceres combine ideas and energies to fashion their magical world, everything they create together – words and music, video, live performance art – interlocks to tell the whole story. And when all the elements align, The Twin unlocks a universe of endless possibilities and infinite outcomes. You'll never experience it the same way twice."

"There is no one true self. With every choice you make, your story changes. Between the potential and the actual, there exist an infinite number of variations on who you have been.

The mysterious tale of The Twin, the second full-length from Sound of Ceres, exists in myriad permutations, too: a new album, a mesmerizing live show, videos, an Alastair Reynolds short story… and others in-between. Sound of Ceres' creative cohort of authors, composers, and illusionists traveled from a snowy Alpine retreat to the outer limits of deep space to bring you The Twin.

While their 2016 debut Nostalgia for Infinity responded to the hugeness of time and space, now Sound of Ceres explore the strangeness of being just one human outcome amidst an infinitude of possibilities.

The adventure begins with one of the great works of 20th century German literature, The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann. As Ryan Hover read the tale of Hans Castorp (named for one of the twins of Gemini), whose life as a shipbuilder gets sidetracked by a visit to a rest home in the Swiss Alps, new chords, melodies, and lyrical ideas seized his imagination. Elements from the novel – the snow and isolation of the mountains, echoes of Grimm's Fairy Tales, a fixation with the number seven – took on a new form as the fantastic universe of The Twin took shape.

Karen Hover and Ryan gave voice to early versions of the songs, exploring the sound of words even as they teased out lyrical ideas. Rough sketches were dispatched to band mates Derrick Bozich, Jacob Graham, and Ben Phelan, and then Ryan fashioned their instrumental contributions into new arrangements.

But just as Hans in The Magic Mountain undergoes a great transformation as from the flatlands through the narrow gauge to the Alps, The Twin underwent great changes as it began to travel – in this case, to Iceland.

Ryan, Karen, and Jacob arrived at the Reykjavik studio of producer Alex Somers (Sigur Rós, Julianna Barwick) with the original mixes of what seemed like more-or- less finished songs. And then they went through a different door. Guitars and harpsichords gave way to more analog synthesizers and melodic percussion. As the music's dynamic range grew wider, timbres chilled, and more layers of vocals were woven into the background, a new twin of The Twin emerged.

The Twin opens with the hypnotic "Gemini Scenic," analog keyboards and pulsating drums lifting up Karen's hazy, layered vocals; the intensity ebbs and flows, propelling the listener deeper into the album's mysterious sonic universe. "Mercury's Moods" clicks and hisses like some steam-powered alien machine, while "The Twin" underpins harp glissandi and Ryan's voice with crisp, dry snare hits. Hints of '60s exotica, '70s AM radio, and even symphonic grandeur weave through layers of rippling synths and shifting rhythms. Ideas drawn from the past and future fold together, creating a sound that exists outside any particular time or trend.

In concert, The Twin evolves and changes nightly; no two versions of this immersive audio-visual experience are alike. Lasers and fiber optics pierce the darkness and smoke, creating a web of ever-changing constellations. Stars, circles, and double- helixes dance around the band, bouncing off reflective costumes and outstretched hands. Responding fluidly to each unique environment where they perform, Sound of Ceres transport the audience into the heart of the great cosmos via a mystifying display of lights and effects, coupled with hypnotizing sound.

Just as the various members of Sound of Ceres combine ideas and energies to fashion their magical world, everything they create together – words and music, video, live performance art – interlocks to tell the whole story. And when all the elements align, The Twin unlocks a universe of endless possibilities and infinite outcomes. You'll never experience it the same way twice."

James McMurtry with Special Guest Bonnie Whitmore

Legendary tunesmith James McMurtry continues riding waves of universal acclaim for his last offering, Complicated Game. “At a stage where most veteran musicians fall into a groove or rut, McMurtry continues to surprise,” Texas Music magazine noted. “[Complicated Game] is a collection of narratives as sharply observed as any from McMurtry, but with a contemplative depth that comes with maturity.” Indeed, the Austin resident’s latest collection spotlights a singular craftsman as he turns inward (“These Things I've Come to Know,” “You Got to Me”). “The lyrical theme is mostly about relationships,” McMurtry says. “It's also a little about the big old world verses the poor little farmer or fisherman.”

Either way, McMurtry spins his stories with a novelist’s eye (“Long Island Sound”) and a painter's precision (“She Loves Me”). “[McMurtry] takes listeners on a road trip of unprecedented geographic and emotional scope,” No Depression raved of the record. “Lyrically, the album is wise and adventurous, with McMurtry — who’s not prone to autobiographical tales — credibly inhabiting characters from all walks of life.” “[McMurtry] fuses wry, literate observations about the world with the snarl of barroom rock,” National Public Radio echoed. “The result is at times sardonic, subversive and funny, but often vulnerable and always poignant.”

Complicated Game doubles down on the literate storytelling longtime enthusiasts expect. Recall high watermarks past: “Childish Things,” “Choctaw Bingo,” “Peter Pan,” “Levelland,” and “Out Here in the Middle” only begin the list. (Yes, Robert Earl Keen covered those last two, “Levelland” remaining a live staple.) Just Us Kids (2008), which includes fan favorites “Hurricane Party,” “Ruby and Carlos” and “You’d a Thought,” earned a Billboard 200 chart position and some Americana Music Award nominations. Childish Things (2005) scored endless critical praise and spent six full weeks topping the Americana Music Radio chart. In 2006, Childish Things won the Americana Music Association’s Album of the Year; “We Can’t Make It Here” was named the rapidly rising organization’s Song of the Year. The poignant lyrics of McMurtry’s immense catalog still ring true today. In 2011, “We Can’t Make It Here” was cited among The Nation’s “Best Protest Songs Ever.” “’We Can't Make It Here,’” Bob Lefsetz wrote, “has stood the test of time because of its unmitigated truth.”

McMurtry has packed houses with the James McMurtry Band since his successful first album, the John Mellencamp-produced Too Long in the Wasteland (1989). The popular Live in Aught-Three (2004) on Compadre Records, and Live in Europe (2009) both captured the McMurtry band’s extraordinary concert sets.

“I'm tired of the road, but I wouldn't want to be denied access to it,” McMurtry says. “I'm always writing new material one line at a time on the iPhone. I don't know when there will be a new record, but Ross Hogarth will produce it whenever it happens.”

McMurtry tours year round and consistently throws down unparalleled powerhouse performances. The Washington Post notes: “Much attention is paid to James McMurtry’s lyrics and rightfully so: He creates a novel’s worth of emotion and experience in four minutes of blisteringly stark couplets. What gets overlooked, however, is that he's an accomplished rock guitar player ... serious stuff, imparted by a singularly serious band.”

Legendary tunesmith James McMurtry continues riding waves of universal acclaim for his last offering, Complicated Game. “At a stage where most veteran musicians fall into a groove or rut, McMurtry continues to surprise,” Texas Music magazine noted. “[Complicated Game] is a collection of narratives as sharply observed as any from McMurtry, but with a contemplative depth that comes with maturity.” Indeed, the Austin resident’s latest collection spotlights a singular craftsman as he turns inward (“These Things I've Come to Know,” “You Got to Me”). “The lyrical theme is mostly about relationships,” McMurtry says. “It's also a little about the big old world verses the poor little farmer or fisherman.”

Either way, McMurtry spins his stories with a novelist’s eye (“Long Island Sound”) and a painter's precision (“She Loves Me”). “[McMurtry] takes listeners on a road trip of unprecedented geographic and emotional scope,” No Depression raved of the record. “Lyrically, the album is wise and adventurous, with McMurtry — who’s not prone to autobiographical tales — credibly inhabiting characters from all walks of life.” “[McMurtry] fuses wry, literate observations about the world with the snarl of barroom rock,” National Public Radio echoed. “The result is at times sardonic, subversive and funny, but often vulnerable and always poignant.”

Complicated Game doubles down on the literate storytelling longtime enthusiasts expect. Recall high watermarks past: “Childish Things,” “Choctaw Bingo,” “Peter Pan,” “Levelland,” and “Out Here in the Middle” only begin the list. (Yes, Robert Earl Keen covered those last two, “Levelland” remaining a live staple.) Just Us Kids (2008), which includes fan favorites “Hurricane Party,” “Ruby and Carlos” and “You’d a Thought,” earned a Billboard 200 chart position and some Americana Music Award nominations. Childish Things (2005) scored endless critical praise and spent six full weeks topping the Americana Music Radio chart. In 2006, Childish Things won the Americana Music Association’s Album of the Year; “We Can’t Make It Here” was named the rapidly rising organization’s Song of the Year. The poignant lyrics of McMurtry’s immense catalog still ring true today. In 2011, “We Can’t Make It Here” was cited among The Nation’s “Best Protest Songs Ever.” “’We Can't Make It Here,’” Bob Lefsetz wrote, “has stood the test of time because of its unmitigated truth.”

McMurtry has packed houses with the James McMurtry Band since his successful first album, the John Mellencamp-produced Too Long in the Wasteland (1989). The popular Live in Aught-Three (2004) on Compadre Records, and Live in Europe (2009) both captured the McMurtry band’s extraordinary concert sets.

“I'm tired of the road, but I wouldn't want to be denied access to it,” McMurtry says. “I'm always writing new material one line at a time on the iPhone. I don't know when there will be a new record, but Ross Hogarth will produce it whenever it happens.”

McMurtry tours year round and consistently throws down unparalleled powerhouse performances. The Washington Post notes: “Much attention is paid to James McMurtry’s lyrics and rightfully so: He creates a novel’s worth of emotion and experience in four minutes of blisteringly stark couplets. What gets overlooked, however, is that he's an accomplished rock guitar player ... serious stuff, imparted by a singularly serious band.”

Michael Nau & The Mighty Thread (Cotton Jones) with Special Guest Cornelia Murr

Michael Nau returns this year with an expanded full-band lineup now known as The Mighty Thread, comprised of musicians from all over America who have been a part of his touring and recording life over the past few years. “We’ve all played together in various arrangements over the past few years”, says Nau. “We made a record with this core group last year and did a west coast trip at the end of ’17. It was fun and so we want to try and keep it going wherever we can. As such, we’re going to do a string of shows coming up wherein any show listed as “…& the mighty thread” will be full band shows comprised of Will Brown on keys, Benny Yurco on guitar, Graeme Gibson on drums, Robinson Morse & Evan ApRoberts on bass and hopefully get to release some music featuring these bandmates in the near future”.

Michael Nau returns this year with an expanded full-band lineup now known as The Mighty Thread, comprised of musicians from all over America who have been a part of his touring and recording life over the past few years. “We’ve all played together in various arrangements over the past few years”, says Nau. “We made a record with this core group last year and did a west coast trip at the end of ’17. It was fun and so we want to try and keep it going wherever we can. As such, we’re going to do a string of shows coming up wherein any show listed as “…& the mighty thread” will be full band shows comprised of Will Brown on keys, Benny Yurco on guitar, Graeme Gibson on drums, Robinson Morse & Evan ApRoberts on bass and hopefully get to release some music featuring these bandmates in the near future”.

(Early Show) Christopher Mark Jones & The Roots Ensemble with Special Guest Byron Nash

In 2017 Americana songwriter Christopher Mark Jones released Incantations, his fifth album, and the book Smoke On The Meadow: Selected Lyrics 1977-2017. He has been playing and recording since his 1978 Transatlantic Records (UK) release No More Range to Roam. A former pro basketball player and French professor, Christopher spent his early career busking in Paris, touring the UK, Denmark, and Holland, and upon his return to the US, Boston-area clubs. These days he tours regionally from his base in Pittsburgh, but especially enjoys shows with the Roots Ensemble, including Vince Camut on guitar and pedal steel, Eric Kurtzrock on drums and vocals, and Jim Spears on bass.

http://www.christophermarkjones.com.
"Railway Track" https://youtu.be/4nZBmk2DR8g

Byron Nash will select from his repertoire of funk, rock and reggae originals, and break out his flying-V acoustic guitar for a soulful acoustic opening set.

http://byronnash.com/music/.

In 2017 Americana songwriter Christopher Mark Jones released Incantations, his fifth album, and the book Smoke On The Meadow: Selected Lyrics 1977-2017. He has been playing and recording since his 1978 Transatlantic Records (UK) release No More Range to Roam. A former pro basketball player and French professor, Christopher spent his early career busking in Paris, touring the UK, Denmark, and Holland, and upon his return to the US, Boston-area clubs. These days he tours regionally from his base in Pittsburgh, but especially enjoys shows with the Roots Ensemble, including Vince Camut on guitar and pedal steel, Eric Kurtzrock on drums and vocals, and Jim Spears on bass.

http://www.christophermarkjones.com.
"Railway Track" https://youtu.be/4nZBmk2DR8g

Byron Nash will select from his repertoire of funk, rock and reggae originals, and break out his flying-V acoustic guitar for a soulful acoustic opening set.

http://byronnash.com/music/.

(Late Show) Antz Marching - A Dave Matthews Tribute Band (Acoustic Performance)

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. DMB has always been a performance-based band giving fans a different experience at each show. They maintain a level of musicianship that is rarely seen in popular music groups today. In order to recreate this performance aspect of DMB, it was necessary to assemble a collection of musicians that could support the same musical instruments and rival the talent level of the original act. The members of Pittsburgh’s own DMB cover band, Antz Marching, have achieved this goal. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Every member of the band is a veteran of the local Pittsburgh music scene and several of the members have even achieved advanced degrees in musical theory and performance. While the members of Antz Marching are in their 30’s and 40’s, they have a combined total of 180 years of playing expertise. This combination of experience, along with each members dedication to his/her craft, has allowed Antz Marching to give fans an experience similar to a live DMB performance but in a much more intimate setting. This talented group dedicates their time, effort, and talents to continuing the Dave Matthews’s legacy and love for music. In a year that the Dave Matthews Band is not touring, Antz Marching is in the perfect position to bring the “DMB fix” that Pittsburghers are looking for.

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. DMB has always been a performance-based band giving fans a different experience at each show. They maintain a level of musicianship that is rarely seen in popular music groups today. In order to recreate this performance aspect of DMB, it was necessary to assemble a collection of musicians that could support the same musical instruments and rival the talent level of the original act. The members of Pittsburgh’s own DMB cover band, Antz Marching, have achieved this goal. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Every member of the band is a veteran of the local Pittsburgh music scene and several of the members have even achieved advanced degrees in musical theory and performance. While the members of Antz Marching are in their 30’s and 40’s, they have a combined total of 180 years of playing expertise. This combination of experience, along with each members dedication to his/her craft, has allowed Antz Marching to give fans an experience similar to a live DMB performance but in a much more intimate setting. This talented group dedicates their time, effort, and talents to continuing the Dave Matthews’s legacy and love for music. In a year that the Dave Matthews Band is not touring, Antz Marching is in the perfect position to bring the “DMB fix” that Pittsburghers are looking for.

Dawn Landes + Chris Stills

Dawn Landes

Through four full-length albums, Dawn Landes has blazed her own path with songs that are as fresh as they are timeless. Still, there’s no mistaking that strains of Nashville reside in her voice and in her musical soul, and now, with her fifth album, Landes is finally bringing them to center stage. “Meet Me At The River” is Landes’ self-described “Nashville record,” and she has assured its pedigree by enlisting the production skills of Fred Foster, the Country Music
Hall of Fame member who played a pivotal role in the careers of Dolly Parton, Roy Orbison, and Kris Kristofferson.

Two years ago, Landes reached out to Foster, and a four-hour visit to his Nashville home convinced both they were musical kindred spirits. With roots in both Louisville, Kentucky, and Branson, Missouri, Landes has been attracting ardent fans and critical acclaim since entering New York’s music scene in 2000. Along the way, she has collaborated with such contemporaries as Sufjan Stevens, Justin Townes Earle, and Norah Jones, creating music for albums, movies, and television that crosses folk, rock, and alternative genres.

To develop the album together, Landes and Foster underwent a months-long process of what Foster calls “wood-shedding” – hours of listening to music, discussing ideas, and finetuning lyrics.

Ten songs written or co-written by Landes made the cut, offering a range of musical moods and attitudes. “How to Say ‘I Love You’” and “I Don’t Dance” (a duet with Country Music Hall of Famer Bobby Bare) show off Landes’ light touch with melody and lyrics, while “Wind and Rain” and “Southern Girl” are searing testimonies to heartbreak. Landes takes inspiration from classic country themes with “Why They Name Whiskey After Men,” “Traveling,” and “Old Memories.” For the title track, “Meet Me at the River,” Landes expresses wistful longings; she takes on eternal questions with the simple, and simply exquisite, “What Will I Do?” With “Keep on Moving,” she embraces the tradition of music as political expression. Rounding out the album are two songs written by Jimmy Driftwood, the late American folk singer-songwriter and activist whom Foster produced in the 1960s.

Foster and sound engineer Kyle Lehning oversaw the two series of recording sessions, held six months apart, and drew in the cream of Nashville’s studio musicians to collaborate. The result is an album that brims with Nashville authenticity, while at the same time shining the spotlight on Landes’ own authentic voice.

Originally determined to simply make a “Nashville record,” Landes has since moved to the city and become a part of its music scene. She’s now eager to share the new album, “Meet Me at the River”.

Chris Stills

No matter how much life twists and turns, it always brings us where we’re meant to be… That’s definitely the case with Chris Stills.
After many successful years overseas in France, Chris turned his attention back to LA to focus on fatherhood and strengthening the bond he shares with his two daughters. Getting back to his musical roots, Chris reconnected with that “California kid who loves Leon Russell and Tom Petty”. Ten years in the making, and a rollercoaster of experiences snowballed into his independent third full- length album, Don’t Be Afraid.

“There was a lot of life that had to happen,” he exclaims. “A lot of things had to go right for this record to see the light of day. For as much as there’s a slight embarrassment in regards to how
long it took, I can’t knock myself, because I went through quite a bit. Like anybody else, I’ve had my
ups and downs in this business and personally as well, but I never stopped doing what I do. Some stars just needed to align. The songs themselves are an honest chronicle from various moments of my journey to now. When I came back from France, I needed to be as present as possible for my kids while going through a divorce. When that dust finally settled, I went to the studio. Once I did, I got back to who I am.”

So who is Chris Stills?

For starters, he’s a celebrated troubadour with two fan favorite albums—100 Year Thing [1998] and Chris Stills [2006]—under his belt. Moreover, he’s a road dog who’s shared stages with everyone from Richard Ashcroft, Rufus and Martha Wainwright, Ryan Adams, Shelby Lynn, and Paul Weller to Smashing Pumpkins and Gov’t Mule. He’s also a sought-after presence in film and television whose songs have featured in multiple movies and shows. He even appeared as a regular co-star for
2 seasons in Showtime’s Shameless. In addition, he contributed “Live To Live” to American
Hustle and most recently sang the Bee Gees’ “How Can You Mend A Broken Heart” in the 2018
Oscar® winning movie I, Tonya. As an actor, he took on the role of Julius Caesar in the top- grossing French musical Cleopatra-The Last Queen of Egypt. He also starred in the French film Requiem for a Killer opposite Melanie Laurent, Tcheky Karyo and Clovis Corniac. Elle magazine praised him as, “Sublime... a revelation.” As a philanthropist, he’s the co-producer and musical director for “Light Up the Blues”—an annual concert to benefit Autism Speaks. Every side of Stills shines through Don’t Be Afraid.

Working intermittently with producers and sometimes bandmates Zac Rae (Death Cab for Cutie) and Dan Burns (Grammy Nominated and 3 time Juno Award winner), the vision for what would become Don’t Be Afraid came into focus as they helped Chris sort through demos he recorded as early as 2013. Threading together Americana-style storytelling, rock ‘n’ roll energy, pop panache, and classic grit, it reasserted Stills’ identity.

Chris Stills p.2





Listening to this album, Chris exudes a pure authenticity as he writes about his personal life and experiences over the past decade. With an endearing and honest intimacy he crosses a wide range of ups and downs through love and hardships that Chris calls “a self-reflective, atmospheric space walk”.

Rustling acoustic guitar punctuated by a bluesy wail, introduces the single “The Weekend.” Right off the bat, he admits, “Sometimes my past comes back to haunt me” before sharing a playful narrative born from a barbecue with friends Clifton Collins, Jr. who loved the song so much he directed the video, as well as Natasha Bedingfield and David Saw who both ended up as co-writers on the song.

“It was born out of fun,” he states. “We’re taking the piss out of smoking too much weed, drinking too much, and losing your phone.”

Elsewhere, the upbeat sun-soaked harmonies of “This Summer Love”, reminiscent of Harry
Nilsson, recount romance in everybody’s favorite season.

“I grew up going to the island of Ibiza every summer,” he continues. “After many years I finally went back. It came out of a desire. I was single. It was summertime. I was writing about the magic of meeting someone.”

Meanwhile, he joined forces with his old friend Ryan Adams for the rollicking tribute to a “Bad Girl” on “Criminal Mind.” Showcasing another side of his story, “Daddy’s Little Girl” portrays a father’s toughest moment—when he has to give his daughter away.

In the end, Stills turned life experience into an unforgettable journey in Don’t Be Afraid.

“I’d like to think that there is hope in all these songs. If there is something in my music that makes you feel better, then hallelujah.”

Dawn Landes

Through four full-length albums, Dawn Landes has blazed her own path with songs that are as fresh as they are timeless. Still, there’s no mistaking that strains of Nashville reside in her voice and in her musical soul, and now, with her fifth album, Landes is finally bringing them to center stage. “Meet Me At The River” is Landes’ self-described “Nashville record,” and she has assured its pedigree by enlisting the production skills of Fred Foster, the Country Music
Hall of Fame member who played a pivotal role in the careers of Dolly Parton, Roy Orbison, and Kris Kristofferson.

Two years ago, Landes reached out to Foster, and a four-hour visit to his Nashville home convinced both they were musical kindred spirits. With roots in both Louisville, Kentucky, and Branson, Missouri, Landes has been attracting ardent fans and critical acclaim since entering New York’s music scene in 2000. Along the way, she has collaborated with such contemporaries as Sufjan Stevens, Justin Townes Earle, and Norah Jones, creating music for albums, movies, and television that crosses folk, rock, and alternative genres.

To develop the album together, Landes and Foster underwent a months-long process of what Foster calls “wood-shedding” – hours of listening to music, discussing ideas, and finetuning lyrics.

Ten songs written or co-written by Landes made the cut, offering a range of musical moods and attitudes. “How to Say ‘I Love You’” and “I Don’t Dance” (a duet with Country Music Hall of Famer Bobby Bare) show off Landes’ light touch with melody and lyrics, while “Wind and Rain” and “Southern Girl” are searing testimonies to heartbreak. Landes takes inspiration from classic country themes with “Why They Name Whiskey After Men,” “Traveling,” and “Old Memories.” For the title track, “Meet Me at the River,” Landes expresses wistful longings; she takes on eternal questions with the simple, and simply exquisite, “What Will I Do?” With “Keep on Moving,” she embraces the tradition of music as political expression. Rounding out the album are two songs written by Jimmy Driftwood, the late American folk singer-songwriter and activist whom Foster produced in the 1960s.

Foster and sound engineer Kyle Lehning oversaw the two series of recording sessions, held six months apart, and drew in the cream of Nashville’s studio musicians to collaborate. The result is an album that brims with Nashville authenticity, while at the same time shining the spotlight on Landes’ own authentic voice.

Originally determined to simply make a “Nashville record,” Landes has since moved to the city and become a part of its music scene. She’s now eager to share the new album, “Meet Me at the River”.

Chris Stills

No matter how much life twists and turns, it always brings us where we’re meant to be… That’s definitely the case with Chris Stills.
After many successful years overseas in France, Chris turned his attention back to LA to focus on fatherhood and strengthening the bond he shares with his two daughters. Getting back to his musical roots, Chris reconnected with that “California kid who loves Leon Russell and Tom Petty”. Ten years in the making, and a rollercoaster of experiences snowballed into his independent third full- length album, Don’t Be Afraid.

“There was a lot of life that had to happen,” he exclaims. “A lot of things had to go right for this record to see the light of day. For as much as there’s a slight embarrassment in regards to how
long it took, I can’t knock myself, because I went through quite a bit. Like anybody else, I’ve had my
ups and downs in this business and personally as well, but I never stopped doing what I do. Some stars just needed to align. The songs themselves are an honest chronicle from various moments of my journey to now. When I came back from France, I needed to be as present as possible for my kids while going through a divorce. When that dust finally settled, I went to the studio. Once I did, I got back to who I am.”

So who is Chris Stills?

For starters, he’s a celebrated troubadour with two fan favorite albums—100 Year Thing [1998] and Chris Stills [2006]—under his belt. Moreover, he’s a road dog who’s shared stages with everyone from Richard Ashcroft, Rufus and Martha Wainwright, Ryan Adams, Shelby Lynn, and Paul Weller to Smashing Pumpkins and Gov’t Mule. He’s also a sought-after presence in film and television whose songs have featured in multiple movies and shows. He even appeared as a regular co-star for
2 seasons in Showtime’s Shameless. In addition, he contributed “Live To Live” to American
Hustle and most recently sang the Bee Gees’ “How Can You Mend A Broken Heart” in the 2018
Oscar® winning movie I, Tonya. As an actor, he took on the role of Julius Caesar in the top- grossing French musical Cleopatra-The Last Queen of Egypt. He also starred in the French film Requiem for a Killer opposite Melanie Laurent, Tcheky Karyo and Clovis Corniac. Elle magazine praised him as, “Sublime... a revelation.” As a philanthropist, he’s the co-producer and musical director for “Light Up the Blues”—an annual concert to benefit Autism Speaks. Every side of Stills shines through Don’t Be Afraid.

Working intermittently with producers and sometimes bandmates Zac Rae (Death Cab for Cutie) and Dan Burns (Grammy Nominated and 3 time Juno Award winner), the vision for what would become Don’t Be Afraid came into focus as they helped Chris sort through demos he recorded as early as 2013. Threading together Americana-style storytelling, rock ‘n’ roll energy, pop panache, and classic grit, it reasserted Stills’ identity.

Chris Stills p.2





Listening to this album, Chris exudes a pure authenticity as he writes about his personal life and experiences over the past decade. With an endearing and honest intimacy he crosses a wide range of ups and downs through love and hardships that Chris calls “a self-reflective, atmospheric space walk”.

Rustling acoustic guitar punctuated by a bluesy wail, introduces the single “The Weekend.” Right off the bat, he admits, “Sometimes my past comes back to haunt me” before sharing a playful narrative born from a barbecue with friends Clifton Collins, Jr. who loved the song so much he directed the video, as well as Natasha Bedingfield and David Saw who both ended up as co-writers on the song.

“It was born out of fun,” he states. “We’re taking the piss out of smoking too much weed, drinking too much, and losing your phone.”

Elsewhere, the upbeat sun-soaked harmonies of “This Summer Love”, reminiscent of Harry
Nilsson, recount romance in everybody’s favorite season.

“I grew up going to the island of Ibiza every summer,” he continues. “After many years I finally went back. It came out of a desire. I was single. It was summertime. I was writing about the magic of meeting someone.”

Meanwhile, he joined forces with his old friend Ryan Adams for the rollicking tribute to a “Bad Girl” on “Criminal Mind.” Showcasing another side of his story, “Daddy’s Little Girl” portrays a father’s toughest moment—when he has to give his daughter away.

In the end, Stills turned life experience into an unforgettable journey in Don’t Be Afraid.

“I’d like to think that there is hope in all these songs. If there is something in my music that makes you feel better, then hallelujah.”

Ryan Montbleau (Solo) with Special Guest Johnny Stanec

Ryan Montbleau has been an acclaimed singer, songwriter, and bandleader for more than a decade, but with his new album I WAS JUST LEAVING, the New England-based artist has truly arrived. Contemplative and richly emotive, the album offers a glimpse into the often-lonesome life of the relentlessly traveling troubadour, a strikingly single-minded existence too often clouded by the blur of constant motion. Recorded at New Orleans’ Esplanade Studios over four days in January 2016 with producer Anders Osborne and engineer/mixer Mark Howard (known for his work with such icons as Bob Dylan, Tom Waits, Neil Young, and U2), the album marks Montbleau’s first full length release in the wake of a series of seismic personal shifts. Songs like “Bright Side” and the touching title track reveal a uniquely blessed artist who has truly found his voice, his gift for melody and craft fused with vision and a remarkably open-armed approach.

“There’s no part of this record that I am unsure of,” Montbleau says. “All the juice of the last fifteen years is in there. My humanity and my heart are on this record.”

Montbleau has been among America’s finest songwriters and performers, earning national attention and a fervent fan following with songs like “75 and Sunny” and his breakthrough cover of Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car,” the latter a Spotify smash with total streams now in excess of 28 million.

After twelve years on the road Montbleau found himself at a crossroads in 2016. “Within a very short time, my world got flipped around. My partner was gone, my band of ten years was gone, my friends were all far away. The one thing I had was a career, because it turns out that was all I had worked on. When the dust settled, I realized I didn’t really have much of a home life.”

“I thought all along that I had been building a home but it turned out I was just leaving. That’s where the title of the song and the record came from. So many raw feelings were just aching through me at that point Eventually they vibrated out through the guitar, through singing. I had to sing these songs.”

An artist’s artist, Montbleau has collaborated with such diverse performers as Martin Sexton, Trombone Shorty, and Galactic. His association with Anders Osborne extends back to 2012 when the New Orleans-based singer/songwriter/guitarist played on Ryan’s Ben Ellman-produced FOR HIGHER alongside such fellow Big Easy icons as Ivan Neville and The Meters’ George Porter, Jr. Two years later, Anders and Ryan reconnected on the road backstage at a festival. The seeds were planted for a collaboration.

Montbleau’s guitar playing and vocals are both front and center on I WAS JUST LEAVING, with Osborne accompanying on drums, percussion, bass, guitar, and harmonica, each used simply and sparsely for maximum effect. Osborne and Howard built upon that same goal, creating space and capturing rawness by utilizing as many early takes as possible.

“Bright Side,” the album’s first single, is perhaps the song most emblematic of Montbleau’s growth as both a human being and artist. At once finely etched and strikingly direct, “Bright Side” is an ideal distillation of his approach to songwriting, balancing multiple shades of emotional nuance with a fearless, unfettered sentimentality that ultimately leads to a greater truth.

I WAS JUST LEAVING marks a singular milestone for Ryan Montbleau, the moment in which this exceptional singer, songwriter, and performer has blossomed into a fully matured artist.

“I’ve been planting these seeds for so long and it has all led up to this moment. It feels like finally the fruits of all my efforts are coming out. I’m still working hard but there’s an ease to what’s happening. I have a career that I’ve built, that I’ve earned. Now what’s fun is putting out the best music I can and seeing what happens.”

Ryan Montbleau has been an acclaimed singer, songwriter, and bandleader for more than a decade, but with his new album I WAS JUST LEAVING, the New England-based artist has truly arrived. Contemplative and richly emotive, the album offers a glimpse into the often-lonesome life of the relentlessly traveling troubadour, a strikingly single-minded existence too often clouded by the blur of constant motion. Recorded at New Orleans’ Esplanade Studios over four days in January 2016 with producer Anders Osborne and engineer/mixer Mark Howard (known for his work with such icons as Bob Dylan, Tom Waits, Neil Young, and U2), the album marks Montbleau’s first full length release in the wake of a series of seismic personal shifts. Songs like “Bright Side” and the touching title track reveal a uniquely blessed artist who has truly found his voice, his gift for melody and craft fused with vision and a remarkably open-armed approach.

“There’s no part of this record that I am unsure of,” Montbleau says. “All the juice of the last fifteen years is in there. My humanity and my heart are on this record.”

Montbleau has been among America’s finest songwriters and performers, earning national attention and a fervent fan following with songs like “75 and Sunny” and his breakthrough cover of Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car,” the latter a Spotify smash with total streams now in excess of 28 million.

After twelve years on the road Montbleau found himself at a crossroads in 2016. “Within a very short time, my world got flipped around. My partner was gone, my band of ten years was gone, my friends were all far away. The one thing I had was a career, because it turns out that was all I had worked on. When the dust settled, I realized I didn’t really have much of a home life.”

“I thought all along that I had been building a home but it turned out I was just leaving. That’s where the title of the song and the record came from. So many raw feelings were just aching through me at that point Eventually they vibrated out through the guitar, through singing. I had to sing these songs.”

An artist’s artist, Montbleau has collaborated with such diverse performers as Martin Sexton, Trombone Shorty, and Galactic. His association with Anders Osborne extends back to 2012 when the New Orleans-based singer/songwriter/guitarist played on Ryan’s Ben Ellman-produced FOR HIGHER alongside such fellow Big Easy icons as Ivan Neville and The Meters’ George Porter, Jr. Two years later, Anders and Ryan reconnected on the road backstage at a festival. The seeds were planted for a collaboration.

Montbleau’s guitar playing and vocals are both front and center on I WAS JUST LEAVING, with Osborne accompanying on drums, percussion, bass, guitar, and harmonica, each used simply and sparsely for maximum effect. Osborne and Howard built upon that same goal, creating space and capturing rawness by utilizing as many early takes as possible.

“Bright Side,” the album’s first single, is perhaps the song most emblematic of Montbleau’s growth as both a human being and artist. At once finely etched and strikingly direct, “Bright Side” is an ideal distillation of his approach to songwriting, balancing multiple shades of emotional nuance with a fearless, unfettered sentimentality that ultimately leads to a greater truth.

I WAS JUST LEAVING marks a singular milestone for Ryan Montbleau, the moment in which this exceptional singer, songwriter, and performer has blossomed into a fully matured artist.

“I’ve been planting these seeds for so long and it has all led up to this moment. It feels like finally the fruits of all my efforts are coming out. I’m still working hard but there’s an ease to what’s happening. I have a career that I’ve built, that I’ve earned. Now what’s fun is putting out the best music I can and seeing what happens.”

Adrian Legg with Special Guest Jagtime Millionaire

Following another stint in an Irish show band based in Dublin, Legg moved back to London and continued to gig in bands that played clubs and pubs and toured around and outside Britain. When one bandleader asked him to play acoustic guitar chords up against a microphone, he became fascinated with the notion of blending the tonality of an acoustic with the amplified power of the electric guitar.

Thus began an electro-acoustic quest that continues today to find the holy guitar grail that melds tone, technique and technology to allow him to create, perform and record the music his imagination envisions, eventually incorporating synthesizers and computerized MIDI programming to augment and enrich his one-man musicality. “I wanted something that had the harmonic content roughly like an acoustic, and that had the flexibility in terms of stringing and volume levels, whatever you wanted to do, of an electric,” he explains.

Starting to gig as a solo artist in the mid 1970s, Legg won a Guitar magazine solo acoustic competition in both the composition and performance categories, and began writing articles for that magazine and other guitar publications (and later Guitar Player in America), plus authored his first of a number of books, The All Round Gigster. He released his first of five albums in Britain in 1976. Soon after he began working for Rose Morris & Company’s musical instrument and equipment store on London’s legendary Denmark Street music business strip doing guitar repairs, quality control and manufacturer contact. That led to collaborations and consultations with numerous guitar makers and amplifier and pickup manufacturers and technicians over the years as well as guitar clinics and product demonstrations at musical instrument and equipment shows in Britain, Europe and later America and Japan. His compositions began being used by English radio and TV programs, and London’s Ballet Rambert also choreographed one of his songs as a dance piece.

With his 1990 American recording debut on Guitars & Other Cathedrals, Legg found even greater success across the pond as a regularly touring solo act, headlining and sharing bills with fellow guitarists Richard Thompson, David Lindley, Eric Johnson (whose 2005 album Bloom Legg plays on) and Joe Satriani (on both his own shows and as part of his G3 Tour package with Johnson and Steve Vai, whose Favored Nations record label released two Legg albums). Guitar Player named his records Guitar for Mortals and Mrs. Crowe’s Blue Waltz as Best Acoustic Album (1992 & ’93) and Wine, Women & Waltz as Best Overall Guitar Album (1994) in its annual readers’ polls. He has three instructional videos on the U.S. market (Beyond Acoustic Guitar, Fingerpicking & Open Tunings and How To Cheat At Guitar) as well as two books (Customizing Your Electric Guitar and a collection of his compositions in tablature and standard notation, Pickin’ and Squintin’). In addition to his commentaries for “All Things Considered,” the popular public radio news show regularly uses a number of his varied guitar interpretations of its theme music.

Throughout his career, he has earned the highest praise from the media. "Legg is, above all, a guitarist of great power, invention and versatility,” observes the St. Petersburg Times. “Through fast-fingered picking, spontaneously layering parts and occasional ringing harmonics, he sounds like an orchestra.” Guitar Player heralds how he “combines a sublime melodic sense with a mighty right-hand groove, creating pretty music with rhythmically aggressive undercurrents,” while Acoustic Guitar notes that “the guitar is the most versatile instrument in the world, and nobody demonstrates this better than Adrian Legg.” But the Atlanta Journal-Constitution likely summed up his impact on listeners best when it exclaimed, "Mr. Legg's compositions, with their narrative melodies and nakedly emotive tones, offer an antidote to the guitar-hero syndrome.”

For Legg, the fulcrum and essence of his creativity is in live performance. “Playing live is the whole point,” he stresses. “Everyone makes a journey, an effort; we all come together — me, the audience, the people who run the venue — to share this wonderful, universal, human emotional interaction. This is where music lives.

“Before we had all this mechanical stuff that’s what we did,” Legg notes. “We got together and did it ourselves, or somebody came and did it for us. Everybody is involved in some kind of effort for that to happen. So everybody contributes to the musical event, and everybody is engaged in it. It has a huge social value which I think is very important.”

Described by Audio magazine as a "kind of cross between Robert Fripp and Garrison Keillor," Legg is a genuine entertainer who excels at not only painting pictures if not frescoes and telling stories with music but also wittily regaling his audiences with tales from his life and travels and his cogent and often oblique yet thought provoking observations on a spectrum of topics. It’s all part of his dedication to making his performances a full-blooded emotional experience. “If you haven't shared a laugh with someone,” he insists, "you certainly can't share a tragedy."

So it’s no wonder that popular BBC radio personality Andy Kershaw says of Legg, “Quite simply, there is no one else like him,” citing his “dazzling technique and equally large dollops of spirit, humor, passion, eclecticism and spontaneity.” For his part, Legg appreciates all the praise, but views his mission as far more basic, and more than anything else an expression of his soul and humanity. “I don’t see what I do as particularly eclectic; I see it as perfectly normal. In terms of the music that has gone before me, I simply reflect my forebears like every other musician.” The results of that approach, however, are simply irresistible and unforgettable.

Following another stint in an Irish show band based in Dublin, Legg moved back to London and continued to gig in bands that played clubs and pubs and toured around and outside Britain. When one bandleader asked him to play acoustic guitar chords up against a microphone, he became fascinated with the notion of blending the tonality of an acoustic with the amplified power of the electric guitar.

Thus began an electro-acoustic quest that continues today to find the holy guitar grail that melds tone, technique and technology to allow him to create, perform and record the music his imagination envisions, eventually incorporating synthesizers and computerized MIDI programming to augment and enrich his one-man musicality. “I wanted something that had the harmonic content roughly like an acoustic, and that had the flexibility in terms of stringing and volume levels, whatever you wanted to do, of an electric,” he explains.

Starting to gig as a solo artist in the mid 1970s, Legg won a Guitar magazine solo acoustic competition in both the composition and performance categories, and began writing articles for that magazine and other guitar publications (and later Guitar Player in America), plus authored his first of a number of books, The All Round Gigster. He released his first of five albums in Britain in 1976. Soon after he began working for Rose Morris & Company’s musical instrument and equipment store on London’s legendary Denmark Street music business strip doing guitar repairs, quality control and manufacturer contact. That led to collaborations and consultations with numerous guitar makers and amplifier and pickup manufacturers and technicians over the years as well as guitar clinics and product demonstrations at musical instrument and equipment shows in Britain, Europe and later America and Japan. His compositions began being used by English radio and TV programs, and London’s Ballet Rambert also choreographed one of his songs as a dance piece.

With his 1990 American recording debut on Guitars & Other Cathedrals, Legg found even greater success across the pond as a regularly touring solo act, headlining and sharing bills with fellow guitarists Richard Thompson, David Lindley, Eric Johnson (whose 2005 album Bloom Legg plays on) and Joe Satriani (on both his own shows and as part of his G3 Tour package with Johnson and Steve Vai, whose Favored Nations record label released two Legg albums). Guitar Player named his records Guitar for Mortals and Mrs. Crowe’s Blue Waltz as Best Acoustic Album (1992 & ’93) and Wine, Women & Waltz as Best Overall Guitar Album (1994) in its annual readers’ polls. He has three instructional videos on the U.S. market (Beyond Acoustic Guitar, Fingerpicking & Open Tunings and How To Cheat At Guitar) as well as two books (Customizing Your Electric Guitar and a collection of his compositions in tablature and standard notation, Pickin’ and Squintin’). In addition to his commentaries for “All Things Considered,” the popular public radio news show regularly uses a number of his varied guitar interpretations of its theme music.

Throughout his career, he has earned the highest praise from the media. "Legg is, above all, a guitarist of great power, invention and versatility,” observes the St. Petersburg Times. “Through fast-fingered picking, spontaneously layering parts and occasional ringing harmonics, he sounds like an orchestra.” Guitar Player heralds how he “combines a sublime melodic sense with a mighty right-hand groove, creating pretty music with rhythmically aggressive undercurrents,” while Acoustic Guitar notes that “the guitar is the most versatile instrument in the world, and nobody demonstrates this better than Adrian Legg.” But the Atlanta Journal-Constitution likely summed up his impact on listeners best when it exclaimed, "Mr. Legg's compositions, with their narrative melodies and nakedly emotive tones, offer an antidote to the guitar-hero syndrome.”

For Legg, the fulcrum and essence of his creativity is in live performance. “Playing live is the whole point,” he stresses. “Everyone makes a journey, an effort; we all come together — me, the audience, the people who run the venue — to share this wonderful, universal, human emotional interaction. This is where music lives.

“Before we had all this mechanical stuff that’s what we did,” Legg notes. “We got together and did it ourselves, or somebody came and did it for us. Everybody is involved in some kind of effort for that to happen. So everybody contributes to the musical event, and everybody is engaged in it. It has a huge social value which I think is very important.”

Described by Audio magazine as a "kind of cross between Robert Fripp and Garrison Keillor," Legg is a genuine entertainer who excels at not only painting pictures if not frescoes and telling stories with music but also wittily regaling his audiences with tales from his life and travels and his cogent and often oblique yet thought provoking observations on a spectrum of topics. It’s all part of his dedication to making his performances a full-blooded emotional experience. “If you haven't shared a laugh with someone,” he insists, "you certainly can't share a tragedy."

So it’s no wonder that popular BBC radio personality Andy Kershaw says of Legg, “Quite simply, there is no one else like him,” citing his “dazzling technique and equally large dollops of spirit, humor, passion, eclecticism and spontaneity.” For his part, Legg appreciates all the praise, but views his mission as far more basic, and more than anything else an expression of his soul and humanity. “I don’t see what I do as particularly eclectic; I see it as perfectly normal. In terms of the music that has gone before me, I simply reflect my forebears like every other musician.” The results of that approach, however, are simply irresistible and unforgettable.

Ghost of Paul Revere / Charlie Parr

Ghost of Paul Revere
"We grew up listening to Radiohead and the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd," says Griffin Sherry, guitarist/singer in The Ghost Of Paul Revere. "Everyone assumed we were a bluegrass band because we were playing these traditional instruments, but we weren’t writing traditional music. We were just writing songs with the instruments we had."

The result is a sound that the Portland, Maine-based band describes as "holler folk," not because it involves a lot of hollering, per se, but because it invokes the rich communal tradition of field hollers, with their call-and-response melodies, sing-along hooks, and densely layered harmonies. That sense of musical camaraderie is essential to everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, and nowhere is it more evident than their sophomore album, ''Monarch.'

The album builds on the success of the band's 2014 debut full-length, 'Believe,' and their 2015 EP, 'Field Notes Vol. 1,' which was recorded primarily in a single day at Converse's Rubber Tracks studio in Boston. The session was part of a prize package presented by the iconic Newport Folk Festival, which had invited the band to perform at the storied Rhode Island musical gathering earlier that year as part of a lineup featuring everyone from James Taylor and Jason Isbell to The Lone Bellow and Bela Fleck.

"The Monday before Newport we got a message saying to pack our bags and come on down," remembers Sherry. "We hadn't played much outside of Maine or started opening for any big acts yet at that point, and it was a hugely inspiring moment."

Word began to spread about the rowdy pickers from the north. The Boston Globe raved that they "create the type of music for which festivals are made," while No Depression said they "prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere," and Dispatch Magazine wrote that they possess not only "the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression." Hitting listeners straight in the feelings has been the band's M.O. since its inception in 2011, and they've used their powerful stage show to convert the masses at every stop along their long and winding journey, which has included shared stages with artists like The Avett Brothers, The Travelin' McCourys, Brown Bird, The Revivalists, the Infamous Stringdusters, and more. The band sold out Port City Music Hall, Stone Mountain Arts Center, and the Strand Theater multiple times, won Best In Maine at the New England Music Awards, and capped off 2015 with an electrifying headline performance on New Year's Eve at Portland's State Theatre in front of 1,600 enraptured fans.

When it came time to record, 'Monarch,' though, the band knew they wanted to push the sonic envelope beyond the live-in-the-studio setup that had guided their previous efforts.

"Every other record has just been the three of us in a room with microphones until we got a take we liked," explains Sherry. "We approached this one differently. It was the first time we did a lot of arranging and writing in the studio. We decided we'd worry about learning how to present the songs live after we'd recorded everything instead of the other way around."

"It enabled us to get a lot more adventurous with our ideas," adds bassist/singer Sean McCarthy. "We wanted to do something new and explore where we could take the sound while still staying true to who we are."

The album opens with "Little Bird," a playful, infectious foot -stomper that blends blues and soul and roots and perfectly reflects the communal, inviting nature of the band's music.

Banjo player Max Davis takes over the songwriting and lead vocal duties for "Avalanche," an emotional anthem featuring one of the album's most lush arrangements along with driving drums from special guest Tony McNaboe (Ray LaMontagne, Rustic Overtones), while "King's Road" finds the band expanding their sonic palette to include strings and electric guitar, and "Honey Please" channels 60's R&B and Motown through old-school folk instrumentation. At the core of everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, though, are their powerful, stop-you-dead-in -your-tracks harmonies. On songs like "Wild Child," "Welcome Home," and "Need Somebody," the band conjures up whole worlds of shimmering sonic beauty in the blending of their voices.

"The album follows this arc where it starts very bright-eyed and optimistic and then hits a turning point where it gets really dark," says Sherry, "like a relationship that starts beautifully and then grows sour. As we started to build the record and expand the sound, it had a place sonically and emotionally.”

By the end of the record, the song cycle reveals that traveling through the darkness is in fact a necessary step for positive growth. 'Monarch' closer "Chrysalides" evokes the imagery of metamorphosis, a transformation that represents rebirth and new beginnings.

"It's about what happens in that moment of metamorphosis and change," says Davis. "I was interested in combining different words into a new term that could capture that feeling, so 'Chrysalides' is a play on chrysalis. This was one of the first times that I allowed myself to bite into and really take advantage of that space in the writing."

If there's one takeaway from 'Monarch,' it's that change is inevitable. Lovers, families, friends, instruments, sounds; they all transform with time. The key to thriving and surviving in a challenging world is to embrace those transformations, to accept them not as endings but as fresh starts. What comes next? Only time can tell. One thing's for sure, though: by opening their hearts and souls with such artistic grace and humility, The Ghost of Paul Revere have created a rich, rewarding, passionate community, one that they can count on to join them for every step of the remarkable journey that lies ahead.

Charlie Parr
Many people play roots music, but few modern musicians live those roots like Minnesota’s Charlie Parr. Recording since the earliest days of the 21st century, Parr’s heartfelt and plaintive original folk blues and traditional spirituals don’t strive for authenticity: They are authentic. It’s the music of a self-taught guitarist and banjo player who grew up without a TV but with his dad’s recordings of America’s musical founding fathers, including Charley Patton and Lightnin’ Hopkins, Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. With his long scraggly hair, father-time beard, thrift-store workingman’s flannel and jeans, and emphatic, throaty voice, Parr looks and sounds like he would have fit right into Harry Smith’s “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

Parr’s forthcoming album, Barnswallow will be his eleventh studio release. Most of his recordings, including Roustabout (2008), Jubilee (2007), Rooster (2005), King Earl (2004), 1922 (2002) and Criminals and Sinners (2001) eschew typical studio settings. His inspiration is drawn from the alternately fertile and frozen soil of Minnesota. Parr grew up in the Hormel company city of Austin, Minnesota (population 25,000) where most of the world’s favorite tinned meat, Spam, is still manufactured. And he hasn’t moved far, drawing sustenance from the surprisingly large, thriving and mutually supportive music scene of Duluth: Parr’s 2011 album of traditional songs, Keep Your Hands on the Plow features locals including Charlie’s wife, Emily Parr; old-timey banjo/fiddle band Four Mile Portage; and Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker of the renowned alternative rock band Low.

Ghost of Paul Revere
"We grew up listening to Radiohead and the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd," says Griffin Sherry, guitarist/singer in The Ghost Of Paul Revere. "Everyone assumed we were a bluegrass band because we were playing these traditional instruments, but we weren’t writing traditional music. We were just writing songs with the instruments we had."

The result is a sound that the Portland, Maine-based band describes as "holler folk," not because it involves a lot of hollering, per se, but because it invokes the rich communal tradition of field hollers, with their call-and-response melodies, sing-along hooks, and densely layered harmonies. That sense of musical camaraderie is essential to everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, and nowhere is it more evident than their sophomore album, ''Monarch.'

The album builds on the success of the band's 2014 debut full-length, 'Believe,' and their 2015 EP, 'Field Notes Vol. 1,' which was recorded primarily in a single day at Converse's Rubber Tracks studio in Boston. The session was part of a prize package presented by the iconic Newport Folk Festival, which had invited the band to perform at the storied Rhode Island musical gathering earlier that year as part of a lineup featuring everyone from James Taylor and Jason Isbell to The Lone Bellow and Bela Fleck.

"The Monday before Newport we got a message saying to pack our bags and come on down," remembers Sherry. "We hadn't played much outside of Maine or started opening for any big acts yet at that point, and it was a hugely inspiring moment."

Word began to spread about the rowdy pickers from the north. The Boston Globe raved that they "create the type of music for which festivals are made," while No Depression said they "prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere," and Dispatch Magazine wrote that they possess not only "the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression." Hitting listeners straight in the feelings has been the band's M.O. since its inception in 2011, and they've used their powerful stage show to convert the masses at every stop along their long and winding journey, which has included shared stages with artists like The Avett Brothers, The Travelin' McCourys, Brown Bird, The Revivalists, the Infamous Stringdusters, and more. The band sold out Port City Music Hall, Stone Mountain Arts Center, and the Strand Theater multiple times, won Best In Maine at the New England Music Awards, and capped off 2015 with an electrifying headline performance on New Year's Eve at Portland's State Theatre in front of 1,600 enraptured fans.

When it came time to record, 'Monarch,' though, the band knew they wanted to push the sonic envelope beyond the live-in-the-studio setup that had guided their previous efforts.

"Every other record has just been the three of us in a room with microphones until we got a take we liked," explains Sherry. "We approached this one differently. It was the first time we did a lot of arranging and writing in the studio. We decided we'd worry about learning how to present the songs live after we'd recorded everything instead of the other way around."

"It enabled us to get a lot more adventurous with our ideas," adds bassist/singer Sean McCarthy. "We wanted to do something new and explore where we could take the sound while still staying true to who we are."

The album opens with "Little Bird," a playful, infectious foot -stomper that blends blues and soul and roots and perfectly reflects the communal, inviting nature of the band's music.

Banjo player Max Davis takes over the songwriting and lead vocal duties for "Avalanche," an emotional anthem featuring one of the album's most lush arrangements along with driving drums from special guest Tony McNaboe (Ray LaMontagne, Rustic Overtones), while "King's Road" finds the band expanding their sonic palette to include strings and electric guitar, and "Honey Please" channels 60's R&B and Motown through old-school folk instrumentation. At the core of everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, though, are their powerful, stop-you-dead-in -your-tracks harmonies. On songs like "Wild Child," "Welcome Home," and "Need Somebody," the band conjures up whole worlds of shimmering sonic beauty in the blending of their voices.

"The album follows this arc where it starts very bright-eyed and optimistic and then hits a turning point where it gets really dark," says Sherry, "like a relationship that starts beautifully and then grows sour. As we started to build the record and expand the sound, it had a place sonically and emotionally.”

By the end of the record, the song cycle reveals that traveling through the darkness is in fact a necessary step for positive growth. 'Monarch' closer "Chrysalides" evokes the imagery of metamorphosis, a transformation that represents rebirth and new beginnings.

"It's about what happens in that moment of metamorphosis and change," says Davis. "I was interested in combining different words into a new term that could capture that feeling, so 'Chrysalides' is a play on chrysalis. This was one of the first times that I allowed myself to bite into and really take advantage of that space in the writing."

If there's one takeaway from 'Monarch,' it's that change is inevitable. Lovers, families, friends, instruments, sounds; they all transform with time. The key to thriving and surviving in a challenging world is to embrace those transformations, to accept them not as endings but as fresh starts. What comes next? Only time can tell. One thing's for sure, though: by opening their hearts and souls with such artistic grace and humility, The Ghost of Paul Revere have created a rich, rewarding, passionate community, one that they can count on to join them for every step of the remarkable journey that lies ahead.

Charlie Parr
Many people play roots music, but few modern musicians live those roots like Minnesota’s Charlie Parr. Recording since the earliest days of the 21st century, Parr’s heartfelt and plaintive original folk blues and traditional spirituals don’t strive for authenticity: They are authentic. It’s the music of a self-taught guitarist and banjo player who grew up without a TV but with his dad’s recordings of America’s musical founding fathers, including Charley Patton and Lightnin’ Hopkins, Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. With his long scraggly hair, father-time beard, thrift-store workingman’s flannel and jeans, and emphatic, throaty voice, Parr looks and sounds like he would have fit right into Harry Smith’s “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

Parr’s forthcoming album, Barnswallow will be his eleventh studio release. Most of his recordings, including Roustabout (2008), Jubilee (2007), Rooster (2005), King Earl (2004), 1922 (2002) and Criminals and Sinners (2001) eschew typical studio settings. His inspiration is drawn from the alternately fertile and frozen soil of Minnesota. Parr grew up in the Hormel company city of Austin, Minnesota (population 25,000) where most of the world’s favorite tinned meat, Spam, is still manufactured. And he hasn’t moved far, drawing sustenance from the surprisingly large, thriving and mutually supportive music scene of Duluth: Parr’s 2011 album of traditional songs, Keep Your Hands on the Plow features locals including Charlie’s wife, Emily Parr; old-timey banjo/fiddle band Four Mile Portage; and Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker of the renowned alternative rock band Low.

SOLD OUT - (Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Gary Gulman: Must Be Nice! with Special Guest Norlex Belma

Originally from Boston, Gary Gulman has been a scholarship college football player, an accountant, and a high school teacher. Now he is one of the most popular touring comics and one of only a handful of comedians to perform on every single late-night talk show. Gary marked his 20-year anniversary in stand-up with the “It’s About Time Tour,” selling out theaters throughout the country. It’s no wonder the New York Times wrote, “Gary is finally being recognized as one of the country’s strongest comedians.”

Gary's TV credits include "Last Comic Standing," "Inside Amy Schumer," and currently on HBO's "Crashing" and HBO's new series "2 Dope Queens." His 3 stand-up specials are streaming now on Netflix and Amazon.

Originally from Boston, Gary Gulman has been a scholarship college football player, an accountant, and a high school teacher. Now he is one of the most popular touring comics and one of only a handful of comedians to perform on every single late-night talk show. Gary marked his 20-year anniversary in stand-up with the “It’s About Time Tour,” selling out theaters throughout the country. It’s no wonder the New York Times wrote, “Gary is finally being recognized as one of the country’s strongest comedians.”

Gary's TV credits include "Last Comic Standing," "Inside Amy Schumer," and currently on HBO's "Crashing" and HBO's new series "2 Dope Queens." His 3 stand-up specials are streaming now on Netflix and Amazon.

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Gary Gulman: Must Be Nice! with Special Guest Norlex Belma

Originally from Boston, Gary Gulman has been a scholarship college football player, an accountant, and a high school teacher. Now he is one of the most popular touring comics and one of only a handful of comedians to perform on every single late-night talk show. Gary marked his 20-year anniversary in stand-up with the “It’s About Time Tour,” selling out theaters throughout the country. It’s no wonder the New York Times wrote, “Gary is finally being recognized as one of the country’s strongest comedians.”

Gary's TV credits include "Last Comic Standing," "Inside Amy Schumer," and currently on HBO's "Crashing" and HBO's new series "2 Dope Queens." His 3 stand-up specials are streaming now on Netflix and Amazon.

Originally from Boston, Gary Gulman has been a scholarship college football player, an accountant, and a high school teacher. Now he is one of the most popular touring comics and one of only a handful of comedians to perform on every single late-night talk show. Gary marked his 20-year anniversary in stand-up with the “It’s About Time Tour,” selling out theaters throughout the country. It’s no wonder the New York Times wrote, “Gary is finally being recognized as one of the country’s strongest comedians.”

Gary's TV credits include "Last Comic Standing," "Inside Amy Schumer," and currently on HBO's "Crashing" and HBO's new series "2 Dope Queens." His 3 stand-up specials are streaming now on Netflix and Amazon.

Driftwood with Special Guests Nameless In August and Striped Maple Hollow

When Driftwood released its first full-length album, Rally Day, recorded in their hometown of Binghamton, a unique sound transpired that reflected not only the working-class ethos of an upstate New York town, but a coalescing of identity, influence, and uninhibited musical spirit.

“It’s sometimes tough to keep any sort of focus on style or sound when you have three different songwriters,” guitarist Dan Forsyth conceded. Longtime friend and banjoist Joe Kollar offers, “I consider our sound to be more of an attitude and an approach – the result of all of our influences in a completely open musical forum where the only stipulation is to create it from the heart.” “Really Driftwood is a song based group,” fiddler Claire Byrne added incisively.

And even though they come from different directions, the three founding members – along with bassist Joey Arcuri – tend to end up at the same place.

That unity, as well as the joy derived from playing together, can be heard throughout City Lights. It takes them on a familiar road and serendipitous evolution, replete with folk, old-time, country, punk, and rock, depending on their personal moods and their songs’ needs.

Increased songwriting and close-quarter living on tour manifested strengthened relationships and new energy. “Keeping this kind of touring schedule, we thought of recording albums as a sort of secondary thing and considered ourselves a ‘live’ band. We learn so much on the road and this kind of work has always felt productive,” Forsyth explains.

And while in the past they used the stage to work out arrangements of new songs, for City Lights, they used the studio. “It wasn’t until this last album that we took some time off to learn more about being in the studio. We wanted to take our time and record on our own terms.”

As evidence of their growth and compatibility, both Forsyth and Byrne tag “Skin and Bone” as the head of the album. It’s a Kollar composition that he says “came from a reflection I had of myself and life on the road, in general. It touches on trying to keep perspective, forging ahead, and embracing the future.” Clearly, that’s a state of mind they can all relate to.

The heart of the album, though, is a toss up with Forsyth choosing the romance of “Too Afraid,” Byrne picking the nostalgia of “The Waves,” and Kollar tapping the excitement of the title track. That disparity may be because, in their decade together, the musicians have all undergone monumental life changes. They have come into their own… together. “Generally speaking, there’s a maturity to us now,” Kollar explains. “We have a bit of experience doing what we do and the music reflects that point of view. The song subjects, our playing/singing abilities, our recording abilities, and our relationships have all matured.”

That’s precisely what’s heard in the music. A sharpened band. Skilled songwriters. Down-right masterful instrumentalists. And the sum of their seasons together has only strengthened their fabric. It’s pretty clear in their current songwriting and recordings as well, as Driftwood is now laying the groundwork for an upcoming album set to be released in the Fall of 2018. If history is any indication, it will be another strong step forward for this talented group.

When Driftwood released its first full-length album, Rally Day, recorded in their hometown of Binghamton, a unique sound transpired that reflected not only the working-class ethos of an upstate New York town, but a coalescing of identity, influence, and uninhibited musical spirit.

“It’s sometimes tough to keep any sort of focus on style or sound when you have three different songwriters,” guitarist Dan Forsyth conceded. Longtime friend and banjoist Joe Kollar offers, “I consider our sound to be more of an attitude and an approach – the result of all of our influences in a completely open musical forum where the only stipulation is to create it from the heart.” “Really Driftwood is a song based group,” fiddler Claire Byrne added incisively.

And even though they come from different directions, the three founding members – along with bassist Joey Arcuri – tend to end up at the same place.

That unity, as well as the joy derived from playing together, can be heard throughout City Lights. It takes them on a familiar road and serendipitous evolution, replete with folk, old-time, country, punk, and rock, depending on their personal moods and their songs’ needs.

Increased songwriting and close-quarter living on tour manifested strengthened relationships and new energy. “Keeping this kind of touring schedule, we thought of recording albums as a sort of secondary thing and considered ourselves a ‘live’ band. We learn so much on the road and this kind of work has always felt productive,” Forsyth explains.

And while in the past they used the stage to work out arrangements of new songs, for City Lights, they used the studio. “It wasn’t until this last album that we took some time off to learn more about being in the studio. We wanted to take our time and record on our own terms.”

As evidence of their growth and compatibility, both Forsyth and Byrne tag “Skin and Bone” as the head of the album. It’s a Kollar composition that he says “came from a reflection I had of myself and life on the road, in general. It touches on trying to keep perspective, forging ahead, and embracing the future.” Clearly, that’s a state of mind they can all relate to.

The heart of the album, though, is a toss up with Forsyth choosing the romance of “Too Afraid,” Byrne picking the nostalgia of “The Waves,” and Kollar tapping the excitement of the title track. That disparity may be because, in their decade together, the musicians have all undergone monumental life changes. They have come into their own… together. “Generally speaking, there’s a maturity to us now,” Kollar explains. “We have a bit of experience doing what we do and the music reflects that point of view. The song subjects, our playing/singing abilities, our recording abilities, and our relationships have all matured.”

That’s precisely what’s heard in the music. A sharpened band. Skilled songwriters. Down-right masterful instrumentalists. And the sum of their seasons together has only strengthened their fabric. It’s pretty clear in their current songwriting and recordings as well, as Driftwood is now laying the groundwork for an upcoming album set to be released in the Fall of 2018. If history is any indication, it will be another strong step forward for this talented group.

SOLD OUT - Joshua Radin with Special Guest Lily Kershaw

Love and the complications surrounding it have long proven to be Joshua Radin's songwriting forte. Though he never intended to be a live performer, there was little choice when the first song he ever wrote, "Winter," was featured on an episode of "Scrubs." The resulting fervor around the song soon led to a record deal, and over the last decade, Radin has toured the world countless times, sold hundreds of thousands of records and topped the iTunes charts, earned raves from Rolling Stone to The Guardian, performed on "The Tonight Show," "Conan," and more, played Ellen DeGeneres' wedding at her personal request, and had his songs featured in more than 150 different films, commercials, and TV shows.

Love and the complications surrounding it have long proven to be Joshua Radin's songwriting forte. Though he never intended to be a live performer, there was little choice when the first song he ever wrote, "Winter," was featured on an episode of "Scrubs." The resulting fervor around the song soon led to a record deal, and over the last decade, Radin has toured the world countless times, sold hundreds of thousands of records and topped the iTunes charts, earned raves from Rolling Stone to The Guardian, performed on "The Tonight Show," "Conan," and more, played Ellen DeGeneres' wedding at her personal request, and had his songs featured in more than 150 different films, commercials, and TV shows.

Tony Lucca with Special Guest Tom Mackell

To multiple generations of emerging and established artists, Nashville is nirvana, a music mecca, a fulcrum for serious songwriters who don’t just make music for a living, but for whom music is life. For years now, Tony Lucca has had the energy and spirit of Music City coursing through his veins, a seemingly life-sustaining flow of inspiration that in part served as the lifeblood for the writing, recording and producing of his current self-titled album, the eighth full-length studio set in his notable canon. “When you go into a writing session, you gotta know who you’re writing for… and then you dig in,” says Lucca, who at this stage in his career has become a seasoned songsmith. “I learned a lot right off the bat, because again, doors were flying open for me that would of otherwise stayed shut.”

For Lucca, who was raised in a very large musical family in yet another American music mecca, Detroit, home to Motown, the constant opening of professional doors started when he was very young. But arguably the most divinatory door that’s opened for him was the one he walked through where his sonic sojourn began. “There was definitely this moment that the dream was born as a kid, where my eyes got real wide,” says Lucca. “Walking into a music shop in Detroit when I was probably seven or eight, and just seeing rows and rows of guitars on the walls, and I was like, holy cow, that is awesome. I want all of them.” Though he didn’t get them all, one would do. By the age of 12, his already well-honed musical talent literally began to pay dividends, after earning his first few bucks for a gig at a junior high school dance.

It’s fair to say Lucca has long since stopped chasing his dream of making music, and for some time now has been living his dream. In 1995, following a four-season run as a cast member on The All New Mickey Mouse Club alongside fellow future hit making heavyweights Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears, Lucca relocated to Los Angeles where he dove into doing the Hollywood shuffle/auditioning actor thing before deciding to ditch acting in favor of pursuing his true passion. “I think it was definitely 1996 when I realized I had to make it clear for myself, if no one else, what I was going to do and how I was going to channel my energy; what I was gonna focus on and what I was willing to sacrifice it all for, and that was music,” says Lucca. “I literally walked out of an audition thinking I’ve got to have more to say than this. I went home, grabbed a guitar, wrote a song and I knew right away that it was the caliber of song that if I could stick to it and take it this seriously every time, that I’d be the kind of artist I’ve always dreamed I might end up being at some point.”

Now satisfied with the professional road he was on, Lucca began to put some proverbial musical mud on his tires with his 1997 self-released debut album, So Satisfied, followed later that same year by his sophomore set, Strong Words Softly Spoken. Two EPs and a limited series of live CDs (all released through his website tonylucca.com) set the table for the release of his third full-length, 2004’s Shotgun.

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of what many fans and critics concede could be the crown jewel of Lucca’s catalog, the emotive Canyon Songs, a touching 10-track tip of the cap to the legendary Laurel Canyon sound immortalized by master musicians including Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne. The album features the standout track “Around the Bend,” which as Lucca recalls was written in a motel room in Nashville. “I went to a liquor store, grabbed a bottle of Tennessee whisky, went back to my motel room, left the door open, grabbed my guitar and just started writing it,” Lucca says. “I remember looking out the door into that southern Tennessee air and just thinking about all the greats that had come through here… and what a pleasure and honor it is to get the opportunity to just grab a bit of that mojo and make it your own, one song at a time.”

So what lies ahead? What is around the bend for Tony Lucca, a man who’s been an actor - making myriad television appearances on popular shows such as Parenthood, The Tonight Show, Last Call with Carson Daly, the Aaron Spelling-produced Malibu Shores, as well as small roles in some independent features? What is the next benchmark for the guy who was tabloid fodder during his years dating actress Keri Russell and a third place finisher on Season 2 of The Voice (which served as a springboard for a series of additional key career milestones, including the signing of a recording contract with Adam Levine’s 222 Records, as well as high profile stints on tour with the likes of Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson and Sara Bareilles, among countless others)? What’s on tap for a man who is now a husband, a father and of course a top tier singer/songwriter? Plenty!

“It’s the 10-year anniversary of Canyon Songs and oddly enough, I’m one of the few artists at my stage of the game who actually owns all of his records; I own the whole catalog,” Lucca says. “Instead of diving back into the next album cycle, I’ve decided to reflect for a minute and promote the larger body of work, to shine more light on Tony Lucca, the songwriter. I’ve got plenty of traveling ahead. In the meantime, I’ll be working on a periodic releasing of deep cuts, B-sides, rarities, and other stuff with the folks at Rock Ridge Music, culminating in a 10-year anniversary vinyl edition of Canyon Songs.”

Tony Lucca has seen more than his fair share of changes in the musical landscape since the release of his 1997 debut, So Satisfied. It would be easy for a far less determined and dedicated artist to be so dissatisfied with, as Pink Floyd dubbed it back in 1975, “the machine,” so as to throw up their hands in defeat. Instead, Lucca has surveyed the landscape and sees a blank canvas, an opportunity to use a wide new palette of colors to paint more musical portraits, while still displaying his past masterpieces in different frames. That is the sign of a true artist.

To multiple generations of emerging and established artists, Nashville is nirvana, a music mecca, a fulcrum for serious songwriters who don’t just make music for a living, but for whom music is life. For years now, Tony Lucca has had the energy and spirit of Music City coursing through his veins, a seemingly life-sustaining flow of inspiration that in part served as the lifeblood for the writing, recording and producing of his current self-titled album, the eighth full-length studio set in his notable canon. “When you go into a writing session, you gotta know who you’re writing for… and then you dig in,” says Lucca, who at this stage in his career has become a seasoned songsmith. “I learned a lot right off the bat, because again, doors were flying open for me that would of otherwise stayed shut.”

For Lucca, who was raised in a very large musical family in yet another American music mecca, Detroit, home to Motown, the constant opening of professional doors started when he was very young. But arguably the most divinatory door that’s opened for him was the one he walked through where his sonic sojourn began. “There was definitely this moment that the dream was born as a kid, where my eyes got real wide,” says Lucca. “Walking into a music shop in Detroit when I was probably seven or eight, and just seeing rows and rows of guitars on the walls, and I was like, holy cow, that is awesome. I want all of them.” Though he didn’t get them all, one would do. By the age of 12, his already well-honed musical talent literally began to pay dividends, after earning his first few bucks for a gig at a junior high school dance.

It’s fair to say Lucca has long since stopped chasing his dream of making music, and for some time now has been living his dream. In 1995, following a four-season run as a cast member on The All New Mickey Mouse Club alongside fellow future hit making heavyweights Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears, Lucca relocated to Los Angeles where he dove into doing the Hollywood shuffle/auditioning actor thing before deciding to ditch acting in favor of pursuing his true passion. “I think it was definitely 1996 when I realized I had to make it clear for myself, if no one else, what I was going to do and how I was going to channel my energy; what I was gonna focus on and what I was willing to sacrifice it all for, and that was music,” says Lucca. “I literally walked out of an audition thinking I’ve got to have more to say than this. I went home, grabbed a guitar, wrote a song and I knew right away that it was the caliber of song that if I could stick to it and take it this seriously every time, that I’d be the kind of artist I’ve always dreamed I might end up being at some point.”

Now satisfied with the professional road he was on, Lucca began to put some proverbial musical mud on his tires with his 1997 self-released debut album, So Satisfied, followed later that same year by his sophomore set, Strong Words Softly Spoken. Two EPs and a limited series of live CDs (all released through his website tonylucca.com) set the table for the release of his third full-length, 2004’s Shotgun.

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of what many fans and critics concede could be the crown jewel of Lucca’s catalog, the emotive Canyon Songs, a touching 10-track tip of the cap to the legendary Laurel Canyon sound immortalized by master musicians including Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne. The album features the standout track “Around the Bend,” which as Lucca recalls was written in a motel room in Nashville. “I went to a liquor store, grabbed a bottle of Tennessee whisky, went back to my motel room, left the door open, grabbed my guitar and just started writing it,” Lucca says. “I remember looking out the door into that southern Tennessee air and just thinking about all the greats that had come through here… and what a pleasure and honor it is to get the opportunity to just grab a bit of that mojo and make it your own, one song at a time.”

So what lies ahead? What is around the bend for Tony Lucca, a man who’s been an actor - making myriad television appearances on popular shows such as Parenthood, The Tonight Show, Last Call with Carson Daly, the Aaron Spelling-produced Malibu Shores, as well as small roles in some independent features? What is the next benchmark for the guy who was tabloid fodder during his years dating actress Keri Russell and a third place finisher on Season 2 of The Voice (which served as a springboard for a series of additional key career milestones, including the signing of a recording contract with Adam Levine’s 222 Records, as well as high profile stints on tour with the likes of Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson and Sara Bareilles, among countless others)? What’s on tap for a man who is now a husband, a father and of course a top tier singer/songwriter? Plenty!

“It’s the 10-year anniversary of Canyon Songs and oddly enough, I’m one of the few artists at my stage of the game who actually owns all of his records; I own the whole catalog,” Lucca says. “Instead of diving back into the next album cycle, I’ve decided to reflect for a minute and promote the larger body of work, to shine more light on Tony Lucca, the songwriter. I’ve got plenty of traveling ahead. In the meantime, I’ll be working on a periodic releasing of deep cuts, B-sides, rarities, and other stuff with the folks at Rock Ridge Music, culminating in a 10-year anniversary vinyl edition of Canyon Songs.”

Tony Lucca has seen more than his fair share of changes in the musical landscape since the release of his 1997 debut, So Satisfied. It would be easy for a far less determined and dedicated artist to be so dissatisfied with, as Pink Floyd dubbed it back in 1975, “the machine,” so as to throw up their hands in defeat. Instead, Lucca has surveyed the landscape and sees a blank canvas, an opportunity to use a wide new palette of colors to paint more musical portraits, while still displaying his past masterpieces in different frames. That is the sign of a true artist.

(Rescheduled from March 5) Aubrey Logan with Special Guest Neon Swing X-perience Quintet

Rescheduled from March 5

Aubrey Logan is known throughout the world as the Queen of Sass. She has performed on several national television shows including a stint on American Idol, an appearance on The Goldbergs, Jools Holland and with Pharrell Williams at the Grammy Awards. A recent guest on the Jimmy Kimmel Show, she's spent the last two years touring around the world with Postmodern Jukebox, where she's featured nightly in front of thousands of fans, have performed in over 150 shows from The Greek Theatre to Radio City Music Hall and has made appearances in over 30 European cities from London to Moscow. To top it all off, she's just completed taping a PBS special with Postmodern Jukebox.

Rescheduled from March 5

Aubrey Logan is known throughout the world as the Queen of Sass. She has performed on several national television shows including a stint on American Idol, an appearance on The Goldbergs, Jools Holland and with Pharrell Williams at the Grammy Awards. A recent guest on the Jimmy Kimmel Show, she's spent the last two years touring around the world with Postmodern Jukebox, where she's featured nightly in front of thousands of fans, have performed in over 150 shows from The Greek Theatre to Radio City Music Hall and has made appearances in over 30 European cities from London to Moscow. To top it all off, she's just completed taping a PBS special with Postmodern Jukebox.

The SCU Little Band: The Biggest Little Ukulele Band in Pittsburgh

A Steel City Ukes Little Band Show is an eccelectic, acoustic romp through decades of sing-along, feel-good music. We are 9 friends who, having been figuratively smacked upside the head with ukuleles, are now able to channel their inner rockstars with super strumming tricks, amazing melodic licks, and infectious harmonies that will keep your brain tickin’ long after the show.

So go on, dust off your inner rockstar. Put on your fancy pants, grab a seat at the bar, and come sing along with a show!

A Steel City Ukes Little Band Show is an eccelectic, acoustic romp through decades of sing-along, feel-good music. We are 9 friends who, having been figuratively smacked upside the head with ukuleles, are now able to channel their inner rockstars with super strumming tricks, amazing melodic licks, and infectious harmonies that will keep your brain tickin’ long after the show.

So go on, dust off your inner rockstar. Put on your fancy pants, grab a seat at the bar, and come sing along with a show!

(Early Show) Austin Lucas with special guest Paul Luc

Austin Lucas has come home.

It’s been over two decades since the songwriter packed his bags and left Bloomington, Indiana, the Midwestern town where he was born and spent his formative years. He returns to that place, both creatively and physically, with his seventh studio album, Immortal Americans. Written after a tumultuous period that found Lucas getting sober, supporting his partner through a battle with cancer, and breaking up with his longtime record label. Immortal Americans is a clear-eyed album for murkier times, rooted in stripped-down songs that find the artist reflecting upon the changes in both his hometown and himself.

Co-produced by Lucas and Will Johnson (Centro-matic) and recorded/engineered by Steve Albini and captured in a series of live, full-band performances, Immortal Americans was written after Lucas resettled in Bloomington. He’d been away for years, touring the world as an independent solo artist before signing a record deal with New West in 2013. In many ways, the albums he released during that period were reflections of the music he’d grown up with, from the mountain music of his father (bluegrass musician Bob Lucas) to the punk records that soundtracked his teenage years. Appropriately, Lucas earned a fanbase as a folksinger with punk roots – or was it the other way around? – while touring the country with artists who represented both ends of that spectrum, sharing tours with Willie Nelson one minute and Chuck Ragan the next.

Somewhere along the way, his vices began to get the best of him. He started drinking too much. He gained weight. His marriage crumbled. Albums like 2013’s cowpunk-inspired Stay Reckless and 2016’s Between the Moon and the Midwest shone a light on those challenges, tackling everything from divorce to depression. When Lucas hit rock bottom though, he stopped writing about his temptations and instead, left them behind for good. He headed back to southern Indiana, resettling himself in a town that had changed considerably since he left.

There, in a region suffering from an opioid epidemic, an HIV crisis, and a homelessness problem, Lucas focused on rebuilding his career and his body. He got sober, shedding more than 100 pounds. He recounted the stories of his youth, where, as an outsider in a small town, he dodged beer cans and bottles hurled by passing drivers. As he once more walked the Bloomington streets, he learned to embrace his own fighting spirit again. The album’s title track, “Immortal Americans,” emerged from that period of self-discovery.

“My friends and I had to fight for who we were,” he remembers of those early days in the Midwest, “and it was an alienating, anxious, and oftentimes scary way to live. This song is about that fight. It goes out to the most marginalized and at-risk human beings who live in our country, all the people who live on the outside of mainstream society and have to fight every day for their identities and for their existence – because those are the true immortal Americans.”

Meanwhile, Lucas’ new partner was fighting a different sort of battle. Lucas had discovered a lump on her body during their first evening together and the mass turned out to be cancerous. He became not only her romantic partner, but her caretaker too, nursing her back to health after a life-altering surgery and a string of energy-sapping chemotherapy sessions. Lucas continued writing music throughout the process, strumming an acoustic guitar quietly while his girlfriend slept in the next room. Although much of Immortal Americans is influenced by that experience, album standouts like “The Shadow and Marie” tackle the experience directly, shining a light on his partner’s vitality and unending beauty.

“The song opens up with dark lyrics,” he admits, “but the overall point is, ‘We’re still alive. We still have so much to be grateful for. As long as we’re still here, there’s beauty and joy.’ I wrote it to remind my lover that even though she’d been through a crazy ordeal in which her body was permanently changed, she was still beautiful to me. The song may start out on a low note, but as it builds, it goes to a place that’s brighter. It pushes toward something better. In many ways, that’s the theme of the whole record.”

When it came time to record his new songs at Steve Albini’s studio in Chicago, Lucas didn’t reach too far beyond the songs’ unplugged origins. He’d already cut loose from his record label, which meant he was free to chase down his muse without any sort of outside influence. He consolidated his sound accordingly, stripping away the electric guitars and dense sonic landscapes that had permeated his recent albums. In their place, he focused on acoustic instruments and a restrained rhythm section, gluing everything together with lyrically-sharp songs that measured the distance between his rocky past and even-keeled present. The band – whose members included his Dad, who’d traveled north to play banjo with his son – crowded into the same room at Electrical Audio and played together, resulting in an all-analog album that’s both raw and real.

“I wanted it to sound like human beings playing instruments,” says Lucas, “I knew the best thing for this batch of songs was for them to sound as organic as possible. I sang live, playing guitar at the same time, and we worked very quickly. It was an in-the-moment kind of album.”

Immortal Americans is Austin Lucas’ homecoming album, created during a whirlwind period of tumult and regrowth. With its gothic heartland sound and autobiographical lyrics, it’s also Lucas at his most honest, rooted in a string of largely unamplified anthems that don’t rely on electricity to pack a punch.

“I was watching the changes in Bloomington and reflecting upon the changes in my own life,” he sums up. “Not all of this is happy stuff, but there’s hope. There’s light in the darkness. I really do believe in second and third chances, because I know how many chances I’ve received. You have to keep fighting, because that’s what makes life worth living.”

Or, in other words, that’s what makes you immortal.

Austin Lucas has come home.

It’s been over two decades since the songwriter packed his bags and left Bloomington, Indiana, the Midwestern town where he was born and spent his formative years. He returns to that place, both creatively and physically, with his seventh studio album, Immortal Americans. Written after a tumultuous period that found Lucas getting sober, supporting his partner through a battle with cancer, and breaking up with his longtime record label. Immortal Americans is a clear-eyed album for murkier times, rooted in stripped-down songs that find the artist reflecting upon the changes in both his hometown and himself.

Co-produced by Lucas and Will Johnson (Centro-matic) and recorded/engineered by Steve Albini and captured in a series of live, full-band performances, Immortal Americans was written after Lucas resettled in Bloomington. He’d been away for years, touring the world as an independent solo artist before signing a record deal with New West in 2013. In many ways, the albums he released during that period were reflections of the music he’d grown up with, from the mountain music of his father (bluegrass musician Bob Lucas) to the punk records that soundtracked his teenage years. Appropriately, Lucas earned a fanbase as a folksinger with punk roots – or was it the other way around? – while touring the country with artists who represented both ends of that spectrum, sharing tours with Willie Nelson one minute and Chuck Ragan the next.

Somewhere along the way, his vices began to get the best of him. He started drinking too much. He gained weight. His marriage crumbled. Albums like 2013’s cowpunk-inspired Stay Reckless and 2016’s Between the Moon and the Midwest shone a light on those challenges, tackling everything from divorce to depression. When Lucas hit rock bottom though, he stopped writing about his temptations and instead, left them behind for good. He headed back to southern Indiana, resettling himself in a town that had changed considerably since he left.

There, in a region suffering from an opioid epidemic, an HIV crisis, and a homelessness problem, Lucas focused on rebuilding his career and his body. He got sober, shedding more than 100 pounds. He recounted the stories of his youth, where, as an outsider in a small town, he dodged beer cans and bottles hurled by passing drivers. As he once more walked the Bloomington streets, he learned to embrace his own fighting spirit again. The album’s title track, “Immortal Americans,” emerged from that period of self-discovery.

“My friends and I had to fight for who we were,” he remembers of those early days in the Midwest, “and it was an alienating, anxious, and oftentimes scary way to live. This song is about that fight. It goes out to the most marginalized and at-risk human beings who live in our country, all the people who live on the outside of mainstream society and have to fight every day for their identities and for their existence – because those are the true immortal Americans.”

Meanwhile, Lucas’ new partner was fighting a different sort of battle. Lucas had discovered a lump on her body during their first evening together and the mass turned out to be cancerous. He became not only her romantic partner, but her caretaker too, nursing her back to health after a life-altering surgery and a string of energy-sapping chemotherapy sessions. Lucas continued writing music throughout the process, strumming an acoustic guitar quietly while his girlfriend slept in the next room. Although much of Immortal Americans is influenced by that experience, album standouts like “The Shadow and Marie” tackle the experience directly, shining a light on his partner’s vitality and unending beauty.

“The song opens up with dark lyrics,” he admits, “but the overall point is, ‘We’re still alive. We still have so much to be grateful for. As long as we’re still here, there’s beauty and joy.’ I wrote it to remind my lover that even though she’d been through a crazy ordeal in which her body was permanently changed, she was still beautiful to me. The song may start out on a low note, but as it builds, it goes to a place that’s brighter. It pushes toward something better. In many ways, that’s the theme of the whole record.”

When it came time to record his new songs at Steve Albini’s studio in Chicago, Lucas didn’t reach too far beyond the songs’ unplugged origins. He’d already cut loose from his record label, which meant he was free to chase down his muse without any sort of outside influence. He consolidated his sound accordingly, stripping away the electric guitars and dense sonic landscapes that had permeated his recent albums. In their place, he focused on acoustic instruments and a restrained rhythm section, gluing everything together with lyrically-sharp songs that measured the distance between his rocky past and even-keeled present. The band – whose members included his Dad, who’d traveled north to play banjo with his son – crowded into the same room at Electrical Audio and played together, resulting in an all-analog album that’s both raw and real.

“I wanted it to sound like human beings playing instruments,” says Lucas, “I knew the best thing for this batch of songs was for them to sound as organic as possible. I sang live, playing guitar at the same time, and we worked very quickly. It was an in-the-moment kind of album.”

Immortal Americans is Austin Lucas’ homecoming album, created during a whirlwind period of tumult and regrowth. With its gothic heartland sound and autobiographical lyrics, it’s also Lucas at his most honest, rooted in a string of largely unamplified anthems that don’t rely on electricity to pack a punch.

“I was watching the changes in Bloomington and reflecting upon the changes in my own life,” he sums up. “Not all of this is happy stuff, but there’s hope. There’s light in the darkness. I really do believe in second and third chances, because I know how many chances I’ve received. You have to keep fighting, because that’s what makes life worth living.”

Or, in other words, that’s what makes you immortal.

(Late Show) The Vindys, Wine and Spirit, Bryan McQuaid

Since 2013, THE VINDYS have become one of the most sought after, premier bands in the Northeast Ohio area with their unique blend of pop, jazz, and rock. They have been described as “a vibrant slice of vintage pop theatre.” (Music Connection Magazine) and “slinky, sultry, and jazzy” (Guy D’Astolfo, The Vindicator). Through the incorporation of multiple genres into one cohesive sound, The Vindys have the ability to appeal to a wide audience. Their versatility and incomparable style is one of the many reasons why The Vindys are a rarity amongst other groups. Their professional sound, as well as alluring stage presence and magnetic charisma, is supported by the band’s background and expertise in music performance, education, and production.
Personnel include Jackie Popovec on lead vocals and guitar, John Anthony on guitar and harmony vocals, Ed Davis on drums and harmony vocals, Scott Boyer on bass, and Rick Deak on guitar and harmony vocals. All are classically trained musicians from the distinguished schools of Capital University Conservatory of Music, Dana School of Music, Slippery Rock University, and Mike Curb College of Music. The Vindys combine their skills and experiences resulting in a depth and maturity in their music that is intricate, yet relatable.
Because they are a Youngstown-based band, The Vindys are passionate about representing Youngstown as a place where the music scene is thriving. Their name pays homage to their roots by drawing influence from Youngstown’s daily newspaper, The Vindicator. Brad Savage, program director of The Summit 91.3 FM, explains, “To me, they really personify Youngstown and northeast Ohio. They’ve got depth and substance and are instantly likable. Their songs get stuck in your head after one listen.” The band frequents live music venues in Northeast Ohio and were featured live performers at The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, The House of Blues, Beachland Ballroom & Tavern, Youngstown State University, Kent State University, Walsh University, Federal Frenzy, Vex Fest, and Revive Music and Arts Festival.
Additionally, The Vindys have shared the stage with nationally recognized solo acts and groups such as Hunter Hayes, Marty Stuart, The Drive-By Truckers, Reeve Carney, The Clarks, Welshly Arms, and Judah & the Lion. Their single “Too Long” was named Number 2 on The Summit FM’s Top 33 Local Songs of 2017. Additionally, their album “Keep Going” was featured as one of Canton Repository reporter Dan Kane’s top 10 albums of 2017.

Since 2013, THE VINDYS have become one of the most sought after, premier bands in the Northeast Ohio area with their unique blend of pop, jazz, and rock. They have been described as “a vibrant slice of vintage pop theatre.” (Music Connection Magazine) and “slinky, sultry, and jazzy” (Guy D’Astolfo, The Vindicator). Through the incorporation of multiple genres into one cohesive sound, The Vindys have the ability to appeal to a wide audience. Their versatility and incomparable style is one of the many reasons why The Vindys are a rarity amongst other groups. Their professional sound, as well as alluring stage presence and magnetic charisma, is supported by the band’s background and expertise in music performance, education, and production.
Personnel include Jackie Popovec on lead vocals and guitar, John Anthony on guitar and harmony vocals, Ed Davis on drums and harmony vocals, Scott Boyer on bass, and Rick Deak on guitar and harmony vocals. All are classically trained musicians from the distinguished schools of Capital University Conservatory of Music, Dana School of Music, Slippery Rock University, and Mike Curb College of Music. The Vindys combine their skills and experiences resulting in a depth and maturity in their music that is intricate, yet relatable.
Because they are a Youngstown-based band, The Vindys are passionate about representing Youngstown as a place where the music scene is thriving. Their name pays homage to their roots by drawing influence from Youngstown’s daily newspaper, The Vindicator. Brad Savage, program director of The Summit 91.3 FM, explains, “To me, they really personify Youngstown and northeast Ohio. They’ve got depth and substance and are instantly likable. Their songs get stuck in your head after one listen.” The band frequents live music venues in Northeast Ohio and were featured live performers at The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, The House of Blues, Beachland Ballroom & Tavern, Youngstown State University, Kent State University, Walsh University, Federal Frenzy, Vex Fest, and Revive Music and Arts Festival.
Additionally, The Vindys have shared the stage with nationally recognized solo acts and groups such as Hunter Hayes, Marty Stuart, The Drive-By Truckers, Reeve Carney, The Clarks, Welshly Arms, and Judah & the Lion. Their single “Too Long” was named Number 2 on The Summit FM’s Top 33 Local Songs of 2017. Additionally, their album “Keep Going” was featured as one of Canton Repository reporter Dan Kane’s top 10 albums of 2017.

SOLD OUT - Chuck Ragan with Special Guest Bret Kunash

Chuck Ragan’s bracing new release Till Midnight once again confirms what the iconoclastic singer-songwriter’s fans have known all along: that he’s a deeply compelling songwriter and an effortlessly charismatic performer, as well as a true believer in music’s ability to illuminate and inspire.

Till Midnight‘s ten typically impassioned new Ragan compositions embody the artist’s trademark mix of eloquent lyrical insight and catchy, forceful songcraft. The album’s formidable blend of head and heart is reflected on such new tunes as “Something May Catch Fire,” “Vagabond,” “Non Typical,” “Bedroll Lullaby” and “Wake With You,” on which Ragan applies his distinctively raspy voice and sharp melodic sensibility to vividly expressive tunes that reflect both his early grounding in traditional American music and his deep affinity for rock n’ roll.

“There’s a lot of love songs on this one,” notes Ragan, whose work has always shown a knack for addressing individual concerns as well as societal ones. “I love to write love songs because it’s the most powerful emotion. It’s what grounds us to this Earth and makes us want to fight to make the world a better place.

“I always just try to write from the heart and make the music as genuine as I possibly can,” he continues. “By doing that, I’m usually writing about whatever’s going on in my life. And when you’re living your life by wearing your heart on your sleeve, there’s not a lot to hide behind.”

In a musical life that spans close to three decades, Chuck Ragan has consistently worn his heart on his sleeve, and carved out a musical niche in the process. First with post-hardcore trailblazers Hot Water Music and subsequently on his own, he’s built a large and singularly powerful body of work whose honesty, immediacy and warmth have won the loyalty of a fiercely devoted international fan base that’s supported him through his various musical incarnations.

Till Midnight benefits from sensitive production by multi-instrumentalist and Blind Melon/AWOL Nation member Christopher Thorn, and backup by Ragan’s longstanding combo the Camaraderie—guitarist/pedal steel player Todd Beene, fiddler Jon Gaunt and bassist Joe Ginsberg, plus new drummer David Hidalgo Jr., of Social Distortion and formerly of Suicidal Tendencies, and son of Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo—along with Rami Jaffee of Wallflowers/Foo Fighters fame, Ben Nichols of Lucero, Dave Hause, Jenny O., Chad Price and Jon Snodgrass of Drag the River.

To give Till Midnight an appropriately organic, lived-in feel, Ragan gathered the musicians at his home in Northern California for a week of rehearsal, fishing and preproduction, before road-testing the new material in Europe.

“It was really the first time we all learned and rehearsed the songs as a group and laid everything down together,” Ragan explains. “It made a huge difference for everybody to have time to sit and breathe with these songs and let everything develop naturally. There was a feeling that I set out to capture and the guys there were able to help us capture it.”

Although its birth cycle may have been different, the honesty and urgency that distinguish Till Midnight have been constants in the musical journey that began in Ragan’s early years. After playing in numerous bands in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Ragan teamed with Chris Wollard, Jason Black and George Rebelo, with whom he relocated from Sarasota, FL to Gainesville and formed Hot Water Music. That band quickly emerged as one of the American punk scene’s most distinctive and inventive units, winning a reputation as a riveting live act while releasing such well-received studio albums as Fuel for the Hate Game, Forever and Counting, No Division, A Flight and A Crash, Caution and The New What Next, as well as the live discs Live at the Hardback and Live in Chicago and the compilations Finding the Rhythms, Never Ender and Till the Wheels Fall Off.

Feeling the urge to stretch out creatively, Ragan ventured into a more acoustic approach with the side project Rumbleseat, which released several singles and the album Rumbleseat Is Dead. After Hot Water Music disbanded in 2005, Ragan enthusiastically embraced his new status as solo troubadour, exploring an expanded palette of acoustic and electric textures on the acclaimed albums Feast or Famine, Gold Country and Covering Ground, as well as the stripped-down live set Los Feliz and a series of limited-edition subscription singles released in 2006 and 2007, and later compiled on CD as The Blueprint Sessions.

In 2008, Ragan launched the long-running Revival Tour, a series of collaborative acoustic adventures featuring a diverse assortment of punk, bluegrass and alt-country performers. In addition to Ragan, the Revival Tour, which has visited Britain, Europe, Australia and Scandinavia as well as North America, has featured a broad array of talents, including Anderson Family Bluegrass, Rise Against frontman Tim McIlrath, Craig Finn of the Hold Steady, Cory Branan, Ben Kweller, Laura Jane Grace, Jay Malinowski of Bedouin Soundclash, Tim Barry, Austin Lucas, Matt Pryor of the Get Up Kids, Jesse Malin, Chris Carrabba, Chris McCaughan, Lucero’s Ben Nichols, Dave Hause, Flogging Molly’s Matt Hensley and Nathan Maxwell, Joey Cape, Brian Fallon of the Gaslight Anthem, Audra Mae, Emily Barker, Dan Andriano of the Alkaline Trio, along with Jenny O, Kevin Seconds, Frank Turner, Rocky Votolato, Jon Snodgrass, Chad Price and Jenny Owen Youngs.

In 2012—the same year that Ragan reunited with Hot Water Music to record their album Exister—the veteran road warrior released his first book, The Road Most Traveled, a collection of insights and anecdotes on the touring life that serves as both a personal memoir and a helpful how-to handbook. He is currently working on a second volume.

As his book makes clear, and as Till Midnight confirms, Ragan takes his musical mission seriously, drawing inspiration and emotional sustenance from the songwriters and music he surrounds himself with, his family and friends along with the close and loyal relationship with his audience.

“The way I see it,” Ragan observes, “we’re faced with tons of inspiration every day. Every step of this life has a way of teaching you something, showing you something, opening your ears and your heart to something. I have all these friends out there, and this community that supports me, who believe in what I’m doing and who believe in the power of music and the power of community.

“It’s a blessing and a privilege to stand on stage and play music for people,” he continues. “I meet so many folks out there, and they’re so hospitable and so kind and say such nice things to me about the songs. The support and the energy that I get from them is what makes it possible for me to keep doing this. And when I’m there and in that moment, it’s important to me to give it back to them as strongly as they’re giving it to me.”

Chuck Ragan’s bracing new release Till Midnight once again confirms what the iconoclastic singer-songwriter’s fans have known all along: that he’s a deeply compelling songwriter and an effortlessly charismatic performer, as well as a true believer in music’s ability to illuminate and inspire.

Till Midnight‘s ten typically impassioned new Ragan compositions embody the artist’s trademark mix of eloquent lyrical insight and catchy, forceful songcraft. The album’s formidable blend of head and heart is reflected on such new tunes as “Something May Catch Fire,” “Vagabond,” “Non Typical,” “Bedroll Lullaby” and “Wake With You,” on which Ragan applies his distinctively raspy voice and sharp melodic sensibility to vividly expressive tunes that reflect both his early grounding in traditional American music and his deep affinity for rock n’ roll.

“There’s a lot of love songs on this one,” notes Ragan, whose work has always shown a knack for addressing individual concerns as well as societal ones. “I love to write love songs because it’s the most powerful emotion. It’s what grounds us to this Earth and makes us want to fight to make the world a better place.

“I always just try to write from the heart and make the music as genuine as I possibly can,” he continues. “By doing that, I’m usually writing about whatever’s going on in my life. And when you’re living your life by wearing your heart on your sleeve, there’s not a lot to hide behind.”

In a musical life that spans close to three decades, Chuck Ragan has consistently worn his heart on his sleeve, and carved out a musical niche in the process. First with post-hardcore trailblazers Hot Water Music and subsequently on his own, he’s built a large and singularly powerful body of work whose honesty, immediacy and warmth have won the loyalty of a fiercely devoted international fan base that’s supported him through his various musical incarnations.

Till Midnight benefits from sensitive production by multi-instrumentalist and Blind Melon/AWOL Nation member Christopher Thorn, and backup by Ragan’s longstanding combo the Camaraderie—guitarist/pedal steel player Todd Beene, fiddler Jon Gaunt and bassist Joe Ginsberg, plus new drummer David Hidalgo Jr., of Social Distortion and formerly of Suicidal Tendencies, and son of Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo—along with Rami Jaffee of Wallflowers/Foo Fighters fame, Ben Nichols of Lucero, Dave Hause, Jenny O., Chad Price and Jon Snodgrass of Drag the River.

To give Till Midnight an appropriately organic, lived-in feel, Ragan gathered the musicians at his home in Northern California for a week of rehearsal, fishing and preproduction, before road-testing the new material in Europe.

“It was really the first time we all learned and rehearsed the songs as a group and laid everything down together,” Ragan explains. “It made a huge difference for everybody to have time to sit and breathe with these songs and let everything develop naturally. There was a feeling that I set out to capture and the guys there were able to help us capture it.”

Although its birth cycle may have been different, the honesty and urgency that distinguish Till Midnight have been constants in the musical journey that began in Ragan’s early years. After playing in numerous bands in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Ragan teamed with Chris Wollard, Jason Black and George Rebelo, with whom he relocated from Sarasota, FL to Gainesville and formed Hot Water Music. That band quickly emerged as one of the American punk scene’s most distinctive and inventive units, winning a reputation as a riveting live act while releasing such well-received studio albums as Fuel for the Hate Game, Forever and Counting, No Division, A Flight and A Crash, Caution and The New What Next, as well as the live discs Live at the Hardback and Live in Chicago and the compilations Finding the Rhythms, Never Ender and Till the Wheels Fall Off.

Feeling the urge to stretch out creatively, Ragan ventured into a more acoustic approach with the side project Rumbleseat, which released several singles and the album Rumbleseat Is Dead. After Hot Water Music disbanded in 2005, Ragan enthusiastically embraced his new status as solo troubadour, exploring an expanded palette of acoustic and electric textures on the acclaimed albums Feast or Famine, Gold Country and Covering Ground, as well as the stripped-down live set Los Feliz and a series of limited-edition subscription singles released in 2006 and 2007, and later compiled on CD as The Blueprint Sessions.

In 2008, Ragan launched the long-running Revival Tour, a series of collaborative acoustic adventures featuring a diverse assortment of punk, bluegrass and alt-country performers. In addition to Ragan, the Revival Tour, which has visited Britain, Europe, Australia and Scandinavia as well as North America, has featured a broad array of talents, including Anderson Family Bluegrass, Rise Against frontman Tim McIlrath, Craig Finn of the Hold Steady, Cory Branan, Ben Kweller, Laura Jane Grace, Jay Malinowski of Bedouin Soundclash, Tim Barry, Austin Lucas, Matt Pryor of the Get Up Kids, Jesse Malin, Chris Carrabba, Chris McCaughan, Lucero’s Ben Nichols, Dave Hause, Flogging Molly’s Matt Hensley and Nathan Maxwell, Joey Cape, Brian Fallon of the Gaslight Anthem, Audra Mae, Emily Barker, Dan Andriano of the Alkaline Trio, along with Jenny O, Kevin Seconds, Frank Turner, Rocky Votolato, Jon Snodgrass, Chad Price and Jenny Owen Youngs.

In 2012—the same year that Ragan reunited with Hot Water Music to record their album Exister—the veteran road warrior released his first book, The Road Most Traveled, a collection of insights and anecdotes on the touring life that serves as both a personal memoir and a helpful how-to handbook. He is currently working on a second volume.

As his book makes clear, and as Till Midnight confirms, Ragan takes his musical mission seriously, drawing inspiration and emotional sustenance from the songwriters and music he surrounds himself with, his family and friends along with the close and loyal relationship with his audience.

“The way I see it,” Ragan observes, “we’re faced with tons of inspiration every day. Every step of this life has a way of teaching you something, showing you something, opening your ears and your heart to something. I have all these friends out there, and this community that supports me, who believe in what I’m doing and who believe in the power of music and the power of community.

“It’s a blessing and a privilege to stand on stage and play music for people,” he continues. “I meet so many folks out there, and they’re so hospitable and so kind and say such nice things to me about the songs. The support and the energy that I get from them is what makes it possible for me to keep doing this. And when I’m there and in that moment, it’s important to me to give it back to them as strongly as they’re giving it to me.”

An Evening With Richard Shindell

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York's Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way andexpanding our sense of just what it is a song may be. From his first record, Sparrow'sPoint (1992) to his current release, Careless(September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct. Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question.After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered "I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty."

Originally from New York, now dividing his time between Buenos Aires, Argentina and New York's Hudson Valley, Richard Shindell is a writer whose songs paint pictures, tell stories, juxtapose ideas and images, inhabit characters, vividly evoking entire worlds along the way andexpanding our sense of just what it is a song may be. From his first record, Sparrow'sPoint (1992) to his current release, Careless(September 2016), Shindell has explored the possibilities offered by this most elastic and variable of cultural confections: the song. The path that led him to songwriting was both circuitous and direct. Taking up the guitar at the age of eight, he listened but imagined that composing a song was out of the question.After college and a nine month stint in a Zen Buddhist community in Upstate New York, he headed to Europe with his guitar, finding something not approaching a livelihood performing in the Paris Metro, where he discovered "I loved the acoustics in those tunnels, but only when they were empty."

Esme Patterson with Special Guest Sadie's Song

Denver, CO's Esme Patterson has been making waves all around the country since going solo in 2012 (she was previously in Denver­based Paper Bird). Her voice is smooth and sweet when she wants it to be, and then fully rock and roll when you least expect it. Each of Patterson’s songs listens like an intensely personal diary entry, and you’ll likely find yourself relating to all of them with wide­eyed wonder.

Denver, CO's Esme Patterson has been making waves all around the country since going solo in 2012 (she was previously in Denver­based Paper Bird). Her voice is smooth and sweet when she wants it to be, and then fully rock and roll when you least expect it. Each of Patterson’s songs listens like an intensely personal diary entry, and you’ll likely find yourself relating to all of them with wide­eyed wonder.

Opus One Comedy Presents A Holiday Comedy Show Featuring Mike Travers and Friends

Mike Travers is a comedian from Pittsburgh, Pa. He mixes original songs and uses crowd participation for a completely unique comedy experience! He is a regular at the Pittsburgh Improv, features and headlines for the Steel City Comedy Tour, and has also performed at The Comedy Store Los Angeles, and several resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean. He performs all around the tri-state area and the US with headliners such as Chris Porter, Theo Von, Billy Gardell, Steve Byrne, Jason Collings, Brent Morin, Brad Williams, and many others.

Mike Travers is a comedian from Pittsburgh, Pa. He mixes original songs and uses crowd participation for a completely unique comedy experience! He is a regular at the Pittsburgh Improv, features and headlines for the Steel City Comedy Tour, and has also performed at The Comedy Store Los Angeles, and several resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean. He performs all around the tri-state area and the US with headliners such as Chris Porter, Theo Von, Billy Gardell, Steve Byrne, Jason Collings, Brent Morin, Brad Williams, and many others.

(Early Show) Judy Kasper and Mike Rodgers CD Release Party

JUDY KASPER
Born in Pittsburgh, Judy Kasper has been singing music since she was a kid. "I used to steal my brothers guitar and play it! I wanted to learn so bad that I taught myself."

Influenced by some of country music's biggest female legends like Loretta Lynn, her most recent album makes you feel like you are right at home in country music's beginnings. "When I finally came to Nashville and saw all the historic sites and museums where country music began I couldn't help but be moved. Then visiting Loretta's Lynn's Ranch, my heart was so inspired from being surrounded by the treasure's of someone that I admire so much."

Judy does most of writing at her cottage in Meadville, PA. "Being by the lake and in the country just makes me feel right at home. I can relax and sometimes the music just comes to me as soon as I put the guitar in my hands."

At this show Judy will be releasing the follow up to her debut album. “I love the chance to perform at Club Cafe. I can’t wait to share this new music with all of you!”

MIKE RODGERS
The Nashville recording artist and PA native is set to release his third album at the show. “You go through phases with writing - sometimes the music just comes to you and sometimes you have to dig deep. I’m just happy to share some of these songs that I’ve had for a while.”

Written, recorded, and produced in his home studio, Mike released his first new single in three years in January. The song, “She Is the Best” can be found on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, and other music sites. Mike has performed at many venues in Nashville including the Bluebird Cafe, Tequila Cowboy, and the Tin Roof..to name a few. He also did a 25 - city National tour in 2016.

“Club Cafe is always a fun place to play. I can’t wait to see family and friends and share this new music with them.”

JUDY KASPER
Born in Pittsburgh, Judy Kasper has been singing music since she was a kid. "I used to steal my brothers guitar and play it! I wanted to learn so bad that I taught myself."

Influenced by some of country music's biggest female legends like Loretta Lynn, her most recent album makes you feel like you are right at home in country music's beginnings. "When I finally came to Nashville and saw all the historic sites and museums where country music began I couldn't help but be moved. Then visiting Loretta's Lynn's Ranch, my heart was so inspired from being surrounded by the treasure's of someone that I admire so much."

Judy does most of writing at her cottage in Meadville, PA. "Being by the lake and in the country just makes me feel right at home. I can relax and sometimes the music just comes to me as soon as I put the guitar in my hands."

At this show Judy will be releasing the follow up to her debut album. “I love the chance to perform at Club Cafe. I can’t wait to share this new music with all of you!”

MIKE RODGERS
The Nashville recording artist and PA native is set to release his third album at the show. “You go through phases with writing - sometimes the music just comes to you and sometimes you have to dig deep. I’m just happy to share some of these songs that I’ve had for a while.”

Written, recorded, and produced in his home studio, Mike released his first new single in three years in January. The song, “She Is the Best” can be found on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, and other music sites. Mike has performed at many venues in Nashville including the Bluebird Cafe, Tequila Cowboy, and the Tin Roof..to name a few. He also did a 25 - city National tour in 2016.

“Club Cafe is always a fun place to play. I can’t wait to see family and friends and share this new music with them.”

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents The Steel City Comedy Tour Featuring Chuck Krieger & T-Robe with Special Guests Ray Zawodni, Collin Chamberlin, Ian McIntosh and Andreas O'Rourke. Hosted by Joey Welsh

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy and Tenacity and Friends Presents - A ThanksGiggles Affair Starring Tenacity, Marcus Cox, Samantha B Cakes and Chris the Crowd Pleaser

An Evening With Coco Montoya

“Stratocaster-fueled, fierce slash-and-burn guitar work…dramatic, smoldering Southern soul-rooted intensity. Montoya’s voice is as expressive as his guitar.” –Washington Post

“Montoya is a show-stopper…Heartfelt singing and merciless guitar with a wicked icy burn…he swings like a jazz man and stings like the Iceman, Albert Collins. He is one of the truly gifted blues artists of his generation.” –Living Blues

The old Willie Dixon adage, “blues is truth,” perfectly describes the searing, contemporary blues-rock of
world-renowned guitarist and vocalist COCO MONTOYA. Taught by the “Master of the Telecaster,” Albert Collins, but with a hard-edged sound and style all his own, Montoya mixes his forceful, melodic guitar playing and passionate vocals with memorable songs, delivering the blues’ hardest truths. He earned his status as a master guitarist and soul-powered vocalist through years of paying his dues as a sideman with Collins (first as a drummer) and then with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, before launching his solo career in 1993. Five years of constant touring with Collins and ten years with Mayall turned him into a monster player and dynamic performer. Montoya has released eight solo albums—including three for Alligator between 2000 and 2007—and has played at clubs, concert halls and major festivals all over the world. Guitar Player says Montoya plays “stunning, powerhouse blues with a searing tone, emotional soloing, and energetic, unforced vocals.”

“Stratocaster-fueled, fierce slash-and-burn guitar work…dramatic, smoldering Southern soul-rooted intensity. Montoya’s voice is as expressive as his guitar.” –Washington Post

“Montoya is a show-stopper…Heartfelt singing and merciless guitar with a wicked icy burn…he swings like a jazz man and stings like the Iceman, Albert Collins. He is one of the truly gifted blues artists of his generation.” –Living Blues

The old Willie Dixon adage, “blues is truth,” perfectly describes the searing, contemporary blues-rock of
world-renowned guitarist and vocalist COCO MONTOYA. Taught by the “Master of the Telecaster,” Albert Collins, but with a hard-edged sound and style all his own, Montoya mixes his forceful, melodic guitar playing and passionate vocals with memorable songs, delivering the blues’ hardest truths. He earned his status as a master guitarist and soul-powered vocalist through years of paying his dues as a sideman with Collins (first as a drummer) and then with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, before launching his solo career in 1993. Five years of constant touring with Collins and ten years with Mayall turned him into a monster player and dynamic performer. Montoya has released eight solo albums—including three for Alligator between 2000 and 2007—and has played at clubs, concert halls and major festivals all over the world. Guitar Player says Montoya plays “stunning, powerhouse blues with a searing tone, emotional soloing, and energetic, unforced vocals.”

Griffin House with Special Guest Lee Coulter

It is a true, and nowadays rare, musician who writes lyrics so vulnerable and authentic that an audience is irrevocably captured by the powerful experience of sharing the journey. An album that is essentially an autobiographical account of personal mistakes, change, and growth, offers listeners a chance to reflect on their own experiences and connect with another’s story.

With Griffin House’s upcoming album, So On and So Forth, it is clear the artist digs deep and offers up his narrative after much reflection. House is now a young family man and artist who is choosing sobriety and celebrating the path to his success, through songs which share his perspective on how people remember the past with rose-colored glasses, how we grow up and realize what we deeply need, and how we must find happiness in ourselves in the present.

“The record has a lot to do with recognizing the ego in one’s self and letting it die. It can feel like your whole identity is being wiped away, and you don’t even know who you are anymore. For the person singing these songs, holding on to one’s own individuality in order to remain special or important in the world has started to became far less important than being content with being a good, decent, and loving person. But old habits die hard,” adds House.

The project was tracked last summer at Lakehouse Recording Studios, in Asbury Park, New Jersey. House’s ties to Asbury Park go all the back to 2004, when he was invited to tour with Patti Scialfa. His first show in the boardwalk town was opening a show for Scialfa at the Paramount Theatre. It was there that Griffin met her husband, Bruce Springsteen, and all the wonderful characters in their crew and band. Those memories and experiences made returning to Asbury Park over a decade later to record So On and So Forth feel like a full circle moment in his career.

House recorded the essentially live project with no click track and very little overdubbing. Lakehouse owner, Jon Leidersdorff, helped assemble the band. Prior to walking into the studio, House had never met the musicians and had no idea how the songs would turn out. He adds, “The experience ended up being one of the most fun and positive of my career. The process was stress-free and freeing.” The resulting album reflects this journey — a leap of faith with triumphant results.

Recording and performing for over a decade, House has toured with Ron Sexsmith, Patti Scialfa, Josh Ritter, John Mellencamp, Mat Kearney, and The Cranberries. He received early critical acclaim on the CBS Sunday Morning, and his songs have since been featured in countless films and television shows such as One Tree Hill, Army Wives, and Brothers and Sisters. He has also appeared on Late Night with Craig Ferguson. Most recently, CNN Newsroom invited House to perform “Paris Calling,” from So On and So Forth, live on the air, and the song has been picked up by radio prior to being serviced. House has released ten albums and continues to headline his own national tours. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife Jane and their two daughters.

It is a true, and nowadays rare, musician who writes lyrics so vulnerable and authentic that an audience is irrevocably captured by the powerful experience of sharing the journey. An album that is essentially an autobiographical account of personal mistakes, change, and growth, offers listeners a chance to reflect on their own experiences and connect with another’s story.

With Griffin House’s upcoming album, So On and So Forth, it is clear the artist digs deep and offers up his narrative after much reflection. House is now a young family man and artist who is choosing sobriety and celebrating the path to his success, through songs which share his perspective on how people remember the past with rose-colored glasses, how we grow up and realize what we deeply need, and how we must find happiness in ourselves in the present.

“The record has a lot to do with recognizing the ego in one’s self and letting it die. It can feel like your whole identity is being wiped away, and you don’t even know who you are anymore. For the person singing these songs, holding on to one’s own individuality in order to remain special or important in the world has started to became far less important than being content with being a good, decent, and loving person. But old habits die hard,” adds House.

The project was tracked last summer at Lakehouse Recording Studios, in Asbury Park, New Jersey. House’s ties to Asbury Park go all the back to 2004, when he was invited to tour with Patti Scialfa. His first show in the boardwalk town was opening a show for Scialfa at the Paramount Theatre. It was there that Griffin met her husband, Bruce Springsteen, and all the wonderful characters in their crew and band. Those memories and experiences made returning to Asbury Park over a decade later to record So On and So Forth feel like a full circle moment in his career.

House recorded the essentially live project with no click track and very little overdubbing. Lakehouse owner, Jon Leidersdorff, helped assemble the band. Prior to walking into the studio, House had never met the musicians and had no idea how the songs would turn out. He adds, “The experience ended up being one of the most fun and positive of my career. The process was stress-free and freeing.” The resulting album reflects this journey — a leap of faith with triumphant results.

Recording and performing for over a decade, House has toured with Ron Sexsmith, Patti Scialfa, Josh Ritter, John Mellencamp, Mat Kearney, and The Cranberries. He received early critical acclaim on the CBS Sunday Morning, and his songs have since been featured in countless films and television shows such as One Tree Hill, Army Wives, and Brothers and Sisters. He has also appeared on Late Night with Craig Ferguson. Most recently, CNN Newsroom invited House to perform “Paris Calling,” from So On and So Forth, live on the air, and the song has been picked up by radio prior to being serviced. House has released ten albums and continues to headline his own national tours. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife Jane and their two daughters.

The Midnight Hour

When two of hip-hop’s most accomplished composers get together to make an album you know the results are going to be special. Ali Shaheed Muhammed (of A Tribe Called Quest) & Adrian Younge began their work together in 2013 on the critically acclaimed Souls of Mischief album There Is Only Now and their partnership cemented on their score work for Marvel’s Luke Cage. Today, they are proud to announce the forthcoming release of their carefully constructed and masterful The Midnight Hour. It is the duo’s long awaited debut album and it showcases their songwriting ability like never before.

Lead track and first single “Questions” featuring CeeLo Green is out today and has an unlikely origin story that CeeLo, Adrian and Ali originally explained to Pitchfork back in 2016, when a demo version of the song appeared as a sample on "untitled 06 | 06.30.2014." off of Kendrick Lamar’s untitled unmastered. project. The completed track perfectly captures the album’s underlying roots in hip-hop’s origins and can heard HERE.

Stream The Midnight Hour ft. CeeLo “Questions” now:
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2LaJYA0
Apple Music: https://apple.co/2Ivj4Br

Spotify Embed Code:


The Midnight Hour is black excellence: an ode to the cultural sophistication that the Harlem Renaissance established for its people. The Midnight Hour is comprised of Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Adrian Younge, alongside a tight rhythm section and a full orchestra. The album has features from some of the most celebrated names in contemporary hip-hop and R&B including CeeLo Green, Raphael Saadiq, Marsha Ambrosius, Bilal, Eryn Allen Kane, Karolina, Questlove and more.

Adrian and Ali began working on this album back in 2013, but put the project aside as they would score the hit Netflix series Marvel’s Luke Cage. The Midnight Hour is a soul/jazz/hip-hop album which continues the conversations started by yesterday’s jazz and funk pioneers; those that created the bedrock of samples for hip-hop producers in the 80s/90s. The Midnight Hour is sophisticated hip-hop that fans will enjoy, capturing their jazz rhythm section, and a full orchestra, to analog tape.

One of the seminal compositions, “Questions,” originally began as an unfinished Midnight Hour demo with CeeLo Green. However, Kendrick Lamar heard the track and wanted to sample portions of it for his GRAMMY-winning album To Pimp a Butterfly (the song ultimately made it to Kendrick’s 2016 compilation untitled unmastered. as "untitled 06 | 06.30.2014."). The full, completed version of “Questions” is now the lead single on The Midnight Hour.

“So Amazing” is a reimagining of Luther Vandross’ 1986 single. Ali and Adrian took Luther's original vocal stems and composed new music, as if Luther was in the room with them. This transcendental recording is something that really makes The Midnight Hour special.

The June 8 drop for the album couldn’t come at a better time. Luke Cage’s Season 2 comes out on June 22 on Netflix and The Midnight Hour have a lot of special surprises in store for both the original score and the original music that they have created for the show.

The 20 track, full length double album, will be released on Linear Labs and distributed digitally by INgrooves and vinyl will be distributed by Traffic Entertainment, world wide on June 8, 2018. For more information, please visit www.linearlabsmusic.com.

When two of hip-hop’s most accomplished composers get together to make an album you know the results are going to be special. Ali Shaheed Muhammed (of A Tribe Called Quest) & Adrian Younge began their work together in 2013 on the critically acclaimed Souls of Mischief album There Is Only Now and their partnership cemented on their score work for Marvel’s Luke Cage. Today, they are proud to announce the forthcoming release of their carefully constructed and masterful The Midnight Hour. It is the duo’s long awaited debut album and it showcases their songwriting ability like never before.

Lead track and first single “Questions” featuring CeeLo Green is out today and has an unlikely origin story that CeeLo, Adrian and Ali originally explained to Pitchfork back in 2016, when a demo version of the song appeared as a sample on "untitled 06 | 06.30.2014." off of Kendrick Lamar’s untitled unmastered. project. The completed track perfectly captures the album’s underlying roots in hip-hop’s origins and can heard HERE.

Stream The Midnight Hour ft. CeeLo “Questions” now:
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2LaJYA0
Apple Music: https://apple.co/2Ivj4Br

Spotify Embed Code:


The Midnight Hour is black excellence: an ode to the cultural sophistication that the Harlem Renaissance established for its people. The Midnight Hour is comprised of Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Adrian Younge, alongside a tight rhythm section and a full orchestra. The album has features from some of the most celebrated names in contemporary hip-hop and R&B including CeeLo Green, Raphael Saadiq, Marsha Ambrosius, Bilal, Eryn Allen Kane, Karolina, Questlove and more.

Adrian and Ali began working on this album back in 2013, but put the project aside as they would score the hit Netflix series Marvel’s Luke Cage. The Midnight Hour is a soul/jazz/hip-hop album which continues the conversations started by yesterday’s jazz and funk pioneers; those that created the bedrock of samples for hip-hop producers in the 80s/90s. The Midnight Hour is sophisticated hip-hop that fans will enjoy, capturing their jazz rhythm section, and a full orchestra, to analog tape.

One of the seminal compositions, “Questions,” originally began as an unfinished Midnight Hour demo with CeeLo Green. However, Kendrick Lamar heard the track and wanted to sample portions of it for his GRAMMY-winning album To Pimp a Butterfly (the song ultimately made it to Kendrick’s 2016 compilation untitled unmastered. as "untitled 06 | 06.30.2014."). The full, completed version of “Questions” is now the lead single on The Midnight Hour.

“So Amazing” is a reimagining of Luther Vandross’ 1986 single. Ali and Adrian took Luther's original vocal stems and composed new music, as if Luther was in the room with them. This transcendental recording is something that really makes The Midnight Hour special.

The June 8 drop for the album couldn’t come at a better time. Luke Cage’s Season 2 comes out on June 22 on Netflix and The Midnight Hour have a lot of special surprises in store for both the original score and the original music that they have created for the show.

The 20 track, full length double album, will be released on Linear Labs and distributed digitally by INgrooves and vinyl will be distributed by Traffic Entertainment, world wide on June 8, 2018. For more information, please visit www.linearlabsmusic.com.

(Early Show) The Acoustic Guitar Project Featuring songwriters Christopher Mark Jones, Ben Shannon, EMay, Brian Junker and Steve Gallo

Give a songwriter a guitar for one week and see what happens. That's the premise of The Acoustic Guitar Project, an international series of performances by songwriters in some 50 cities. Sponsored in Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Songwriters Circle and Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society. Details at theacousticguitarproject.com.

Give a songwriter a guitar for one week and see what happens. That's the premise of The Acoustic Guitar Project, an international series of performances by songwriters in some 50 cities. Sponsored in Pittsburgh by Pittsburgh Songwriters Circle and Calliope: The Pittsburgh Folk Music Society. Details at theacousticguitarproject.com.

(Late Show) Burning Bridges and Opus One Comedy Presents Shane Torres with Special Guests John Dick Winters, Melissa Stokoski & Hosted By Harry Gilliland

Shane Torres is a stand up comedian, writer, actor, and podcaster. Originally from Fort Worth, Texas, Shane landed in Portland, Oregon and began his comedy career. Shane has perfomed on festivals all over the globe including Montreal’s Just For Laughs, Comedy Central’s Clusterfest, San Francisco Sketchfest, Bonnaroo, Outsidelands, Bumbershoot, Moontower Comedy Festival in Austin, Red Clay Comedy Festival, High Plains in Denver, Laughingskull, New York Comedy Festival, Laughfest, and many more.
His television appearances to date have included Conan twice, Comedy Central Half Hour Special, IFC’S Comedy Bang Bang, NBC’S Last Comic Standing (barely), Tru Tv’s Comedy Knockout, and Ron White’s Comedy Salute To The Troops on CMT. He has been heard on such popular podcasts such as Savage Love, All Fantasy Everything, Comedy Bang Bang, and Bertcast. He tours frequently across the states and can often be found performing in a comedy club, theaters, and music venues near you.
He has been reviewed by numerous media outlets including The New York Times, Onion AV Club, GQ UK, and more. His album Established 1981 came out in September of 2017 on Comedy Central records “Mr. Torres has a laconic drawling delivery with deliberate pacing, placing him firmly in the tradition of dry deadpan specialist like Tig Notaro and Todd Barry. But his style is warmer, relying on punchlines with corkscrew turns that have moments of vulnerability and even melancholy.” - The New York Times. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Shane Torres is a stand up comedian, writer, actor, and podcaster. Originally from Fort Worth, Texas, Shane landed in Portland, Oregon and began his comedy career. Shane has perfomed on festivals all over the globe including Montreal’s Just For Laughs, Comedy Central’s Clusterfest, San Francisco Sketchfest, Bonnaroo, Outsidelands, Bumbershoot, Moontower Comedy Festival in Austin, Red Clay Comedy Festival, High Plains in Denver, Laughingskull, New York Comedy Festival, Laughfest, and many more.
His television appearances to date have included Conan twice, Comedy Central Half Hour Special, IFC’S Comedy Bang Bang, NBC’S Last Comic Standing (barely), Tru Tv’s Comedy Knockout, and Ron White’s Comedy Salute To The Troops on CMT. He has been heard on such popular podcasts such as Savage Love, All Fantasy Everything, Comedy Bang Bang, and Bertcast. He tours frequently across the states and can often be found performing in a comedy club, theaters, and music venues near you.
He has been reviewed by numerous media outlets including The New York Times, Onion AV Club, GQ UK, and more. His album Established 1981 came out in September of 2017 on Comedy Central records “Mr. Torres has a laconic drawling delivery with deliberate pacing, placing him firmly in the tradition of dry deadpan specialist like Tig Notaro and Todd Barry. But his style is warmer, relying on punchlines with corkscrew turns that have moments of vulnerability and even melancholy.” - The New York Times. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

(Early Show) WDVE and Opus One Comedy Presents Joe Bartnick with Special Guests Andy Picarro, Sean Collier & Hosted by Collin Chamberlin

You’ve heard him on the WDVE and The X and his podcast Puck Off.
You’ve see him on perform on Gotham Live and onstage at The Benedum, The Bynum, The Rex and The Improv.
Now go see him at the Club Café.
One Night Only December 1st
Pittsburgh’s Own Joe Bartnick.

Joe Bartnick was born and raised in Pittsburgh PA where he learned to eat, drink and be funny. He moved to San Francisco and began his career as a standup comic working his way up from performing in coffee shops and laundry mats to play prestigious venues around the world such as The Chicago Theater and The Ryman Auditorium. In Pittsburgh he has played The Benedum, Heinz Hall and The Rex.
Joe moved to Los Angeles and jumped into writing and acting. Joe has written on many television projects including the ESPYS, The NFL on FOX, ‘Snoop After Dark’ and Eddie Griffin’s ‘Going for Broke’. As an actor Joe starred in ‘Dirty Jokes’ the Movie. Joe created and starred (fully clothed) in the Playboy TV series ‘King of Clubs’.
Joe performed a closing set on AXS-TV’s Live at Gotham. Over the years Joe has performed on theater tours Bill Burr, Lisa Lampanelli, Dave Attell, Mitch Hedberg and Lewis Black.
One of Joe’s biggest thrills was roasting Motley Crue’s Tommy Lee on ‘Battleground Earth’. Joe wrote the best- selling book “You Might Be a Douchebag” and collaborated with Don Jamieson on “You Might Be A Metal Head”.
Joe has parlayed his love of hockey into the highly successful podcast ‘Puck Off’ and writes a column for Pro Hockey News.
Joe is a regular guest on the WDVE Morning Show. He can also be heard on The Mark Madden Show and Trib Live Radio.

You’ve heard him on the WDVE and The X and his podcast Puck Off.
You’ve see him on perform on Gotham Live and onstage at The Benedum, The Bynum, The Rex and The Improv.
Now go see him at the Club Café.
One Night Only December 1st
Pittsburgh’s Own Joe Bartnick.

Joe Bartnick was born and raised in Pittsburgh PA where he learned to eat, drink and be funny. He moved to San Francisco and began his career as a standup comic working his way up from performing in coffee shops and laundry mats to play prestigious venues around the world such as The Chicago Theater and The Ryman Auditorium. In Pittsburgh he has played The Benedum, Heinz Hall and The Rex.
Joe moved to Los Angeles and jumped into writing and acting. Joe has written on many television projects including the ESPYS, The NFL on FOX, ‘Snoop After Dark’ and Eddie Griffin’s ‘Going for Broke’. As an actor Joe starred in ‘Dirty Jokes’ the Movie. Joe created and starred (fully clothed) in the Playboy TV series ‘King of Clubs’.
Joe performed a closing set on AXS-TV’s Live at Gotham. Over the years Joe has performed on theater tours Bill Burr, Lisa Lampanelli, Dave Attell, Mitch Hedberg and Lewis Black.
One of Joe’s biggest thrills was roasting Motley Crue’s Tommy Lee on ‘Battleground Earth’. Joe wrote the best- selling book “You Might Be a Douchebag” and collaborated with Don Jamieson on “You Might Be A Metal Head”.
Joe has parlayed his love of hockey into the highly successful podcast ‘Puck Off’ and writes a column for Pro Hockey News.
Joe is a regular guest on the WDVE Morning Show. He can also be heard on The Mark Madden Show and Trib Live Radio.

(Late Show) WDVE and Opus One Comedy Presents Joe Bartnick with Special Guests Andy Picarro, Sean Collier & Hosted by Collin Chamberlin

You’ve heard him on the WDVE and The X and his podcast Puck Off.
You’ve see him on perform on Gotham Live and onstage at The Benedum, The Bynum, The Rex and The Improv.
Now go see him at the Club Café.
One Night Only December 1st
Pittsburgh’s Own Joe Bartnick.

Joe Bartnick was born and raised in Pittsburgh PA where he learned to eat, drink and be funny. He moved to San Francisco and began his career as a standup comic working his way up from performing in coffee shops and laundry mats to play prestigious venues around the world such as The Chicago Theater and The Ryman Auditorium. In Pittsburgh he has played The Benedum, Heinz Hall and The Rex.
Joe moved to Los Angeles and jumped into writing and acting. Joe has written on many television projects including the ESPYS, The NFL on FOX, ‘Snoop After Dark’ and Eddie Griffin’s ‘Going for Broke’. As an actor Joe starred in ‘Dirty Jokes’ the Movie. Joe created and starred (fully clothed) in the Playboy TV series ‘King of Clubs’.
Joe performed a closing set on AXS-TV’s Live at Gotham. Over the years Joe has performed on theater tours Bill Burr, Lisa Lampanelli, Dave Attell, Mitch Hedberg and Lewis Black.
One of Joe’s biggest thrills was roasting Motley Crue’s Tommy Lee on ‘Battleground Earth’. Joe wrote the best- selling book “You Might Be a Douchebag” and collaborated with Don Jamieson on “You Might Be A Metal Head”.
Joe has parlayed his love of hockey into the highly successful podcast ‘Puck Off’ and writes a column for Pro Hockey News.
Joe is a regular guest on the WDVE Morning Show. He can also be heard on The Mark Madden Show and Trib Live Radio.

You’ve heard him on the WDVE and The X and his podcast Puck Off.
You’ve see him on perform on Gotham Live and onstage at The Benedum, The Bynum, The Rex and The Improv.
Now go see him at the Club Café.
One Night Only December 1st
Pittsburgh’s Own Joe Bartnick.

Joe Bartnick was born and raised in Pittsburgh PA where he learned to eat, drink and be funny. He moved to San Francisco and began his career as a standup comic working his way up from performing in coffee shops and laundry mats to play prestigious venues around the world such as The Chicago Theater and The Ryman Auditorium. In Pittsburgh he has played The Benedum, Heinz Hall and The Rex.
Joe moved to Los Angeles and jumped into writing and acting. Joe has written on many television projects including the ESPYS, The NFL on FOX, ‘Snoop After Dark’ and Eddie Griffin’s ‘Going for Broke’. As an actor Joe starred in ‘Dirty Jokes’ the Movie. Joe created and starred (fully clothed) in the Playboy TV series ‘King of Clubs’.
Joe performed a closing set on AXS-TV’s Live at Gotham. Over the years Joe has performed on theater tours Bill Burr, Lisa Lampanelli, Dave Attell, Mitch Hedberg and Lewis Black.
One of Joe’s biggest thrills was roasting Motley Crue’s Tommy Lee on ‘Battleground Earth’. Joe wrote the best- selling book “You Might Be a Douchebag” and collaborated with Don Jamieson on “You Might Be A Metal Head”.
Joe has parlayed his love of hockey into the highly successful podcast ‘Puck Off’ and writes a column for Pro Hockey News.
Joe is a regular guest on the WDVE Morning Show. He can also be heard on The Mark Madden Show and Trib Live Radio.

Dead Soft with Special Guests Murder for Girls and Vulfblitzer

Dead Soft is a four piece rock n roll band from Vancouver, BC
comprised of members Nathaniel Epp, Keeley Rochon, Kyle Schick, and
Alex Smith. After forming in 2011, they have released a string of EPs
and singles leading up to their debut self-titled album, originally released
by Kingfisher Bluez in Canada and later on American soil by JEFF The
Brotherhood’s Infinity Cat Recordings. Blending hefty portions of
heavy, dirge-like punk with an upbeat pop flourish, Dead Soft has been
known to evoke an aesthetic of doom and sweetness in equal measure.

Dead Soft is a four piece rock n roll band from Vancouver, BC
comprised of members Nathaniel Epp, Keeley Rochon, Kyle Schick, and
Alex Smith. After forming in 2011, they have released a string of EPs
and singles leading up to their debut self-titled album, originally released
by Kingfisher Bluez in Canada and later on American soil by JEFF The
Brotherhood’s Infinity Cat Recordings. Blending hefty portions of
heavy, dirge-like punk with an upbeat pop flourish, Dead Soft has been
known to evoke an aesthetic of doom and sweetness in equal measure.

Middle Kids with Special Guest The Shacks (Moved from Stage AE) - Presented by 91.3 WYEP, Opus One & PromoWest North Shore

One listen to Lost Friends, Middle Kids’ forthcoming debut on Domino, and it’s clear that the rising Australian trio is aligned with each member’s own vision. Its 12 songs veer from brittle blasts of indie rock to elegiac piano ballads to pop anthems destined to ignite stadium singalongs.

Already armed with a sleeper hit (“Edge of Town”), and with Lost Friends expected in the spring, the band – including singer-guitarist-songwriter Hannah Joy, bassist Tim Fitz, and drummer Harry Day -- is poised to break out well beyond its native Sydney in 2018.

Lost Friends brims with radio catnip, from the driving wall of sound that kicks “On My Knees” into overdrive to “Mistake” and its infectious chorus that could have been lifted straight out of a long-lost Fleetwood Mac album.

As the band’s lyricist, Joy is unflinching in her ruminations, which often reflect not only the world’s turbulent state of affairs, but also the optimism and joy that keep us afloat.

“That’s so much a thread throughout this album: Even though things are tough, it’s worth believing in something good and in the idea that we can heal. And in some ways, I wanted the music to be beautiful and a respite from what’s going on.”

Lost Friends is indeed beautiful, and yet it’s also a strange brew of skittering tempos, melodies that suddenly shift from major to minor chords, and rhythmic interludes that set the band apart from its peers.

When Joy and Fitz met through mutual friends in 2014, she was taken by how “bizarre” and heartfelt Fitz’s own songs were. And the admiration was mutual.

“Hannah’s the only person I know who regularly makes people cry just by singing,” Fitz says. “Her songs will sometimes sound like how the world feels.”

They ended up writing and recording most of Lost Friends in Joy and Fitz’s home, just as they did with their self-titled EP, which Domino released in early 2017 to widespread acclaim and led to tours with Ryan Adams and Cold War Kids.

Despite their circuitous paths to the band, Joy, Fitz, and Day share at least one common trait: They know how to craft classic riffs that tangle up in your brain like taffy and choruses that linger long after the song has faded. And they’ve bonded over a greater sense of what their music should accomplish.

“We are obsessive about music, but we don’t see music as the end point. We see it as an amazing force of connection,” Joy says. “We’re really committed to each other as people first, and then the music comes out of that place.”

One listen to Lost Friends, Middle Kids’ forthcoming debut on Domino, and it’s clear that the rising Australian trio is aligned with each member’s own vision. Its 12 songs veer from brittle blasts of indie rock to elegiac piano ballads to pop anthems destined to ignite stadium singalongs.

Already armed with a sleeper hit (“Edge of Town”), and with Lost Friends expected in the spring, the band – including singer-guitarist-songwriter Hannah Joy, bassist Tim Fitz, and drummer Harry Day -- is poised to break out well beyond its native Sydney in 2018.

Lost Friends brims with radio catnip, from the driving wall of sound that kicks “On My Knees” into overdrive to “Mistake” and its infectious chorus that could have been lifted straight out of a long-lost Fleetwood Mac album.

As the band’s lyricist, Joy is unflinching in her ruminations, which often reflect not only the world’s turbulent state of affairs, but also the optimism and joy that keep us afloat.

“That’s so much a thread throughout this album: Even though things are tough, it’s worth believing in something good and in the idea that we can heal. And in some ways, I wanted the music to be beautiful and a respite from what’s going on.”

Lost Friends is indeed beautiful, and yet it’s also a strange brew of skittering tempos, melodies that suddenly shift from major to minor chords, and rhythmic interludes that set the band apart from its peers.

When Joy and Fitz met through mutual friends in 2014, she was taken by how “bizarre” and heartfelt Fitz’s own songs were. And the admiration was mutual.

“Hannah’s the only person I know who regularly makes people cry just by singing,” Fitz says. “Her songs will sometimes sound like how the world feels.”

They ended up writing and recording most of Lost Friends in Joy and Fitz’s home, just as they did with their self-titled EP, which Domino released in early 2017 to widespread acclaim and led to tours with Ryan Adams and Cold War Kids.

Despite their circuitous paths to the band, Joy, Fitz, and Day share at least one common trait: They know how to craft classic riffs that tangle up in your brain like taffy and choruses that linger long after the song has faded. And they’ve bonded over a greater sense of what their music should accomplish.

“We are obsessive about music, but we don’t see music as the end point. We see it as an amazing force of connection,” Joy says. “We’re really committed to each other as people first, and then the music comes out of that place.”

Helena Deland

Helena Deland's two latest singles, 'There Are A Thousand' and 'Perfect Weather For A Crime' are poetic, catchy, and undeniably magnetic. Helena's voice runs shivers down spines and guides her self-described "sincere pop" to a completely irresistible state. Her songwriting sounds like a more melodically driven Courtney Barnett, equipped with clever word play and lush rock instrumentation. Check out Montreal's fresh faced rock starlet Helena Deland and her latest sonic offerings off her upcoming album, Altogether Unaccompanied.

Montreal's Helena Deland writes songs that are a testimony of a given time or place, converting her memories to something that sounds, in a word, unforgettable. A myriad of influences filter in and out of her writing, from '60's Parisian pop to indie folk to fuzz rock. She describes her songwriting as a collection of 'unsent letters,' perhaps fueling her self coined genre, 'sincere pop.' Helena captures the unapologetic aspects of womanhood the world needs today, highlighting powerful femininity in her vocals and refined writing in her unique lyrical choices. Helena will be touring the world over the next year, promoting the release of her upcoming LP, Altogether Unaccompanied.

Helena Deland's two latest singles, 'There Are A Thousand' and 'Perfect Weather For A Crime' are poetic, catchy, and undeniably magnetic. Helena's voice runs shivers down spines and guides her self-described "sincere pop" to a completely irresistible state. Her songwriting sounds like a more melodically driven Courtney Barnett, equipped with clever word play and lush rock instrumentation. Check out Montreal's fresh faced rock starlet Helena Deland and her latest sonic offerings off her upcoming album, Altogether Unaccompanied.

Montreal's Helena Deland writes songs that are a testimony of a given time or place, converting her memories to something that sounds, in a word, unforgettable. A myriad of influences filter in and out of her writing, from '60's Parisian pop to indie folk to fuzz rock. She describes her songwriting as a collection of 'unsent letters,' perhaps fueling her self coined genre, 'sincere pop.' Helena captures the unapologetic aspects of womanhood the world needs today, highlighting powerful femininity in her vocals and refined writing in her unique lyrical choices. Helena will be touring the world over the next year, promoting the release of her upcoming LP, Altogether Unaccompanied.

Gabriel Kahane

The day after the 2016 presidential election, singer-songwriter Gabriel Kahane boarded a train at Penn Station and traveled 8,980 miles around the continental U.S. with no phone or internet access, talking to dozens of strangers in an attempt to better understand his country and fellow citizens. The resulting album, Book of Travelers, marks Gabriel’s debut for Nonesuch Records. By turns sprawling and intimate, this collection of songs is at once a prayer for empathy and reconciliation, as well as an unflinching examination of the complex and often troubled history of the United States.

Over the last decade, Kahane has quietly established himself as a songwriter all his own, grafting a deep interest in storytelling to a keen sense of harmony and rhythm. His major label debut, The Ambassador, a study of Los Angeles seen through the lens of ten street addresses, was hailed by Rolling Stone as “one of the year’s very best albums”.

Gabriel has collaborated with a diverse array of artists, including Paul Simon, Sufjan Stevens, Andrew Bird, Blake Mills, and Chris Thile, the front man of Punch Brothers, for whom Kahane opened forty concerts in the US in 2015 and 2016. As a composer, he has been commissioned by the American Composers Orchestra, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Carnegie Hall, A Far Cry, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Oregon Symphony, and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, with whom he toured in the spring of 2013, performing Gabriel’s Guide to the 48 States, an hour-long cycle on texts from the WPA American Guide Series. Other orchestral highlights have included solo appearances with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Colorado Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and The Knights, with whom Gabriel recorded his orchestral song cycle Crane Palimpsest, following a performance at Tanglewood’s Ozawa Hall.

An avid theater Artist, Kahane has appeared twice at the BAM Next Wave Festival, in 2014 with the critically-lauded staged version of The Ambassador, directed by Tony-winner John Tiffany; and returning in 2017 with 8980: Book of Travelers, directed by Daniel Fish. He is also the composer-lyricist of the musical February House, which premiered in 2012 at the Public Theater.

A graduate of Brown University and two-time MacDowell Colony fellow, Gabriel lives in Brooklyn, NY.

The day after the 2016 presidential election, singer-songwriter Gabriel Kahane boarded a train at Penn Station and traveled 8,980 miles around the continental U.S. with no phone or internet access, talking to dozens of strangers in an attempt to better understand his country and fellow citizens. The resulting album, Book of Travelers, marks Gabriel’s debut for Nonesuch Records. By turns sprawling and intimate, this collection of songs is at once a prayer for empathy and reconciliation, as well as an unflinching examination of the complex and often troubled history of the United States.

Over the last decade, Kahane has quietly established himself as a songwriter all his own, grafting a deep interest in storytelling to a keen sense of harmony and rhythm. His major label debut, The Ambassador, a study of Los Angeles seen through the lens of ten street addresses, was hailed by Rolling Stone as “one of the year’s very best albums”.

Gabriel has collaborated with a diverse array of artists, including Paul Simon, Sufjan Stevens, Andrew Bird, Blake Mills, and Chris Thile, the front man of Punch Brothers, for whom Kahane opened forty concerts in the US in 2015 and 2016. As a composer, he has been commissioned by the American Composers Orchestra, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Carnegie Hall, A Far Cry, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Oregon Symphony, and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, with whom he toured in the spring of 2013, performing Gabriel’s Guide to the 48 States, an hour-long cycle on texts from the WPA American Guide Series. Other orchestral highlights have included solo appearances with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Colorado Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and The Knights, with whom Gabriel recorded his orchestral song cycle Crane Palimpsest, following a performance at Tanglewood’s Ozawa Hall.

An avid theater Artist, Kahane has appeared twice at the BAM Next Wave Festival, in 2014 with the critically-lauded staged version of The Ambassador, directed by Tony-winner John Tiffany; and returning in 2017 with 8980: Book of Travelers, directed by Daniel Fish. He is also the composer-lyricist of the musical February House, which premiered in 2012 at the Public Theater.

A graduate of Brown University and two-time MacDowell Colony fellow, Gabriel lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Danny Golden with Special Guests Oliver Kennan and Ferdinand the Bull

Danny Golden doesn’t quite remember how he ended up in Austin, TX. There were a few years in Colorado playing bluegrass banjo, a stint in his hometown of Pittsburgh, PA writing and forming his style, and couch surfing in Brooklyn while making his first album. Suddenly he found himself behind the wheel of his Nissan, halfway between New York and Texas, realizing he didn’t know a soul there. He just had a feeling it was the place for his music.
Jump ahead two years and you find him playing the Austin circuit with an amazing backing band: Spencer Garland (Black Pumas, Matthew Logan Vasquez, PR Newman), Jeff Olson (White Denim, Balmorhea) and Brendan Bond (Glorietta, Matthew Logan Vasquez, Golden Dawn Arkestra). Insert lifelong best friend and collaborator Ben Brown on lead guitar and you’ve got the band. Add Producer John Michael Landon, and help from a few friends including Mary Bryce (SMiiLE) and Evan Kaspar (Mother Falcon) and you have the full roster for Golden’s 2018 album Old Love.
Danny is a singer/songwriter, a rock and roller and a lifelong searcher for truth and people to share it with. He says the artist’s job is to investigate the depths of our world and bring some meaning back to the surface. His music is an antidote to the status quo; the trendy internet fads we inhale like a fruity pebble flavored vape pen until the flavor runs out and we need a new fix. In a world of artists selling you their projected images of hip, Golden’s music invites you to real connection on a human level.
Old Love is his exploration of relationships, of the situations we all find ourselves in when we let somebody into our life. It’s an investigation of the ancient binding force that has both inspired and confused us since the world began. It’s about clear cut signs and gray areas. It’s about facing the daunting power of love and taking it head on. It’s about the potential to be overwhelmed by that same love and walk away. It’s about figuring out your path and interacting with the temptations and distractions that get more fun and better looking every day.

Oliver Kennan:
Oliver Kennan is a New York City-based indie-soul artist and bandleader. Oliver has become known in the NY music scene for his infectious energy onstage and hisremarkably tight 7-piece contemporary soul band. His influences range from Otis Redding to Arcade Fire, Betty Davis to Radiohead, and Wilson Pickett to Amy Winehouse. Oliver is a retro soul performer with one foot planted firmly in the 21st century, a celebration of the past and present. His forthcoming LP will be released via Hornblow Recordings in 2018.

Ferdinand the Bull:
Ferdinand the Bull is the project of Pennsylvania-based singer/songwriter Nick Snyder and multi-instrumentalist Bryce Rabideau. Since its inception in 2013, the band has grown from a passion project of Nick’s into a force to be reckoned with in the midwestern folk scene. Their energetic live shows, driven by bold vocal harmonies, intricate arrangements, and a bombastic rhythm section, have captivated audiences across the country.

In their forthcoming album Painting Over Pictures, a colorful instrumental backbone supports a raw, honest lyrical body. Nick’s earnest songwriting and Bryce’s eclectic arrangements make for a compelling combination. The duo draws inspiration from traditional folk and contemporary music alike, and the result is an emotional and infectious record that deepens in meaning and scope the more you listen to it. Boasting an expanded palette that includes a string quartet, a horn section, and a host of other musical textures, Painting Over Pictures is the band’s most vivid and expansive album to date.

Ferdinand the Bull is a meditation on vulnerability and passion - the inescapable feeling of growing too big for your past and yearning to hold on to it anyway.

Danny Golden doesn’t quite remember how he ended up in Austin, TX. There were a few years in Colorado playing bluegrass banjo, a stint in his hometown of Pittsburgh, PA writing and forming his style, and couch surfing in Brooklyn while making his first album. Suddenly he found himself behind the wheel of his Nissan, halfway between New York and Texas, realizing he didn’t know a soul there. He just had a feeling it was the place for his music.
Jump ahead two years and you find him playing the Austin circuit with an amazing backing band: Spencer Garland (Black Pumas, Matthew Logan Vasquez, PR Newman), Jeff Olson (White Denim, Balmorhea) and Brendan Bond (Glorietta, Matthew Logan Vasquez, Golden Dawn Arkestra). Insert lifelong best friend and collaborator Ben Brown on lead guitar and you’ve got the band. Add Producer John Michael Landon, and help from a few friends including Mary Bryce (SMiiLE) and Evan Kaspar (Mother Falcon) and you have the full roster for Golden’s 2018 album Old Love.
Danny is a singer/songwriter, a rock and roller and a lifelong searcher for truth and people to share it with. He says the artist’s job is to investigate the depths of our world and bring some meaning back to the surface. His music is an antidote to the status quo; the trendy internet fads we inhale like a fruity pebble flavored vape pen until the flavor runs out and we need a new fix. In a world of artists selling you their projected images of hip, Golden’s music invites you to real connection on a human level.
Old Love is his exploration of relationships, of the situations we all find ourselves in when we let somebody into our life. It’s an investigation of the ancient binding force that has both inspired and confused us since the world began. It’s about clear cut signs and gray areas. It’s about facing the daunting power of love and taking it head on. It’s about the potential to be overwhelmed by that same love and walk away. It’s about figuring out your path and interacting with the temptations and distractions that get more fun and better looking every day.

Oliver Kennan:
Oliver Kennan is a New York City-based indie-soul artist and bandleader. Oliver has become known in the NY music scene for his infectious energy onstage and hisremarkably tight 7-piece contemporary soul band. His influences range from Otis Redding to Arcade Fire, Betty Davis to Radiohead, and Wilson Pickett to Amy Winehouse. Oliver is a retro soul performer with one foot planted firmly in the 21st century, a celebration of the past and present. His forthcoming LP will be released via Hornblow Recordings in 2018.

Ferdinand the Bull:
Ferdinand the Bull is the project of Pennsylvania-based singer/songwriter Nick Snyder and multi-instrumentalist Bryce Rabideau. Since its inception in 2013, the band has grown from a passion project of Nick’s into a force to be reckoned with in the midwestern folk scene. Their energetic live shows, driven by bold vocal harmonies, intricate arrangements, and a bombastic rhythm section, have captivated audiences across the country.

In their forthcoming album Painting Over Pictures, a colorful instrumental backbone supports a raw, honest lyrical body. Nick’s earnest songwriting and Bryce’s eclectic arrangements make for a compelling combination. The duo draws inspiration from traditional folk and contemporary music alike, and the result is an emotional and infectious record that deepens in meaning and scope the more you listen to it. Boasting an expanded palette that includes a string quartet, a horn section, and a host of other musical textures, Painting Over Pictures is the band’s most vivid and expansive album to date.

Ferdinand the Bull is a meditation on vulnerability and passion - the inescapable feeling of growing too big for your past and yearning to hold on to it anyway.

(Early Show) This Side of Eve - New Music Release

This Side of Eve consists of Alyssa and John Creasy and their many talented friends who have contributed to their music over the years. Currently TSE is working on several new projects with diverse musical influences and genres represented.

This Side of Eve consists of Alyssa and John Creasy and their many talented friends who have contributed to their music over the years. Currently TSE is working on several new projects with diverse musical influences and genres represented.

(Early Show) Dan Petrich (Album Release Show for 'Of Devils, Gods, and Men') with Special Guests Jagtime Millionaire and Ben Minett

Join Dan Petrich for the release of his new album 'Of Devils, Gods, and Men'. With special guests Jagtime Millionaire and Ben Minett.

Join Dan Petrich for the release of his new album 'Of Devils, Gods, and Men'. With special guests Jagtime Millionaire and Ben Minett.

The Talbott Brothers

The Talbott Brothers are a Portland based duo composed of brothers Nick and Tyler Talbott. Born and raised in Imperial, a small town in Southwestern Nebraska, they began writing and performing together in the summer of 2012 before relocating to Portland, OR. Forming an alternative blend of folk, rock and blues, The Talbott Brothers creatively combine blood harmonies with storytelling and infectious melodies.

In their latest full-length album, Gray, The Talbott Brothers illustrate the tension between conflicting relationships and the various trials of the human condition. Ear To The Ground Music describes it as, “Equal parts optimistic and captivating, inspiring and hopeful.” Following the album’s release, The Talbott Brothers made their debut at KINK FM’s Skype Live Studio, embarked on a national headlining tour and shared the stage with artists such as Johnnyswim, ZZ Ward and Dead Horses.

In addition to having their music featured in national campaigns such as the Buckle and Tennessee Tourism, The Talbott Brothers are endorsed by Elixir Strings and have joined forces with Sennheiser for product showcase videos and annual performances at The NAMM Show in Anaheim, CA. After playing more than 500 shows and independently releasing 3 albums, The Talbott Brothers’ deep-rooted passion and growing fanbase continue to drive them full steam ahead.

The Talbott Brothers are a Portland based duo composed of brothers Nick and Tyler Talbott. Born and raised in Imperial, a small town in Southwestern Nebraska, they began writing and performing together in the summer of 2012 before relocating to Portland, OR. Forming an alternative blend of folk, rock and blues, The Talbott Brothers creatively combine blood harmonies with storytelling and infectious melodies.

In their latest full-length album, Gray, The Talbott Brothers illustrate the tension between conflicting relationships and the various trials of the human condition. Ear To The Ground Music describes it as, “Equal parts optimistic and captivating, inspiring and hopeful.” Following the album’s release, The Talbott Brothers made their debut at KINK FM’s Skype Live Studio, embarked on a national headlining tour and shared the stage with artists such as Johnnyswim, ZZ Ward and Dead Horses.

In addition to having their music featured in national campaigns such as the Buckle and Tennessee Tourism, The Talbott Brothers are endorsed by Elixir Strings and have joined forces with Sennheiser for product showcase videos and annual performances at The NAMM Show in Anaheim, CA. After playing more than 500 shows and independently releasing 3 albums, The Talbott Brothers’ deep-rooted passion and growing fanbase continue to drive them full steam ahead.

(Early Show) Christmastravaganza Featuring The Dead End Streets, The Moat Rats and Jenny & the Jags - Sponsored by The River's Edge and Benefitting Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Foundation

Joe Grushecky & The House Rockers (Entry includes copy of 'Down the Road A Piece' CD)

Joe Grushecky’s music has stood the test of time. For 30 years publications such as Billboard, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, No Depression, and countless others have hailed him as one of rock & roll’s most talented singer-songwriters.
In 1979 Rolling Stone magazine crowned his band’s, the Iron City Houserockers, first album Love’s So Tough the “debut record of the year.” Acclaimed rock writer Jimmy Guterman, named their second album, Have a Good Time (But Get Out Alive) as one of the 100 Best Rock & Roll Records of all time! Legendary guitarist and Rock Hall of Famer Steve Cropper produced Blood on the Bricks. Rock superstar and Hall of Famer, Bruce Springsteen, produced American Babylon in 1995 and continues to perform with the band and write with Joe including the Grammy winning Code of Silence.
We’re Not Dead Yet, Live in Pittsburgh, Joe’s 14th LP, carries on his tradition of delivering honest and passionate music. This is what Blurt Magazine has to say about the band’s live performances. “Grushecky and the Houserockers performed like they thought they were damn rock stars and, on that night, they were indeed the greatest rock 'n' roll outfit on the planet”

In a world where truth is rare and nothing seems genuine anymore, some things remains constant…there is still real music being made out there. And Joe Grushecky is still making it.

Joe Grushecky’s music has stood the test of time. For 30 years publications such as Billboard, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, No Depression, and countless others have hailed him as one of rock & roll’s most talented singer-songwriters.
In 1979 Rolling Stone magazine crowned his band’s, the Iron City Houserockers, first album Love’s So Tough the “debut record of the year.” Acclaimed rock writer Jimmy Guterman, named their second album, Have a Good Time (But Get Out Alive) as one of the 100 Best Rock & Roll Records of all time! Legendary guitarist and Rock Hall of Famer Steve Cropper produced Blood on the Bricks. Rock superstar and Hall of Famer, Bruce Springsteen, produced American Babylon in 1995 and continues to perform with the band and write with Joe including the Grammy winning Code of Silence.
We’re Not Dead Yet, Live in Pittsburgh, Joe’s 14th LP, carries on his tradition of delivering honest and passionate music. This is what Blurt Magazine has to say about the band’s live performances. “Grushecky and the Houserockers performed like they thought they were damn rock stars and, on that night, they were indeed the greatest rock 'n' roll outfit on the planet”

In a world where truth is rare and nothing seems genuine anymore, some things remains constant…there is still real music being made out there. And Joe Grushecky is still making it.

Stephen Kellogg

Over the last decade, Connecticut native Stephen Kellogg has performed more than 1500 concerts around the world, raised thousands of dollars for causes close to his heart, been named Armed Forces Entertainer of the Year, and penned singles for artists like "American Idol" winner Nick Fradiani and the platinum selling rock band O.A.R. Stephen’s most recent writing work with legendary guitarist Robert Randolph, has led to a 2017 Grammy nomination for "Best Contemporary Blues Record." He's also had his songs covered by international major label acts and released eight albums of his own that have yielded hundreds of thousands of ticket and album sales.
When it comes to performing, CBS radio has called him "the best live act you've never seen" and another writer for No Depression gives him the oddly flattering title "the best songwriter you're not listening to." Filmmaker Peter Harding was so moved by the underground nature of Stephen's story that he made a documentary called "Last Man Standing" which went on to become an Amazon exclusive film. In recent years he’s added speaking to his resume delivering a Tedx Talk on job satisfaction, the key note speech for the prestigious photography summit WRKSHP, and garnering an invitation to speak to the students at Columbine High School in Littleton, CO on the topics of social justice and 'finding your voice.'
While it's true that Kellogg may not currently be a household name to everyone, he has persisted in building a substantial career that has landed him onstage with some of the biggest and best touring bands in the world (Train, Sugarland, Jason Isbell, Sara Bareilles, and Hanson to name a few.) Kellogg's music has found its way onto the Billboard charts and been featured in numerous films and TV shows. His Americana-tinged, folk, pop, and rock stylings can make his sound hard to define, but to his core, this musician and father of four brings heart and incredible energy to everything he does.

Over the last decade, Connecticut native Stephen Kellogg has performed more than 1500 concerts around the world, raised thousands of dollars for causes close to his heart, been named Armed Forces Entertainer of the Year, and penned singles for artists like "American Idol" winner Nick Fradiani and the platinum selling rock band O.A.R. Stephen’s most recent writing work with legendary guitarist Robert Randolph, has led to a 2017 Grammy nomination for "Best Contemporary Blues Record." He's also had his songs covered by international major label acts and released eight albums of his own that have yielded hundreds of thousands of ticket and album sales.
When it comes to performing, CBS radio has called him "the best live act you've never seen" and another writer for No Depression gives him the oddly flattering title "the best songwriter you're not listening to." Filmmaker Peter Harding was so moved by the underground nature of Stephen's story that he made a documentary called "Last Man Standing" which went on to become an Amazon exclusive film. In recent years he’s added speaking to his resume delivering a Tedx Talk on job satisfaction, the key note speech for the prestigious photography summit WRKSHP, and garnering an invitation to speak to the students at Columbine High School in Littleton, CO on the topics of social justice and 'finding your voice.'
While it's true that Kellogg may not currently be a household name to everyone, he has persisted in building a substantial career that has landed him onstage with some of the biggest and best touring bands in the world (Train, Sugarland, Jason Isbell, Sara Bareilles, and Hanson to name a few.) Kellogg's music has found its way onto the Billboard charts and been featured in numerous films and TV shows. His Americana-tinged, folk, pop, and rock stylings can make his sound hard to define, but to his core, this musician and father of four brings heart and incredible energy to everything he does.

An Evening With Billy Price

2016 Blues Music Award Winner Billy Price first attracted national attention during his three-year association with guitarist Roy Buchanan. Price is the vocalist on two of Buchanan's LPs, That's What I'm Here For and Live Stock. Since then, with the Keystone Rhythm Band, the Billy Price Band, and solo projects, Billy Price has recorded and released a total of 15 albums, CDs, and DVDs. In April 2016, he was officially recognized and inducted as a Pittsburgh Rock ’n Roll Legend at an award ceremony.

Price’s album This Time for Real, with the late Chicago soul singer Otis Clay, received a 2016 Blues Music Award in the category of Best Soul Blues Album of 2015. A live recording of the Billy Price Band, Alive and Strange, was released in April 2017.

His new album Reckoning, produced by Kid Andersen at Greaseland Studios, was released on June 15, 2018 by Vizztone Label Group.

2016 Blues Music Award Winner Billy Price first attracted national attention during his three-year association with guitarist Roy Buchanan. Price is the vocalist on two of Buchanan's LPs, That's What I'm Here For and Live Stock. Since then, with the Keystone Rhythm Band, the Billy Price Band, and solo projects, Billy Price has recorded and released a total of 15 albums, CDs, and DVDs. In April 2016, he was officially recognized and inducted as a Pittsburgh Rock ’n Roll Legend at an award ceremony.

Price’s album This Time for Real, with the late Chicago soul singer Otis Clay, received a 2016 Blues Music Award in the category of Best Soul Blues Album of 2015. A live recording of the Billy Price Band, Alive and Strange, was released in April 2017.

His new album Reckoning, produced by Kid Andersen at Greaseland Studios, was released on June 15, 2018 by Vizztone Label Group.

Bill Deasy's Annual Boxing Day Show

43 minutes. That is all Bill Deasy is asking of you.

43 minutes.

Turn off your phone. Shut the door. Block out the world.

Then...just...listen.


Wheels on road
Roads in moonlight
Moonlight falling on a midnight train

So begins "Timeless Things," the lead-off title track for Bill Deasy's eighth full-length studio record. Anton DeFade's driving bass pumps along beside Jake Hanner's steady kick drum. Rob James' (on loan from The Clarks) signature confectionary guitar work assisted by electric rhythm from newcomer Noah Minarik, laces through, tying the musical tapestry together. All are in support of Bill's voice, his acoustic guitar, and, of course, his words.

Timeless things.

"Every now and then you strike a vein," Deasy says, reflecting on this latest batch of songs. "I didn't even know I was wanting to do a new project, but the songs kept coming, each one seeming to lead to the next."

Nowhere is his intuitive approach to songwriting more prominently displayed than on the record's closing track, "End of the Record Song," which recalls vintage Jackson Browne.

"That one was a real labor of love," Bill notes. "I wrote it over a long weekend and just kept singing it and singing it as the lines slowly appeared."

The song shifts at the midway point from third to first person, a choice Deasy explains holds personal significance.

"The first half of that song is about the character I used to be, wallowing in the sad heartache music of my melancholy youth. Then after the solo section, I find the guts to step out from behind the mask of all the story songs and just be myself. I am wallowing in happiness now. A nice change, for sure."

Though at first the songsmith envisioned recording this new material with his long-time band mates in the Gathering Field, scheduling issues made a solo project the best option. Deasy teamed with local producer Jake Hanner (Donora, Meeting of Important People) and the two set to work.

"We built each song from the ground up," Bill explains. "Jake referenced a rehearsal recording to create simple loops to which I then laid down solo acoustic performances. Once we felt great about those we started layering."

In addition to the studio band mentioned above, guests include singers Maia Sharp, Scott Blasey and Clark Slater. Gathering Field member Dave Brown contributes electric guitar on two tracks as well.

The result is a remarkably natural sounding recording of, perhaps, the strongest songs of Deasy's career.

"We realized as we got deeper into it that something really good was happening," he recalls. "Our job from that point on was just to let it."

********

Bill Deasy has recorded and toured nationally both as a solo artist and with the Gathering Field. Bill has also written for other artists including Martina McBride and Billy Ray Cyrus in addition to collaborating on songs with the likes of Howard Jones, the Clarks, Maia Sharp, Bijou Phillips, One Flew South, Kim Carnes, Odie Blackmon and many others. Bill's recording of "Good Things are Happening," a song he co-wrote on a trip to Nashville, became the long-running theme for Good Morning America on ABC and he appeared in the promo spots, strumming his guitar and singing.

In 2006, Bill added "published author" to his list of accomplishments with the release of Ransom Seaborn which went on to win the Golden Needle Award and is currently being adapted for film. Traveling Clothes followed in 2009 and Ghost Tree in 2010, both delivering generously on the promise of Ransom Seaborn.

Bill was recently included in the book “Pittsburgh Born, Pittsburgh Bred” as one of 500 of the most memorable Pittsburghers from the past 250 years.

43 minutes. That is all Bill Deasy is asking of you.

43 minutes.

Turn off your phone. Shut the door. Block out the world.

Then...just...listen.


Wheels on road
Roads in moonlight
Moonlight falling on a midnight train

So begins "Timeless Things," the lead-off title track for Bill Deasy's eighth full-length studio record. Anton DeFade's driving bass pumps along beside Jake Hanner's steady kick drum. Rob James' (on loan from The Clarks) signature confectionary guitar work assisted by electric rhythm from newcomer Noah Minarik, laces through, tying the musical tapestry together. All are in support of Bill's voice, his acoustic guitar, and, of course, his words.

Timeless things.

"Every now and then you strike a vein," Deasy says, reflecting on this latest batch of songs. "I didn't even know I was wanting to do a new project, but the songs kept coming, each one seeming to lead to the next."

Nowhere is his intuitive approach to songwriting more prominently displayed than on the record's closing track, "End of the Record Song," which recalls vintage Jackson Browne.

"That one was a real labor of love," Bill notes. "I wrote it over a long weekend and just kept singing it and singing it as the lines slowly appeared."

The song shifts at the midway point from third to first person, a choice Deasy explains holds personal significance.

"The first half of that song is about the character I used to be, wallowing in the sad heartache music of my melancholy youth. Then after the solo section, I find the guts to step out from behind the mask of all the story songs and just be myself. I am wallowing in happiness now. A nice change, for sure."

Though at first the songsmith envisioned recording this new material with his long-time band mates in the Gathering Field, scheduling issues made a solo project the best option. Deasy teamed with local producer Jake Hanner (Donora, Meeting of Important People) and the two set to work.

"We built each song from the ground up," Bill explains. "Jake referenced a rehearsal recording to create simple loops to which I then laid down solo acoustic performances. Once we felt great about those we started layering."

In addition to the studio band mentioned above, guests include singers Maia Sharp, Scott Blasey and Clark Slater. Gathering Field member Dave Brown contributes electric guitar on two tracks as well.

The result is a remarkably natural sounding recording of, perhaps, the strongest songs of Deasy's career.

"We realized as we got deeper into it that something really good was happening," he recalls. "Our job from that point on was just to let it."

********

Bill Deasy has recorded and toured nationally both as a solo artist and with the Gathering Field. Bill has also written for other artists including Martina McBride and Billy Ray Cyrus in addition to collaborating on songs with the likes of Howard Jones, the Clarks, Maia Sharp, Bijou Phillips, One Flew South, Kim Carnes, Odie Blackmon and many others. Bill's recording of "Good Things are Happening," a song he co-wrote on a trip to Nashville, became the long-running theme for Good Morning America on ABC and he appeared in the promo spots, strumming his guitar and singing.

In 2006, Bill added "published author" to his list of accomplishments with the release of Ransom Seaborn which went on to win the Golden Needle Award and is currently being adapted for film. Traveling Clothes followed in 2009 and Ghost Tree in 2010, both delivering generously on the promise of Ransom Seaborn.

Bill was recently included in the book “Pittsburgh Born, Pittsburgh Bred” as one of 500 of the most memorable Pittsburghers from the past 250 years.

(Early Show) Sam Stucky's 5th Day of Christmas with Special Guests Second to Safety and Guy Russo

The Abominable Snow Jam featuring Identity X and Big Atlantic

Identity X is a constantly evolving original modern rock/alternative band based out of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. The band pulls influence from the writing style of Incubus blended with the hard rock roots of the 80's metal scene, and progressive stylings of bands like Rush and Coheed & Cambria.

David Toole - Lead Vocals, Guitar : Darin DiNapoli - Backup Vocals, Guitar : Roman Prokopenko - Bass:;
Jonathan Joseph - Keys and Samples : Dave Ardale - Drums

Identity X is a constantly evolving original modern rock/alternative band based out of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. The band pulls influence from the writing style of Incubus blended with the hard rock roots of the 80's metal scene, and progressive stylings of bands like Rush and Coheed & Cambria.

David Toole - Lead Vocals, Guitar : Darin DiNapoli - Backup Vocals, Guitar : Roman Prokopenko - Bass:;
Jonathan Joseph - Keys and Samples : Dave Ardale - Drums

Hey Monea!

Hey Monea are:

Dan Monea – vocalist, guitarist, shark fisherman, foodie

Nate Monea – vocalist, drummer, MacGyverer, skeptic

Stephen Fernandez – vocalist, bassist, herboligist, shaman



Hey Monea have always been driven by a healthy sense of wanderlust – a deep desire to see the world, try new things, and to challenge the limits of what is possible. This band of tender-hearted rascals has been bonded by three albums, years of touring and recording, with a deep love of music and desire to bring people together. They’ve played festivals all over the world including Hard Rock Calling in London (Bruce Springsteen / Lady Antebellum), The Rock Boat (Sister Hazel / Barenaked Ladies), 311 Cruise, and even a performance on Guam. In addition to traditional touring, the band travels annually to Guatemala with an organization called The Music Is Love Exchange for a week of service work and performances at schools and hospitals.



“We love what we do, and we love being on the road. Connecting with people from every corner of the world through music brings real joy to us. Everybody has a story, and we want to hear that. And we want to share ours,” says Dan Monea. The band performs constantly, either touring nationally or playing bar gigs to pay bills.



Hey Monea’s pop-leaning rock music centers around emotionality and their soaring harmonies aim directly at the heart of the human spirit. Dan and Nate were raised Jehovah’s Witnesses and it was their family’s decision to leave that community that set the boys on a path toward pursuing deeper connection points. Every tour stop is an opportunity to meet people, be of service, an effort to build bonds with their audience. The band refers to their extended community as their “ghetto family”, and the family reunion takes place every September in downtown Canton at the band’s own Little C Music Festival, now in its third year. "We've spent quite a few years traveling, meeting new people, and having amazing experiences at every stop. Along the way we've made so many friends who are incredibly talented, and have something unique and inspiring to offer. Little C is our way of bringing all those friends to Canton to show them the little corner of the earth we call home, and to show all of our friends here in Canton the cast of characters we've met out there on the road,” offers Nate Monea. This year’s event will take place September 14 and 15 in partnership with the Canton Flea, ArtsInStark, VisitCanton, and several additional local sponsors.



The band’s new single, “Push And Pull” is available now.

Hey Monea are:

Dan Monea – vocalist, guitarist, shark fisherman, foodie

Nate Monea – vocalist, drummer, MacGyverer, skeptic

Stephen Fernandez – vocalist, bassist, herboligist, shaman



Hey Monea have always been driven by a healthy sense of wanderlust – a deep desire to see the world, try new things, and to challenge the limits of what is possible. This band of tender-hearted rascals has been bonded by three albums, years of touring and recording, with a deep love of music and desire to bring people together. They’ve played festivals all over the world including Hard Rock Calling in London (Bruce Springsteen / Lady Antebellum), The Rock Boat (Sister Hazel / Barenaked Ladies), 311 Cruise, and even a performance on Guam. In addition to traditional touring, the band travels annually to Guatemala with an organization called The Music Is Love Exchange for a week of service work and performances at schools and hospitals.



“We love what we do, and we love being on the road. Connecting with people from every corner of the world through music brings real joy to us. Everybody has a story, and we want to hear that. And we want to share ours,” says Dan Monea. The band performs constantly, either touring nationally or playing bar gigs to pay bills.



Hey Monea’s pop-leaning rock music centers around emotionality and their soaring harmonies aim directly at the heart of the human spirit. Dan and Nate were raised Jehovah’s Witnesses and it was their family’s decision to leave that community that set the boys on a path toward pursuing deeper connection points. Every tour stop is an opportunity to meet people, be of service, an effort to build bonds with their audience. The band refers to their extended community as their “ghetto family”, and the family reunion takes place every September in downtown Canton at the band’s own Little C Music Festival, now in its third year. "We've spent quite a few years traveling, meeting new people, and having amazing experiences at every stop. Along the way we've made so many friends who are incredibly talented, and have something unique and inspiring to offer. Little C is our way of bringing all those friends to Canton to show them the little corner of the earth we call home, and to show all of our friends here in Canton the cast of characters we've met out there on the road,” offers Nate Monea. This year’s event will take place September 14 and 15 in partnership with the Canton Flea, ArtsInStark, VisitCanton, and several additional local sponsors.



The band’s new single, “Push And Pull” is available now.

Mo Lowda & The Humble

Known for their progressive song writing and energetic live performances, Mo Lowda & The Humble's beginnings were in the beer-soaked basements of Philadelphia. Following the release of their first full length album in 2013, the trio, consisting of Jordan Caiola, Shane Woods, and Nate Matulis began playing venues throughout the city. After experiencing the high of multiple sold out hometown shows, Mo Lowda took their act on the road and began consistently touring the country. Their 2016 sophomore release, 'Act Accordingly', was a short and sweet embodiment of the band's natural progression; refining their already formidable sound. Following that release, Jeff Lucci stepped in as the new bassist, bringing his unique songwriting and tasteful use of effects pedals into the mix. On the heels of playing over 100 shows nationwide in 2017, Mo Lowda is set for a full US tour In 2018, in support of their upcoming Full-Length entitled "Creatures".

Known for their progressive song writing and energetic live performances, Mo Lowda & The Humble's beginnings were in the beer-soaked basements of Philadelphia. Following the release of their first full length album in 2013, the trio, consisting of Jordan Caiola, Shane Woods, and Nate Matulis began playing venues throughout the city. After experiencing the high of multiple sold out hometown shows, Mo Lowda took their act on the road and began consistently touring the country. Their 2016 sophomore release, 'Act Accordingly', was a short and sweet embodiment of the band's natural progression; refining their already formidable sound. Following that release, Jeff Lucci stepped in as the new bassist, bringing his unique songwriting and tasteful use of effects pedals into the mix. On the heels of playing over 100 shows nationwide in 2017, Mo Lowda is set for a full US tour In 2018, in support of their upcoming Full-Length entitled "Creatures".

(Early Show) An Evening With Andy McKee

Andy McKee is among the world’s finest acoustic guitarists. His youthful energy and attention to song structure and melodic content elevates him above the rest. He entertains both the eye and the ear as he magically transforms the steel string guitar into a full orchestra via his use of altered tunings, tapping, partial capos, percussive hits and a signature two-handed technique.

McKee’s crossover success has helped him to achieve millions upon millions of YouTube viewers, underscoring his emergence as one of today’s most unique and influential artists. He has been featured as a cover story in both Acoustic Guitar Magazine in the U.S. and Acoustic Magazine in the UK, and is also the figurehead of the unique Guitar Masters tours. McKee’s tour dates have taken him through Europe, Asia, Australia and North America, including tours with legendary acts including Prince and Dream Theater.

Live performances of Andy’s have become a point of fascination with his loyal followers. So, in late 2015, Andy decided it was time to release a live album. Featuring tracks from his entire catalog, Live Book was recorded live in December 2015 at The Melting Point in Athens, GA, the Red Clay Music Foundry in Duluth, GA, and Workplay in Birmingham, AL. McKee went through the recordings from all three shows and selected the finest takes of each set. Reflecting on the song choices, he looks to provide current fans the chance to relive their favorite shows, and hopes that he can showcase the energy he creates for those who haven’t been able to attend a show and new fans alike.

“I’ve always wanted to do a live album; for quite a few years I’ve felt it’s something that has been missing from my collection of releases,” says McKee. “This album will feature some of my YouTube hits like ‘Drifting’ and ‘Rylynn’, some songs from my 2014 EP Mythmaker, and a cover of a Michael Hedges song called ‘Because It’s There’ played on harp guitar that I haven’t released yet.”

McKee is the first artist to be signed CGP Sounds, the record label founded by fellow guitarist Tommy Emmanuel.

“I’m honored to be a part of his label. I heard Tommy 15 years ago at a festival in Kansas and was blown away by his playing and performing, and I still am,” Mckee stated. “To be the first person on his label is surreal, and I’m excited and proud to be a part of it.”

Live Book released worldwide on April 22. The album, McKee’s first live record, was released through CGP Sounds. In support of the new album, McKee is now embarking on “The Next Chapter Tour” throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States.

Andy McKee is among the world’s finest acoustic guitarists. His youthful energy and attention to song structure and melodic content elevates him above the rest. He entertains both the eye and the ear as he magically transforms the steel string guitar into a full orchestra via his use of altered tunings, tapping, partial capos, percussive hits and a signature two-handed technique.

McKee’s crossover success has helped him to achieve millions upon millions of YouTube viewers, underscoring his emergence as one of today’s most unique and influential artists. He has been featured as a cover story in both Acoustic Guitar Magazine in the U.S. and Acoustic Magazine in the UK, and is also the figurehead of the unique Guitar Masters tours. McKee’s tour dates have taken him through Europe, Asia, Australia and North America, including tours with legendary acts including Prince and Dream Theater.

Live performances of Andy’s have become a point of fascination with his loyal followers. So, in late 2015, Andy decided it was time to release a live album. Featuring tracks from his entire catalog, Live Book was recorded live in December 2015 at The Melting Point in Athens, GA, the Red Clay Music Foundry in Duluth, GA, and Workplay in Birmingham, AL. McKee went through the recordings from all three shows and selected the finest takes of each set. Reflecting on the song choices, he looks to provide current fans the chance to relive their favorite shows, and hopes that he can showcase the energy he creates for those who haven’t been able to attend a show and new fans alike.

“I’ve always wanted to do a live album; for quite a few years I’ve felt it’s something that has been missing from my collection of releases,” says McKee. “This album will feature some of my YouTube hits like ‘Drifting’ and ‘Rylynn’, some songs from my 2014 EP Mythmaker, and a cover of a Michael Hedges song called ‘Because It’s There’ played on harp guitar that I haven’t released yet.”

McKee is the first artist to be signed CGP Sounds, the record label founded by fellow guitarist Tommy Emmanuel.

“I’m honored to be a part of his label. I heard Tommy 15 years ago at a festival in Kansas and was blown away by his playing and performing, and I still am,” Mckee stated. “To be the first person on his label is surreal, and I’m excited and proud to be a part of it.”

Live Book released worldwide on April 22. The album, McKee’s first live record, was released through CGP Sounds. In support of the new album, McKee is now embarking on “The Next Chapter Tour” throughout Europe, Asia, and the United States.

(Early Show) Adia Victoria

At a recent performance, the host made the mistake of introducing Adia Victoria as an Americana artist. Victoria leaned into the microphone with a correction, “Adia Victoria does not sing Americana, Adia Victoria sings the blues.” From there, the artist let her guitar and powerful lyrics speak for her. After a self-released single that drew the attention of Rolling Stone and others, Victoria continued to dazzle and confound with her first studio album, Beyond the Bloodhounds. The album takes its title from a line in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs. Just as Jacobs sought to get beyond the reach of her master’s bloodhounds, Victoria is always reaching beyond the facile notions of what a Black woman artist should look like and sound like.

Instead of following the model of the folks that she saw around her who had been worn down by white supremacy, poverty, and oppression in the rural South Carolina town she grew up in, Victoria set off to shape a life of her own making. She dropped out of school and worked a series of odd jobs. At 18 she went to Paris and then spent time in Brooklyn, Atlanta, and now is based in Nashville. Victoria is a polymath who studied ballet, acting, wrote poetry, before finding a home in the blues. It was when a friend gave Victoria an acoustic guitar that things began to click. “I fell in love with the practice, the discipline of learning. It was the first time in my life that I felt capable of learning and progressing at something.” According to Victoria, this practice was a lifesaver. “I don’t know if I would be alive if I had not found that. Had I not found this outlet of expression. Probably in prison or dead.”

In the wake of Beyond the Bloodhounds, touring, press and enormous expectations a lesser artist would have just rested on her laurels. Instead, Victoria released two short albums that show the immense wingspan of her talent and curiosity. How It Feels is a French-language short album that reimagines French pop classics with a blueswoman’s edge. Victoria returned to her roots with the EP Baby Blues, a trio of classic blues covers that first inspired her.

A mere two years after Beyond the Bloodhounds, Adia Victoria returns with her
second full-length studio album, Silences. After a season of dealing with others trying to define, claim, and name her art and artistry, Victoria went inward. “I found when I went back home that the thing that disturbed me the most was the lack of activity. Having to deal with myself once again on an intimate level.”

Reading and literature helped her find her way back in. The title of the album comes from Tillie Olsen’s Silences, which deals with the myriad ways that the stories of oppressed people’s stories have been silenced over the years, even though they continued to create despite being ignored. “I struggled to write this album in a way that I never had to before. I took for granted I guess my freedom and my alone time and I felt that something had been taken away from me. And I felt like I didn’t have a voice anymore. This album was the therapy that I needed to find that voice that had been silenced.”

We find a voice in full holler on Silences. The listener is thrust into a completely formed world that opens with a twisted creation tale. “Clean,” is reminiscent of the story of the Garden of Eden, but instead of withering under God’s judgement for her shame, our protagonist announces that “First of all / There is no God / Because I killed my God.” This bold act instills in her “The kind of calm I hope to keep.” Any student of stories or life knows that this is can only be the beginning. A calm so deep must be earned along the way.

Silences is at its heart the mythic journey of a woman coming back to herself. “It’s just very much this character is acting out from various oppressions. You’ve been held down, you’ve been smothered, and she reaches her breaking point.” From this departure, the album moves her protagonist out into the world where she meets up with the devil and her own desires for her life in the uptempo rockers “Pacolet Road” and “Different Kind Of Love.” In the next movement, we find a woman daunted and damaged but still resolved. Once we get to “The Needle’s Eye” and “Cry Wolf” she’s gained some well-earned maturity down in the dark of the world. In Silences, Victoria brings the topics of mental illness, drug addiction, sexism, and all the things that try to consume the very lives of women attempting to make a world of their own making to the forefront. The album closes with “Get Lonely,” a plaintive, urgent ballad that our hero could be imploring to “get lonely” with a lover. Or she just as easily could be pleading with this new woman in the mirror that she has found along her journey to be still and marvel at all that she has created and survived.

Just as Victoria has been intentional about creating the kind of life that she wanted to live, she’s done the same thing with her collaborators. The band has changed a lot like Destiny’s Child since the first album, to get the perfect presentation and I think I finally found it. Victoria’s guys are Mason Hickman- Lead Guitar, Jason Harris- Bass, Peter Eddins- Keys, Timothy Beaty aka Knapps- Drums, Chazen Singleton- Horns, and Austin Wilhote aka Willé- Horns. “No. This is the greatest possession that I have. I have a bunch of guys now that I’ve been with and they allow me the ability and the space to command them, to direct them. They have faith in me.”

When it was time to record Silences with Aaron Dessner of The National who has also produced albums for Sharon Van Etten, Frightened Rabbit, Mumford & Sons, Local Natives, and more, Victoria remained hesitant. “I want to let you into my art, but I was so very, very cautious. And I just found that as a human being and as a fellow artist he had the warmth and the understanding and the respect that you don’t come across too often in this industry. He opened his home and his studio to me and my guys and it was like there was no ego. We were just free to experiment and together and we got work done.” With Adia Victoria’s steady hand and fearless vision at the helm, Silences does indeed get work done. Of the recording process, Dessner notes, ““From the very beginning of our collaboration, it was clear to me that Adia’s vision for this album had a cohesive and very particular narrative thread. It was incredibly rewarding to help realize it. The substantive nature of her writing and strength of Adia’s lyrics really guided us through the entire recording process. Every sound and direction, whether subversive, experimental or leaning into a groove, it was all in service of her broader vision and the text. Ultimately, the album is both an incredibly personal narrative of Adia’s journey and a powerful, broader statement of resistance.”

At a recent performance, the host made the mistake of introducing Adia Victoria as an Americana artist. Victoria leaned into the microphone with a correction, “Adia Victoria does not sing Americana, Adia Victoria sings the blues.” From there, the artist let her guitar and powerful lyrics speak for her. After a self-released single that drew the attention of Rolling Stone and others, Victoria continued to dazzle and confound with her first studio album, Beyond the Bloodhounds. The album takes its title from a line in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs. Just as Jacobs sought to get beyond the reach of her master’s bloodhounds, Victoria is always reaching beyond the facile notions of what a Black woman artist should look like and sound like.

Instead of following the model of the folks that she saw around her who had been worn down by white supremacy, poverty, and oppression in the rural South Carolina town she grew up in, Victoria set off to shape a life of her own making. She dropped out of school and worked a series of odd jobs. At 18 she went to Paris and then spent time in Brooklyn, Atlanta, and now is based in Nashville. Victoria is a polymath who studied ballet, acting, wrote poetry, before finding a home in the blues. It was when a friend gave Victoria an acoustic guitar that things began to click. “I fell in love with the practice, the discipline of learning. It was the first time in my life that I felt capable of learning and progressing at something.” According to Victoria, this practice was a lifesaver. “I don’t know if I would be alive if I had not found that. Had I not found this outlet of expression. Probably in prison or dead.”

In the wake of Beyond the Bloodhounds, touring, press and enormous expectations a lesser artist would have just rested on her laurels. Instead, Victoria released two short albums that show the immense wingspan of her talent and curiosity. How It Feels is a French-language short album that reimagines French pop classics with a blueswoman’s edge. Victoria returned to her roots with the EP Baby Blues, a trio of classic blues covers that first inspired her.

A mere two years after Beyond the Bloodhounds, Adia Victoria returns with her
second full-length studio album, Silences. After a season of dealing with others trying to define, claim, and name her art and artistry, Victoria went inward. “I found when I went back home that the thing that disturbed me the most was the lack of activity. Having to deal with myself once again on an intimate level.”

Reading and literature helped her find her way back in. The title of the album comes from Tillie Olsen’s Silences, which deals with the myriad ways that the stories of oppressed people’s stories have been silenced over the years, even though they continued to create despite being ignored. “I struggled to write this album in a way that I never had to before. I took for granted I guess my freedom and my alone time and I felt that something had been taken away from me. And I felt like I didn’t have a voice anymore. This album was the therapy that I needed to find that voice that had been silenced.”

We find a voice in full holler on Silences. The listener is thrust into a completely formed world that opens with a twisted creation tale. “Clean,” is reminiscent of the story of the Garden of Eden, but instead of withering under God’s judgement for her shame, our protagonist announces that “First of all / There is no God / Because I killed my God.” This bold act instills in her “The kind of calm I hope to keep.” Any student of stories or life knows that this is can only be the beginning. A calm so deep must be earned along the way.

Silences is at its heart the mythic journey of a woman coming back to herself. “It’s just very much this character is acting out from various oppressions. You’ve been held down, you’ve been smothered, and she reaches her breaking point.” From this departure, the album moves her protagonist out into the world where she meets up with the devil and her own desires for her life in the uptempo rockers “Pacolet Road” and “Different Kind Of Love.” In the next movement, we find a woman daunted and damaged but still resolved. Once we get to “The Needle’s Eye” and “Cry Wolf” she’s gained some well-earned maturity down in the dark of the world. In Silences, Victoria brings the topics of mental illness, drug addiction, sexism, and all the things that try to consume the very lives of women attempting to make a world of their own making to the forefront. The album closes with “Get Lonely,” a plaintive, urgent ballad that our hero could be imploring to “get lonely” with a lover. Or she just as easily could be pleading with this new woman in the mirror that she has found along her journey to be still and marvel at all that she has created and survived.

Just as Victoria has been intentional about creating the kind of life that she wanted to live, she’s done the same thing with her collaborators. The band has changed a lot like Destiny’s Child since the first album, to get the perfect presentation and I think I finally found it. Victoria’s guys are Mason Hickman- Lead Guitar, Jason Harris- Bass, Peter Eddins- Keys, Timothy Beaty aka Knapps- Drums, Chazen Singleton- Horns, and Austin Wilhote aka Willé- Horns. “No. This is the greatest possession that I have. I have a bunch of guys now that I’ve been with and they allow me the ability and the space to command them, to direct them. They have faith in me.”

When it was time to record Silences with Aaron Dessner of The National who has also produced albums for Sharon Van Etten, Frightened Rabbit, Mumford & Sons, Local Natives, and more, Victoria remained hesitant. “I want to let you into my art, but I was so very, very cautious. And I just found that as a human being and as a fellow artist he had the warmth and the understanding and the respect that you don’t come across too often in this industry. He opened his home and his studio to me and my guys and it was like there was no ego. We were just free to experiment and together and we got work done.” With Adia Victoria’s steady hand and fearless vision at the helm, Silences does indeed get work done. Of the recording process, Dessner notes, ““From the very beginning of our collaboration, it was clear to me that Adia’s vision for this album had a cohesive and very particular narrative thread. It was incredibly rewarding to help realize it. The substantive nature of her writing and strength of Adia’s lyrics really guided us through the entire recording process. Every sound and direction, whether subversive, experimental or leaning into a groove, it was all in service of her broader vision and the text. Ultimately, the album is both an incredibly personal narrative of Adia’s journey and a powerful, broader statement of resistance.”

@clubcafelive

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