club cafe

pittsburgh, pa
(Early Show) Kim Richey with Special Guest Bill Deasy - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Those artists who find themselves stuck in the deepest of ruts two decades into their careers could learn a thing or two from veteran singer-songwriter Kim Richey. She’s never been afraid to go where the inspiration is.

Two-time Grammy-nominated Kim is a storyteller; a weaver of emotions and a tugger of heartstrings. Tender, poetic and aching with life’s truths, Kim’s songs transport you to her world, where words paint pictures and melodies touch the soul. And then there’s her voice. Pure, arresting and honest, it makes you take notice; Kim has the kind of voice where if emotions were ribbons, they’d be streaming in rainbow colours from your iPod.

Early on, the Zanesville, Ohio native thrived on the progressive side of mainstream country, her albums (1995’s Kim Richey, 1997’s Bittersweet and 1999’s Glimmer, all on Mercury) showcasing twang-pop sensibilities, a rich, rounded vocal tone and effortlessly sophisticated songwriting that other discerning performers - Radney Foster, Trisha Yearwood and Pam Tillis to name a few - coveted for their own recordings.

In the years since, Kim has made her subtly psychedelic album Rise (Lost Highway) in Los Angeles with producer Bill Bottrell, flown to London to enlist the help of Giles Martin and emerging with the crisply orchestrated Chinese Boxes (Vanguard) and turned to her East Nashville-based bandleader and frequent co-writer Neilson Hubbard to conjure the earthy indie-pop feel of Wreck Your Wheels (Lojinx/Thirty Tigers) and to complete her latest masterpiece of smart, sensual understatement Thorn In My Heart (Lojinx/Yep Roc).

The array of top-tier guests on the album include Jason Isbell, Wilco’s Pat Sansone, My Morning Jacket’s Carl Broemel, Will Kimbrough and Yearwood, who was, for the first time, returning the harmony-singing favor. And the dozen songs themselves show that Richey’s still dreaming up fetching melodies that arc and bend in unexpected ways, and still discovering fresh angles from which to articulate matters of the heart.

Those artists who find themselves stuck in the deepest of ruts two decades into their careers could learn a thing or two from veteran singer-songwriter Kim Richey. She’s never been afraid to go where the inspiration is.

Two-time Grammy-nominated Kim is a storyteller; a weaver of emotions and a tugger of heartstrings. Tender, poetic and aching with life’s truths, Kim’s songs transport you to her world, where words paint pictures and melodies touch the soul. And then there’s her voice. Pure, arresting and honest, it makes you take notice; Kim has the kind of voice where if emotions were ribbons, they’d be streaming in rainbow colours from your iPod.

Early on, the Zanesville, Ohio native thrived on the progressive side of mainstream country, her albums (1995’s Kim Richey, 1997’s Bittersweet and 1999’s Glimmer, all on Mercury) showcasing twang-pop sensibilities, a rich, rounded vocal tone and effortlessly sophisticated songwriting that other discerning performers - Radney Foster, Trisha Yearwood and Pam Tillis to name a few - coveted for their own recordings.

In the years since, Kim has made her subtly psychedelic album Rise (Lost Highway) in Los Angeles with producer Bill Bottrell, flown to London to enlist the help of Giles Martin and emerging with the crisply orchestrated Chinese Boxes (Vanguard) and turned to her East Nashville-based bandleader and frequent co-writer Neilson Hubbard to conjure the earthy indie-pop feel of Wreck Your Wheels (Lojinx/Thirty Tigers) and to complete her latest masterpiece of smart, sensual understatement Thorn In My Heart (Lojinx/Yep Roc).

The array of top-tier guests on the album include Jason Isbell, Wilco’s Pat Sansone, My Morning Jacket’s Carl Broemel, Will Kimbrough and Yearwood, who was, for the first time, returning the harmony-singing favor. And the dozen songs themselves show that Richey’s still dreaming up fetching melodies that arc and bend in unexpected ways, and still discovering fresh angles from which to articulate matters of the heart.

(Late Show) Grand Prismatic ('Thoughts In Translation' Album Release Party) with Special Guest Bikini Islands

Join Club Cafe for Grand Prismatic's Album Release Party.

Join Club Cafe for Grand Prismatic's Album Release Party.

(Early Show) Chris Barron (of Spin Doctors) with Special Guest The Wreckids

Chris Barron is best known as the lead singer for the Grammy nominated band, Spin Doctors, who sold like, fifty-two gazillion records or something. They were on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine and opened for the Rolling Stones (or vice versa). Chris Barron cooks a mean meatloaf, wrote the songs, "Little Miss Can't Be Wrong" and "Two Princes" both of which went to Billboard’s top five, he likes kids and dogs, and keeps his gold and platinum records in his bathroom.

Chris plays nifty chords on an old Gibson to masterfully crafted songs that are poignant yet wistful and funny.

Chris Barron is best known as the lead singer for the Grammy nominated band, Spin Doctors, who sold like, fifty-two gazillion records or something. They were on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine and opened for the Rolling Stones (or vice versa). Chris Barron cooks a mean meatloaf, wrote the songs, "Little Miss Can't Be Wrong" and "Two Princes" both of which went to Billboard’s top five, he likes kids and dogs, and keeps his gold and platinum records in his bathroom.

Chris plays nifty chords on an old Gibson to masterfully crafted songs that are poignant yet wistful and funny.

(Late Show) Smokin' Betties Burlesque Presents: Spring Teasings. Featuring Amoxie Villain, Clea Cutthroat, Hakan and Hosted By Lilith De Ville

Smokin' Betties Burlesque Presents: Spring Teasings. Featuring Amoxie Villain, Clea Cutthroat, Hakan and Hosted By Lilith De Ville

Smokin' Betties Burlesque Presents: Spring Teasings. Featuring Amoxie Villain, Clea Cutthroat, Hakan and Hosted By Lilith De Ville

Trout Steak Revival with Special Guest Striped Maple Hollow

Ever since winning the 2014 Telluride Bluegrass Festival Band Competition, Trout Steak Revival has quickly become a quintessential Colorado band. The band won an Emmy Award for a soundtrack they contributed to a Rocky Mountain PBS. They’ve collaborated with school children in mentoring programs in Denver and Steamboat Springs. Their music is featured on Bank of Colorado's radio and television advertisements. Most recently, Westword named them Denver’s Best Bluegrass Band, and they were nominated as a Momentum Band of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Ever since winning the 2014 Telluride Bluegrass Festival Band Competition, Trout Steak Revival has quickly become a quintessential Colorado band. The band won an Emmy Award for a soundtrack they contributed to a Rocky Mountain PBS. They’ve collaborated with school children in mentoring programs in Denver and Steamboat Springs. Their music is featured on Bank of Colorado's radio and television advertisements. Most recently, Westword named them Denver’s Best Bluegrass Band, and they were nominated as a Momentum Band of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Nina Nesbitt with Special Guest Whitney Woerz

“I've grown up. I feel like that's the main thing.” The Nina Nesbitt of 2017 is not like the Nina Nesbitt of 2013, the one who arrived as if from nowhere in 2012 and scored a UK top 15 album with Peroxide in early 2014. The heartfelt, easily relatable lyrics remain, as evidenced on the multi-layered, story-telling pop of new single, The Moments I'm Missing, which was written and produced solely by Nesbitt. That character-filled voice remains, as does the razor-sharpe eye for acute lyrical observations and nagging, ear-worm melodies. What's new is a desire to inject her music with more obvious pop influences, an area she dived headlong into last year on the excellent, one-off single Chewing Gum. While the first album zipped past in a flash, things falling into place at an alarming speed almost outside of her control, this new Nina Nesbitt, now 22, is in charge of everything. All of it. An independent artist in all variations of that phrase, this is the sound of a singer-songwriter comfortable in their own skin. “I'm so proud of this album,” she beams. “If it does well then great, obviously, but I feel like I've made the record I've always wanted to make.”

Born in a little village outside Edinburgh, Nesbitt's musical education was a long and constantly evolving one. Fully immersed in chart pop thanks to her Swedish mother – think lots of ABBA, Britney, Christina, Whitney – that was then mixed later with the more outré leanings of her father, specifically Brian Eno. Closeted in her little village, it took her friends to break her out of a fairly dark early obsession. “My friend at school told me to stop listening to Basshunter and start listening to Nirvana, so she introduced me to the rock world,” she laughs. Later, after moving to London, her musical horizons were exploded more and more. “I really got into R&B all of a sudden, and I just love how Lauryn Hill, Bryson Tiller and Kehlani communicate things about their life. It's like I know who they are when I'm listening to their songs. So I wanted to represent that in my music too.”

But we're getting ahead of ourselves, because music wasn't always her only passion. Despite learning to play various instruments, Nesbitt was also a rhythmic gymnast training to go to the Olympics. “I feel like that is where a lot of my drive has come from, because I wanted to be the best,” she explains. “I was so passionate about it. I ended up being in the Scottish team and training for the Commonwealth Games. I stopped because I'd gone as far as I could. Then music was the next thing.” Rhythmic gymnastics was also joined on the sidelines by the flute, an instrument that's hard to make look cool, especially when there are boys around. At 15, having learned the guitar, a new inspiration arrived. “I remember being 15 and hearing Taylor Swift's song 15 and being like 'oh my God', it's a girl with a guitar writing her own songs,” she says. “I wanted to do that! I don't come from a musical background or a wealthy background, so I needed to find a way of getting out there and that thing of writing your own songs felt affordable and doable.”

By this point she'd already started uploading covers to YouTube, chiefly to work out if she could actually sing, a baptism of fire that showed an early resolve. “I used to be like 'do I have a good voice?' and my mum would say 'you've got a unique tone',” she cackles. “So I never knew if I was good or not, but I loved singing so much. I basically recorded these videos because I thought strangers would give me an honest opinion and that way I could work out if I was good or not. So I didn't tell anyone about it.” Having already started songwriting aged 10 (her first song was called Dreams Become Reality), she'd also started accumulating a collection of her own recordings, which came in handy when a chance meeting with Ed Sheeran in 2011 after a gig lead to an impromptu performance and an offer to support him at Shepherd's Bush Empire and several dates across Europe. Still unsigned, a cover of an Example song then lead to a support slot on his arena tour, which was then followed by an appearance on the Radio One playlist. Having signed to Island, the Nesbitt tornado was now in motion, taking in more playlist appearances, more live shows, more Top 40 singles, more acclaim.

When the dust settled and the album was out, however, Nesbitt was ready to move on. Chewing Gum was the sound of her breaking out of her comfort zone and indulging fully her love of pop, a move that was embraced by her fans but one that felt a little too alien. While proud of the song, it symbolised the breakdown of her relationship with Island and kickstarted her move away from being an artist and embracing songwriting for others. It was a move that reignited her passion for music, lifted her confidence back up after the label split and eventually lead to the creation of The Moments I'm Missing. The pop album she'd been making, and that Chewing Gum was meant to be on, may have been scrapped but the process of its creation has its positives, chiefly her learning production for herself. As I said, always fully in control. “Production is expensive and I didn't want to have to rely on anyone else for my own career,” she says. “I wanted to do it myself. I've got this little studio at home and I just sit for hours and hours learning. I want to be able to do it all by myself if I have to. I want to always be able to put music out.”

With songs cut by various artists (including one song currently being kept on hold by one of the biggest megastars in the world), Nesbitt's keen to carry on with the songwriting for others. But the passion for her own project is firmly back, kickstarted by the creation of the beautiful, fully biographical The Moments I'm Missing, a swirling combination of delicate piano lament and robust, intricately programmed beats that features LA singer Goody Grace. “I went home from a session for someone else and I wanted to write a song nobody else could sing but me. I wanted to write a song that's just about my life,” she says, referring to these new songs accurately as “suburban pop”. I loved how rappers or R&B artists talked about their lives and I wanted to find the singer-songwriter version of that. When my career took off it all happened so fast and I couldn't always take it all in. But now I've had a lot of time to look back and see what was amazing and what was shit. It's not about missing as in longing; it's about the moments I'm missing from my brain. It's about recollecting.”

Elsewhere there's the gloriously biting The Best You Had (“it's crazy that you're moving on so fast, but baby it's okay if I am still the best you had” runs the chorus), a low-key, R&B-tinged tale of love gone sour written and produced with newcomer Jordan Riley (upcoming producer LostBoy has also worked on various songs across the album). “It's a personal thing because I've definitely felt like that but I had a conversation with a friend who was gutted her ex had moved on but she was like 'as long as I was better then that's fine'. She really hit the nail on the head. So I made it into a little poem. Once I started working on it in the studio the whole thing came to me in about 30 minutes.” Then there's Somebody Special, perhaps the best example of the bridge between the old and new. Written in Nashville with Dan Muckala and Brianna Kennedy, it's a love song but “not too mushy” and sounds like a global smash, all slowly percolating verses and a chorus you want to live inside.

In a music industry that often doesn't give you second chances, or time to settle into the artist you want to be, Nina Nesbitt's found a way to not only make it work, but make it work for her. Rather than rush into making an album for the sake of it, she waited for the inspiration to strike and let it slowly take shape organically. “With an album I feel like it's parallel to my life in a way – I was just trying to find out what I liked and what I was good at,” she says succinctly. What she's good at is being an artist, but one that's fully in control, i.e. the very best kind.

“I've grown up. I feel like that's the main thing.” The Nina Nesbitt of 2017 is not like the Nina Nesbitt of 2013, the one who arrived as if from nowhere in 2012 and scored a UK top 15 album with Peroxide in early 2014. The heartfelt, easily relatable lyrics remain, as evidenced on the multi-layered, story-telling pop of new single, The Moments I'm Missing, which was written and produced solely by Nesbitt. That character-filled voice remains, as does the razor-sharpe eye for acute lyrical observations and nagging, ear-worm melodies. What's new is a desire to inject her music with more obvious pop influences, an area she dived headlong into last year on the excellent, one-off single Chewing Gum. While the first album zipped past in a flash, things falling into place at an alarming speed almost outside of her control, this new Nina Nesbitt, now 22, is in charge of everything. All of it. An independent artist in all variations of that phrase, this is the sound of a singer-songwriter comfortable in their own skin. “I'm so proud of this album,” she beams. “If it does well then great, obviously, but I feel like I've made the record I've always wanted to make.”

Born in a little village outside Edinburgh, Nesbitt's musical education was a long and constantly evolving one. Fully immersed in chart pop thanks to her Swedish mother – think lots of ABBA, Britney, Christina, Whitney – that was then mixed later with the more outré leanings of her father, specifically Brian Eno. Closeted in her little village, it took her friends to break her out of a fairly dark early obsession. “My friend at school told me to stop listening to Basshunter and start listening to Nirvana, so she introduced me to the rock world,” she laughs. Later, after moving to London, her musical horizons were exploded more and more. “I really got into R&B all of a sudden, and I just love how Lauryn Hill, Bryson Tiller and Kehlani communicate things about their life. It's like I know who they are when I'm listening to their songs. So I wanted to represent that in my music too.”

But we're getting ahead of ourselves, because music wasn't always her only passion. Despite learning to play various instruments, Nesbitt was also a rhythmic gymnast training to go to the Olympics. “I feel like that is where a lot of my drive has come from, because I wanted to be the best,” she explains. “I was so passionate about it. I ended up being in the Scottish team and training for the Commonwealth Games. I stopped because I'd gone as far as I could. Then music was the next thing.” Rhythmic gymnastics was also joined on the sidelines by the flute, an instrument that's hard to make look cool, especially when there are boys around. At 15, having learned the guitar, a new inspiration arrived. “I remember being 15 and hearing Taylor Swift's song 15 and being like 'oh my God', it's a girl with a guitar writing her own songs,” she says. “I wanted to do that! I don't come from a musical background or a wealthy background, so I needed to find a way of getting out there and that thing of writing your own songs felt affordable and doable.”

By this point she'd already started uploading covers to YouTube, chiefly to work out if she could actually sing, a baptism of fire that showed an early resolve. “I used to be like 'do I have a good voice?' and my mum would say 'you've got a unique tone',” she cackles. “So I never knew if I was good or not, but I loved singing so much. I basically recorded these videos because I thought strangers would give me an honest opinion and that way I could work out if I was good or not. So I didn't tell anyone about it.” Having already started songwriting aged 10 (her first song was called Dreams Become Reality), she'd also started accumulating a collection of her own recordings, which came in handy when a chance meeting with Ed Sheeran in 2011 after a gig lead to an impromptu performance and an offer to support him at Shepherd's Bush Empire and several dates across Europe. Still unsigned, a cover of an Example song then lead to a support slot on his arena tour, which was then followed by an appearance on the Radio One playlist. Having signed to Island, the Nesbitt tornado was now in motion, taking in more playlist appearances, more live shows, more Top 40 singles, more acclaim.

When the dust settled and the album was out, however, Nesbitt was ready to move on. Chewing Gum was the sound of her breaking out of her comfort zone and indulging fully her love of pop, a move that was embraced by her fans but one that felt a little too alien. While proud of the song, it symbolised the breakdown of her relationship with Island and kickstarted her move away from being an artist and embracing songwriting for others. It was a move that reignited her passion for music, lifted her confidence back up after the label split and eventually lead to the creation of The Moments I'm Missing. The pop album she'd been making, and that Chewing Gum was meant to be on, may have been scrapped but the process of its creation has its positives, chiefly her learning production for herself. As I said, always fully in control. “Production is expensive and I didn't want to have to rely on anyone else for my own career,” she says. “I wanted to do it myself. I've got this little studio at home and I just sit for hours and hours learning. I want to be able to do it all by myself if I have to. I want to always be able to put music out.”

With songs cut by various artists (including one song currently being kept on hold by one of the biggest megastars in the world), Nesbitt's keen to carry on with the songwriting for others. But the passion for her own project is firmly back, kickstarted by the creation of the beautiful, fully biographical The Moments I'm Missing, a swirling combination of delicate piano lament and robust, intricately programmed beats that features LA singer Goody Grace. “I went home from a session for someone else and I wanted to write a song nobody else could sing but me. I wanted to write a song that's just about my life,” she says, referring to these new songs accurately as “suburban pop”. I loved how rappers or R&B artists talked about their lives and I wanted to find the singer-songwriter version of that. When my career took off it all happened so fast and I couldn't always take it all in. But now I've had a lot of time to look back and see what was amazing and what was shit. It's not about missing as in longing; it's about the moments I'm missing from my brain. It's about recollecting.”

Elsewhere there's the gloriously biting The Best You Had (“it's crazy that you're moving on so fast, but baby it's okay if I am still the best you had” runs the chorus), a low-key, R&B-tinged tale of love gone sour written and produced with newcomer Jordan Riley (upcoming producer LostBoy has also worked on various songs across the album). “It's a personal thing because I've definitely felt like that but I had a conversation with a friend who was gutted her ex had moved on but she was like 'as long as I was better then that's fine'. She really hit the nail on the head. So I made it into a little poem. Once I started working on it in the studio the whole thing came to me in about 30 minutes.” Then there's Somebody Special, perhaps the best example of the bridge between the old and new. Written in Nashville with Dan Muckala and Brianna Kennedy, it's a love song but “not too mushy” and sounds like a global smash, all slowly percolating verses and a chorus you want to live inside.

In a music industry that often doesn't give you second chances, or time to settle into the artist you want to be, Nina Nesbitt's found a way to not only make it work, but make it work for her. Rather than rush into making an album for the sake of it, she waited for the inspiration to strike and let it slowly take shape organically. “With an album I feel like it's parallel to my life in a way – I was just trying to find out what I liked and what I was good at,” she says succinctly. What she's good at is being an artist, but one that's fully in control, i.e. the very best kind.

Blackfoot Gypsies with Special Guest Daddy Long Legs

The Blackfoot Gypsies have unleashed a set of original roadhouse rockin' tunes with To the Top, on Plowboy Records. The Nashville, Tennessee based powerhouse quartet demonstrate raucous energy and soul on this collection delivering their take on white-knuckled rock'n'roll.

Across the 15 tracks of To the Top, the Blackfoot Gypsies fuse their influences -- swamp blues cool, downhome hillbilly funk and homegrown punk panache -- into a lean, mean machine invoking such classic musical malcontents as the Rolling Stones, the Faces and Mott the Hoople, while sparking and spitting 21st-century fire. It's the type of record that could only come from a band that learned to rock the old-fashioned way -- one sweaty, full-throttle live performance at a time.

The band's brew of rock, hillbilly and blues began in 2010 when Oregon native, guitarist and singer Matthew Paige moved to Nashville and hooked up with drummer and Music City native Zach Murphy. The pair wanted to form a full band, but the urge to rock could not wait.

"We were doing just what we wanted to do," Paige says, "but making enough noise to fill out the sound was a challenge. I started playing through two amps to make the most sound."

The pair spent the next two years building a reputation through raucous live performances and two self-released EPs, Blackfoot Gypsies (2010) and Dandee Cheeseball (2011), and their first LP, On the Loose (2012). Hard touring followed the album's release as the duo bashed across the US through hard-won club dates. After three years, they were ready to expand their sound.

"There's really only so much you can do with a two-piece," Murphy says. "You have to do everything in extreme. I think we were too much for some people -- just a violent onslaught of noise."

They soon completed their expanded line-up when bass player Dylan Whitlow and harmonica master extraordinaire Ollie Dogg arrived within weeks of each other. Whitlow, a Gettysburg, Pennsylvania native and a veteran of several Nashville rock bands, had crossed paths with Paige and Murphy before, but Nashville native Ollie Dogg was new to the rock 'n' roll scene. He was a longtime veteran of Nashville's blues community and a regular at many blues jams, but joining a band full time was a new experience.

"My cousin told me about the band," Ollie Dogg says. "I met them a couple of weeks later, and played with them. They just told me to be loose. That's how I like to play, loose -- just take it and make it work. I've been playing with them ever since."

With the line-up complete, they entered the studio and laid down ten tracks of butt-shakin' country-blues rock. Released in April 2015 by Plowboy Records, Handle It delivered a mix of juke joint blues, front porch pickin' and snotty-nosed rock 'n' roll, positioning the group as inheritors of a fine pedigree, from Bo Diddley to the Black Crowes. Long nights tearing up the road followed as the band shared bills with the Alabama Shakes, Drivin' N' Cryin', the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Trampled by Turtles and many others. They toured throughout the US and wowed European audiences on their first international tour.

After sharpening their sound through hundreds of live performances, the band headed for Electric Kite Studio in Madison, Tennessee. Working with engineer Matt Stager and armed with 15 original tunes, the Blackfoot Gypsies self- produced their new album, To the Top. They also recruited some notable musical assistance from some of Nashville's finest musicians, including backup vocals from red-hot country queen Margo Price, Spencer Cullum, Jr. (Steelism) on steel guitar, Micah Hulscher on piano, Alexis Saski on background vocals, Taylor Powell and Shannon Pollard assisting on drums, and Paul Thacker, Diego Vasquez and Joe Hunter supplying horn section support. The album was mixed by Joe Funderburk at Creative Workshop.

To the Top wastes no time making it perfectly clear that the Blackfoot Gypsies are locked and loaded to rock. The album opens with a powerful statement of purpose in a trio of pedal-to-the-metal rockers. "I'm So Blue," "Everybody's Watching" and "Promise to Keep" all roar with an explosive energy worthy of the early ' 70s Rolling Stones or the Faces, while demonstrating that the Blackfoot Gypsies wear their inspirations on their sleeves without falling into the trap of pointless imitation.

The band slows things down a bit with "Potatoes and Whiskey," a rough -- cut slice of honky-tonk featuring Margo Price on backing vocals. Next they hop on a sanctified express train for the balling-the-jack anthem "I Had a Vision," followed by the Big Easy groove of "Back to New Orleans," a song perfect for second-line dancing anytime or anyplace.

Hitting their stride midway through the record, the Blackfoot Gypsies alternate rockers ("Lying Through Your Teeth," "I Wanna Be Famous," "She Was Mine" and "Warning") with songs demonstrating the band's versatility, with the hillbilly swing of "Velvet Low Down Blues," the Dylan-esque country ruckus of "Woman Woman" and the sublime juke joint jam of "I Got the Blues."

Wrapping up with the primal kick and Bo Diddley beat of "Gypsy Queen" and the lightly glam-seasoned back-to-basics haymaker "Why Should I Cry," the disc is a complex and masterful blend of rock, blues and hillbilly stomp sure to please the most discriminating palate and send the most reluctant feet to the dance floor.

The Blackfoot Gypsies have unleashed a set of original roadhouse rockin' tunes with To the Top, on Plowboy Records. The Nashville, Tennessee based powerhouse quartet demonstrate raucous energy and soul on this collection delivering their take on white-knuckled rock'n'roll.

Across the 15 tracks of To the Top, the Blackfoot Gypsies fuse their influences -- swamp blues cool, downhome hillbilly funk and homegrown punk panache -- into a lean, mean machine invoking such classic musical malcontents as the Rolling Stones, the Faces and Mott the Hoople, while sparking and spitting 21st-century fire. It's the type of record that could only come from a band that learned to rock the old-fashioned way -- one sweaty, full-throttle live performance at a time.

The band's brew of rock, hillbilly and blues began in 2010 when Oregon native, guitarist and singer Matthew Paige moved to Nashville and hooked up with drummer and Music City native Zach Murphy. The pair wanted to form a full band, but the urge to rock could not wait.

"We were doing just what we wanted to do," Paige says, "but making enough noise to fill out the sound was a challenge. I started playing through two amps to make the most sound."

The pair spent the next two years building a reputation through raucous live performances and two self-released EPs, Blackfoot Gypsies (2010) and Dandee Cheeseball (2011), and their first LP, On the Loose (2012). Hard touring followed the album's release as the duo bashed across the US through hard-won club dates. After three years, they were ready to expand their sound.

"There's really only so much you can do with a two-piece," Murphy says. "You have to do everything in extreme. I think we were too much for some people -- just a violent onslaught of noise."

They soon completed their expanded line-up when bass player Dylan Whitlow and harmonica master extraordinaire Ollie Dogg arrived within weeks of each other. Whitlow, a Gettysburg, Pennsylvania native and a veteran of several Nashville rock bands, had crossed paths with Paige and Murphy before, but Nashville native Ollie Dogg was new to the rock 'n' roll scene. He was a longtime veteran of Nashville's blues community and a regular at many blues jams, but joining a band full time was a new experience.

"My cousin told me about the band," Ollie Dogg says. "I met them a couple of weeks later, and played with them. They just told me to be loose. That's how I like to play, loose -- just take it and make it work. I've been playing with them ever since."

With the line-up complete, they entered the studio and laid down ten tracks of butt-shakin' country-blues rock. Released in April 2015 by Plowboy Records, Handle It delivered a mix of juke joint blues, front porch pickin' and snotty-nosed rock 'n' roll, positioning the group as inheritors of a fine pedigree, from Bo Diddley to the Black Crowes. Long nights tearing up the road followed as the band shared bills with the Alabama Shakes, Drivin' N' Cryin', the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Trampled by Turtles and many others. They toured throughout the US and wowed European audiences on their first international tour.

After sharpening their sound through hundreds of live performances, the band headed for Electric Kite Studio in Madison, Tennessee. Working with engineer Matt Stager and armed with 15 original tunes, the Blackfoot Gypsies self- produced their new album, To the Top. They also recruited some notable musical assistance from some of Nashville's finest musicians, including backup vocals from red-hot country queen Margo Price, Spencer Cullum, Jr. (Steelism) on steel guitar, Micah Hulscher on piano, Alexis Saski on background vocals, Taylor Powell and Shannon Pollard assisting on drums, and Paul Thacker, Diego Vasquez and Joe Hunter supplying horn section support. The album was mixed by Joe Funderburk at Creative Workshop.

To the Top wastes no time making it perfectly clear that the Blackfoot Gypsies are locked and loaded to rock. The album opens with a powerful statement of purpose in a trio of pedal-to-the-metal rockers. "I'm So Blue," "Everybody's Watching" and "Promise to Keep" all roar with an explosive energy worthy of the early ' 70s Rolling Stones or the Faces, while demonstrating that the Blackfoot Gypsies wear their inspirations on their sleeves without falling into the trap of pointless imitation.

The band slows things down a bit with "Potatoes and Whiskey," a rough -- cut slice of honky-tonk featuring Margo Price on backing vocals. Next they hop on a sanctified express train for the balling-the-jack anthem "I Had a Vision," followed by the Big Easy groove of "Back to New Orleans," a song perfect for second-line dancing anytime or anyplace.

Hitting their stride midway through the record, the Blackfoot Gypsies alternate rockers ("Lying Through Your Teeth," "I Wanna Be Famous," "She Was Mine" and "Warning") with songs demonstrating the band's versatility, with the hillbilly swing of "Velvet Low Down Blues," the Dylan-esque country ruckus of "Woman Woman" and the sublime juke joint jam of "I Got the Blues."

Wrapping up with the primal kick and Bo Diddley beat of "Gypsy Queen" and the lightly glam-seasoned back-to-basics haymaker "Why Should I Cry," the disc is a complex and masterful blend of rock, blues and hillbilly stomp sure to please the most discriminating palate and send the most reluctant feet to the dance floor.

Ghost of Paul Revere / Boy Named Banjo

Ghost of Paul Revere
"We grew up listening to Radiohead and the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd," says Griffin Sherry, guitarist/singer in The Ghost Of Paul Revere. "Everyone assumed we were a bluegrass band because we were playing these traditional instruments, but we weren’t writing traditional music. We were just writing songs with the instruments we had."

The result is a sound that the Portland, Maine-based band describes as "holler folk," not because it involves a lot of hollering, per se, but because it invokes the rich communal tradition of field hollers, with their call-and-response melodies, sing-along hooks, and densely layered harmonies. That sense of musical camaraderie is essential to everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, and nowhere is it more evident than their sophomore album, ''Monarch.'

The album builds on the success of the band's 2014 debut full-length, 'Believe,' and their 2015 EP, 'Field Notes Vol. 1,' which was recorded primarily in a single day at Converse's Rubber Tracks studio in Boston. The session was part of a prize package presented by the iconic Newport Folk Festival, which had invited the band to perform at the storied Rhode Island musical gathering earlier that year as part of a lineup featuring everyone from James Taylor and Jason Isbell to The Lone Bellow and Bela Fleck.

"The Monday before Newport we got a message saying to pack our bags and come on down," remembers Sherry. "We hadn't played much outside of Maine or started opening for any big acts yet at that point, and it was a hugely inspiring moment."

Word began to spread about the rowdy pickers from the north. The Boston Globe raved that they "create the type of music for which festivals are made," while No Depression said they "prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere," and Dispatch Magazine wrote that they possess not only "the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression." Hitting listeners straight in the feelings has been the band's M.O. since its inception in 2011, and they've used their powerful stage show to convert the masses at every stop along their long and winding journey, which has included shared stages with artists like The Avett Brothers, The Travelin' McCourys, Brown Bird, The Revivalists, the Infamous Stringdusters, and more. The band sold out Port City Music Hall, Stone Mountain Arts Center, and the Strand Theater multiple times, won Best In Maine at the New England Music Awards, and capped off 2015 with an electrifying headline performance on New Year's Eve at Portland's State Theatre in front of 1,600 enraptured fans.

When it came time to record, 'Monarch,' though, the band knew they wanted to push the sonic envelope beyond the live-in-the-studio setup that had guided their previous efforts.

"Every other record has just been the three of us in a room with microphones until we got a take we liked," explains Sherry. "We approached this one differently. It was the first time we did a lot of arranging and writing in the studio. We decided we'd worry about learning how to present the songs live after we'd recorded everything instead of the other way around."

"It enabled us to get a lot more adventurous with our ideas," adds bassist/singer Sean McCarthy. "We wanted to do something new and explore where we could take the sound while still staying true to who we are."

The album opens with "Little Bird," a playful, infectious foot -stomper that blends blues and soul and roots and perfectly reflects the communal, inviting nature of the band's music.

Banjo player Max Davis takes over the songwriting and lead vocal duties for "Avalanche," an emotional anthem featuring one of the album's most lush arrangements along with driving drums from special guest Tony McNaboe (Ray LaMontagne, Rustic Overtones), while "King's Road" finds the band expanding their sonic palette to include strings and electric guitar, and "Honey Please" channels 60's R&B and Motown through old-school folk instrumentation. At the core of everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, though, are their powerful, stop-you-dead-in -your-tracks harmonies. On songs like "Wild Child," "Welcome Home," and "Need Somebody," the band conjures up whole worlds of shimmering sonic beauty in the blending of their voices.

"The album follows this arc where it starts very bright-eyed and optimistic and then hits a turning point where it gets really dark," says Sherry, "like a relationship that starts beautifully and then grows sour. As we started to build the record and expand the sound, it had a place sonically and emotionally.”

By the end of the record, the song cycle reveals that traveling through the darkness is in fact a necessary step for positive growth. 'Monarch' closer "Chrysalides" evokes the imagery of metamorphosis, a transformation that represents rebirth and new beginnings.

"It's about what happens in that moment of metamorphosis and change," says Davis. "I was interested in combining different words into a new term that could capture that feeling, so 'Chrysalides' is a play on chrysalis. This was one of the first times that I allowed myself to bite into and really take advantage of that space in the writing."

If there's one takeaway from 'Monarch,' it's that change is inevitable. Lovers, families, friends, instruments, sounds; they all transform with time. The key to thriving and surviving in a challenging world is to embrace those transformations, to accept them not as endings but as fresh starts. What comes next? Only time can tell. One thing's for sure, though: by opening their hearts and souls with such artistic grace and humility, The Ghost of Paul Revere have created a rich, rewarding, passionate community, one that they can count on to join them for every step of the remarkable journey that lies ahead.

Boy Named Banjo

Boy named banjo is a Americana-roots band from Nashville, TN

Boy Named Banjo is creating a lot of buzz in the americana and country scenes east of the Mississippi. the nashville natives founded the group in 2011, realeasing their first album The Tanglewood Sessions at the age of 18. the group has since released its sophomore record, Long Story Short (2014), and an EP, lost on main (2015). bnb took the stage at Bonnaro0 in 2015, which led to a nomination for "Best local Band (Nashville)" By The Tennesseean.

Ghost of Paul Revere
"We grew up listening to Radiohead and the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd," says Griffin Sherry, guitarist/singer in The Ghost Of Paul Revere. "Everyone assumed we were a bluegrass band because we were playing these traditional instruments, but we weren’t writing traditional music. We were just writing songs with the instruments we had."

The result is a sound that the Portland, Maine-based band describes as "holler folk," not because it involves a lot of hollering, per se, but because it invokes the rich communal tradition of field hollers, with their call-and-response melodies, sing-along hooks, and densely layered harmonies. That sense of musical camaraderie is essential to everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, and nowhere is it more evident than their sophomore album, ''Monarch.'

The album builds on the success of the band's 2014 debut full-length, 'Believe,' and their 2015 EP, 'Field Notes Vol. 1,' which was recorded primarily in a single day at Converse's Rubber Tracks studio in Boston. The session was part of a prize package presented by the iconic Newport Folk Festival, which had invited the band to perform at the storied Rhode Island musical gathering earlier that year as part of a lineup featuring everyone from James Taylor and Jason Isbell to The Lone Bellow and Bela Fleck.

"The Monday before Newport we got a message saying to pack our bags and come on down," remembers Sherry. "We hadn't played much outside of Maine or started opening for any big acts yet at that point, and it was a hugely inspiring moment."

Word began to spread about the rowdy pickers from the north. The Boston Globe raved that they "create the type of music for which festivals are made," while No Depression said they "prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere," and Dispatch Magazine wrote that they possess not only "the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression." Hitting listeners straight in the feelings has been the band's M.O. since its inception in 2011, and they've used their powerful stage show to convert the masses at every stop along their long and winding journey, which has included shared stages with artists like The Avett Brothers, The Travelin' McCourys, Brown Bird, The Revivalists, the Infamous Stringdusters, and more. The band sold out Port City Music Hall, Stone Mountain Arts Center, and the Strand Theater multiple times, won Best In Maine at the New England Music Awards, and capped off 2015 with an electrifying headline performance on New Year's Eve at Portland's State Theatre in front of 1,600 enraptured fans.

When it came time to record, 'Monarch,' though, the band knew they wanted to push the sonic envelope beyond the live-in-the-studio setup that had guided their previous efforts.

"Every other record has just been the three of us in a room with microphones until we got a take we liked," explains Sherry. "We approached this one differently. It was the first time we did a lot of arranging and writing in the studio. We decided we'd worry about learning how to present the songs live after we'd recorded everything instead of the other way around."

"It enabled us to get a lot more adventurous with our ideas," adds bassist/singer Sean McCarthy. "We wanted to do something new and explore where we could take the sound while still staying true to who we are."

The album opens with "Little Bird," a playful, infectious foot -stomper that blends blues and soul and roots and perfectly reflects the communal, inviting nature of the band's music.

Banjo player Max Davis takes over the songwriting and lead vocal duties for "Avalanche," an emotional anthem featuring one of the album's most lush arrangements along with driving drums from special guest Tony McNaboe (Ray LaMontagne, Rustic Overtones), while "King's Road" finds the band expanding their sonic palette to include strings and electric guitar, and "Honey Please" channels 60's R&B and Motown through old-school folk instrumentation. At the core of everything The Ghost of Paul Revere does, though, are their powerful, stop-you-dead-in -your-tracks harmonies. On songs like "Wild Child," "Welcome Home," and "Need Somebody," the band conjures up whole worlds of shimmering sonic beauty in the blending of their voices.

"The album follows this arc where it starts very bright-eyed and optimistic and then hits a turning point where it gets really dark," says Sherry, "like a relationship that starts beautifully and then grows sour. As we started to build the record and expand the sound, it had a place sonically and emotionally.”

By the end of the record, the song cycle reveals that traveling through the darkness is in fact a necessary step for positive growth. 'Monarch' closer "Chrysalides" evokes the imagery of metamorphosis, a transformation that represents rebirth and new beginnings.

"It's about what happens in that moment of metamorphosis and change," says Davis. "I was interested in combining different words into a new term that could capture that feeling, so 'Chrysalides' is a play on chrysalis. This was one of the first times that I allowed myself to bite into and really take advantage of that space in the writing."

If there's one takeaway from 'Monarch,' it's that change is inevitable. Lovers, families, friends, instruments, sounds; they all transform with time. The key to thriving and surviving in a challenging world is to embrace those transformations, to accept them not as endings but as fresh starts. What comes next? Only time can tell. One thing's for sure, though: by opening their hearts and souls with such artistic grace and humility, The Ghost of Paul Revere have created a rich, rewarding, passionate community, one that they can count on to join them for every step of the remarkable journey that lies ahead.

Boy Named Banjo

Boy named banjo is a Americana-roots band from Nashville, TN

Boy Named Banjo is creating a lot of buzz in the americana and country scenes east of the Mississippi. the nashville natives founded the group in 2011, realeasing their first album The Tanglewood Sessions at the age of 18. the group has since released its sophomore record, Long Story Short (2014), and an EP, lost on main (2015). bnb took the stage at Bonnaro0 in 2015, which led to a nomination for "Best local Band (Nashville)" By The Tennesseean.

Curtis McMurtry / Bindley Hardware Co.

Curtis McMurtry writes songs about villains that believe they are victims. Influenced by Fiona Apple, Billy Strayhorn and Leonard Cohen, Curtis' music combines sinister lyrics with lush, unconventional arrangements. His first solo album Respectable Enemy was released in August 2014, and drew comparisons to Calexico and John Fullbright. His sophomore album The Hornet's Nest was released in February 2017, and continues to garner critical acclaim. Curtis' music has been featured on NPR's Weekend Edition, and his song "Wrong Inflection" was included in the soundtrack for comedian Tig Notaro's Amazon Prime series One Mississippi.



Curtis was born and raised in Austin, Texas and grew up listening to local musicians Warren Hood, Ephraim Owens, Seela, and his father, James McMurtry. Curtis studied music composition and ethnomusicology in college, primarily writing contemporary chamber music for banjo and strings. After graduation, Curtis moved to Nashville to sharpen his songwriting by co-writing with elder statesmen including Fred Koller and Guy Clark. He has since moved back to Austin where he performs as a quartet with cellist Diana Burgess (of Mother Falcon), upright bassist Taylor Turner (of Magia Negra) and trumpeter Nathan Calzada.

Bindley Hardware Co. is a rust-belt Americana band from Pittsburgh, PA. They draw influence from classic country, folk and modern alt-country, as well as from the original Bindley Hardware Co., its namesake hardware store owned and operated by frontman Jon's family during Pittsburgh’s industrial boom in the early 20th century. "To be able to make music or have any kind of creative endeavor that identifies where you’re from is really important. [...] Things in Pittsburgh inspire me every day. The Bindley Hardware Co. has such a rich history and I’m kind of making it my own," Bindley said.

Curtis McMurtry writes songs about villains that believe they are victims. Influenced by Fiona Apple, Billy Strayhorn and Leonard Cohen, Curtis' music combines sinister lyrics with lush, unconventional arrangements. His first solo album Respectable Enemy was released in August 2014, and drew comparisons to Calexico and John Fullbright. His sophomore album The Hornet's Nest was released in February 2017, and continues to garner critical acclaim. Curtis' music has been featured on NPR's Weekend Edition, and his song "Wrong Inflection" was included in the soundtrack for comedian Tig Notaro's Amazon Prime series One Mississippi.



Curtis was born and raised in Austin, Texas and grew up listening to local musicians Warren Hood, Ephraim Owens, Seela, and his father, James McMurtry. Curtis studied music composition and ethnomusicology in college, primarily writing contemporary chamber music for banjo and strings. After graduation, Curtis moved to Nashville to sharpen his songwriting by co-writing with elder statesmen including Fred Koller and Guy Clark. He has since moved back to Austin where he performs as a quartet with cellist Diana Burgess (of Mother Falcon), upright bassist Taylor Turner (of Magia Negra) and trumpeter Nathan Calzada.

Bindley Hardware Co. is a rust-belt Americana band from Pittsburgh, PA. They draw influence from classic country, folk and modern alt-country, as well as from the original Bindley Hardware Co., its namesake hardware store owned and operated by frontman Jon's family during Pittsburgh’s industrial boom in the early 20th century. "To be able to make music or have any kind of creative endeavor that identifies where you’re from is really important. [...] Things in Pittsburgh inspire me every day. The Bindley Hardware Co. has such a rich history and I’m kind of making it my own," Bindley said.

(Early Show) The Local / Radio Lark

What do you get when you cross a punk rocker from Belfast, Northern Ireland with a indie-folkster from Pittsburgh? The powerful indie rock ensemble The Local, whose combination of punk rock influences, infused with sweeping operatic arrangements resemble something producer Brian McTear (War on Drugs, Strand of Oaks, Matt Pond PA, Local Natives) lovingly describes as My Bloody Valentine meets Ennio Morricone.

Their story begins near Belfast where Dean Henry formed the short-lived punk band Slate with his younger brother Lee. Proudly wearing their influences on their sleeve, the band drew a large and loyal local following with its stage presence and catchy, driving tunes. It was during this time that he met Jenny, an American living in Northern Ireland, also playing in small town pubs and clubs around the country. She became a supporter of The band, and later, Slate’s unofficial tour manager. “We would load our gear into my Peugeot hatchback and trek all over Northern Ireland playing shows”. The couple married and headed to Pittsburgh, where Jenny was born and raised.

A lifelong music appreciator, Ben Sweet determined to teach himself guitar after a diabetes diagnosis. With an assist from a music theory text, he quickly gained his chops and began writing the lyrically-driven folk songs which formed the basis of his solo act Southside American. His first solo record In Our Keystone State was released in 2013 to critical acclaim and significant local buzz. As Sweet looked to round out Southside’s sound, he added a backing band. A tip from the band’s keyboardist, who worked alongside Jenny Henry, led him to Dean, a skilled percussionist, in the spring of 2014.

It was while playing together in Southside American that Henry and Sweet discovered their mutual affection for bands such as The Jam, The Clash, The Replacements and The Pixies. Sweet encouraged Henry to begin writing his own songs and, in no time, he was churning out one compelling composition after another, all the while his guitar chops increasing dramatically. The two begin writing together and, in no time at all, had put together the songs which form the nucleus of their debut EP Reverie which was recorded with McTear at Miner Street Studio in Philadelphia, and features Jenny Henry on bass and Pat Berkery (The War on Drugs, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!) on drums.

Since returning from the studio, the band has recently added keyboardist Eric Matlock.

A self-described band for adults The Local brings a powerful yet understated sensibility to the stage on diverse tracks such as Reverie, Racing and Fair Play. The Reverie EP is due to be released in the spring of 2018 on Wednesday Records. It was mastered by Paul Hammond.

What do you get when you cross a punk rocker from Belfast, Northern Ireland with a indie-folkster from Pittsburgh? The powerful indie rock ensemble The Local, whose combination of punk rock influences, infused with sweeping operatic arrangements resemble something producer Brian McTear (War on Drugs, Strand of Oaks, Matt Pond PA, Local Natives) lovingly describes as My Bloody Valentine meets Ennio Morricone.

Their story begins near Belfast where Dean Henry formed the short-lived punk band Slate with his younger brother Lee. Proudly wearing their influences on their sleeve, the band drew a large and loyal local following with its stage presence and catchy, driving tunes. It was during this time that he met Jenny, an American living in Northern Ireland, also playing in small town pubs and clubs around the country. She became a supporter of The band, and later, Slate’s unofficial tour manager. “We would load our gear into my Peugeot hatchback and trek all over Northern Ireland playing shows”. The couple married and headed to Pittsburgh, where Jenny was born and raised.

A lifelong music appreciator, Ben Sweet determined to teach himself guitar after a diabetes diagnosis. With an assist from a music theory text, he quickly gained his chops and began writing the lyrically-driven folk songs which formed the basis of his solo act Southside American. His first solo record In Our Keystone State was released in 2013 to critical acclaim and significant local buzz. As Sweet looked to round out Southside’s sound, he added a backing band. A tip from the band’s keyboardist, who worked alongside Jenny Henry, led him to Dean, a skilled percussionist, in the spring of 2014.

It was while playing together in Southside American that Henry and Sweet discovered their mutual affection for bands such as The Jam, The Clash, The Replacements and The Pixies. Sweet encouraged Henry to begin writing his own songs and, in no time, he was churning out one compelling composition after another, all the while his guitar chops increasing dramatically. The two begin writing together and, in no time at all, had put together the songs which form the nucleus of their debut EP Reverie which was recorded with McTear at Miner Street Studio in Philadelphia, and features Jenny Henry on bass and Pat Berkery (The War on Drugs, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!) on drums.

Since returning from the studio, the band has recently added keyboardist Eric Matlock.

A self-described band for adults The Local brings a powerful yet understated sensibility to the stage on diverse tracks such as Reverie, Racing and Fair Play. The Reverie EP is due to be released in the spring of 2018 on Wednesday Records. It was mastered by Paul Hammond.

(Late Show) Joe Jack Talcum (Dead Milkmen) with Special Guests Coolzey and The Inevitable Mr. Chris

Joe Jack Talcum (Dead Milkmen)
Anthony Joseph "Joe" Genaro (born October 15, 1962 in Wagontown, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and songwriter, best known as the guitarist and co-lead vocalist for the punk rock group The Dead Milkmen. Currently residing in Philadelphia, Genaro has performed with a number of punk and indie rock groups, most recently including The Low Budgets, and is also a solo artist. He is of Italian heritage.

Coolzey
Golden era hip-hop roots planted in black Iowa dirt and tempered by 90s alternative era rock influence yields a juxtaposition of the dark, horrific nature of life paired with a slapstick and comedic view of the world, allowing for a wide, unpredictable arsenal of material ranging from soul-spilling indie bedroom rock to wise-cracking battle rap and on to radio pop.

Coolzey stepped into the public eye around 2005 with a demo album and a series of exploratory DIY tours with rapper/comedian and friend Schaffer the Darklord. Interest spread quickly and Coolzey found himself touring alongside hip-hop legends from Brand Nubian and Jurassic 5 as well as punk rock heroes like Dead Milkmen. Coolzey’s first album ‘The Honey’ was released in 2010 and second official full-length ‘Hit Factory’ in 2013. In these albums as well as in a number of EPs, collaborations and side projects, he finds his niche as a songwriter, navigating hip-hop, rock, punk and pop in the spirit of genre defying influences such as Ween, Beck, The Beastie Boys and Outkast.

Coolzey’s love for multiple genres can also be evidenced in his record label Public School Records, which curates music from the classic hip-hop of Bru Lei to the art pop of Belly Belt.

Joe Jack Talcum (Dead Milkmen)
Anthony Joseph "Joe" Genaro (born October 15, 1962 in Wagontown, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and songwriter, best known as the guitarist and co-lead vocalist for the punk rock group The Dead Milkmen. Currently residing in Philadelphia, Genaro has performed with a number of punk and indie rock groups, most recently including The Low Budgets, and is also a solo artist. He is of Italian heritage.

Coolzey
Golden era hip-hop roots planted in black Iowa dirt and tempered by 90s alternative era rock influence yields a juxtaposition of the dark, horrific nature of life paired with a slapstick and comedic view of the world, allowing for a wide, unpredictable arsenal of material ranging from soul-spilling indie bedroom rock to wise-cracking battle rap and on to radio pop.

Coolzey stepped into the public eye around 2005 with a demo album and a series of exploratory DIY tours with rapper/comedian and friend Schaffer the Darklord. Interest spread quickly and Coolzey found himself touring alongside hip-hop legends from Brand Nubian and Jurassic 5 as well as punk rock heroes like Dead Milkmen. Coolzey’s first album ‘The Honey’ was released in 2010 and second official full-length ‘Hit Factory’ in 2013. In these albums as well as in a number of EPs, collaborations and side projects, he finds his niche as a songwriter, navigating hip-hop, rock, punk and pop in the spirit of genre defying influences such as Ween, Beck, The Beastie Boys and Outkast.

Coolzey’s love for multiple genres can also be evidenced in his record label Public School Records, which curates music from the classic hip-hop of Bru Lei to the art pop of Belly Belt.

(Early Show) BobbyrocK (Featuring Justin Brescia from MTV's The Hills) with Special Guests Second Street Stranger and Fidelity Laurel

From Southern California (Huntington Beach), BobbyrocK Is Called "Thee Punk of Rock". A Huge Sound Coming From This Alternative Punk Rock Solo Artist. Guitarist/Singer/Writer Justin "Bobby" Brescia As Seen On The Hit Reality MTV Show 'The Hills'. With a TV Backround , Companies Such As The MTV Network , Us Weekly , E! NEWS , And VOGUE Amongst The Heaviest Hitters In The Industry All Know Who Justin 'Bobby' Brescia Is On A First Name Basis , Constantly Keeping Up With His Whereabouts Via Up To Date News Articles , Live Podcasts , Photo Shoots , And Coming To His Shows !

Justin Is Currently Set To Play His Fourth U.S. Tour Of 35 Dates In March Of 2018, One Thing's For Sure, When Justin "BobbyrocK" Brescia Hits The Stage You're In For A Real Treat! In The Mean Time Keep Your Eyes And Ears Pealed For NEW SINGLE & MUSIC VIDEO: 'BACK TO YOU' Arriving in MARCH!

From Southern California (Huntington Beach), BobbyrocK Is Called "Thee Punk of Rock". A Huge Sound Coming From This Alternative Punk Rock Solo Artist. Guitarist/Singer/Writer Justin "Bobby" Brescia As Seen On The Hit Reality MTV Show 'The Hills'. With a TV Backround , Companies Such As The MTV Network , Us Weekly , E! NEWS , And VOGUE Amongst The Heaviest Hitters In The Industry All Know Who Justin 'Bobby' Brescia Is On A First Name Basis , Constantly Keeping Up With His Whereabouts Via Up To Date News Articles , Live Podcasts , Photo Shoots , And Coming To His Shows !

Justin Is Currently Set To Play His Fourth U.S. Tour Of 35 Dates In March Of 2018, One Thing's For Sure, When Justin "BobbyrocK" Brescia Hits The Stage You're In For A Real Treat! In The Mean Time Keep Your Eyes And Ears Pealed For NEW SINGLE & MUSIC VIDEO: 'BACK TO YOU' Arriving in MARCH!

(Late Show) Soul Shine Overdrive with Thirty Years Later

Soul Shine Overdrive
A rock band hailing from Pittsburgh, PA that infuses elements of blues, funk, soul and jazz creating a musically rich sound spanning many genres.

Thirty Years Later
Thirty Years Later is a Pittsburgh Original Rock Band.

Soul Shine Overdrive
A rock band hailing from Pittsburgh, PA that infuses elements of blues, funk, soul and jazz creating a musically rich sound spanning many genres.

Thirty Years Later
Thirty Years Later is a Pittsburgh Original Rock Band.

Canceled - Kelley Stoltz with Special Guest PM Mirror

This show has been canceled - all tickets can be refunded at your point of purchase.

This show has been canceled - all tickets can be refunded at your point of purchase.

Calliope Songwriters Open Stage at Club Cafe and Songwriters Meeting with Featured Performer Sadie

No cover!

7-9pm: Calliope songwriters meeteing. Meet fellow musicians, collaborate on songs with others and refine your songwriting techniques with the help of a group environment. Open to all interested in attending even if you do not wish to participate, and open to all skill levels

9pm: Club Cafe's revered open stage returns. Sign up and open stage begin at 9pm. No cover, all genres/styles welcome.

Club Cafe's monthly open stage has joined forces with Calliope and John Hayes (long time host of the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern's open mic night). All acts and genres are welcome to attend. The open stage will happen the first Tuesday of every month. We are excited to be working with John and Calliope and look forward to this next chapter in our long running, well revered open stage.

No cover!

7-9pm: Calliope songwriters meeteing. Meet fellow musicians, collaborate on songs with others and refine your songwriting techniques with the help of a group environment. Open to all interested in attending even if you do not wish to participate, and open to all skill levels

9pm: Club Cafe's revered open stage returns. Sign up and open stage begin at 9pm. No cover, all genres/styles welcome.

Club Cafe's monthly open stage has joined forces with Calliope and John Hayes (long time host of the Bloomfield Bridge Tavern's open mic night). All acts and genres are welcome to attend. The open stage will happen the first Tuesday of every month. We are excited to be working with John and Calliope and look forward to this next chapter in our long running, well revered open stage.

Dead Horses with Special Guest Sadie

At fifteen, Dead Horses frontwoman Sarah Vos' world turned upside down. Raised in a strict, fundamentalist home, Vos lost everything when she and her family were expelled from the rural Wisconsin church where her father had long served as pastor. What happened next is the story of Dead Horses' stunning new album, 'My Mother the Moon," a record full of trauma and triumph, despair and hope, pain and resilience.

Blending elements of traditional roots with contemporary indie folk, the album is both familiar and unexpected, unflinchingly honest in its portrayal of modern American life, yet optimistic in its unshakable faith in brighter days to come. Earthy and organic, Vos' songs often reveal themselves to be exercises in empathy and outreach; she writes not only to find meaning in the struggles she's endured, but also to embrace kindred souls on their own personal journeys of self-discovery. As much as the album is a reckoning with the past and everything she witnessed growing up (mental illness, poverty, addiction, and violence), it's also an effort to shape the future, to build a community based around art and love and beauty and acceptance, a community to replace the one she was so brusquely robbed of as a child.

'My Mother the Moon' is Dead Horses' third album, and it follows hot on the heels of their acclaimed 2016 release, 'Cartoon Moon,' which Wisconsin Public Radio called “equally beautiful and effortless." That record prompted the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to declare Dead Horses a Band To Watch and earned them honors for "Best Album," "Best Americana/Bluegrass Artist," and "Best Female Vocalist" at the 2017 WAMI Awards. American Songwriter called Vos “a compelling vocalist…who carries every tune with her husky, deeply emotional tone that feels lived in and real," while No Depression hailed her songwriting as “beautiful and fresh." With a fleshed out touring lineup, the group logged countless miles, sharing bills along the way with Trampled by Turtles, Mandolin Orange, and Elephant Revival in addition to making festival appearances from Bristol Rhythm and Roots to WinterWonderGrass.

At fifteen, Dead Horses frontwoman Sarah Vos' world turned upside down. Raised in a strict, fundamentalist home, Vos lost everything when she and her family were expelled from the rural Wisconsin church where her father had long served as pastor. What happened next is the story of Dead Horses' stunning new album, 'My Mother the Moon," a record full of trauma and triumph, despair and hope, pain and resilience.

Blending elements of traditional roots with contemporary indie folk, the album is both familiar and unexpected, unflinchingly honest in its portrayal of modern American life, yet optimistic in its unshakable faith in brighter days to come. Earthy and organic, Vos' songs often reveal themselves to be exercises in empathy and outreach; she writes not only to find meaning in the struggles she's endured, but also to embrace kindred souls on their own personal journeys of self-discovery. As much as the album is a reckoning with the past and everything she witnessed growing up (mental illness, poverty, addiction, and violence), it's also an effort to shape the future, to build a community based around art and love and beauty and acceptance, a community to replace the one she was so brusquely robbed of as a child.

'My Mother the Moon' is Dead Horses' third album, and it follows hot on the heels of their acclaimed 2016 release, 'Cartoon Moon,' which Wisconsin Public Radio called “equally beautiful and effortless." That record prompted the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to declare Dead Horses a Band To Watch and earned them honors for "Best Album," "Best Americana/Bluegrass Artist," and "Best Female Vocalist" at the 2017 WAMI Awards. American Songwriter called Vos “a compelling vocalist…who carries every tune with her husky, deeply emotional tone that feels lived in and real," while No Depression hailed her songwriting as “beautiful and fresh." With a fleshed out touring lineup, the group logged countless miles, sharing bills along the way with Trampled by Turtles, Mandolin Orange, and Elephant Revival in addition to making festival appearances from Bristol Rhythm and Roots to WinterWonderGrass.

Canceled - Live From The Chambers Featuring Cam Chambers and Special Guest Luis Castillo

This event has been canceled and will be rescheduled at a later date.

This event has been canceled and will be rescheduled at a later date.

(Early Show) Guy Russo - Album Release with Special Guest Ben Shannon

Pittsburgh singer-songwriter Guy Russo releases his debut solo album, "Part of It All," his first release since the 2014 disbandment of the duo Broken Fences. The album comes out of The Church and Treelady Studios family, co-produced with Dave Hidek and mastered by Garrett Haines. As the album title suggests, things get a little cosmic in this one, while still preserving the some of the more confessional folk writing characterized by earlier work. The release show will feature much of the record's personnel, as well as an opening set from songwriting guru Ben Shannon.

Ben Shannon is a Nashville born, Pittsburgh based singer, songwriter, and recording artist. After the release of his sophomore record, Farewell Mountain, Shannon was invited to join a weekly circle of songwriters . The rules were simple: one song a week posted as an MP3 link with lyrics every Tuesday. The sheer volume of writing created the necessity for a retrospective show. This show will feature all new material written after September 2017.

Pittsburgh singer-songwriter Guy Russo releases his debut solo album, "Part of It All," his first release since the 2014 disbandment of the duo Broken Fences. The album comes out of The Church and Treelady Studios family, co-produced with Dave Hidek and mastered by Garrett Haines. As the album title suggests, things get a little cosmic in this one, while still preserving the some of the more confessional folk writing characterized by earlier work. The release show will feature much of the record's personnel, as well as an opening set from songwriting guru Ben Shannon.

Ben Shannon is a Nashville born, Pittsburgh based singer, songwriter, and recording artist. After the release of his sophomore record, Farewell Mountain, Shannon was invited to join a weekly circle of songwriters . The rules were simple: one song a week posted as an MP3 link with lyrics every Tuesday. The sheer volume of writing created the necessity for a retrospective show. This show will feature all new material written after September 2017.

(Late Show) Funky Fest Pre-Party Pittsburgh Featuring Habatat with Special Guest Glenn Strother Project

Since early 2012, The ever-blossoming psychedelic Jam/Funk/Rock outfit HABATAT has made positive strides in the Pgh, Pa suburbs sharing stages with the likes of “Twiddle”, “the Heavy Pets”, “Pigeons Playing Ping Pong”, and “Zack Deputy” to name very few.. Throughout 2013/2014, HABATAT focused on playing clubs, bars, bowling alleys, any local venue that would have them; as well as festivals, fundraisers, and community events steadily building their following as they did.
2015 marked the band's first self titled release and opened the doors for mainstream acceptance; which quickly followed by them being offered many long term opportunities.
In 2016 the future looks extremely bright for this young group of euphonious pioneers. Combining gritty yet sultry vocals by Ryan Woods, colorful funky bass riffs from Kris Lupher, soulful solos from Cory "Gweedo" Mickinak, powerful dance/funk grooves by J.Banks and provocative horns from Josh Covert, this group will leave you floored with their energetic live performance; a raw boogaloo of sound.
Their music brings forth flashing vibes of some of the great legendary rock bands such as Cream, CCR, and The Grateful Dead but they are in a characteristic thumbprint completely of their own. Equipped with a four hour repertoire of original songs and ballads, Woods' vocalizations emit a fervent and rasping melody that sets the footprint for every song. The lyrical components of each verse are sung out with a boldness and warmth. Each one as good as the other.” By the great power of energy transmission between our close friends, the Habateers (fan club), and never ending support from family; We are happy to take you through our world of music and life, and continue to build to unseen horizons; growing as a community with people of love and passion in what they do and how we act with one another.
We are excited about the recording and release of our 2nd album expected to release in summer 2017; as well as a full summer tour/ festival season. We full-heartedly Thank the ones who have brought us to these times and places in our journey…
CHEERS to each moment shared together and the ones yet to come…!

Since early 2012, The ever-blossoming psychedelic Jam/Funk/Rock outfit HABATAT has made positive strides in the Pgh, Pa suburbs sharing stages with the likes of “Twiddle”, “the Heavy Pets”, “Pigeons Playing Ping Pong”, and “Zack Deputy” to name very few.. Throughout 2013/2014, HABATAT focused on playing clubs, bars, bowling alleys, any local venue that would have them; as well as festivals, fundraisers, and community events steadily building their following as they did.
2015 marked the band's first self titled release and opened the doors for mainstream acceptance; which quickly followed by them being offered many long term opportunities.
In 2016 the future looks extremely bright for this young group of euphonious pioneers. Combining gritty yet sultry vocals by Ryan Woods, colorful funky bass riffs from Kris Lupher, soulful solos from Cory "Gweedo" Mickinak, powerful dance/funk grooves by J.Banks and provocative horns from Josh Covert, this group will leave you floored with their energetic live performance; a raw boogaloo of sound.
Their music brings forth flashing vibes of some of the great legendary rock bands such as Cream, CCR, and The Grateful Dead but they are in a characteristic thumbprint completely of their own. Equipped with a four hour repertoire of original songs and ballads, Woods' vocalizations emit a fervent and rasping melody that sets the footprint for every song. The lyrical components of each verse are sung out with a boldness and warmth. Each one as good as the other.” By the great power of energy transmission between our close friends, the Habateers (fan club), and never ending support from family; We are happy to take you through our world of music and life, and continue to build to unseen horizons; growing as a community with people of love and passion in what they do and how we act with one another.
We are excited about the recording and release of our 2nd album expected to release in summer 2017; as well as a full summer tour/ festival season. We full-heartedly Thank the ones who have brought us to these times and places in our journey…
CHEERS to each moment shared together and the ones yet to come…!

Bill Toms and Hard Rain (featuring The Soulville Horns) and Terraplane Records Presents The 'Live' Recording. Come and be part of this CD which will be released in 2019.

Bill Toms and Hard Rain (featuring The Soulville Horns) and Terraplane Records Presents The "Live" Recording. Come and be part of this CD which will be released in 2019.

Bill Toms and Hard Rain (featuring The Soulville Horns) and Terraplane Records Presents The "Live" Recording. Come and be part of this CD which will be released in 2019.

The Weeks with Special Guest Becca Mancari

Rowdy, Raucous, Longhair Mississippi Glam Rock.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent
2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teen- agers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were tour- ing Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly ener- gized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on col- laboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.
Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like
"Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's
snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, when- ever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick
our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're go- ing. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the auto- biographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rock- ing out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damnien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

Rowdy, Raucous, Longhair Mississippi Glam Rock.

That's the sound of Easy, The Week's long-awaited followup to their breakthrough album, Dear Bo Jackson. Recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis - a place filled with the ghosts (and gear) of the Replacements, ZZ Top, and Big Star, all of whom traveled to Ardent to create their own landmark albums - Easy finds The Weeks doubling down on a mix of groove, grit, and guitars. It's swaggering and sharply-focused, shining new light on a band of brothers who, although still in their mid-20s, have already logged a decade's worth of sweaty gigs together.

If Easy bears resemblance to the raw, rowdy attitude of the The Weeks' live show, it's because the album was written at the end of a busy, five-year period that found the group rarely leaving the road.

"We moved to Nashville in 2010," remembers frontman Cyle Barnes, who formed the band in Jackson, Mississippi, with his three longtime bandmates: drummer (and twin brother) Cain Barnes, guitarist Sam Williams, and bass player Damien Bone. "We spent
2011 to 2015 touring. November 2015 was the first time we ever spent an entire month in Nashville."

Those years on the road were eye-opening for The Weeks, all of whom were just teen- agers when they began playing together in 2006. By their early 20s, the guys were tour- ing Europe with Kings of Leon, promoting the newly-released Dear Bo Jackson in front of 20,000 people each night. Back in America, The Weeks continued playing their own club shows, too. The experience taught them how to bridge the gap between arena shows and smaller gigs. In short, it taught them how to be themselves, no matter the audience.

Appropriately, Easy consolidates the band's strengths. While the songs on 2013's Dear Bo Jackson were thick with horn arrangements, strings, and guest appearances, Easy is a leaner, louder beast. The Weeks began working on its 11 tracks after returning home from a long tour and taking some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Newly ener- gized, they began writing songs at Sam and Damien's home in Nashville, with Cyle and Williams splitting the bulk of the songwriting duties. The whole process relied on col- laboration, with the full band fleshing out the newer songs.

"Everyone would come to the house, make food, hang out, and play music 'til four in the morning," Williams remembers. "We wrote 25 songs, then picked our favorites for the final tracklist.
Easy is driving and direct, captured in punchy sound by producer Paul Ebersold. The goal was to clear out any unnecessary clutter, focusing instead on The Weeks' biggest strengths: the elastic power of Cyle's voice, capable of a crooning drawl one minute and a roof-raising howl the next; the range of Sam's guitar playing, from Motown-influenced chord stabs to garage-rock blasts of sound; and the interlocking rhythms of Damien and Cain. They threw some curveballs into the mix, too, riding a lovely, lazy, organ-heavy groove on the southern soul song "Hands on the Radio" and punctuating songs like
"Ike" with a small horn section. Along the way, they made good use the studio's vintage gear, finding room on a handful of songs for Elvis Presley's microphone, Big Star's
snare drum, the "Green Onions" organ from Booker T. & the M.G.'s.

"We said, 'If we can do this song in five chords, let's do it,'" says Sam. "That way, when- ever the curveballs do happen, they mean a lot. We focused on the songs first, and then we added stuff, as long as it didn't harm the energy or the groove. We wanted to pick
our moments better."

Inspired by the real-life characters, places, and stories The Weeks encountered on tour, Easy is a record about where the band has been, as well as a sign of where they're go- ing. "I wanted the stories to be real - a little dark, maybe - but I wanted them to be redeeming, too," says Cyle, who began turning the stories into proper songs once the tour ended. He tossed some personal tales into the mix, too, with songs like the auto- biographical "Gold Doesn't Rust" focusing on the joy of plugging in, tuning up and rock- ing out.

"We just wanted to make a rock record," adds Damnien, shrugging his shoulders at the simplicity of it all. The Weeks earned their road warrior credentials years ago, but they've never defined their ambition - or the wide range of their abilities - this clearly before.

And speaking of simple…what's the deal with that album title?

"We called it Easy because every time I make music with these guys, it's easy," says Cain, who has spent more than a third of his life as a member of The Weeks. "It feels good. But the other side of it is, there's nothing easy about being in a band. There's nothing easy about staying together for 10 years and still wanting to make music. We have the hardest and easiest job on the planet. But it works for us."

Glen Phillips

Glen Phillips has always been a courageous and inviting songwriter. During his years as lead singer of Toad the Wet Sprocket, the band’s elegant folk/pop sound and his honest, introspective lyrics helped them forge a close bond with their fans. Since starting his solo career, Phillips has pared his music down to its emotional core, concentrating on the simple truths of love and relationships, with a profound spiritual understanding.


Swallowed by the New takes on life’s difficult transitions and delivers some of the Phillips' most vulnerable songs. “I made this album during the dissolution of a 23 year marriage, Phillips says. “A major chapter of my life was coming to a close, and I discovered early on that I had to work hard to
get through the transition with compassion and clarity. These songs were a big part of that process.”


The album was recorded in May of 2015 with producer/bass player Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams), Jay Bellerose (drums), Chris Bruce (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keys) and Ruby Amanfu (vocals). The sparse arrangements are centered on Phillips’ vocals and acoustic guitar.


Shimmering electric guitar accents drift through a curtain of sighing strings on Go, a ballad that bids a poignant farewell to a lover at the end of a relationship.
“And though I want you close / This light can only glow / To

warn you far away from shore / Saying I love you, now go,”


Leaving Oldtown has the feel of a classic pop ballad, with a string section and piano supporting a poignant vocal, as Phillips describes a man, “hollow as a sparrow bone,” packing up his belongings as winter approaches.


The Easy Ones focuses on the importance of staying present when it’s not easy or simple, but necessary. Joined in harmony with his 13-year daughter, Phillips says:
“You can’t just love the easy ones / You’ve got to let them in / When you’d rather just run.”


Amnesty is a gentle rocker, with twang-heavy guitars, a funky back beat and elegant string accents, it chronicles a long journey of searching for understanding and safe harbor. “I’m here to catch some kind of spark / In every face I see / And offer amnesty.”


Held Up suggests a gospel tune being chanted by a chain gang. The stomping drumbeat and jubilant handclaps
support a vocal that faces the scales of judgment; in balance between self-recrimination and salvation.
“Brother you ain’t so broken / Sister you ain’t so small / Everybody goes together / Or nobody goes at all.”


The folk hymn Grief and Praise was inspired by writer Martin Prechtel who maintains that “grief is praising those things we love and have lost, and praise is grieving those things we love and will lose”. It sums up the philosophy of the record in no uncertain terms:
“For all that you love will be taken some day / By the angel of death or the servants of change / In a floodwater tide without rancor or rage / So sing loud while you're able / In grief and
in praise”


Swallowed by the New is full of the inviting melodies that

have always marked Phillips’ work, while his singing reaches a new degree of intimacy and immediacy. The arrangements hint at country, soul, folk, rock and classic pop, without ever sounding derivative. The emotions may be raw, but they are guided by Phillips’ steady vocals towards healing and renewal.




Phillips started Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, when he was still in high school. He was as surprised as anyone when
their low-key folk rock landed them on the pop charts. When the band members decided to go their separate ways, Phillips began a solo career with Abulum followed by Winter Pays for Summer, Mr. Lemons and Secrets of the New Explorers. Always open to new projects and unlikely collaborations, he’s toured and recorded with Works Progress Administration, a band that included members of Nickel Creek, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Elvis Costello’s Attractions; Mutual Admiration Society with Nickel Creek; Remote Tree Children, an experimental project with John Askew and Plover, with Neilson Hubbard and Garrison Starr.


His acoustic duo tour to support Swallowed by the New
starts in October and will continue through the spring of
2017. “I enjoy the spontaneity of acoustic performance, where I can take the show wherever it needs to go and follow the lead of an audience instead of following a set list.
There’s more talking, more stories, and more of a loose feel. The subject matter is on the serious side, but I feel like the perspective is ultimately positive. Life is about changes, no matter how we may try and pretend otherwise. This album is all about learning how to face change.”

Glen Phillips has always been a courageous and inviting songwriter. During his years as lead singer of Toad the Wet Sprocket, the band’s elegant folk/pop sound and his honest, introspective lyrics helped them forge a close bond with their fans. Since starting his solo career, Phillips has pared his music down to its emotional core, concentrating on the simple truths of love and relationships, with a profound spiritual understanding.


Swallowed by the New takes on life’s difficult transitions and delivers some of the Phillips' most vulnerable songs. “I made this album during the dissolution of a 23 year marriage, Phillips says. “A major chapter of my life was coming to a close, and I discovered early on that I had to work hard to
get through the transition with compassion and clarity. These songs were a big part of that process.”


The album was recorded in May of 2015 with producer/bass player Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann, Lucinda Williams), Jay Bellerose (drums), Chris Bruce (guitar), Jebin Bruni (keys) and Ruby Amanfu (vocals). The sparse arrangements are centered on Phillips’ vocals and acoustic guitar.


Shimmering electric guitar accents drift through a curtain of sighing strings on Go, a ballad that bids a poignant farewell to a lover at the end of a relationship.
“And though I want you close / This light can only glow / To

warn you far away from shore / Saying I love you, now go,”


Leaving Oldtown has the feel of a classic pop ballad, with a string section and piano supporting a poignant vocal, as Phillips describes a man, “hollow as a sparrow bone,” packing up his belongings as winter approaches.


The Easy Ones focuses on the importance of staying present when it’s not easy or simple, but necessary. Joined in harmony with his 13-year daughter, Phillips says:
“You can’t just love the easy ones / You’ve got to let them in / When you’d rather just run.”


Amnesty is a gentle rocker, with twang-heavy guitars, a funky back beat and elegant string accents, it chronicles a long journey of searching for understanding and safe harbor. “I’m here to catch some kind of spark / In every face I see / And offer amnesty.”


Held Up suggests a gospel tune being chanted by a chain gang. The stomping drumbeat and jubilant handclaps
support a vocal that faces the scales of judgment; in balance between self-recrimination and salvation.
“Brother you ain’t so broken / Sister you ain’t so small / Everybody goes together / Or nobody goes at all.”


The folk hymn Grief and Praise was inspired by writer Martin Prechtel who maintains that “grief is praising those things we love and have lost, and praise is grieving those things we love and will lose”. It sums up the philosophy of the record in no uncertain terms:
“For all that you love will be taken some day / By the angel of death or the servants of change / In a floodwater tide without rancor or rage / So sing loud while you're able / In grief and
in praise”


Swallowed by the New is full of the inviting melodies that

have always marked Phillips’ work, while his singing reaches a new degree of intimacy and immediacy. The arrangements hint at country, soul, folk, rock and classic pop, without ever sounding derivative. The emotions may be raw, but they are guided by Phillips’ steady vocals towards healing and renewal.




Phillips started Toad the Wet Sprocket in 1986, when he was still in high school. He was as surprised as anyone when
their low-key folk rock landed them on the pop charts. When the band members decided to go their separate ways, Phillips began a solo career with Abulum followed by Winter Pays for Summer, Mr. Lemons and Secrets of the New Explorers. Always open to new projects and unlikely collaborations, he’s toured and recorded with Works Progress Administration, a band that included members of Nickel Creek, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Elvis Costello’s Attractions; Mutual Admiration Society with Nickel Creek; Remote Tree Children, an experimental project with John Askew and Plover, with Neilson Hubbard and Garrison Starr.


His acoustic duo tour to support Swallowed by the New
starts in October and will continue through the spring of
2017. “I enjoy the spontaneity of acoustic performance, where I can take the show wherever it needs to go and follow the lead of an audience instead of following a set list.
There’s more talking, more stories, and more of a loose feel. The subject matter is on the serious side, but I feel like the perspective is ultimately positive. Life is about changes, no matter how we may try and pretend otherwise. This album is all about learning how to face change.”

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa feat. Napoleon Murphy Brock and Denny Walley

Project/Object is the longest continually touring alumni-based Zappa tribute band in the world. For nearly twenty five years they have toured and performed Zappa music with more of his bandmates than anyone other than Zappa himself. Project/Object tours of the USA, Canada & Europe have paved the way for a rich variety of excellent, contemporary Zappa tribute acts.



Project/Object is the band that brought most of the currently touring Zappa alumni out of retirement and onto the road. To date, almost twenty musicians, from every era of Zappa’s history, have performed with Project/Object. The band is back on the road with a short tour that reunites old bandmates Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley. The setlist features material that they performed on tour together with Frank, as well as Zappa classics and faves from other albums they did with him.



Napoleon Murphy Brock, the frontman for Zappa’s early seventies bands, first appeared on the breakthrough album Apostrophe (‘), then handled lead vocals and sax for the incredibly popular Roxy and Elsewhere. His vocals on One Size Fits All are legendary, and he appeared with Denny Walley on the iconic Bongo Fury, which documents Zappa’s 1975 collaborative tour with his old friend Captain Beefheart. Brock went on to tour with fellow Zappa alum George Duke, and with Duke reached new heights in the hugely popular George Duke Band. Napoleon later provided harmony vocals for Sheik Yerbouti, one of Zappa’s biggest selling albums. He also appears on Thingfish and You Can’t Do That Onstage Anymore - Helsinki.



Denny Walley, a key member of Zappa’s mid 70s and early 80s tours, is the band member that goes back the furthest with Frank - they met during the 8th grade! Denny brought his incendiary slide guitar work to many Zappa tours and albums, splitting time as Captain Beefheart’s slide guitarist as well. Denny appears on what is arguably Beefheart’s greatest work: Bat Chain Puller, and on Zappa favorites like Joe’s Garage and You Are What You Is. Denny not only performed with Zappa on SNL a few times, but later became a set-builder for the show!

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa feat. Napoleon Murphy Brock and Denny Walley

Project/Object is the longest continually touring alumni-based Zappa tribute band in the world. For nearly twenty five years they have toured and performed Zappa music with more of his bandmates than anyone other than Zappa himself. Project/Object tours of the USA, Canada & Europe have paved the way for a rich variety of excellent, contemporary Zappa tribute acts.



Project/Object is the band that brought most of the currently touring Zappa alumni out of retirement and onto the road. To date, almost twenty musicians, from every era of Zappa’s history, have performed with Project/Object. The band is back on the road with a short tour that reunites old bandmates Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley. The setlist features material that they performed on tour together with Frank, as well as Zappa classics and faves from other albums they did with him.



Napoleon Murphy Brock, the frontman for Zappa’s early seventies bands, first appeared on the breakthrough album Apostrophe (‘), then handled lead vocals and sax for the incredibly popular Roxy and Elsewhere. His vocals on One Size Fits All are legendary, and he appeared with Denny Walley on the iconic Bongo Fury, which documents Zappa’s 1975 collaborative tour with his old friend Captain Beefheart. Brock went on to tour with fellow Zappa alum George Duke, and with Duke reached new heights in the hugely popular George Duke Band. Napoleon later provided harmony vocals for Sheik Yerbouti, one of Zappa’s biggest selling albums. He also appears on Thingfish and You Can’t Do That Onstage Anymore - Helsinki.



Denny Walley, a key member of Zappa’s mid 70s and early 80s tours, is the band member that goes back the furthest with Frank - they met during the 8th grade! Denny brought his incendiary slide guitar work to many Zappa tours and albums, splitting time as Captain Beefheart’s slide guitarist as well. Denny appears on what is arguably Beefheart’s greatest work: Bat Chain Puller, and on Zappa favorites like Joe’s Garage and You Are What You Is. Denny not only performed with Zappa on SNL a few times, but later became a set-builder for the show!

Project/Object - The Music Of Frank Zappa with Napoleon Murphy Brock & Denny Walley

Patrick Sweany with Special Guest Angela Perley & The Howling Moons

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he'll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He's a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing 'em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn't his ability to copy - it's his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby "Blue" Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It's no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad's extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide - with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn't stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed him to form a band.

After 7 critically acclaimed records (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He's played premiere festivals (Newport Folk Fest, Merlefest, Montreal Jazz Fest, Telluride Blues & Brews) and supported international acts such as The Black Keys, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna, and others on tour.

His forthcoming record, Ancient Noise, comes out in Spring 2018. It was recordedat historic Sam Phillips Recording by acclaimed producer/engineer Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margot Price) and features an all-star backing band: Ken Coomer on drums (ex-Wilco), Ted Pecchio on bass (Doyle Bramhall II, Susan Tedeschi), and the legendary Charles Hodges on keys (Al Green). Ancient Noise is a great amalgam of Sweany's evolving sounds, from the gritty blues of the openers "Old Time Ways" and "Up & Down," to the piano-based ballad "Country Loving." "We also added a lot more funk to this record," says Sweany. "There's a definite nod to the Deep South 70s sound of Allen Toussaint productions and Little Feat jams."

Patrick Sweany likes the spaces in between.

On a given night (or on a given album) he'll swing through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball. He's a musical omnivore, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing 'em all together seamlessly into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Patrick isn't his ability to copy - it's his authenticity. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby "Blue" Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Patrick somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own.

It's no wonder that as a kid he immersed himself in his dad's extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and, of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin' Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants.

In his late teens, Patrick began playing the clubs and coffeehouses around Kent, OH. He quickly gained a reputation for the intricate country blues style he was developing: part Piedmont picking, part Delta slide - with an equally impressive deep, smooth vocal style.

But Patrick wouldn't stay in the acoustic world for long. His love of 50s era soul and rock fused with the adrenaline-soaked garage punk revival happening throughout the Rust Belt pushed him to form a band.

After 7 critically acclaimed records (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Patrick has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He's played premiere festivals (Newport Folk Fest, Merlefest, Montreal Jazz Fest, Telluride Blues & Brews) and supported international acts such as The Black Keys, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna, and others on tour.

His forthcoming record, Ancient Noise, comes out in Spring 2018. It was recordedat historic Sam Phillips Recording by acclaimed producer/engineer Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margot Price) and features an all-star backing band: Ken Coomer on drums (ex-Wilco), Ted Pecchio on bass (Doyle Bramhall II, Susan Tedeschi), and the legendary Charles Hodges on keys (Al Green). Ancient Noise is a great amalgam of Sweany's evolving sounds, from the gritty blues of the openers "Old Time Ways" and "Up & Down," to the piano-based ballad "Country Loving." "We also added a lot more funk to this record," says Sweany. "There's a definite nod to the Deep South 70s sound of Allen Toussaint productions and Little Feat jams."

Gun Hill Royals / Tim Vitullo Band

If soul happens to put his thumb out there, hell... there's room in the back. For Gun Hill Royals, music is a brotherhood, music is sacred, and damn it all, that’s how it's gonna be.

--

Tim Vitullo is a bit different.

A promising singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Vitullo decided to return home to both Pittsburgh, PA and his blues influences to record Josephine & Assorted Train Songs, his debut studio LP. This comes after poising himself as an exciting, young jazz artist in State College, PA with the release of This is the Thing! in 2012.

With his latest statement, Vitullo mixes the best of his blues, rock, and pop influences to present a dozen examples of "adult alternative album rock." Songs like "Josephine" are concise and accessible with a smooth delivery and a sly sense of humor. Ballads "Letters" and "A Different Kind of Blue" are earnest experiments in confessional-style songwriting flanked by dense vocal and horn arrangements. Further, burners "Interstate Jesus," "Black & White Wonderful," and "Pretty Good" flash the guitar prowess that has been Vitullo's calling card since his earliest musical ventures.

Josephine & Assorted Train Songs was produced, engineered, and mixed by singer/songwriter and producer Steven Foxbury in Pittsburgh, PA. Recorded entirely at Foxbury's Yellow Couch Studio, the LP is a home-grown display of some of the city's most promising young talents.

If soul happens to put his thumb out there, hell... there's room in the back. For Gun Hill Royals, music is a brotherhood, music is sacred, and damn it all, that’s how it's gonna be.

--

Tim Vitullo is a bit different.

A promising singer, guitarist, and songwriter, Vitullo decided to return home to both Pittsburgh, PA and his blues influences to record Josephine & Assorted Train Songs, his debut studio LP. This comes after poising himself as an exciting, young jazz artist in State College, PA with the release of This is the Thing! in 2012.

With his latest statement, Vitullo mixes the best of his blues, rock, and pop influences to present a dozen examples of "adult alternative album rock." Songs like "Josephine" are concise and accessible with a smooth delivery and a sly sense of humor. Ballads "Letters" and "A Different Kind of Blue" are earnest experiments in confessional-style songwriting flanked by dense vocal and horn arrangements. Further, burners "Interstate Jesus," "Black & White Wonderful," and "Pretty Good" flash the guitar prowess that has been Vitullo's calling card since his earliest musical ventures.

Josephine & Assorted Train Songs was produced, engineered, and mixed by singer/songwriter and producer Steven Foxbury in Pittsburgh, PA. Recorded entirely at Foxbury's Yellow Couch Studio, the LP is a home-grown display of some of the city's most promising young talents.

(Early Show) The Damaged Pies - Last One Out Shuts the Lights 30th Anniversary Show Benefiting WhyHunger

Since its' inception, Damaged Pies has played and recorded at some of the most legendary venues in world. From CBGB's in New York City to the Whisky a-go-go in L.A., from Liverpool's Cavern to Sun Studio in Memphis to Trident Studios in London, from Farm Aid Eve in Hershey to The Surf Ballroom in Iowa, from Damaged Pies Day in Pittsburgh to Toronto to Philly, from Athens to Boston, from Wrigley Field to Three Rivers Stadium from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco to the Wheeling Jamboree to Nashville and all points in between, Damaged Pies has been one of rock and roll's most durable and well-traveled acts.

Damaged Pies/ Steve Bodner has also been honored with the Jefferson Award for Public Service. The Damaged Pies current single to benefit WhyHUnger's Artists Against Hunger and Poverty is entitled Same Circus, Different Town and features David Hentschel (Elton John, Genesis) and covert art by Bernie Taupin (Elton John).

The Damaged Pies new album, The Stars on a Summer’s Night, is available now on Amazon, I-Tunes, CD Baby and Spotify and features cover art, And Blue by Bernie Taupin. One of the tracks, We Must Learn to Live Together features the words of Civil Rights Leader and Georgia State Representative John Lewis.

Musicians for Hunger Relief's new song, Louder Than Concorde features Rock and Roll Legends Adam Marsland (The Beach Boys, Wilson Phillips), Spooner Oldham (Aretha Franklin, Crosby Stills, Nash and Young, Percy Sledge) and Caleb Quaye (Elton John, Hall and Oates).

Damaged Pies has opened for former Beatle Pete Best, Marshall Crenshaw, Alejandro Escovedo, Pegi Young (Neil’s wife), James McCartney, The Atomic Punks, Peter Case, former Eagle Don Felder, Peter Mulvey, John Hall (Orleans) Wayne “The Train” Hancock and Jen Chapin.

Damaged Pies is a member of WhyHunger's Artists Against Hunger & Poverty, The Recording Academy, Pittsburgh Legends Awards and ASCAP. Damaged Pies also founded Pittsburgh Musicians for Hunger Relief. The Damaged Pies Steve Bodner is also a District Advocate for The Recording Academy/ The Grammys.
Damaged Pies movie Same Circus, Different Town is available on You Tube.

Since its' inception, Damaged Pies has played and recorded at some of the most legendary venues in world. From CBGB's in New York City to the Whisky a-go-go in L.A., from Liverpool's Cavern to Sun Studio in Memphis to Trident Studios in London, from Farm Aid Eve in Hershey to The Surf Ballroom in Iowa, from Damaged Pies Day in Pittsburgh to Toronto to Philly, from Athens to Boston, from Wrigley Field to Three Rivers Stadium from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco to the Wheeling Jamboree to Nashville and all points in between, Damaged Pies has been one of rock and roll's most durable and well-traveled acts.

Damaged Pies/ Steve Bodner has also been honored with the Jefferson Award for Public Service. The Damaged Pies current single to benefit WhyHUnger's Artists Against Hunger and Poverty is entitled Same Circus, Different Town and features David Hentschel (Elton John, Genesis) and covert art by Bernie Taupin (Elton John).

The Damaged Pies new album, The Stars on a Summer’s Night, is available now on Amazon, I-Tunes, CD Baby and Spotify and features cover art, And Blue by Bernie Taupin. One of the tracks, We Must Learn to Live Together features the words of Civil Rights Leader and Georgia State Representative John Lewis.

Musicians for Hunger Relief's new song, Louder Than Concorde features Rock and Roll Legends Adam Marsland (The Beach Boys, Wilson Phillips), Spooner Oldham (Aretha Franklin, Crosby Stills, Nash and Young, Percy Sledge) and Caleb Quaye (Elton John, Hall and Oates).

Damaged Pies has opened for former Beatle Pete Best, Marshall Crenshaw, Alejandro Escovedo, Pegi Young (Neil’s wife), James McCartney, The Atomic Punks, Peter Case, former Eagle Don Felder, Peter Mulvey, John Hall (Orleans) Wayne “The Train” Hancock and Jen Chapin.

Damaged Pies is a member of WhyHunger's Artists Against Hunger & Poverty, The Recording Academy, Pittsburgh Legends Awards and ASCAP. Damaged Pies also founded Pittsburgh Musicians for Hunger Relief. The Damaged Pies Steve Bodner is also a District Advocate for The Recording Academy/ The Grammys.
Damaged Pies movie Same Circus, Different Town is available on You Tube.

(Late Show) Joanna Lowe & The Broken Word / Working Breed

Joanna's Spoken Word Poetry simmers, steeps, and boils over original soundscapes ranging from the violent to the divine.

Working Breed is a scintillating quartet that writes original and eclectic Art Rock full of surprises. Their unique musical compositions are formed with a rock base that is interwoven by elements of jazz, blues, reggae, and many other genre themes. Lead vocalist Erika J C Laing ranges from torch singer to sopranic, and is surrounded on stage by a bevvy of musical instruments that are tastefully interspersed amongst the solid foundation set by Mike Dugan on guitar, Jonah Petrelli on bass, and Kieran Bittles on drums. The result is an engaging performance unlike any other in Pittsburgh or elsewhere, as the audience is continuously dazzled by the shifting nature of the music and playful incorporation of instruments often atypical to a rock group, such as trombone, trumpet, musical saw, synthy keys, and more. Their adventurous energy is infectious, and their performance an experience!

Joanna's Spoken Word Poetry simmers, steeps, and boils over original soundscapes ranging from the violent to the divine.

Working Breed is a scintillating quartet that writes original and eclectic Art Rock full of surprises. Their unique musical compositions are formed with a rock base that is interwoven by elements of jazz, blues, reggae, and many other genre themes. Lead vocalist Erika J C Laing ranges from torch singer to sopranic, and is surrounded on stage by a bevvy of musical instruments that are tastefully interspersed amongst the solid foundation set by Mike Dugan on guitar, Jonah Petrelli on bass, and Kieran Bittles on drums. The result is an engaging performance unlike any other in Pittsburgh or elsewhere, as the audience is continuously dazzled by the shifting nature of the music and playful incorporation of instruments often atypical to a rock group, such as trombone, trumpet, musical saw, synthy keys, and more. Their adventurous energy is infectious, and their performance an experience!

(Early Show) Diana Chittester (Paradox CD Release Tour) with Special Guest Avi Diamond

Diana Chittester stands alone on stage with an arsenal of acoustic guitars. Her solo show is brought to life with signature percussive multi-part playing, mimicking a full band on a solo acoustic guitar, without the help of loopers or other technological tricks. Blending intelligent and articulate lyrics, Diana's personal stories and vulnerability shared on stage resonates with audiences.

Music Connection Magazine noted her “intelligent and articulate lyrics” on the review of her first full-length album, In This Skin (2012). Dubbed a “Guitar God” by Skinny Devil Magazine and “a complex guitar acrobat” by ArtVoice Magazine, in 2017 she was invited to perform on the "Cellar Sessions" series recorded live at City Winery in NYC. Diana tours regularly in the US and Canada including folk-rock venues such as The Ark, Music Box Supper Club, Rockwood Music Hall and Performing Art Centers across the MidWest. She's opened for many iconic songwriters like Colin Hay, Kim Richey, Melissa Ferrick, LP, Jennifer Batten, Chris Trapper (Push Stars) and Kelly Richey to name few.

In early 2017, Diana toured with Canadian Juno-nominated songwriter, Royal Wood, through 10 cities in 12 days performing at the most prestigious folk venues such as The Ark, Rockwood Music Hall, Club Passim, World Cafe Live, Ludlow Garage, Music Box Supper Club and more.

Currently, Diana is recording new music for her upcoming album titled Paradox due out May 2018 while also teaching educational workshops at high schools and colleges.

Diana Chittester stands alone on stage with an arsenal of acoustic guitars. Her solo show is brought to life with signature percussive multi-part playing, mimicking a full band on a solo acoustic guitar, without the help of loopers or other technological tricks. Blending intelligent and articulate lyrics, Diana's personal stories and vulnerability shared on stage resonates with audiences.

Music Connection Magazine noted her “intelligent and articulate lyrics” on the review of her first full-length album, In This Skin (2012). Dubbed a “Guitar God” by Skinny Devil Magazine and “a complex guitar acrobat” by ArtVoice Magazine, in 2017 she was invited to perform on the "Cellar Sessions" series recorded live at City Winery in NYC. Diana tours regularly in the US and Canada including folk-rock venues such as The Ark, Music Box Supper Club, Rockwood Music Hall and Performing Art Centers across the MidWest. She's opened for many iconic songwriters like Colin Hay, Kim Richey, Melissa Ferrick, LP, Jennifer Batten, Chris Trapper (Push Stars) and Kelly Richey to name few.

In early 2017, Diana toured with Canadian Juno-nominated songwriter, Royal Wood, through 10 cities in 12 days performing at the most prestigious folk venues such as The Ark, Rockwood Music Hall, Club Passim, World Cafe Live, Ludlow Garage, Music Box Supper Club and more.

Currently, Diana is recording new music for her upcoming album titled Paradox due out May 2018 while also teaching educational workshops at high schools and colleges.

(Late Show) Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts / Demos Papadimas and His Band

Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts put a contemporary spin on soulful roots music. Driven by the dynamic guitar playing duo of Shawn Mazzei and Dan Bubien, along with Bubien’s soulful gritty vocals. Their signature sound is highlighted by the precision playing and deep toned-full sound of drummer Mark Pollera and glued together by Christian Caputo’s steady, groove oriented bass playing.

Dan Bubien & the Delta Struts put a contemporary spin on soulful roots music. Driven by the dynamic guitar playing duo of Shawn Mazzei and Dan Bubien, along with Bubien’s soulful gritty vocals. Their signature sound is highlighted by the precision playing and deep toned-full sound of drummer Mark Pollera and glued together by Christian Caputo’s steady, groove oriented bass playing.

Mipso with Special Guest Courtney Hartman

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso – Jacob Sharp (mandolin, vocals), Wood Robinson (bass, vocals), Joseph Terrell (guitar, vocals), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle, vocals) – release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular”(Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes. Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn. Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run.

Chapel Hill’s indie Americana quartet Mipso – Jacob Sharp (mandolin, vocals), Wood Robinson (bass, vocals), Joseph Terrell (guitar, vocals), and Libby Rodenbough (fiddle, vocals) – release their fifth album, Edges Run, on April 6th, 2018 via a newly inked record deal with AntiFragile Music. Influenced by the contradiction of its progressive home and the surrounding rural southern landscapes, Mipso has been hailed as “hewing surprisingly close to gospel and folk while still sounding modern and secular”(Acoustic Guitar) and was recently recognized by Rolling Stone as an “ Artist You Need to Know.” The band brings a distinctly unique sound – full of wistful beauty, hopeful undercurrents, and panoramic soundscapes. Venturing ever-further from its string-band pedigree to discover a broader Americana where classic folk-rock and modern alt-country sounds mingle easily with Appalachian tradition, Mipso’s music is lush and forward moving, with lyrics that sear and salve in turn. Look for Mipso on tour this spring in support of their new release, Edges Run.

Chris Smither with Special Guest Zak Trojano

CALL ME LUCKY is the new record from Chris Smither and is his first set of brand new originals in six years (March 2018 | Signature Sounds/Mighty Albert). Recorded at the gorgeous Blue Rock Studio in the Texas foothills. Packed with Smither trademark songs that offer commentary on the human condition with a wink of an eye and pulls from deep in the soul and a couple of surprise covers that remind us of Chris' deftness as a song interpreter as he makes the songs his own. CALL ME LUCKY features longtime producer and multi-instrumentalist David Goodrich, drummer Billy Conway (Morphine), Matt Lorenz (aka The Suitcase Junket), Mike Meadows, and engineer Keith Gary. They went into the session to record ten songs. What they ended up with is a double record: Disc 1 features the eight originals and two covers they started with; Disc 2 catapults some of the very same songs into another dimension. Essentially Smither covering Smither.

Fans from around the world continue to fill concert halls, music clubs, and festivals ready for the Smither experience. Reviewers including those from the Associated Press, NPR, Mojo, and The New York Times agree that Smither remains a significant songwriter and an electrifying guitarist — an American original — as he draws deeply from folk and blues, modern poets and philosophers. And with CALL ME LUCKY he keeps doing just that.

CALL ME LUCKY is the new record from Chris Smither and is his first set of brand new originals in six years (March 2018 | Signature Sounds/Mighty Albert). Recorded at the gorgeous Blue Rock Studio in the Texas foothills. Packed with Smither trademark songs that offer commentary on the human condition with a wink of an eye and pulls from deep in the soul and a couple of surprise covers that remind us of Chris' deftness as a song interpreter as he makes the songs his own. CALL ME LUCKY features longtime producer and multi-instrumentalist David Goodrich, drummer Billy Conway (Morphine), Matt Lorenz (aka The Suitcase Junket), Mike Meadows, and engineer Keith Gary. They went into the session to record ten songs. What they ended up with is a double record: Disc 1 features the eight originals and two covers they started with; Disc 2 catapults some of the very same songs into another dimension. Essentially Smither covering Smither.

Fans from around the world continue to fill concert halls, music clubs, and festivals ready for the Smither experience. Reviewers including those from the Associated Press, NPR, Mojo, and The New York Times agree that Smither remains a significant songwriter and an electrifying guitarist — an American original — as he draws deeply from folk and blues, modern poets and philosophers. And with CALL ME LUCKY he keeps doing just that.

Smooth Hound Smith with Special Guest Millgroves Crossing

Smooth Hound Smith is a foot stompin’ American roots duo comprised of “one-man-band” Zack Smith (guitars/vocals/foot drums/harmonicas/banjo) and Caitlin Doyle (vocals/percussion). Established in 2012, and based in East Nashville, TN, they record and perform a varied and unique style of folky, garage-infused rhythm & blues. Using primal foot percussion, complex, fuzzed-out, finger-picked guitar patterns, warbled harmonicas, tasty harmonies and A LOT of tambourine, they are able to create something rugged and visceral- a modern interpretation of early blues, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll music that harkens back to the traditions of hazy front porch folk songs as well as raucous back-alley juke joints.

The duo has traveled over 150,000 road miles, playing over 800 shows across America, Europe, and Canada, all in the last five years. In addition to their own headlining shows, they have toured as support for bands such as the Dixie Chicks (25 dates in the US and Canada in 2016/2017), The Record Company, and Jamestown Revival.

Their eponymous debut album garnered attention from media outlets such as Nashville’s independent radio, WRLT Lightning 100, as well as publications like American Songwriter and RELIX Magazine. They were also selected over thousands of other bands to perform at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, headlined by Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, and more. In addition, the music of Smooth Hound Smith has been featured on CMT’s Nashville, MTV’s The Real World and the Esquire Network.

Smooth Hound Smith’s second full-length album, Sweet Tennessee Honey, was released in 2016, and features appearances by Natalie Maines (Dixie Chicks), Sarah Jarosz, and Jano Rix (The Wood Brothers). They continue to tour heavily while working on new material for a third full-length album, expected to be released in 2018.

Smooth Hound Smith is a foot stompin’ American roots duo comprised of “one-man-band” Zack Smith (guitars/vocals/foot drums/harmonicas/banjo) and Caitlin Doyle (vocals/percussion). Established in 2012, and based in East Nashville, TN, they record and perform a varied and unique style of folky, garage-infused rhythm & blues. Using primal foot percussion, complex, fuzzed-out, finger-picked guitar patterns, warbled harmonicas, tasty harmonies and A LOT of tambourine, they are able to create something rugged and visceral- a modern interpretation of early blues, soul, and rock ‘n’ roll music that harkens back to the traditions of hazy front porch folk songs as well as raucous back-alley juke joints.

The duo has traveled over 150,000 road miles, playing over 800 shows across America, Europe, and Canada, all in the last five years. In addition to their own headlining shows, they have toured as support for bands such as the Dixie Chicks (25 dates in the US and Canada in 2016/2017), The Record Company, and Jamestown Revival.

Their eponymous debut album garnered attention from media outlets such as Nashville’s independent radio, WRLT Lightning 100, as well as publications like American Songwriter and RELIX Magazine. They were also selected over thousands of other bands to perform at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, headlined by Billy Joel, Mumford & Sons, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, and more. In addition, the music of Smooth Hound Smith has been featured on CMT’s Nashville, MTV’s The Real World and the Esquire Network.

Smooth Hound Smith’s second full-length album, Sweet Tennessee Honey, was released in 2016, and features appearances by Natalie Maines (Dixie Chicks), Sarah Jarosz, and Jano Rix (The Wood Brothers). They continue to tour heavily while working on new material for a third full-length album, expected to be released in 2018.

Canceled - The Huntress and Holder of Hands with Special Guest Pairdown

Due to scheduling issues beyond our control, the artist has canceled this date. Refunds are available at point of purchase. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Due to scheduling issues beyond our control, the artist has canceled this date. Refunds are available at point of purchase. We apologize for any inconvenience.

(Early Show) Lee Robinson & ISKA

Lee Robinson has been blending his improvisations with different styles of music for years. His performances have given generation of listeners a broader appreciation for music.

Along with his talented groups "Iska and Unspunt Orkestra" they provide powerful performances that transport their listeners on a multi-dimensional musical journey through jazz styles of, contemporary, funk, classical and original compositions.

Lee Robinson has been blending his improvisations with different styles of music for years. His performances have given generation of listeners a broader appreciation for music.

Along with his talented groups "Iska and Unspunt Orkestra" they provide powerful performances that transport their listeners on a multi-dimensional musical journey through jazz styles of, contemporary, funk, classical and original compositions.

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Bait and Switch, Miniature Table Concert, Lorenzo's Oil and Special Guests

Bait & Switch has been going at it in Pittsburgh, PA since around 2006. Comprised of two members, Sean G. Donaldson and Addi Twigg, the duo will twist your favorite pop songs into something so terrible and beautiful that you won’t want to look away.

The pair has performed at charity events, variety shows, comedy gigs, and even weddings — but has become something of an unofficial darling of the Pittsburgh improv comedy scene. Bait & Switch performs frequently at Pitt’s Friday Nite Improvs, the city’s only all audience-participation improv show, and we have made pals with Hustlebot, Pittsburgh’s tallest improv comedy troupe.

Though most of our time is spent on warping the styles of various pop songs, we have been known to make the occasional “traditional” parody (changing the lyrics of the song) on behalf of local sports fans. That’s right, we’re Steelers and Penguin fans! Wait, what do you mean Pittsburgh has a baseball team?

Bait & Switch will try almost anything once - just ask us nicely!

Bait & Switch has been going at it in Pittsburgh, PA since around 2006. Comprised of two members, Sean G. Donaldson and Addi Twigg, the duo will twist your favorite pop songs into something so terrible and beautiful that you won’t want to look away.

The pair has performed at charity events, variety shows, comedy gigs, and even weddings — but has become something of an unofficial darling of the Pittsburgh improv comedy scene. Bait & Switch performs frequently at Pitt’s Friday Nite Improvs, the city’s only all audience-participation improv show, and we have made pals with Hustlebot, Pittsburgh’s tallest improv comedy troupe.

Though most of our time is spent on warping the styles of various pop songs, we have been known to make the occasional “traditional” parody (changing the lyrics of the song) on behalf of local sports fans. That’s right, we’re Steelers and Penguin fans! Wait, what do you mean Pittsburgh has a baseball team?

Bait & Switch will try almost anything once - just ask us nicely!

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present

The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

The best of burlesque and variety from around the world.

Lucy La Bam & Opus One Present

The 2018 Burlypicks - Burlesque & Variety Performance Competition - Pennsylvania Regional

The best of burlesque and variety from around the world.

The Tillers / Lost Dog Street Band

The Tillers
The Tillers have been thumping their own distinctive sound of string band style folk music for a decade, riding it all over the country and across the sea. Four studio albums and one live record have won them praise as modern folk storytellers of the national soundscape.

Lost Dog Street Band
Lost Dog Street Band tours the country each year, delivering their story through song in venues nationwide. Drawing from years of lonely tramping, and more than one tragic loss, Lost Dog Street Band has crafted a distinct sound that is best described as ‘dark country’. In the same vein as country-legend Guy Clark, Benjamin Tod weaves his melodies and lyrics together to offer listeners an unapologetically raw and authentic account of the human experience.

The Tillers
The Tillers have been thumping their own distinctive sound of string band style folk music for a decade, riding it all over the country and across the sea. Four studio albums and one live record have won them praise as modern folk storytellers of the national soundscape.

Lost Dog Street Band
Lost Dog Street Band tours the country each year, delivering their story through song in venues nationwide. Drawing from years of lonely tramping, and more than one tragic loss, Lost Dog Street Band has crafted a distinct sound that is best described as ‘dark country’. In the same vein as country-legend Guy Clark, Benjamin Tod weaves his melodies and lyrics together to offer listeners an unapologetically raw and authentic account of the human experience.

Matthew Logan Vasquez with Special Guest Parker Gispert (of The Whigs)

Matthew Logan Vasquez is feeling optimistic.

That's not necessarily apparent the first time you spin his new full-length solo album. Each track on Matthew Logan Does What He Wants feels urgent and intense. Impatient landlords, financial woes and other frustrations fan the agitation embedded in the opening track, "Same." Isolation darkens the brooding images of "From Behind The Glass." Death takes a bow on "The Fighter." Vasquez can't help but juxtapose the celebration of "Fatherhood" with a lament that "we ain't got the money to pay the hospital." The music enhances this impression. As fans of his work with Delta Spirit and Middle Brother know well, Vasquez knows how to fuse passion and poetry in his writing and then ignite this volatile mix with extraordinarily expressive singing. In this sense he stands as a peer and a worthy successor to those who influenced him as an up-and-coming artist - Neil Young, Kurt Cobain, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed and others often mentioned, none of them known for their upbeat, sunny lyrics. With the 2016 release Solicitor Returns. "That last record had a sarcastic, darker tone. The new one is just as hard-hitting and wide-ranging but with a more positive message." This becomes clearer when you replay Does What He Wants and listen more carefully. On the surface, "Tall Man" unfolds as a journey into self-destruction. But at the end, the subject of the story is repeating "I know I can change," each time with escalating emotion as brought to life in Vasquez's searing vocal. "Bad things happen in the song," he acknowledges. "But it all leads to an epiphany. And that is positive. The truth rarely comes to you in an easy way - not unless you're a wiser person than I am. "My point is that life is a struggle," Vasquez continues. "But how can you have optimism and hope if you don't have something negative? Context is what makes it meaningful." For Vasquez, context involves drawing from dramatically different settings. Growing up in Texas and along the California coast, hunkering down for years in Brooklyn as he finessed his music in a more pressurized urban context and then heading back to Austin to put all the pieces together, he took note of the differences and similarities these places offered. During much of that time he channeled his experiences into Delta Spirit, whose albums inspired critics to laud the band as "restless and defiant" (Paste), its music infused by "waves of measured ferocity" (Uncut) and "significant depth" (Austin Chronicle). Vasquez was actually in the process of writing for a projected upcoming Delta Spirit project early last year when he began to think that it might be more appropriate to focus instead on his next solo effort. "I was imagining a new Delta Spirit album as I was writing," he says. "But I began to realize that's not exactly where I'm at right now. The band isn't broken up but it's not coming back right now. I started to feel like Rhett Miller, who had to go away from the Old 97s for a while so he could get tap into his creativity and come back to the band in a new and healthy way." To keep his path clear and work on his own terms, Vasquez built a studio in his home for this past year - a trailer parked about an hour west of Austin. Here, in Texas Hill Country, surrounded by evergreen oak trees, he wrote and recorded basic tracks and then brought in singer Kam Franklin from The Suffers and Shakey Graves drummer Christopher Booshada to add parts as needed. For backup vocals and string parts, he worked long-distance via sound files with the Parkington Sisters, who he performed with during a Middle Brother set at last year's Newport Folk Festival. "They performed a miracle, giving me a 3-D depth that makes the tracks they appear on jump out of the speakers," he insists. In final form, Does What He Wants is like a hall of mirrors, each capturing a different image of one self-aware and restlessly creative individual. The pure finger-picked acoustic guitar that sets up vivid stories on "The Informant" and "Tall Man," the retro textures of "Headed West" (which, Vasquez points out, were actually played on real strings by the Parkingtons), the lofting melody that evokes Roy Orbison ("the greatest singer in the history of singers," Vasquez opines), the waterfall of harmonies in "The Fighter" - This music is diverse yet unified, which of course was a priority for its author. And, in the end, it turns out to feel pretty optimistic after all - a perfect statement for these times and possibly for some time to come.

Matthew Logan Vasquez is feeling optimistic.

That's not necessarily apparent the first time you spin his new full-length solo album. Each track on Matthew Logan Does What He Wants feels urgent and intense. Impatient landlords, financial woes and other frustrations fan the agitation embedded in the opening track, "Same." Isolation darkens the brooding images of "From Behind The Glass." Death takes a bow on "The Fighter." Vasquez can't help but juxtapose the celebration of "Fatherhood" with a lament that "we ain't got the money to pay the hospital." The music enhances this impression. As fans of his work with Delta Spirit and Middle Brother know well, Vasquez knows how to fuse passion and poetry in his writing and then ignite this volatile mix with extraordinarily expressive singing. In this sense he stands as a peer and a worthy successor to those who influenced him as an up-and-coming artist - Neil Young, Kurt Cobain, Pink Floyd, Lou Reed and others often mentioned, none of them known for their upbeat, sunny lyrics. With the 2016 release Solicitor Returns. "That last record had a sarcastic, darker tone. The new one is just as hard-hitting and wide-ranging but with a more positive message." This becomes clearer when you replay Does What He Wants and listen more carefully. On the surface, "Tall Man" unfolds as a journey into self-destruction. But at the end, the subject of the story is repeating "I know I can change," each time with escalating emotion as brought to life in Vasquez's searing vocal. "Bad things happen in the song," he acknowledges. "But it all leads to an epiphany. And that is positive. The truth rarely comes to you in an easy way - not unless you're a wiser person than I am. "My point is that life is a struggle," Vasquez continues. "But how can you have optimism and hope if you don't have something negative? Context is what makes it meaningful." For Vasquez, context involves drawing from dramatically different settings. Growing up in Texas and along the California coast, hunkering down for years in Brooklyn as he finessed his music in a more pressurized urban context and then heading back to Austin to put all the pieces together, he took note of the differences and similarities these places offered. During much of that time he channeled his experiences into Delta Spirit, whose albums inspired critics to laud the band as "restless and defiant" (Paste), its music infused by "waves of measured ferocity" (Uncut) and "significant depth" (Austin Chronicle). Vasquez was actually in the process of writing for a projected upcoming Delta Spirit project early last year when he began to think that it might be more appropriate to focus instead on his next solo effort. "I was imagining a new Delta Spirit album as I was writing," he says. "But I began to realize that's not exactly where I'm at right now. The band isn't broken up but it's not coming back right now. I started to feel like Rhett Miller, who had to go away from the Old 97s for a while so he could get tap into his creativity and come back to the band in a new and healthy way." To keep his path clear and work on his own terms, Vasquez built a studio in his home for this past year - a trailer parked about an hour west of Austin. Here, in Texas Hill Country, surrounded by evergreen oak trees, he wrote and recorded basic tracks and then brought in singer Kam Franklin from The Suffers and Shakey Graves drummer Christopher Booshada to add parts as needed. For backup vocals and string parts, he worked long-distance via sound files with the Parkington Sisters, who he performed with during a Middle Brother set at last year's Newport Folk Festival. "They performed a miracle, giving me a 3-D depth that makes the tracks they appear on jump out of the speakers," he insists. In final form, Does What He Wants is like a hall of mirrors, each capturing a different image of one self-aware and restlessly creative individual. The pure finger-picked acoustic guitar that sets up vivid stories on "The Informant" and "Tall Man," the retro textures of "Headed West" (which, Vasquez points out, were actually played on real strings by the Parkingtons), the lofting melody that evokes Roy Orbison ("the greatest singer in the history of singers," Vasquez opines), the waterfall of harmonies in "The Fighter" - This music is diverse yet unified, which of course was a priority for its author. And, in the end, it turns out to feel pretty optimistic after all - a perfect statement for these times and possibly for some time to come.

Western Centuries with Special Guest Juvenile Characteristics

When did country music start to sound the same? The first generation of country artists borrowed from everything around them: Appalachian stringband music, Texas fiddle traditions, cowboy songs, Delta blues. In an era of unprecedented access to our musical pasts, shouldn’t country music be even more diverse than it was in its infancy? Honky-tonk supergroup Western Centuries, back with a new album in 2018, surely understands this. They aren’t bound by any dictum to write songs in a modern country, or even a retro country style; instead they’re taking their own personal influences as three very different songwriters and fusing it into a sound that moves beyond the constraints of country. Part of the reason they can make music with this range of influences is because of their roots in city life. Both Cahalen Morrison and Ethan Lawton, two of the three principal songwriters, live in Seattle’s diverse South end, and the third songwriter, Jim Miller, spends most of his time in and around New York City. The urban landscape is rarely mentioned in country music, but it makes for a refreshing sound that draws as easily from modern R&B as it does George Jones. It helps too that the album was recorded and co-produced by acclaimed musician and Grammy-winning producer Joel Savoy in Eunice, Louisiana, where local Cajun and Creole artists have always been adept at marrying old country sounds with R&B and rock n roll.

With Songs from the Deluge, out April 6, 2018 on Free Dirt Records, Western Centuries brings three songwriting voices together into a more unified sound than ever before. Over the past year of heavy touring (since the release of their last album), they’ve pushed each other hard as songwriters. But with a band this well tested on the road, it’s the sonic and lyrical places where each artist’s styles depart that’s most interesting.

Ethan Lawton, known for his earlier work in Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers, loves to pen imaginative parables about people living at extremes. "Wild You Run" by Lawton tells the story of watching someone you love deteriorate with a crippling addiction. The subject chases his temptation, but loses his soul as Lawton cries out helplessly "I won't tell mama what you done, go have your fun....” Lawton's "My Own Private Honky Tonk" is a rambunctious new take on the drinkin' alone narrative which finds Lawton dancing and playing music until the downstairs neighbors call. It's a boogie-woogie flavored tune à la Fats Domino that highlights the upright bass work of Nokosee Fields, the band's newest member. With the opening track, “Far From Home,” Lawton wails "mother, dear mother, won't you spin a yarn about the way things were.” It's about the dark days that young men found abroad in Vietnam and the personal wars they had to fight when they returned back home.

Cahalen Morrison, known for his earlier duo work with Eli West, is the country boy to Lawton's urban cowboy, inspired by his love for cowboy poetry and the New Mexican desert where he grew up. He's got a knack for bending words around stories until they're as funny as they are tragic, as fantastic as they are real. His songs grow like mesquite in the desert; they twist and turn. On "Earthly Justice," Morrison sings of barflys and their troubles, remarking sardonically "if earthly justice just don't get them in the end, there's always a heavenly trial on its way" as vocal harmonies and pedal steel two step all around him. On Morrison’s album closer "Warm Guns,” he waxes quixotic about loss in love, singing in Spanish about being a victim of his own flaws.

Jim Miller, known for his earlier work with Donna the Buffalo, is the resident psychedelic poet. Like the best country songwriters, Miller's sense of communion with nature turns his songs into works of magical realism. On "Wild Birds", a song about a road-bound band, he consults the moss, befriends the tide, and survives fire all while asking for prayers to guide his band home to the end of their migration. "Borrow Time" features Louisiana accordion legend Roddie Romero, and the album's best harmonies between the three lead singers. Some of his most beautiful lines happen on "Time Does The Rest" as he sings "Your heart knows what’s best / Hold her close, the lips will confess / Let it rise let it fall, time does the rest".

Western Centuries’ music crosses vastly differing geographies–the city, the southwest, the metaphysical. And their musical influences are equally as diverse. Together, they weave a tapestry of western music, without sacrificing their hard-earned country dancehall sound. Songs from the Deluge will levitate heavy hearts, turn spilled beer into ballads, and bring country music home as literate, epic odysseys from parts unknown.

When did country music start to sound the same? The first generation of country artists borrowed from everything around them: Appalachian stringband music, Texas fiddle traditions, cowboy songs, Delta blues. In an era of unprecedented access to our musical pasts, shouldn’t country music be even more diverse than it was in its infancy? Honky-tonk supergroup Western Centuries, back with a new album in 2018, surely understands this. They aren’t bound by any dictum to write songs in a modern country, or even a retro country style; instead they’re taking their own personal influences as three very different songwriters and fusing it into a sound that moves beyond the constraints of country. Part of the reason they can make music with this range of influences is because of their roots in city life. Both Cahalen Morrison and Ethan Lawton, two of the three principal songwriters, live in Seattle’s diverse South end, and the third songwriter, Jim Miller, spends most of his time in and around New York City. The urban landscape is rarely mentioned in country music, but it makes for a refreshing sound that draws as easily from modern R&B as it does George Jones. It helps too that the album was recorded and co-produced by acclaimed musician and Grammy-winning producer Joel Savoy in Eunice, Louisiana, where local Cajun and Creole artists have always been adept at marrying old country sounds with R&B and rock n roll.

With Songs from the Deluge, out April 6, 2018 on Free Dirt Records, Western Centuries brings three songwriting voices together into a more unified sound than ever before. Over the past year of heavy touring (since the release of their last album), they’ve pushed each other hard as songwriters. But with a band this well tested on the road, it’s the sonic and lyrical places where each artist’s styles depart that’s most interesting.

Ethan Lawton, known for his earlier work in Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers, loves to pen imaginative parables about people living at extremes. "Wild You Run" by Lawton tells the story of watching someone you love deteriorate with a crippling addiction. The subject chases his temptation, but loses his soul as Lawton cries out helplessly "I won't tell mama what you done, go have your fun....” Lawton's "My Own Private Honky Tonk" is a rambunctious new take on the drinkin' alone narrative which finds Lawton dancing and playing music until the downstairs neighbors call. It's a boogie-woogie flavored tune à la Fats Domino that highlights the upright bass work of Nokosee Fields, the band's newest member. With the opening track, “Far From Home,” Lawton wails "mother, dear mother, won't you spin a yarn about the way things were.” It's about the dark days that young men found abroad in Vietnam and the personal wars they had to fight when they returned back home.

Cahalen Morrison, known for his earlier duo work with Eli West, is the country boy to Lawton's urban cowboy, inspired by his love for cowboy poetry and the New Mexican desert where he grew up. He's got a knack for bending words around stories until they're as funny as they are tragic, as fantastic as they are real. His songs grow like mesquite in the desert; they twist and turn. On "Earthly Justice," Morrison sings of barflys and their troubles, remarking sardonically "if earthly justice just don't get them in the end, there's always a heavenly trial on its way" as vocal harmonies and pedal steel two step all around him. On Morrison’s album closer "Warm Guns,” he waxes quixotic about loss in love, singing in Spanish about being a victim of his own flaws.

Jim Miller, known for his earlier work with Donna the Buffalo, is the resident psychedelic poet. Like the best country songwriters, Miller's sense of communion with nature turns his songs into works of magical realism. On "Wild Birds", a song about a road-bound band, he consults the moss, befriends the tide, and survives fire all while asking for prayers to guide his band home to the end of their migration. "Borrow Time" features Louisiana accordion legend Roddie Romero, and the album's best harmonies between the three lead singers. Some of his most beautiful lines happen on "Time Does The Rest" as he sings "Your heart knows what’s best / Hold her close, the lips will confess / Let it rise let it fall, time does the rest".

Western Centuries’ music crosses vastly differing geographies–the city, the southwest, the metaphysical. And their musical influences are equally as diverse. Together, they weave a tapestry of western music, without sacrificing their hard-earned country dancehall sound. Songs from the Deluge will levitate heavy hearts, turn spilled beer into ballads, and bring country music home as literate, epic odysseys from parts unknown.

St. Dude with The Ugly Blondes and Action Camp

Indie Rock dudes got Stoned or Stoner Rock dudes got Indied or we just listened to a bunch of different sh*t.

Indie Rock dudes got Stoned or Stoner Rock dudes got Indied or we just listened to a bunch of different sh*t.

Johnny A.: Just Me & My Guitars - Presented by Opus One & Iron City Rocks

Boston Hall of Fame inductee Johnny A. is a Gibson and now Epiphone signature guitarist (the Johnny A. Gibson is one of their most popular selling signature models) is a spectacular performer guaranteed to mesmerize an audience with the 1st riff! Johnny has shared the stage with artists from BB King to Steve Vai and everybody in between and has performed at such prestigious festivals as Eric Clapton’s Crossroads, the Montreal Jazz Festival, and Tokyo’s Fuji Rock Festival. Coming back to his roots, Johnny has developed an intimate solo performance celebrating some of the greatest, and most influential, guitar work in history.

Boston Hall of Fame inductee Johnny A. is a Gibson and now Epiphone signature guitarist (the Johnny A. Gibson is one of their most popular selling signature models) is a spectacular performer guaranteed to mesmerize an audience with the 1st riff! Johnny has shared the stage with artists from BB King to Steve Vai and everybody in between and has performed at such prestigious festivals as Eric Clapton’s Crossroads, the Montreal Jazz Festival, and Tokyo’s Fuji Rock Festival. Coming back to his roots, Johnny has developed an intimate solo performance celebrating some of the greatest, and most influential, guitar work in history.

(Early Show) Caitlin Canty with Special Guest Maya De Vitry

Caitlin Canty is an American singer/songwriter whose music carves a line through folk, blues, and country ballads. Her voice was called “casually devastating” by the San Francisco Chronicle and NPR Music describes her songs as having a “haunting urgency.”

Motel Bouquet, Canty’s third record, features ten original songs that hold her darkly radiant voice firmly in the spotlight. Produced by Grammy-nominated Noam Pikelny (Punch Brothers) and recorded live over three days in Nashville, the album boasts a band of some of finest musicians in roots music, including fiddler Stuart Duncan and vocalist Aoife O’Donovan. Rolling Stone hails Motel Bouquet as “dreamy and daring” with “poetic lyrics and haunting melodies.”

Since the release of her critically-acclaimed Reckless Skyline in 2015, Canty has put thousands of miles on her songs, circling through the U.S. and Europe. She warmed up stages for The Milk Carton Kids and Gregory Alan Isakov and recorded with longtime collaborators Darlingside and with Down Like Silver, her duo with Peter Bradley Adams. She won the Troubadour songwriting competition at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, and her song, “Get Up,” was nominated for Song of the Year in the Folk Alliance International Music Awards. Canty’s original recordings have recently appeared on CBS’s Code Black and on the Netflix original series House of Cards.

Raised in small-town Vermont, the daughter of a school teacher and a house painter, Canty earned her degree in biology in the Berkshires and subsequently moved to New York City. She spent her days in the city working as an environmental sustainability consultant and her nights making music at Lower East Side music halls and bars. In 2009, she quit her job and set out to make music full time. In 2015, she packed up her house plants and her 1939 Recording King guitar and drove to Nashville, TN, which she now calls home.

Caitlin Canty is an American singer/songwriter whose music carves a line through folk, blues, and country ballads. Her voice was called “casually devastating” by the San Francisco Chronicle and NPR Music describes her songs as having a “haunting urgency.”

Motel Bouquet, Canty’s third record, features ten original songs that hold her darkly radiant voice firmly in the spotlight. Produced by Grammy-nominated Noam Pikelny (Punch Brothers) and recorded live over three days in Nashville, the album boasts a band of some of finest musicians in roots music, including fiddler Stuart Duncan and vocalist Aoife O’Donovan. Rolling Stone hails Motel Bouquet as “dreamy and daring” with “poetic lyrics and haunting melodies.”

Since the release of her critically-acclaimed Reckless Skyline in 2015, Canty has put thousands of miles on her songs, circling through the U.S. and Europe. She warmed up stages for The Milk Carton Kids and Gregory Alan Isakov and recorded with longtime collaborators Darlingside and with Down Like Silver, her duo with Peter Bradley Adams. She won the Troubadour songwriting competition at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, and her song, “Get Up,” was nominated for Song of the Year in the Folk Alliance International Music Awards. Canty’s original recordings have recently appeared on CBS’s Code Black and on the Netflix original series House of Cards.

Raised in small-town Vermont, the daughter of a school teacher and a house painter, Canty earned her degree in biology in the Berkshires and subsequently moved to New York City. She spent her days in the city working as an environmental sustainability consultant and her nights making music at Lower East Side music halls and bars. In 2009, she quit her job and set out to make music full time. In 2015, she packed up her house plants and her 1939 Recording King guitar and drove to Nashville, TN, which she now calls home.

(Late Show) Danielle Nicole

For Immediate Release – "I'm definitely taking more chances now," Danielle Nicole says of Cry No More, her second solo album and the follow-up to her widely acclaimed 2015 solo debut Wolf Den. "I grew up playing the blues, and the blues is still a big part of what I do. But now I'm reaching out more and trying different things. It still sounds like me, but I'm stretching out a lot more than I have previously."

Indeed, while Wolf Den served as a powerful intro to the young singer-bassist-songwriter's funky, blues-steeped songcraft, Cry No More, set for release on February 23rd, 2018 via Concord Records, takes the artist into fresh new creative territory, delivering 14 emotion-charged new songs whose rootsy musical edge is matched by their air of hard-won personal experience.

Danielle Nicole's expansive approach yields deeply compelling musical results throughout Cry No More. With seasoned veteran Tony Braunagel (Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Burdon) producing, such heartfelt, groove-intensive new tunes as "Crawl," "How Come You Don't Call Me Anymore," the Bill Withers-penned "Hot Spell" and the heart-tugging title track find Danielle cutting loose and focusing on the storytelling and character-development aspects of her songwriting.

"I wanted to open up more about myself, and I think it shows in the songs," Danielle asserts. "I thought really hard about the stories I wanted to tell in these songs. I really dug into my personal experience, and worked to be more open and expose more of myself than I have in the past.

"There's a song there about my father, 'Bobby,' who passed away a long time ago," she continues. "That was a big one for me, because I'd never gone there before. And I've had lots of changes going on in my life, so the title track, 'Cry No More,' is about moving on and letting go, and about getting over things and moving past them. There are a lot of songs on this album about moving on, although that wasn't a conscious direction. Every song is a different story, and every song has a purpose and a perspective."

While Danielle wrote or co-wrote nine of Cry No More's 14 songs, the seductive "Hot Spell" was given to Danielle by its author, long-retired R&B legend Bill Withers. Withers was a surprise visitor to the album's recording sessions at L.A.'s Ultratone Studios, and was so impressed with Danielle's singing that he dug into his archives and offered her the song, which he wrote back in the '70s, but which had gone unrecorded since then.

"Bill is one of my all-time musical heroes," Danielle notes. "We played him a couple of the songs we'd been working on, and he said 'Come on, let's go out to my car for a minute.' So we were hanging out in his SUV, and he's shuffling through his glovebox and he pulls out this disc and says 'I've got this song; it's a bit risqué, but if you don't mind, I'll play it for you.' It was this demo that he'd done, with his daughter doing the vocals. It was real moody and had a great groove, and it was Bill all the way. He told me that if I liked it, I was welcome to record it."

She didn't have to be told twice. "There was a section on the demo where Bill's scatting where the guitar solo would be. We asked him to do that on my version, but he's retired, so he respectfully declined to sing on it. So I sang the scat line and harmonized to it, in his honor. He dug it!"

Danielle enlisted an old friend, Braunagel, who also produced the last two albums by her old family band, Trampled Under Foot, to record the album. The pair's longstanding creative rapport is apparent throughout Cry No More, on which Braunagel co-wrote five songs with Danielle.

"I really wanted to work with Tony on this record, because I knew that he would get the best out of me," Danielle explains. "We've really developed a great working relationship and we write together really well, and I knew that Tony could help me develop these stories into songs.

"This whole record was like a dream come true," she adds. "I got to do the songs I wanted to do, work with the producer I wanted to work with, and record in the studio I wanted to record in. It was really cool how everything fell into place. All of the songs were what I wanted them to be, and all of the players were perfect for the songs. Every aspect of this album, from the birth of the songs to the mastering, was really free and organic."

In addition to Danielle on bass, producer Braunagel on drums and longtime Bonnie Raitt guitarist Johnnie Lee Schell (who also engineered the sessions), Cry No More features appearances by such notable guitarists as Kenny Wayne Shepherd (on "Save Me"), Luther Dickinson (on "Just Can't Keep From Crying"), Walter Trout (on "Burnin' for You"), Sonny Landreth (on "I'm Going Home"), Danielle's touring guitarist Brandon Miller (on "Baby Eyes"), and her brother and former bandmate Nick Schnebelen (on "Crawl").

The musical expertise and emotional depth of Cry No More reflect of a lifetime's worth of music-making. Born Danielle Nicole Schnebelen, Danielle comes from a long line of singers and musicians, and showed an affinity for singing almost from birth. Growing up in Kansas City, Missouri, she performed in public for the first time at the age of 12, singing Koko Taylor's "Never Trust a Man" as part of a Blues for Schools program at her elementary school. In her early teens, she began singing in local coffeehouses and at open mic events, often jamming with her parents at clubs that would allow minors. At 16, she became lead singer in her father's band, Little Eva and the Works. In 1999, she started her own band, Fresh Brew, with some older local musicians. Fresh Brew performed for four years and represented Kansas City in the prestigious International Blues Challenge.

It was during this time that Danielle and her brothers Nick and Kris launched a family band, Trampled Under Foot, relocating to Philadelphia in the process. To maintain the family concept, Danielle learned to play bass, eventually mastering the instrument. Trampled Under Foot traveled the world and recorded several self-released albums, building a sizable national fan base through years of nonstop roadwork. For their 2013 album Badlands, produced by Braunagel, Trampled Under Foot moved to the Telarc label, a division of Concord Music Group. Badlands debuted at #1 on Billboard's Blues Chart.

As Trampled Under Foot wound down after an eventful 13-year run, Danielle formed her own band and signed with Concord Records, releasing a self-titled EP and the Anders Osborne-produced album Wolf Den in 2015. Those releases established Danielle as a formidable solo artist and bandleader.

"I learned a lot from the last album," Danielle states. "It was the first time I was writing and recording and choosing all of the material on my own, which was a big thing for me. I had been in a band with my brothers for 13 years, but it's a whole different thing when it's your name that's on the line. That aspect feels a lot more comfortable now, and I can make decisions without worrying about what everybody else will think."

Nicole's distinctive, inventive bass work—which resulted in her becoming the first woman to win the Blues Foundation's 2014 Blues Music Award for Best Instrumentalist, Bass—is the product of years of intensive roadwork. Although she had no experience with the instrument when she became Trampled Under Foot's bassist, now she can't imagine life without it.

"Playing the bass definitely influences the way I sing, the way I write and the way I approach music," she says. "As I've progressed more, the bass lines have been getting a lot more intricate. It's still a challenge to sing while playing bass, because it's very rare that the bass line and the vocal go together. I still get tripped up sometimes, but at this point I'd never give up the bass.

"When I started doing my solo thing," she continues, "someone asked me if I was gonna hire a bass player. No, of course not! I originally picked up the bass to keep Trampled Under Foot a family band, but I really fell in love with it. It was a huge challenge, and it still is. But I really love being part of the groove and getting to sing on top of that. I had learned some stuff on acoustic guitar before I started playing bass, but I never really felt connected to it the way I do with the bass. It's empowering, walking onto a stage full of grown men who can play their asses off, and it's 'OK, I'm gonna play this bass, we're gonna do this, and it's gonna rock.'"

With Cry No More marking a substantial creative step forward, Danielle Nicole is ready to reap her musical destiny.

"I think that it's a good time for the kind of thing I'm doing," she states. "From my years of playing blues festivals, I've seen that younger and younger audiences are getting into the blues. I think that people want to hear authentic music again."

For Immediate Release – "I'm definitely taking more chances now," Danielle Nicole says of Cry No More, her second solo album and the follow-up to her widely acclaimed 2015 solo debut Wolf Den. "I grew up playing the blues, and the blues is still a big part of what I do. But now I'm reaching out more and trying different things. It still sounds like me, but I'm stretching out a lot more than I have previously."

Indeed, while Wolf Den served as a powerful intro to the young singer-bassist-songwriter's funky, blues-steeped songcraft, Cry No More, set for release on February 23rd, 2018 via Concord Records, takes the artist into fresh new creative territory, delivering 14 emotion-charged new songs whose rootsy musical edge is matched by their air of hard-won personal experience.

Danielle Nicole's expansive approach yields deeply compelling musical results throughout Cry No More. With seasoned veteran Tony Braunagel (Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Burdon) producing, such heartfelt, groove-intensive new tunes as "Crawl," "How Come You Don't Call Me Anymore," the Bill Withers-penned "Hot Spell" and the heart-tugging title track find Danielle cutting loose and focusing on the storytelling and character-development aspects of her songwriting.

"I wanted to open up more about myself, and I think it shows in the songs," Danielle asserts. "I thought really hard about the stories I wanted to tell in these songs. I really dug into my personal experience, and worked to be more open and expose more of myself than I have in the past.

"There's a song there about my father, 'Bobby,' who passed away a long time ago," she continues. "That was a big one for me, because I'd never gone there before. And I've had lots of changes going on in my life, so the title track, 'Cry No More,' is about moving on and letting go, and about getting over things and moving past them. There are a lot of songs on this album about moving on, although that wasn't a conscious direction. Every song is a different story, and every song has a purpose and a perspective."

While Danielle wrote or co-wrote nine of Cry No More's 14 songs, the seductive "Hot Spell" was given to Danielle by its author, long-retired R&B legend Bill Withers. Withers was a surprise visitor to the album's recording sessions at L.A.'s Ultratone Studios, and was so impressed with Danielle's singing that he dug into his archives and offered her the song, which he wrote back in the '70s, but which had gone unrecorded since then.

"Bill is one of my all-time musical heroes," Danielle notes. "We played him a couple of the songs we'd been working on, and he said 'Come on, let's go out to my car for a minute.' So we were hanging out in his SUV, and he's shuffling through his glovebox and he pulls out this disc and says 'I've got this song; it's a bit risqué, but if you don't mind, I'll play it for you.' It was this demo that he'd done, with his daughter doing the vocals. It was real moody and had a great groove, and it was Bill all the way. He told me that if I liked it, I was welcome to record it."

She didn't have to be told twice. "There was a section on the demo where Bill's scatting where the guitar solo would be. We asked him to do that on my version, but he's retired, so he respectfully declined to sing on it. So I sang the scat line and harmonized to it, in his honor. He dug it!"

Danielle enlisted an old friend, Braunagel, who also produced the last two albums by her old family band, Trampled Under Foot, to record the album. The pair's longstanding creative rapport is apparent throughout Cry No More, on which Braunagel co-wrote five songs with Danielle.

"I really wanted to work with Tony on this record, because I knew that he would get the best out of me," Danielle explains. "We've really developed a great working relationship and we write together really well, and I knew that Tony could help me develop these stories into songs.

"This whole record was like a dream come true," she adds. "I got to do the songs I wanted to do, work with the producer I wanted to work with, and record in the studio I wanted to record in. It was really cool how everything fell into place. All of the songs were what I wanted them to be, and all of the players were perfect for the songs. Every aspect of this album, from the birth of the songs to the mastering, was really free and organic."

In addition to Danielle on bass, producer Braunagel on drums and longtime Bonnie Raitt guitarist Johnnie Lee Schell (who also engineered the sessions), Cry No More features appearances by such notable guitarists as Kenny Wayne Shepherd (on "Save Me"), Luther Dickinson (on "Just Can't Keep From Crying"), Walter Trout (on "Burnin' for You"), Sonny Landreth (on "I'm Going Home"), Danielle's touring guitarist Brandon Miller (on "Baby Eyes"), and her brother and former bandmate Nick Schnebelen (on "Crawl").

The musical expertise and emotional depth of Cry No More reflect of a lifetime's worth of music-making. Born Danielle Nicole Schnebelen, Danielle comes from a long line of singers and musicians, and showed an affinity for singing almost from birth. Growing up in Kansas City, Missouri, she performed in public for the first time at the age of 12, singing Koko Taylor's "Never Trust a Man" as part of a Blues for Schools program at her elementary school. In her early teens, she began singing in local coffeehouses and at open mic events, often jamming with her parents at clubs that would allow minors. At 16, she became lead singer in her father's band, Little Eva and the Works. In 1999, she started her own band, Fresh Brew, with some older local musicians. Fresh Brew performed for four years and represented Kansas City in the prestigious International Blues Challenge.

It was during this time that Danielle and her brothers Nick and Kris launched a family band, Trampled Under Foot, relocating to Philadelphia in the process. To maintain the family concept, Danielle learned to play bass, eventually mastering the instrument. Trampled Under Foot traveled the world and recorded several self-released albums, building a sizable national fan base through years of nonstop roadwork. For their 2013 album Badlands, produced by Braunagel, Trampled Under Foot moved to the Telarc label, a division of Concord Music Group. Badlands debuted at #1 on Billboard's Blues Chart.

As Trampled Under Foot wound down after an eventful 13-year run, Danielle formed her own band and signed with Concord Records, releasing a self-titled EP and the Anders Osborne-produced album Wolf Den in 2015. Those releases established Danielle as a formidable solo artist and bandleader.

"I learned a lot from the last album," Danielle states. "It was the first time I was writing and recording and choosing all of the material on my own, which was a big thing for me. I had been in a band with my brothers for 13 years, but it's a whole different thing when it's your name that's on the line. That aspect feels a lot more comfortable now, and I can make decisions without worrying about what everybody else will think."

Nicole's distinctive, inventive bass work—which resulted in her becoming the first woman to win the Blues Foundation's 2014 Blues Music Award for Best Instrumentalist, Bass—is the product of years of intensive roadwork. Although she had no experience with the instrument when she became Trampled Under Foot's bassist, now she can't imagine life without it.

"Playing the bass definitely influences the way I sing, the way I write and the way I approach music," she says. "As I've progressed more, the bass lines have been getting a lot more intricate. It's still a challenge to sing while playing bass, because it's very rare that the bass line and the vocal go together. I still get tripped up sometimes, but at this point I'd never give up the bass.

"When I started doing my solo thing," she continues, "someone asked me if I was gonna hire a bass player. No, of course not! I originally picked up the bass to keep Trampled Under Foot a family band, but I really fell in love with it. It was a huge challenge, and it still is. But I really love being part of the groove and getting to sing on top of that. I had learned some stuff on acoustic guitar before I started playing bass, but I never really felt connected to it the way I do with the bass. It's empowering, walking onto a stage full of grown men who can play their asses off, and it's 'OK, I'm gonna play this bass, we're gonna do this, and it's gonna rock.'"

With Cry No More marking a substantial creative step forward, Danielle Nicole is ready to reap her musical destiny.

"I think that it's a good time for the kind of thing I'm doing," she states. "From my years of playing blues festivals, I've seen that younger and younger audiences are getting into the blues. I think that people want to hear authentic music again."

Suuns with Special Guest Facs

"This record is definitely looser than our last one," says Suuns singer/guitarist Ben Shemie. "It's not as clinical. There's more swagger."
You can hear this freedom flowing through the 11 tracks on Felt, from Look No Further's dramatically loping, surrender-to-the-soil skeletal rock - "Our minimalist overture," notes Shemie - to the climactic bleep 'n' bliss-out of pocket symphony Materials, which finds his vocoder-treated voice floating deliriously amid cavernous inner space. It's both a continuation and rebirth, the Montreal quartet returning to beloved local facility Breakglass Studios (where they cut their first two albums with Jace Lasek of The Besnard Lakes) but this time recording themselves at their own pace, over five fertile sessions spanning several months. A simultaneous stretching out and honing in, mixed to audiophile perfection by St Vincent producer John Congleton (helmer of Suuns' previous full-length Hold/Still), who flew up especially from Dallas to deploy his award-winning skills in situ.

While maintaining a pleasing economy - the closest thing to a ‘jam' here is an otherworldly two-minute instrumental, aptly titled Moonbeams - the informality of self-production has enabled Suuns to explore bright new vistas. "It was different and exciting," declares drummer Liam O'Neill. "In the past there was a more concerted effort on my part to drum in a controlled and genre-specific way. Self-consciously approaching things stylistically. Us doing it ourselves, that process was like a very receptive, limitless workshop to just try out ideas."

Hence the hypnotic future-pop percolations of X-ALT, where guitarist Joseph Yarmush's delicate precision is engulfed by squalls of giddy saxophone. Or the way Watch You, Watch Me's organic/synthetic rush builds and and builds atop O'Neill's elevatory rhythm and the ecstatic, Harmonia-meets-Game Boy patterns unleashed by electronics mastermind Max Henry. As befits a band who cite Andy Stott and My Bloody Valentine as touchstones yet don't sound like either, Suuns have always seamlessly blended the programmed and played. Never mere fusionists, it's now pointless trying to decode their sonic signature as ‘dance music that rocks' or vice versa.

Eschewing presets, Henry devised fresh sounds for each song while also becoming a default musical director, orchestrating patches and oscillations. Quietly enthusing about "freaky post-techno" and Frank Ocean's use of space, he's among your more modest studio desk jockeys: "Yeah, I sat in the control room while the others played - hitting ‘record' and ‘stop'. It also gave me the flexibility to move parts around and play with effects. I do have a sweet tooth for pop music. So if there's a more straightforward option on the table, I tend to push for it. Of course, interesting pop music isn't always about being straightforward, so it's a good thing I don't always get my way."

Said sweetness is amplified by Ben Shemie's newfound vocal range and buoyant melodies, showcased in such wholly unexpected delights as the yearning lilt of Make It Real and sax-smoothed Peace And Love, which sincerely comes on like a post-punk Sade. There's a previously unheard confidence to the singer and lyricist, perhaps best exemplified by centre-piece Control, where his hushed tones are complemented by a bilingual voice musing on dreams and reality, sampled from an old Montreal social art project.

"The sample of that man speaking has a serendipitous story behind it. It's a bit of audio I copied from a series of interviews of people living on the streets of Montreal called The Dream Listener. It was recorded by an artist 10 years ago at the St-James Drop-In Center to raise money for the clinic and asked them to talk about their dreams. I always thought it was a compelling sample, but didn't realize until after we used it that the man in the recording was a family friend, a respected poet, whose struggled with mental illness. It makes the song the true centre piece of the album."

Suuns are proud of their roots in Canada's most socialist province, whilst not sounding quite like anything else the city has produced. "Conditions are great for musicians, but not so much if you want to be a high powered investment banker," laughs Ben. "If I could compare Montreal to anywhere I'd say it's kind of like Berlin, in the sense that there isn't a huge industry, so there isn't that much money. Plus you have to speak French if you want a career, so that stops too many people moving here. It's gentrifying at a slower rate than other cities."

Quebecois natives Shemie and Yarmush founded the group just over a decade ago, the latter having moved to Montreal from a nearby village: "Ben's from the city but I grew up in the mountains - in the forest with nothing!" The only member not to be formally schooled in jazz, guitarist Yarmush studied photography and utilized his visual training to help realize Shemie's novel concept for the eye-catching album artwork.

"I was at a barbecue last summer and there were balloons everywhere," recalls the singer. "I like this idea of pressure, resistance, and pushing against something just before it brakes. And there is something strangely subversive about a finger pushing into a balloon. It seemed to fit the vibe of the record we were making. We made plaster casts of our hands, going for a non-denominational statue vibe. Joe came up with the colour scheme, the sickly green background, and shot the whole cover in an hour."

It's a suitably outré image for Felt, which breaks with Suuns' earlier darkness for a more optimistic ambience. The record's playful atmosphere is echoed by its double meaning title. "Some people might think of the material," muses Ben. "I like that that could be misconstrued. Also it's to have felt and not to feel - a little introspective, but that feeling's in the past."

"This record is definitely looser than our last one," says Suuns singer/guitarist Ben Shemie. "It's not as clinical. There's more swagger."
You can hear this freedom flowing through the 11 tracks on Felt, from Look No Further's dramatically loping, surrender-to-the-soil skeletal rock - "Our minimalist overture," notes Shemie - to the climactic bleep 'n' bliss-out of pocket symphony Materials, which finds his vocoder-treated voice floating deliriously amid cavernous inner space. It's both a continuation and rebirth, the Montreal quartet returning to beloved local facility Breakglass Studios (where they cut their first two albums with Jace Lasek of The Besnard Lakes) but this time recording themselves at their own pace, over five fertile sessions spanning several months. A simultaneous stretching out and honing in, mixed to audiophile perfection by St Vincent producer John Congleton (helmer of Suuns' previous full-length Hold/Still), who flew up especially from Dallas to deploy his award-winning skills in situ.

While maintaining a pleasing economy - the closest thing to a ‘jam' here is an otherworldly two-minute instrumental, aptly titled Moonbeams - the informality of self-production has enabled Suuns to explore bright new vistas. "It was different and exciting," declares drummer Liam O'Neill. "In the past there was a more concerted effort on my part to drum in a controlled and genre-specific way. Self-consciously approaching things stylistically. Us doing it ourselves, that process was like a very receptive, limitless workshop to just try out ideas."

Hence the hypnotic future-pop percolations of X-ALT, where guitarist Joseph Yarmush's delicate precision is engulfed by squalls of giddy saxophone. Or the way Watch You, Watch Me's organic/synthetic rush builds and and builds atop O'Neill's elevatory rhythm and the ecstatic, Harmonia-meets-Game Boy patterns unleashed by electronics mastermind Max Henry. As befits a band who cite Andy Stott and My Bloody Valentine as touchstones yet don't sound like either, Suuns have always seamlessly blended the programmed and played. Never mere fusionists, it's now pointless trying to decode their sonic signature as ‘dance music that rocks' or vice versa.

Eschewing presets, Henry devised fresh sounds for each song while also becoming a default musical director, orchestrating patches and oscillations. Quietly enthusing about "freaky post-techno" and Frank Ocean's use of space, he's among your more modest studio desk jockeys: "Yeah, I sat in the control room while the others played - hitting ‘record' and ‘stop'. It also gave me the flexibility to move parts around and play with effects. I do have a sweet tooth for pop music. So if there's a more straightforward option on the table, I tend to push for it. Of course, interesting pop music isn't always about being straightforward, so it's a good thing I don't always get my way."

Said sweetness is amplified by Ben Shemie's newfound vocal range and buoyant melodies, showcased in such wholly unexpected delights as the yearning lilt of Make It Real and sax-smoothed Peace And Love, which sincerely comes on like a post-punk Sade. There's a previously unheard confidence to the singer and lyricist, perhaps best exemplified by centre-piece Control, where his hushed tones are complemented by a bilingual voice musing on dreams and reality, sampled from an old Montreal social art project.

"The sample of that man speaking has a serendipitous story behind it. It's a bit of audio I copied from a series of interviews of people living on the streets of Montreal called The Dream Listener. It was recorded by an artist 10 years ago at the St-James Drop-In Center to raise money for the clinic and asked them to talk about their dreams. I always thought it was a compelling sample, but didn't realize until after we used it that the man in the recording was a family friend, a respected poet, whose struggled with mental illness. It makes the song the true centre piece of the album."

Suuns are proud of their roots in Canada's most socialist province, whilst not sounding quite like anything else the city has produced. "Conditions are great for musicians, but not so much if you want to be a high powered investment banker," laughs Ben. "If I could compare Montreal to anywhere I'd say it's kind of like Berlin, in the sense that there isn't a huge industry, so there isn't that much money. Plus you have to speak French if you want a career, so that stops too many people moving here. It's gentrifying at a slower rate than other cities."

Quebecois natives Shemie and Yarmush founded the group just over a decade ago, the latter having moved to Montreal from a nearby village: "Ben's from the city but I grew up in the mountains - in the forest with nothing!" The only member not to be formally schooled in jazz, guitarist Yarmush studied photography and utilized his visual training to help realize Shemie's novel concept for the eye-catching album artwork.

"I was at a barbecue last summer and there were balloons everywhere," recalls the singer. "I like this idea of pressure, resistance, and pushing against something just before it brakes. And there is something strangely subversive about a finger pushing into a balloon. It seemed to fit the vibe of the record we were making. We made plaster casts of our hands, going for a non-denominational statue vibe. Joe came up with the colour scheme, the sickly green background, and shot the whole cover in an hour."

It's a suitably outré image for Felt, which breaks with Suuns' earlier darkness for a more optimistic ambience. The record's playful atmosphere is echoed by its double meaning title. "Some people might think of the material," muses Ben. "I like that that could be misconstrued. Also it's to have felt and not to feel - a little introspective, but that feeling's in the past."

Lillie Mae

Lillie Mae has been singing and playing on stages across the country since she could stand on her own two feet. FOREVER AND THEN SOME, her much anticipated Third Man Records debut, sees the Nashville-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist weaving her own extraordinary experiences with the myriad strains of Americana to create a breathtaking song cycle of romance and struggle, solitude and adventure. Songs like "Wash Me Clean" and the plaintive first single, "Over The Hill and Through The Woods," stand out as snapshots of intimacies, encounters, and moments that matter, reverberating with earnest emotion and restless creative energy. Produced by multiple GRAMMY® Award-winner Jack White III at Third Man Studio in Nashville, FOREVER AND THEN SOME affirms Lillie Mae as a remarkably gifted musical storyteller, a bright new star that's been here all along.

Born in Illinois but raised on the road, Lillie Mae first started singing when she was but three years old, picking up the fiddle at the age of seven. Her dad, Forrest Carter Rische, taught all five of his children to sing and play alongside him in his Forrest Carter Family Band. The family traveled America in an old motor home, busking country, gospel, and bluegrass from the Branson Mall to RV parks in Texas' Rio Grande Valley. Though they spent most of their time among other well-traveled musicians, the Risches led a cloistered life, intensely religious with boundaries against anything deemed "too worldly."

With few friends and limited access to the outside world, Lillie Mae and her siblings forged a special bond that remains to this day, a deeply ingrained familial link that fueled their own original musical approach. In 2000, the family was invited by country music legend Cowboy Jack Clement to visit Nashville for an audition. Clement saw tremendous potential in the young musicians, especially the pre-teen Lillie Mae, who he declared "a major voice" at the tender age of nine.

"Cowboy was closer to me than any grandparent I ever had," she says. "His influence on me is still strong. He always pushed me to play different instruments; he saw how I would pick up everything in the studio. He was a good friend to me and we remained close until he passed away."

By now all in their teens and beyond, Lillie Mae, brother Frank, and sisters Scarlett, Amber-Dawn, and McKenna Grace, next formed their own group, known around Nashville as simply The Risches. The band's extraordinary live sets at the famed Lower
Broadway honky tonk, Layla's Bluegrass Inn, made them into local heroes, acclaimed for
their electrifying musicianship and groundbreaking bluegrass/country/pop fusion.

Eventually dubbed Jypsi, Lillie Mae and her siblings signed to a major label and in 2008, released their self-titled debut album. The group scored a top 40 country hit with "I Don't Love You Like That" but their multi-hued Americana proved to be a bit more "far out" than the country world was yet ready to handle.

Lillie Mae continued on, writing original songs inspired by her own uncommon worldview and experience. In 2012, she joined Jack White's crack touring and recording combo, The Peacocks, playing fiddle and mandolin while also lending vocals to such tracks as "Temporary Ground," from 2014's LAZARETTO. The two musicians formed an immediate kinship, both being the youngest children of large families and instrumental polymaths. White was similarly appreciative of Lillie Mae's songwriting, producing her
2014 Third Man debut single, "Nobody's" b/w "The Same Eyes."

Lillie Mae officially set to work recording FOREVER AND THEN SOME at Third Man Studios in March 2016, with White producing and GRAMMY® Award-nominated engineer Joshua V. Smith behind the board. Initially planned as "a trial run" for the album, it quickly became plain that Lillie Mae had come fully armed with chops, ambition, and songs to spare.

"We went in there thinking we would start with three songs," Lillie Mae says, "see how they turned out. We finished the third song and Jack said, ‘You got another?' It just became this steady flow from then on. We just kept churning them out."

Her unique upbringing and lifelong immersion in music has led Lillie Mae to create an authentically original sound all her own. With FOREVER AND THEN SOME, she has forged a kind of Pop Americana, born and raised on country, bluegrass, folk, and blues but imbued with modernist energy and a willingness to push her songs into new shapes and directions. "Honest and True" begins as a heartland heartbreaker but eventually veers into baroque pop terrain while the quirky "Dance To The Beat Of My Own Drum" is as fiercely self-possessed and rhythmic as its title suggests.

"This has been going on my whole life," Lillie Mae says. "People are always asking me, what kind of music is it? I hear my bluegrass influence and my country influence but there's some stuff on it, I don't know where it comes from. It's probably all my love of melody, of melodies changing, that has to do with where the songs go."

What binds FOREVER AND THEN SOME is Lillie Mae's distinctive songcraft, a frank and utterly direct lyrical voice as warm and intuitive as her honeyed vocals themselves. The album's songs – all penned by Lillie Mae, with arrangement advice and assistance on select tracks by her older sister Scarlett – span much of Lillie Mae's adult life, exploring "the choices one makes" and what she calls "a string of similar events."

"There's not one song on there that's not true," she says. "I just jot it down the way I see it. If it didn't happen, I'm not writing about it. It just doesn't work like that for me. When a song pushes through, it's coming through from somewhere and I've got to write it down. That's my obligation. I appreciate it too."

FOREVER AND THEN SOME features backing throughout by the core combo of Frank Carter Rische on electric and acoustic guitars, Scarlett Rische on mandolin, and the veteran rhythm section of bassist Brian Zonn and drummer Tanner Jacobson, both longtime collaborators with the Risches. Other notables appearing include keyboardist Dean Fertita (The Dead Weather, Queens of the Stone Age), banjo player Ian Craft (The Howlin' Brothers), and Old Crow Medicine Show pianist Cory Younts, with harmony vocals from McKenna Grace Rische and singer-songwriter Carey Kotsonis. Though all involved make vital contributions, make no mistake, this is very much Lillie Mae's album.

"I had the luxury of making the record with people I've played with most of my life," she says, "I brought them in because there aren't any better musicians around that I would rather have play on my record. I was able to really rely on those guys."

The Third Man sessions continued through October, thanks to Lillie Mae's abundant songbook as well as her own and her producer's ever-busy schedules. Lillie Mae admits she would have been perfectly happy to continue, "but Jack finally said, we have a lot of songs to choose from, let's put a cap on it and call it a day."

FOREVER AND THEN SOME stands simultaneously as both grounded and adventurous, an indelibly special collection touched by authenticity, resourcefulness, and passion – a passion that shines through in the music itself and Lillie Mae's live performances. Though she gave her all to craft this remarkable album, Lillie Mae's greatest pleasure remains performing live alongside her beloved siblings and fellow musicians.


"I've been writing these songs my whole life," Lillie Mae says, "I was blessed with someone that believed in me and gave me the opportunity to record them. Now I'll get on the road. That's all I want, I long for it. Touring is where I feel most comfortable in the world. The happiest I could ever be would be to have a gig every day."

Lillie Mae has been singing and playing on stages across the country since she could stand on her own two feet. FOREVER AND THEN SOME, her much anticipated Third Man Records debut, sees the Nashville-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist weaving her own extraordinary experiences with the myriad strains of Americana to create a breathtaking song cycle of romance and struggle, solitude and adventure. Songs like "Wash Me Clean" and the plaintive first single, "Over The Hill and Through The Woods," stand out as snapshots of intimacies, encounters, and moments that matter, reverberating with earnest emotion and restless creative energy. Produced by multiple GRAMMY® Award-winner Jack White III at Third Man Studio in Nashville, FOREVER AND THEN SOME affirms Lillie Mae as a remarkably gifted musical storyteller, a bright new star that's been here all along.

Born in Illinois but raised on the road, Lillie Mae first started singing when she was but three years old, picking up the fiddle at the age of seven. Her dad, Forrest Carter Rische, taught all five of his children to sing and play alongside him in his Forrest Carter Family Band. The family traveled America in an old motor home, busking country, gospel, and bluegrass from the Branson Mall to RV parks in Texas' Rio Grande Valley. Though they spent most of their time among other well-traveled musicians, the Risches led a cloistered life, intensely religious with boundaries against anything deemed "too worldly."

With few friends and limited access to the outside world, Lillie Mae and her siblings forged a special bond that remains to this day, a deeply ingrained familial link that fueled their own original musical approach. In 2000, the family was invited by country music legend Cowboy Jack Clement to visit Nashville for an audition. Clement saw tremendous potential in the young musicians, especially the pre-teen Lillie Mae, who he declared "a major voice" at the tender age of nine.

"Cowboy was closer to me than any grandparent I ever had," she says. "His influence on me is still strong. He always pushed me to play different instruments; he saw how I would pick up everything in the studio. He was a good friend to me and we remained close until he passed away."

By now all in their teens and beyond, Lillie Mae, brother Frank, and sisters Scarlett, Amber-Dawn, and McKenna Grace, next formed their own group, known around Nashville as simply The Risches. The band's extraordinary live sets at the famed Lower
Broadway honky tonk, Layla's Bluegrass Inn, made them into local heroes, acclaimed for
their electrifying musicianship and groundbreaking bluegrass/country/pop fusion.

Eventually dubbed Jypsi, Lillie Mae and her siblings signed to a major label and in 2008, released their self-titled debut album. The group scored a top 40 country hit with "I Don't Love You Like That" but their multi-hued Americana proved to be a bit more "far out" than the country world was yet ready to handle.

Lillie Mae continued on, writing original songs inspired by her own uncommon worldview and experience. In 2012, she joined Jack White's crack touring and recording combo, The Peacocks, playing fiddle and mandolin while also lending vocals to such tracks as "Temporary Ground," from 2014's LAZARETTO. The two musicians formed an immediate kinship, both being the youngest children of large families and instrumental polymaths. White was similarly appreciative of Lillie Mae's songwriting, producing her
2014 Third Man debut single, "Nobody's" b/w "The Same Eyes."

Lillie Mae officially set to work recording FOREVER AND THEN SOME at Third Man Studios in March 2016, with White producing and GRAMMY® Award-nominated engineer Joshua V. Smith behind the board. Initially planned as "a trial run" for the album, it quickly became plain that Lillie Mae had come fully armed with chops, ambition, and songs to spare.

"We went in there thinking we would start with three songs," Lillie Mae says, "see how they turned out. We finished the third song and Jack said, ‘You got another?' It just became this steady flow from then on. We just kept churning them out."

Her unique upbringing and lifelong immersion in music has led Lillie Mae to create an authentically original sound all her own. With FOREVER AND THEN SOME, she has forged a kind of Pop Americana, born and raised on country, bluegrass, folk, and blues but imbued with modernist energy and a willingness to push her songs into new shapes and directions. "Honest and True" begins as a heartland heartbreaker but eventually veers into baroque pop terrain while the quirky "Dance To The Beat Of My Own Drum" is as fiercely self-possessed and rhythmic as its title suggests.

"This has been going on my whole life," Lillie Mae says. "People are always asking me, what kind of music is it? I hear my bluegrass influence and my country influence but there's some stuff on it, I don't know where it comes from. It's probably all my love of melody, of melodies changing, that has to do with where the songs go."

What binds FOREVER AND THEN SOME is Lillie Mae's distinctive songcraft, a frank and utterly direct lyrical voice as warm and intuitive as her honeyed vocals themselves. The album's songs – all penned by Lillie Mae, with arrangement advice and assistance on select tracks by her older sister Scarlett – span much of Lillie Mae's adult life, exploring "the choices one makes" and what she calls "a string of similar events."

"There's not one song on there that's not true," she says. "I just jot it down the way I see it. If it didn't happen, I'm not writing about it. It just doesn't work like that for me. When a song pushes through, it's coming through from somewhere and I've got to write it down. That's my obligation. I appreciate it too."

FOREVER AND THEN SOME features backing throughout by the core combo of Frank Carter Rische on electric and acoustic guitars, Scarlett Rische on mandolin, and the veteran rhythm section of bassist Brian Zonn and drummer Tanner Jacobson, both longtime collaborators with the Risches. Other notables appearing include keyboardist Dean Fertita (The Dead Weather, Queens of the Stone Age), banjo player Ian Craft (The Howlin' Brothers), and Old Crow Medicine Show pianist Cory Younts, with harmony vocals from McKenna Grace Rische and singer-songwriter Carey Kotsonis. Though all involved make vital contributions, make no mistake, this is very much Lillie Mae's album.

"I had the luxury of making the record with people I've played with most of my life," she says, "I brought them in because there aren't any better musicians around that I would rather have play on my record. I was able to really rely on those guys."

The Third Man sessions continued through October, thanks to Lillie Mae's abundant songbook as well as her own and her producer's ever-busy schedules. Lillie Mae admits she would have been perfectly happy to continue, "but Jack finally said, we have a lot of songs to choose from, let's put a cap on it and call it a day."

FOREVER AND THEN SOME stands simultaneously as both grounded and adventurous, an indelibly special collection touched by authenticity, resourcefulness, and passion – a passion that shines through in the music itself and Lillie Mae's live performances. Though she gave her all to craft this remarkable album, Lillie Mae's greatest pleasure remains performing live alongside her beloved siblings and fellow musicians.


"I've been writing these songs my whole life," Lillie Mae says, "I was blessed with someone that believed in me and gave me the opportunity to record them. Now I'll get on the road. That's all I want, I long for it. Touring is where I feel most comfortable in the world. The happiest I could ever be would be to have a gig every day."

(Early Show) A-Money & the Downtown City (Album Release Show) with Special Guest Clara Kent

A-$ & the Downtown City is an original rock and roll band helmed by songwriter Adam Merulli which incorporates elements of soul, hip-hop, jazz, and pop. Their debut EP "NIght/Vision" is set for release this spring focusing on themes of hope, justice, love and redemption

A-$ & the Downtown City is an original rock and roll band helmed by songwriter Adam Merulli which incorporates elements of soul, hip-hop, jazz, and pop. Their debut EP "NIght/Vision" is set for release this spring focusing on themes of hope, justice, love and redemption

(Late Show) Garage Space & Tilted Shadows (No Cover!)

Garage Space is a collection of friends that have been together since childhood. Zac Burd and Chris Grenade have been in schooling together since pre-school,upon reconvening after college Zac and Chris decided to start something. The sound came naturally and before long the vibe was undeniably there.
We are a group of musicians from McKeesport, Pennsylvania, USA, part of the Greater Pittsburgh Area. The sound is a mixture of rockabilly, surf, folk, with punk and hardcore undertones.

Garage Space is a collection of friends that have been together since childhood. Zac Burd and Chris Grenade have been in schooling together since pre-school,upon reconvening after college Zac and Chris decided to start something. The sound came naturally and before long the vibe was undeniably there.
We are a group of musicians from McKeesport, Pennsylvania, USA, part of the Greater Pittsburgh Area. The sound is a mixture of rockabilly, surf, folk, with punk and hardcore undertones.

(Early Show) Parker McKay with Johnny Walylko

Parker McKay is a soul-bearing, country pop artist. Her wide range of influences spans from Sheryl Crow to Shania Twain to HAIM and John Mayer. This combination has lent to her unique blend of sultry, powerhouse vocals and stirring melodies.

As both an artist and songwriter, Parker‘s name has already made a notable impact on the industry’s community. Her debut music video premiered exclusively with Rolling Stone. Her lyrics bring a fresh perspective to the table and show that it’s a powerful thing to be a vulnerable, confident and honest woman in country music.

Parker McKay is a soul-bearing, country pop artist. Her wide range of influences spans from Sheryl Crow to Shania Twain to HAIM and John Mayer. This combination has lent to her unique blend of sultry, powerhouse vocals and stirring melodies.

As both an artist and songwriter, Parker‘s name has already made a notable impact on the industry’s community. Her debut music video premiered exclusively with Rolling Stone. Her lyrics bring a fresh perspective to the table and show that it’s a powerful thing to be a vulnerable, confident and honest woman in country music.

(Late Show) Race to the Coffin and Opus One Comedy presents Comedy Roulette: The Roast of Harry Potter Hosted by John Dick Winters

Race to the Coffin Comedy presents Comedy Roulette: Comedy with a Catch - a monthly stand up show that will feature everything from fictional character roasts to drunk comedy. With a new theme every month, each night is guaranteed to be different, entertaining and hilarious.

This month's theme: The Roast of Harry Potter. Hosted by John Dick Winters.

Race to the Coffin Comedy presents Comedy Roulette: Comedy with a Catch - a monthly stand up show that will feature everything from fictional character roasts to drunk comedy. With a new theme every month, each night is guaranteed to be different, entertaining and hilarious.

This month's theme: The Roast of Harry Potter. Hosted by John Dick Winters.

An Evening With Jill Sobule

Jill Sobule is a Denver-born singer, songwriter, storyteller, guitarist and gypsy. Over seven albums and nearly two decades of recording, Jill has mused on topics such as the death penalty, anorexia, shoplifting, reproduction, the French resistance movement, adolescence and the Christian right.

Her recording career began in 1990 with her debut album Things Here are Different, recorded by Todd Rundgren. Her 1995 self-titled album, Jill Sobule, yielded the hit songs I Kissed A Girl (the original) and Supermodel. Since then, she has continued to record, produce and tour with an ever-growing loyal fan base. Jill is considered a pioneer in crowd sourcing, with her 2009 fan-funded record, California Years. She continues to be at the forefront of exploring and creating new models for artists in an ever-changing changing music industry.

She’s performed with Neil Young, Billy Bragg, Steve Earle, Cyndi Lauper, Tom Morello and Warren Zevon and inducted Neil Diamond into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame. She can be seen live as a solo performer as well as the co-star of the Jill & Julia Show, an unusual and mesmerizing combination of song and storytelling in collaboration with comedian/actress Julia Sweeney. She also served as songwriter/composer for the hit Nickelodeon network show Unfabulous during that show's three-season run. She composed the music for the off-Broadway show Prozak and Platypus and her songs have appeared in a multitude of films including Mind the Gap, in which Jill herself co-starred. She has been a political troubadour for NPR stations across America and most recently performed original music at the keynote session for Netroots Nation. Jill is a longtime participant as well as musical contributor at TED.
A veritable gypsy, Jill divides her time between a busy touring schedule and a variety of other projects. The recently released A Day at the Pass finally captures an ongoing collaboration between Jill and John Doe (from the iconic punk band X) and was recorded live at The Pass studio on one fine day in Los Angeles. She is currently recording her next record, Dottie’s Charm’s - a collaboration between her and 11 of her favorite authors, including: Rick Moody, David Hajdu and Jonathon Lathem, Jill is also working with Steve Cossin (The Civillians), Jim Lewis (FELA) and Robin Eaton (a longtime collaborator) on the musical, Times Square.

In the words of New York Times pop music critic Jon Pareles, “Jill Sobule can claim her place among the stellar New York singer-songwriters of the last decade. Topical, funny and more than a little poignant...grown-up music for an adolescent age.”

She’s an American original.

Jill Sobule is a Denver-born singer, songwriter, storyteller, guitarist and gypsy. Over seven albums and nearly two decades of recording, Jill has mused on topics such as the death penalty, anorexia, shoplifting, reproduction, the French resistance movement, adolescence and the Christian right.

Her recording career began in 1990 with her debut album Things Here are Different, recorded by Todd Rundgren. Her 1995 self-titled album, Jill Sobule, yielded the hit songs I Kissed A Girl (the original) and Supermodel. Since then, she has continued to record, produce and tour with an ever-growing loyal fan base. Jill is considered a pioneer in crowd sourcing, with her 2009 fan-funded record, California Years. She continues to be at the forefront of exploring and creating new models for artists in an ever-changing changing music industry.

She’s performed with Neil Young, Billy Bragg, Steve Earle, Cyndi Lauper, Tom Morello and Warren Zevon and inducted Neil Diamond into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame. She can be seen live as a solo performer as well as the co-star of the Jill & Julia Show, an unusual and mesmerizing combination of song and storytelling in collaboration with comedian/actress Julia Sweeney. She also served as songwriter/composer for the hit Nickelodeon network show Unfabulous during that show's three-season run. She composed the music for the off-Broadway show Prozak and Platypus and her songs have appeared in a multitude of films including Mind the Gap, in which Jill herself co-starred. She has been a political troubadour for NPR stations across America and most recently performed original music at the keynote session for Netroots Nation. Jill is a longtime participant as well as musical contributor at TED.
A veritable gypsy, Jill divides her time between a busy touring schedule and a variety of other projects. The recently released A Day at the Pass finally captures an ongoing collaboration between Jill and John Doe (from the iconic punk band X) and was recorded live at The Pass studio on one fine day in Los Angeles. She is currently recording her next record, Dottie’s Charm’s - a collaboration between her and 11 of her favorite authors, including: Rick Moody, David Hajdu and Jonathon Lathem, Jill is also working with Steve Cossin (The Civillians), Jim Lewis (FELA) and Robin Eaton (a longtime collaborator) on the musical, Times Square.

In the words of New York Times pop music critic Jon Pareles, “Jill Sobule can claim her place among the stellar New York singer-songwriters of the last decade. Topical, funny and more than a little poignant...grown-up music for an adolescent age.”

She’s an American original.

Bruno Major

There's nothing like a deadline to focus the mind. Last year, Bruno Major set himself a task: to record and release one song a month for 12 months. Four weeks to take a song from an idea in his head to a finished product and have it out there for people to listen to and enjoy, every month, for a year. People had made albums in less time, he reasoned, how hard could it be?

"When I first said that I was going to do it most people said, ‘Nice one…that's never going to happen.'" Major recalls with a laugh. "A lot of people thought it was overly aspirational: it probably was."

What's impressive is not so much that he managed to pull it off, more that the challenge produced such a remarkable collection of songs. That within the time frame of a month, Major could produce such fully-realised, beautiful and inventive songs and then repeat the trick the following month, twelve times over.

"With a traditional album, there exists the concept of an album track...I haven't had that luxury because once a month I have to release a song and every song has to be a single. There's no room for a piano interlude. Each one had to be something that I could stand behind and say: ‘Hey, this is my next single, it's coming out, I've worked on it all month, I hope you like it.' It forced me to make sure the standard was at a certain level."

Not only did every song hit its mark, but listening to the fruits of Major's labour in the order he created them, you're given an experience that doesn't really have a precedent in music. Tracing a line from the blissful future soul and skittering beats of Wouldn't Mean A Thing through Home's delicate folk to Cold Blood's pulsating electronica, you're treated to a dozen snapshots of an artist at a specific moment in time. You can hear him grow, develop and move through the different emotional states of a year in a way that a traditional album simply wouldn't be able to offer. You can hear how he moved from the minimalism and sub bass warmth of There's Little Left to the jazz-flecked finger picking and layered harmonies of Second Time in just a few weeks and how the latter's dreamlike infatuation slowly faded into the bittersweet kiss-off of Fair-Weather Friend like the changing of the seasons.

"Albums are generally recorded within a smaller time frame and that helps lend them an identity as a whole and gives the tracks a feeling that they're siblings sonically," Major notes. "The big challenge for me has been to make sure there's a link through all of these songs because I've changed as a musician over the year. Listening to 'Wouldn't Mean A Thing' now, I think the sound I have developed with my co producer Phairo has become more developed. If I were to redo the whole thing now, there are elements of every song I would change, but that's part of the charm of them. I like that there's a little journey."

Having initially worked as a session guitarist, Major moved down from Northampton to London and, inspired by the energy of the city, became obsessed with songwriting. Honing his craft writing for other artists while all the time formulating his own musical style; an impossible to pigeonhole blend of sounds that can draw upon anything from James Blake and D'Angelo to Chet Baker and Nick Drake to create its own, uniquely intoxicating aura. It wasn't until a chance psychoactive revelation last year, however, that he struck upon the idea that would give him the perfect means to realise it.

"Whilst I was in Los Angeles I smoked DMT and had this mad epiphany where I saw how the universe works in perfect geometric patterns and synchronised cycles. I wanted to release a song every month, because that's the length of cycle of the moon," he recalls.

By his own admission, Major may have underestimated the task. A song like the Just The Same's touchingly devoted piano pop may have fallen into place one evening in all of 20 minutes, recorded the following day and then sent off to be mastered, but elsewhere there were weeks of fraught panic, scrapped ideas, stumbling blocks, pressure and looming deadlines where having a life outside of the challenge he'd set himself was a distant memory.

"It's definitely been tough, but it's also been wonderful," he reflects. "My life has been Groundhog Day for a year. I'd finish each month with a show and have a couple of nights of partying and then I'd start the next tune, work towards that, release it, over and over. It's been kind of comforting. In a way, I'm not looking forward to that ending."

He's probably earned a few days off to be fair. While he does, the rest of us can sit back and enjoy the music the last year of Bruno Major's life has produced.

There's nothing like a deadline to focus the mind. Last year, Bruno Major set himself a task: to record and release one song a month for 12 months. Four weeks to take a song from an idea in his head to a finished product and have it out there for people to listen to and enjoy, every month, for a year. People had made albums in less time, he reasoned, how hard could it be?

"When I first said that I was going to do it most people said, ‘Nice one…that's never going to happen.'" Major recalls with a laugh. "A lot of people thought it was overly aspirational: it probably was."

What's impressive is not so much that he managed to pull it off, more that the challenge produced such a remarkable collection of songs. That within the time frame of a month, Major could produce such fully-realised, beautiful and inventive songs and then repeat the trick the following month, twelve times over.

"With a traditional album, there exists the concept of an album track...I haven't had that luxury because once a month I have to release a song and every song has to be a single. There's no room for a piano interlude. Each one had to be something that I could stand behind and say: ‘Hey, this is my next single, it's coming out, I've worked on it all month, I hope you like it.' It forced me to make sure the standard was at a certain level."

Not only did every song hit its mark, but listening to the fruits of Major's labour in the order he created them, you're given an experience that doesn't really have a precedent in music. Tracing a line from the blissful future soul and skittering beats of Wouldn't Mean A Thing through Home's delicate folk to Cold Blood's pulsating electronica, you're treated to a dozen snapshots of an artist at a specific moment in time. You can hear him grow, develop and move through the different emotional states of a year in a way that a traditional album simply wouldn't be able to offer. You can hear how he moved from the minimalism and sub bass warmth of There's Little Left to the jazz-flecked finger picking and layered harmonies of Second Time in just a few weeks and how the latter's dreamlike infatuation slowly faded into the bittersweet kiss-off of Fair-Weather Friend like the changing of the seasons.

"Albums are generally recorded within a smaller time frame and that helps lend them an identity as a whole and gives the tracks a feeling that they're siblings sonically," Major notes. "The big challenge for me has been to make sure there's a link through all of these songs because I've changed as a musician over the year. Listening to 'Wouldn't Mean A Thing' now, I think the sound I have developed with my co producer Phairo has become more developed. If I were to redo the whole thing now, there are elements of every song I would change, but that's part of the charm of them. I like that there's a little journey."

Having initially worked as a session guitarist, Major moved down from Northampton to London and, inspired by the energy of the city, became obsessed with songwriting. Honing his craft writing for other artists while all the time formulating his own musical style; an impossible to pigeonhole blend of sounds that can draw upon anything from James Blake and D'Angelo to Chet Baker and Nick Drake to create its own, uniquely intoxicating aura. It wasn't until a chance psychoactive revelation last year, however, that he struck upon the idea that would give him the perfect means to realise it.

"Whilst I was in Los Angeles I smoked DMT and had this mad epiphany where I saw how the universe works in perfect geometric patterns and synchronised cycles. I wanted to release a song every month, because that's the length of cycle of the moon," he recalls.

By his own admission, Major may have underestimated the task. A song like the Just The Same's touchingly devoted piano pop may have fallen into place one evening in all of 20 minutes, recorded the following day and then sent off to be mastered, but elsewhere there were weeks of fraught panic, scrapped ideas, stumbling blocks, pressure and looming deadlines where having a life outside of the challenge he'd set himself was a distant memory.

"It's definitely been tough, but it's also been wonderful," he reflects. "My life has been Groundhog Day for a year. I'd finish each month with a show and have a couple of nights of partying and then I'd start the next tune, work towards that, release it, over and over. It's been kind of comforting. In a way, I'm not looking forward to that ending."

He's probably earned a few days off to be fair. While he does, the rest of us can sit back and enjoy the music the last year of Bruno Major's life has produced.

Bombadil

Two years ago, Bombadil lost a longtime bandmate and breaking up seemed inevitable. But after a period of exploration that forced them to step out of their comfort zone, Bombadil has returned as a band reborn. Their new album ‘Fences,’ released 3/3/17 via Ramseur Records and produced by John Vanderslice (Spoon, The Mountain Goats), is their most remarkable work to date: meticulously crafted, yet accessible and unadorned. Pure, simple, beautiful.

“It’s more than just an album,” says Bombadil drummer and vocalist James Phillips. “It is a new path, a reset after several challenging years.”

‘Fences’ features eleven new, original songs composed by the Durham, NC-based trio – Phillips (drums, vox), Daniel Michalak (bass, vox) and Stacey Harden (guitar, vox). Recorded at Vanderslice’s Tiny Telephone Recording in San Francisco, CA, the album is influenced by early Paul Simon and steeped in shades of Cat Stevens and The Incredible String Band.

“Sometimes you 'produce' the hell out of a record because the material needs to be lifted and transformed,” says Vanderslice. “These songs and performances were so strong I mostly just put up a Neumann U67 and stood out of the way."

Bombadil has made fans at NPR, Rolling Stone and the New York Times, who called them "astonishing." Time Out New York said their music is “bursting with irresistible melodies, unexpected lyrical gems, and moments of profound honesty, all anchored by expert songwriting skills." They've toured extensively in the past with Dr. Dog, Kishi Bashi and Carolina Chocolate Drops and will hit the road again in 2018 in support of the new album.

Two years ago, Bombadil lost a longtime bandmate and breaking up seemed inevitable. But after a period of exploration that forced them to step out of their comfort zone, Bombadil has returned as a band reborn. Their new album ‘Fences,’ released 3/3/17 via Ramseur Records and produced by John Vanderslice (Spoon, The Mountain Goats), is their most remarkable work to date: meticulously crafted, yet accessible and unadorned. Pure, simple, beautiful.

“It’s more than just an album,” says Bombadil drummer and vocalist James Phillips. “It is a new path, a reset after several challenging years.”

‘Fences’ features eleven new, original songs composed by the Durham, NC-based trio – Phillips (drums, vox), Daniel Michalak (bass, vox) and Stacey Harden (guitar, vox). Recorded at Vanderslice’s Tiny Telephone Recording in San Francisco, CA, the album is influenced by early Paul Simon and steeped in shades of Cat Stevens and The Incredible String Band.

“Sometimes you 'produce' the hell out of a record because the material needs to be lifted and transformed,” says Vanderslice. “These songs and performances were so strong I mostly just put up a Neumann U67 and stood out of the way."

Bombadil has made fans at NPR, Rolling Stone and the New York Times, who called them "astonishing." Time Out New York said their music is “bursting with irresistible melodies, unexpected lyrical gems, and moments of profound honesty, all anchored by expert songwriting skills." They've toured extensively in the past with Dr. Dog, Kishi Bashi and Carolina Chocolate Drops and will hit the road again in 2018 in support of the new album.

Richard Buckner with Special Guest Adam Fitz

Surrounded
Richard Buckner
US Release Date: September 3, 2013
MP3 / FLAC / CD / LP
MRG499
© (c) & (p) Merge Records 2013
In the time since Our Blood was released and after a few long tours, Richard Buckner attempted to work on writing short stories but found himself drawn back into the music room. The evidence of his time in the writer’s chair is clear in the dense, lovely prose of Surrounded. The album’s liner notes include text-embedded lyrics, a technique Buckner employed on his earlier albums Since and Impasse, but this marks the first time he used the songs’ extended story to construct the album’s overall view and track sequence.

Throwing out the “tricks and trades” of his previous efforts, Buckner hunkered down at home and chose a few unfamiliar pieces of gear—a Suzuki QChord electronic autoharp and an Electro-Harmonix POG2 pedal—to create basic tracks and open up more sonic possibilities. “The best outcomes happen sometimes when I’m unfamiliar with the tool that I’m using (imagine MacGyver wearing a dog cone).”

The now-infamous process of recording and re-recording Our Blood left him a bit gun-shy, so this time, Buckner decided to get each song out of his house as soon as it was finished to avoid the contamination of over-thinking. After hearing an interview with famed producer Tucker Martine, Buckner found a destination for his songs: “Tucker understood the urgency in me to tie the whole thing up before I fell into the same trap that I’d had finishing Our Blood and was generous enough to move other commitments around to fit Surrounded in. When I had finally finished Our Blood, I felt like I’d just survived a stroll through a mine field. With Surrounded, it was more of a sensation that I’d successfully organized a messy desk.”

Surrounded
Richard Buckner
US Release Date: September 3, 2013
MP3 / FLAC / CD / LP
MRG499
© (c) & (p) Merge Records 2013
In the time since Our Blood was released and after a few long tours, Richard Buckner attempted to work on writing short stories but found himself drawn back into the music room. The evidence of his time in the writer’s chair is clear in the dense, lovely prose of Surrounded. The album’s liner notes include text-embedded lyrics, a technique Buckner employed on his earlier albums Since and Impasse, but this marks the first time he used the songs’ extended story to construct the album’s overall view and track sequence.

Throwing out the “tricks and trades” of his previous efforts, Buckner hunkered down at home and chose a few unfamiliar pieces of gear—a Suzuki QChord electronic autoharp and an Electro-Harmonix POG2 pedal—to create basic tracks and open up more sonic possibilities. “The best outcomes happen sometimes when I’m unfamiliar with the tool that I’m using (imagine MacGyver wearing a dog cone).”

The now-infamous process of recording and re-recording Our Blood left him a bit gun-shy, so this time, Buckner decided to get each song out of his house as soon as it was finished to avoid the contamination of over-thinking. After hearing an interview with famed producer Tucker Martine, Buckner found a destination for his songs: “Tucker understood the urgency in me to tie the whole thing up before I fell into the same trap that I’d had finishing Our Blood and was generous enough to move other commitments around to fit Surrounded in. When I had finally finished Our Blood, I felt like I’d just survived a stroll through a mine field. With Surrounded, it was more of a sensation that I’d successfully organized a messy desk.”

(Early Show) Eliot Lewis of Live From Daryl's House

Eliot Lewis, an independent, multi-instrumentalist
has built a unique career most musicians
could only dream of. As a solo artist he consistently performs and releases
his own brand of guitar featured rock and soul.
He is also the only musician to appear on every episode of the hugely popular
"Live From Daryl's House" show.
Eliot also performs with the most successful duo of all time, Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame inductees Daryl Hall & John Oates on tour.
Eliot has worked with some of the biggest artists in the music business including
Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), Joe Walsh, Todd Rundgren, Train, Grace Potter, Ben Folds,
Booker T, Jewel, Rob Thomas, Keb Mo, Jason Mraz, Darius Rucker,
Gavin DeGraw, just to name a few. He has also performed on some of the most
prestigious stages all over the world including the legendary Hollywood Bowl and Japan's
Budokan Arena, as well as on The Voice, Conan O'Brien, Today Show, The View,
Jimmy Kimmel and many others.
"Eliot is a musician who can do it all, great singer, songwriter and guitarist.
He rocks and he's got soul. No one does it quite like him"
- Daryl Hall

"His talent and dedication go way beyond the average performer.
In short, Lewis is a guy who respects his fans and craft.
If Lewis comes to town, go see him"
- Thom Jennings (Backstage Axxess)

"Exuberant, skilled and passionate, Eliot Lewis has a special
gift for tapping his musical influences to produce inventive and original songs that soar"
- Chris Epting (Music Journalist/Author)


"He blistered through song after song with amazing tone and creative soloing.
Lewis unleashed a few covers that many other bands have attempted at one time
or another. The big difference? Lewis has actually played all those songs with those artists"
- Mike Raymond (Examiner AXS Entertainment)

Eliot Lewis, an independent, multi-instrumentalist
has built a unique career most musicians
could only dream of. As a solo artist he consistently performs and releases
his own brand of guitar featured rock and soul.
He is also the only musician to appear on every episode of the hugely popular
"Live From Daryl's House" show.
Eliot also performs with the most successful duo of all time, Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame inductees Daryl Hall & John Oates on tour.
Eliot has worked with some of the biggest artists in the music business including
Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), Joe Walsh, Todd Rundgren, Train, Grace Potter, Ben Folds,
Booker T, Jewel, Rob Thomas, Keb Mo, Jason Mraz, Darius Rucker,
Gavin DeGraw, just to name a few. He has also performed on some of the most
prestigious stages all over the world including the legendary Hollywood Bowl and Japan's
Budokan Arena, as well as on The Voice, Conan O'Brien, Today Show, The View,
Jimmy Kimmel and many others.
"Eliot is a musician who can do it all, great singer, songwriter and guitarist.
He rocks and he's got soul. No one does it quite like him"
- Daryl Hall

"His talent and dedication go way beyond the average performer.
In short, Lewis is a guy who respects his fans and craft.
If Lewis comes to town, go see him"
- Thom Jennings (Backstage Axxess)

"Exuberant, skilled and passionate, Eliot Lewis has a special
gift for tapping his musical influences to produce inventive and original songs that soar"
- Chris Epting (Music Journalist/Author)


"He blistered through song after song with amazing tone and creative soloing.
Lewis unleashed a few covers that many other bands have attempted at one time
or another. The big difference? Lewis has actually played all those songs with those artists"
- Mike Raymond (Examiner AXS Entertainment)

(Late Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Zach Miller and the Pump Slam Mafia Featuring Karl Prohaska, Terry Jones, Matt Light, and Guests

Bangin in the game since '03, Zach has found himself in 2018, host/booker of over 2500 stand up shows in 7 years, Host/Producer of the cult smash webseries Burn Booth, Host/Producer of the Stand up series Sex, Drugs & Jokes AND still finds time to handle biz with wifey from time to time.


Back home for rare Pittsburgh shows, Zach will host an event of non stop laughs Start to Finish!

Bring extra Undies.

Bangin in the game since '03, Zach has found himself in 2018, host/booker of over 2500 stand up shows in 7 years, Host/Producer of the cult smash webseries Burn Booth, Host/Producer of the Stand up series Sex, Drugs & Jokes AND still finds time to handle biz with wifey from time to time.


Back home for rare Pittsburgh shows, Zach will host an event of non stop laughs Start to Finish!

Bring extra Undies.

(Early Show) Opus One Comedy Presents Zach Miller and the Pump Slam Mafia Featuring Karl Prohaska, Terry Jones, Matt Light, and Guests

Bangin in the game since '03, Zach has found himself in 2018, host/booker of over 2500 stand up shows in 7 years, Host/Producer of the cult smash webseries Burn Booth, Host/Producer of the Stand up series Sex, Drugs & Jokes AND still finds time to handle biz with wifey from time to time.

Bangin in the game since '03, Zach has found himself in 2018, host/booker of over 2500 stand up shows in 7 years, Host/Producer of the cult smash webseries Burn Booth, Host/Producer of the Stand up series Sex, Drugs & Jokes AND still finds time to handle biz with wifey from time to time.

#metoocabaret: Honoring Women's Stories Through Song. Sara Stock Mayo accompanied by Doug Levine

#metoocabaret: Honoring Women’s Stories in Song

Weaving together numerous musical genres, Sara Stock Mayo will bring women’s viewpoints to the forefront, shifting the narrative in telling stories that reflect past and present struggles women face everywhere. The evening promises to be joyful, challenging and enlightening, as the audience follows a journey of fear, anger, regret and triumph while celebrating the power of women’s voices and the courage required to speak one’s truth.


Sara Stock Mayo is a local singer, drama therapist and spiritual leader. She has performed in productions in Pittsburgh, Syracuse and New York City, along with her work as a Cantorial Soloist at congregations Temple Sinai, Temple David, Beth El and Makom, NY. She is also the Managing Director of Pittsburgh Playback Theatre, an improvisational company that works to honor and respect individuals’ stories in a variety of social service and educational settings. Her first love is Musical Theatre and she has performed a variety of one woman cabaret acts. She is delighted to share the stage with her favorite accompanist, Doug Levine, and to bring you this show about women’s stories at a time when it is becoming safer for women to step forward and speak their truth. Through her work with middle schoolers, she hopes to inspire teen girls with her messages of positive body image and self esteem so that the next generation’s stories do not have to start with #metoo.

Douglas Levine is a Pittsburgh based pianist, composer, music director and teacher. He has written or arranged music for companies including Microscopic Opera Company, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, City Theatre, The Junior Mendelssohn Choir, Dreams of Hope, Gateway to the Arts, Renaissance City Women’s Choir, Playhouse Conservatory Company, Pittsburgh Musical Theater, The Warhol, Playhouse REP, Attack Theatre, Pennsylvania Dance Theatre, Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater Festival, Pittsburgh Irish And Classical Theatre, Playhouse Junior and WQED FM. This past Spring he musical directed the CLO Cabaret’s world premiere production of Up And Away, and will musical direct Grey Gardens later this summer for Front Porch Theatricals.

#metoocabaret: Honoring Women’s Stories in Song

Weaving together numerous musical genres, Sara Stock Mayo will bring women’s viewpoints to the forefront, shifting the narrative in telling stories that reflect past and present struggles women face everywhere. The evening promises to be joyful, challenging and enlightening, as the audience follows a journey of fear, anger, regret and triumph while celebrating the power of women’s voices and the courage required to speak one’s truth.


Sara Stock Mayo is a local singer, drama therapist and spiritual leader. She has performed in productions in Pittsburgh, Syracuse and New York City, along with her work as a Cantorial Soloist at congregations Temple Sinai, Temple David, Beth El and Makom, NY. She is also the Managing Director of Pittsburgh Playback Theatre, an improvisational company that works to honor and respect individuals’ stories in a variety of social service and educational settings. Her first love is Musical Theatre and she has performed a variety of one woman cabaret acts. She is delighted to share the stage with her favorite accompanist, Doug Levine, and to bring you this show about women’s stories at a time when it is becoming safer for women to step forward and speak their truth. Through her work with middle schoolers, she hopes to inspire teen girls with her messages of positive body image and self esteem so that the next generation’s stories do not have to start with #metoo.

Douglas Levine is a Pittsburgh based pianist, composer, music director and teacher. He has written or arranged music for companies including Microscopic Opera Company, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, City Theatre, The Junior Mendelssohn Choir, Dreams of Hope, Gateway to the Arts, Renaissance City Women’s Choir, Playhouse Conservatory Company, Pittsburgh Musical Theater, The Warhol, Playhouse REP, Attack Theatre, Pennsylvania Dance Theatre, Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater Festival, Pittsburgh Irish And Classical Theatre, Playhouse Junior and WQED FM. This past Spring he musical directed the CLO Cabaret’s world premiere production of Up And Away, and will musical direct Grey Gardens later this summer for Front Porch Theatricals.

Horse Feathers - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Horse Feathers feels like a secret you don’t really want to share. Over twelve years and five albums, a passionate fan base has experienced this band as a precious commodity that they want to keep close to their hearts. One reason for this can be found in lead singer Justin Ringle’s distinctive voice, at once vulnerable and piercing, and in the quality of the music: gorgeous, lush string arrangements surrounding stark, visceral lyrics whose bite makes a piquant juxtaposition to the surrounding beauty.

Now, however, Horse Feathers has created an album that differs enough from its predecessors to suggest that the cat might get out of the bag. On Appreciation, their sixth full-length and the fifth on venerable independent label Kill Rock Stars, the signifiers of the band are there: Ringle’s warm tenor and lyrics that speak of work, love, and other struggles. But on this album less of the song dynamics are achieved with strings and more with an exciting new rhythm section steeped in Northern Soul. Longtime violinist Nathan Crockett and keyboardist Dustin Dybvig provide continuity, but much of Appreciation feels like the best of Ringle’s previous musical ideas just took a giant step into a larger arena.

Recorded primarily in Kentucky (at La-La Land Studios in Louisville and Shangri-La Studios in Lexington), the new album features instrumentalists J. Tom Hnatow, Robby Cosenza and R&B vocalist Joslyn Hampton, who helped make Appreciation a mixture of strutting ‘70s-style country-pop (“Without Applause,” “Don’t Mean To Pry”) and supple soul (“Best To Leave,” “Evictions”). But Horse Feathers hasn’t gained accessibility at the expense of quality, nor at the expense of their signature instrumentation (“The Hex” might be the only R&B/soul song where the rhythmic lead is played on banjo). For those who crave what NPR called “the densely pretty seethe of Horse Feathers’ earlier ballads”, the album delivers “Born in Love” and “On the Rise”, accentuating the string surge with Hammond organ, piano, tambourine, and finger snaps.

“It just felt like a fresh take on how my songs can come across,” Ringle says. “With this incarnation, it’s okay if what I’m doing right now is in fact kind of a pop song. I can have a chorus and repeat something. I’m more aware of that and enjoy it.”

This artistic adjustment comes in the wake of a lot of changes in Ringle’s life. Not too long ago, he left his former hometown of Portland for the coastal city Astoria, Oregon. He’s also been dipping his toes into the world of record production, helping North Carolina band River Whyless with the recording of their last album We All The Light. After a while of bouncing between three states, as well as stops in Camas, Washington to finish Appreciation with longtime compatriot Skyler Norwood at Miracle Lake Studios, Ringle is finally settling down just in time to get ready to hit the road with Horse Feathers in support of this new album. “I wanna get out there and do my job,” he says.

Diehard fans are going to find plenty to cherish on Appreciation. But they’re going to have to make room in the club house for a lot more people – with this album, the Horse Feathers secret is officially out.

Horse Feathers feels like a secret you don’t really want to share. Over twelve years and five albums, a passionate fan base has experienced this band as a precious commodity that they want to keep close to their hearts. One reason for this can be found in lead singer Justin Ringle’s distinctive voice, at once vulnerable and piercing, and in the quality of the music: gorgeous, lush string arrangements surrounding stark, visceral lyrics whose bite makes a piquant juxtaposition to the surrounding beauty.

Now, however, Horse Feathers has created an album that differs enough from its predecessors to suggest that the cat might get out of the bag. On Appreciation, their sixth full-length and the fifth on venerable independent label Kill Rock Stars, the signifiers of the band are there: Ringle’s warm tenor and lyrics that speak of work, love, and other struggles. But on this album less of the song dynamics are achieved with strings and more with an exciting new rhythm section steeped in Northern Soul. Longtime violinist Nathan Crockett and keyboardist Dustin Dybvig provide continuity, but much of Appreciation feels like the best of Ringle’s previous musical ideas just took a giant step into a larger arena.

Recorded primarily in Kentucky (at La-La Land Studios in Louisville and Shangri-La Studios in Lexington), the new album features instrumentalists J. Tom Hnatow, Robby Cosenza and R&B vocalist Joslyn Hampton, who helped make Appreciation a mixture of strutting ‘70s-style country-pop (“Without Applause,” “Don’t Mean To Pry”) and supple soul (“Best To Leave,” “Evictions”). But Horse Feathers hasn’t gained accessibility at the expense of quality, nor at the expense of their signature instrumentation (“The Hex” might be the only R&B/soul song where the rhythmic lead is played on banjo). For those who crave what NPR called “the densely pretty seethe of Horse Feathers’ earlier ballads”, the album delivers “Born in Love” and “On the Rise”, accentuating the string surge with Hammond organ, piano, tambourine, and finger snaps.

“It just felt like a fresh take on how my songs can come across,” Ringle says. “With this incarnation, it’s okay if what I’m doing right now is in fact kind of a pop song. I can have a chorus and repeat something. I’m more aware of that and enjoy it.”

This artistic adjustment comes in the wake of a lot of changes in Ringle’s life. Not too long ago, he left his former hometown of Portland for the coastal city Astoria, Oregon. He’s also been dipping his toes into the world of record production, helping North Carolina band River Whyless with the recording of their last album We All The Light. After a while of bouncing between three states, as well as stops in Camas, Washington to finish Appreciation with longtime compatriot Skyler Norwood at Miracle Lake Studios, Ringle is finally settling down just in time to get ready to hit the road with Horse Feathers in support of this new album. “I wanna get out there and do my job,” he says.

Diehard fans are going to find plenty to cherish on Appreciation. But they’re going to have to make room in the club house for a lot more people – with this album, the Horse Feathers secret is officially out.

The Toasters with Special Guests Bridges and The Skratchtrax

In their 37th year the Toasters are hitting the gas, not the brakes. With an international all-star line-up their whirlwind global tour continues unabated across the continents with performances scheduled in Costa Rica, Hong Kong (HK International Ska Festival) and Estonia (Live Nation Showcase at Tallinn Music Week). The band also returns to Japan, China, Russia, Hawaii, South America and Mexico on top of regular touring in the USA and Europe playing over 60 shows in 24 countries from Sweden to Bulgaria.

Formed on the Lower East Side of NYC in 1981 the band is the longest running US SKA formation. They bridge the gap between England's 2-Tone movement and the American Ska explosion of the 90's which they are rightfully credited with starting. During the 3rd Wave Ska revival The Toasters formed the famous Moon Records label and kick-started the careers of dozens of bands.

The Toasters will return to the studio later this year to record songs for a new 7” vinyl 45 project.

In their 37th year the Toasters are hitting the gas, not the brakes. With an international all-star line-up their whirlwind global tour continues unabated across the continents with performances scheduled in Costa Rica, Hong Kong (HK International Ska Festival) and Estonia (Live Nation Showcase at Tallinn Music Week). The band also returns to Japan, China, Russia, Hawaii, South America and Mexico on top of regular touring in the USA and Europe playing over 60 shows in 24 countries from Sweden to Bulgaria.

Formed on the Lower East Side of NYC in 1981 the band is the longest running US SKA formation. They bridge the gap between England's 2-Tone movement and the American Ska explosion of the 90's which they are rightfully credited with starting. During the 3rd Wave Ska revival The Toasters formed the famous Moon Records label and kick-started the careers of dozens of bands.

The Toasters will return to the studio later this year to record songs for a new 7” vinyl 45 project.

Ben Caplan

Inspired in part by Eastern European and Jewish folk traditions, Ben Caplan mixes older musical sensibilities with his own soul, straight from his hairy heart. Lyrically, you’ve not heard the like before. Often edgy and dark, Caplan holds a mirror up to show us our nasty bits, singing about the ugliness and showing us that this darkness is the root of the sublime.

His latest album release, Birds with Broken Wings, explodes with sounds both ancient and modern, with more than 30 musicians and even more instruments, combining acoustic sounds from around the world. It was listed on CBC Radio’s 50 Best Canadian Albums of 2015, reached #1 on Earshot’s National Folk/Roots/Blues chart, and was accepted into the Baker & Taylor NPR Discover Songs library. It’s all smoothly blended by the hottest international production team around. It’s uncharted territory, and Caplan’s leading the way.

Inspired in part by Eastern European and Jewish folk traditions, Ben Caplan mixes older musical sensibilities with his own soul, straight from his hairy heart. Lyrically, you’ve not heard the like before. Often edgy and dark, Caplan holds a mirror up to show us our nasty bits, singing about the ugliness and showing us that this darkness is the root of the sublime.

His latest album release, Birds with Broken Wings, explodes with sounds both ancient and modern, with more than 30 musicians and even more instruments, combining acoustic sounds from around the world. It was listed on CBC Radio’s 50 Best Canadian Albums of 2015, reached #1 on Earshot’s National Folk/Roots/Blues chart, and was accepted into the Baker & Taylor NPR Discover Songs library. It’s all smoothly blended by the hottest international production team around. It’s uncharted territory, and Caplan’s leading the way.

Animal Years - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Mike McFadden: Vocals, Guitar
Anthony Saladino: Bass
Anthony Spinnato: Drums

"We borrowed the name from a Josh Ritter album," Animal Years singer-songwriter-guitarist Mike McFadden says of his band's moniker. "Originally, we just liked the way the phrase sounded. But the more we thought about it, the more it meant to us, and we started saying things like 'Live your life in animal years.' If you knew that you'd only be around for a few years, you'd do things differently. That's how we try to operate as a band; we try to go for it every day, like we're gonna die tomorrow."

That level of urgency resonates throughout Far From Home, Animal Years' first eOne release. The five-song EP -- produced by Ryan Hadlock, renowned for his work with the Lumineers, Brandi Carlile and Vance Joy -- offers a consistently compelling distillation of the Brooklyn-by-way-of-Baltimore trio's irresistibly anthemic, unfailingly uplifting songcraft, which ranges from the fist-pumping infectiousness of "Caroline" to the introspective warmth of "Friends" to the bittersweet buoyancy of "Home (I Was Born)." McFadden's catchy, emotionally direct songwriting is matched by the band's exuberant performances, which combine McFadden's openhearted vocals and surging acoustic guitars with the punchy rhythmic kick of bassist Anthony Saladino and drummer Anthony Spinnato.

"Someone once described us in a review as 'singer-songwriter music with the amps turned up,'" McFadden notes. "The emphasis is on the songs and the songwriting, but we're definitely a rock band. Even if I'm playing an acoustic guitar, I'm playing it through an amp with the distortion on. We're always gonna be louder than the other bands on the bill."

Far From Home's memorable compositions and high-energy performances make it clear why Animal Years has already earned a fiercely loyal grass-roots fan base. Without the benefit of a mainstream record label, the band has built its audience the old-fashioned way: through dogged roadwork, winning over one fan at a time.

"When we moved to New York, we hit the city really hard, and things just grew organically," McFadden explains. "We naturally evolved from small clubs to bigger ones, and from small tours to bigger tours, with more people coming out each time. Everything has happened really organically, through us just being ourselves and trying to be as honest as we can."

The thee bandmates and producer Hadlock recorded Far From Home in the remote environs of Applehead Studios in Woodstock, NY, far from the band's normal urban surroundings.

"We really wanted to isolate ourselves in a place with no distractions other than making the record," McFadden explains. "So we all went up to Woodstock and worked in this great studio in a rebuilt barn. We've been demoing stuff for years, but this is the first time the three of us had made a record together. Ryan was really great to work with, and I think that he really brought out the best in us. It was great recording out there in the middle of nowhere; we'd record 12 hours a day, and then all hang out at night."

Far From Home showcases McFadden's knack for writing forthright songs that cut to the chase, lyrically and melodically. "On this EP, I wanted to write things that everyone can relate to," he asserts. "Sometimes lyrics can be open to interpretation, but for the most part I want people to know exactly what I'm talking about. All of these songs were written on the road, so a lot of the themes are about being away from home and missing people, and not taking people for granted.

"We had four songs that we really liked for the EP, but we knew that we needed one more that would really grab people's attention," he continues. "I was driving back from North Carolina, right at the end of a tour, and I wrote 'Caroline' in the car. Within ten minutes, I had pulled over to the side of the road and recorded the whole thing into my phone. A couple of days later, we made a rough demo, and everybody who heard it said 'Yeah, that's the one.' It's the song that got the attention of our record label, and now it's the first single from the EP."

The unpretentious attitude and hard-driving work ethic that define Animal Years were established early on, when Mike McFadden first began writing and performing his own songs in his mid-teens, releasing his first studio CD under his own name while still in high school in Baltimore. That inaugural effort won a good deal of attention, and even gained some local radio play. A second CD, released when McFadden was 18, was even better received by fans and local radio programmers, and soon his songs were being picked up for use in commercials from such advertisers as Coca-Cola and Pennzoil.

"That was the driver for me to think about quitting my job in Baltimore and going to New York to start Animal Years," McFadden recalls. "Before I moved to New York, I did another solo album, The Sun Will Rise. At that point, Anthony the bass player suggested that we find a drummer and make it into a band, so we rebranded the CD as an Animal Years release.

"It became a real band really quickly," McFadden reports. "When we started the band, we were all working jobs to raise money to make it happen, so we could afford to go on the road and into the studio. The guys started taking an equal part of the work, and everybody started contributing. It took some getting used to, but it was good not being alone and not having to do everything myself. The songwriting is still the same, because that's still me, but everyone's invested in this partnership and we're all getting something out of it."

Animal Years' timely relocation to New York proved to be a crucial turning point for the band. "The music scene in Baltimore is really big and varied, but I never felt like we ever really fit in there," says McFadden. "When we got to New York, we felt a lot more at home and got a much better reception. In New York, there're more people, there're more opportunities, there're more venues. You can play a few nights a week and still never run out of places to play."

Having already established themselves in their adopted hometown and having won a legion of new friends and fans on the road, Animal Years plan to continue doing what they do best: making music and touching people.

"We're planning on hitting the road super-hard," McFadden affirms. "We're definitely willing to put in the work, and make it happen by any means necessary. That's the only way you can do it these days. There are so many other people who are working as hard as you are, so you just have to work twice as hard."

Mike McFadden: Vocals, Guitar
Anthony Saladino: Bass
Anthony Spinnato: Drums

"We borrowed the name from a Josh Ritter album," Animal Years singer-songwriter-guitarist Mike McFadden says of his band's moniker. "Originally, we just liked the way the phrase sounded. But the more we thought about it, the more it meant to us, and we started saying things like 'Live your life in animal years.' If you knew that you'd only be around for a few years, you'd do things differently. That's how we try to operate as a band; we try to go for it every day, like we're gonna die tomorrow."

That level of urgency resonates throughout Far From Home, Animal Years' first eOne release. The five-song EP -- produced by Ryan Hadlock, renowned for his work with the Lumineers, Brandi Carlile and Vance Joy -- offers a consistently compelling distillation of the Brooklyn-by-way-of-Baltimore trio's irresistibly anthemic, unfailingly uplifting songcraft, which ranges from the fist-pumping infectiousness of "Caroline" to the introspective warmth of "Friends" to the bittersweet buoyancy of "Home (I Was Born)." McFadden's catchy, emotionally direct songwriting is matched by the band's exuberant performances, which combine McFadden's openhearted vocals and surging acoustic guitars with the punchy rhythmic kick of bassist Anthony Saladino and drummer Anthony Spinnato.

"Someone once described us in a review as 'singer-songwriter music with the amps turned up,'" McFadden notes. "The emphasis is on the songs and the songwriting, but we're definitely a rock band. Even if I'm playing an acoustic guitar, I'm playing it through an amp with the distortion on. We're always gonna be louder than the other bands on the bill."

Far From Home's memorable compositions and high-energy performances make it clear why Animal Years has already earned a fiercely loyal grass-roots fan base. Without the benefit of a mainstream record label, the band has built its audience the old-fashioned way: through dogged roadwork, winning over one fan at a time.

"When we moved to New York, we hit the city really hard, and things just grew organically," McFadden explains. "We naturally evolved from small clubs to bigger ones, and from small tours to bigger tours, with more people coming out each time. Everything has happened really organically, through us just being ourselves and trying to be as honest as we can."

The thee bandmates and producer Hadlock recorded Far From Home in the remote environs of Applehead Studios in Woodstock, NY, far from the band's normal urban surroundings.

"We really wanted to isolate ourselves in a place with no distractions other than making the record," McFadden explains. "So we all went up to Woodstock and worked in this great studio in a rebuilt barn. We've been demoing stuff for years, but this is the first time the three of us had made a record together. Ryan was really great to work with, and I think that he really brought out the best in us. It was great recording out there in the middle of nowhere; we'd record 12 hours a day, and then all hang out at night."

Far From Home showcases McFadden's knack for writing forthright songs that cut to the chase, lyrically and melodically. "On this EP, I wanted to write things that everyone can relate to," he asserts. "Sometimes lyrics can be open to interpretation, but for the most part I want people to know exactly what I'm talking about. All of these songs were written on the road, so a lot of the themes are about being away from home and missing people, and not taking people for granted.

"We had four songs that we really liked for the EP, but we knew that we needed one more that would really grab people's attention," he continues. "I was driving back from North Carolina, right at the end of a tour, and I wrote 'Caroline' in the car. Within ten minutes, I had pulled over to the side of the road and recorded the whole thing into my phone. A couple of days later, we made a rough demo, and everybody who heard it said 'Yeah, that's the one.' It's the song that got the attention of our record label, and now it's the first single from the EP."

The unpretentious attitude and hard-driving work ethic that define Animal Years were established early on, when Mike McFadden first began writing and performing his own songs in his mid-teens, releasing his first studio CD under his own name while still in high school in Baltimore. That inaugural effort won a good deal of attention, and even gained some local radio play. A second CD, released when McFadden was 18, was even better received by fans and local radio programmers, and soon his songs were being picked up for use in commercials from such advertisers as Coca-Cola and Pennzoil.

"That was the driver for me to think about quitting my job in Baltimore and going to New York to start Animal Years," McFadden recalls. "Before I moved to New York, I did another solo album, The Sun Will Rise. At that point, Anthony the bass player suggested that we find a drummer and make it into a band, so we rebranded the CD as an Animal Years release.

"It became a real band really quickly," McFadden reports. "When we started the band, we were all working jobs to raise money to make it happen, so we could afford to go on the road and into the studio. The guys started taking an equal part of the work, and everybody started contributing. It took some getting used to, but it was good not being alone and not having to do everything myself. The songwriting is still the same, because that's still me, but everyone's invested in this partnership and we're all getting something out of it."

Animal Years' timely relocation to New York proved to be a crucial turning point for the band. "The music scene in Baltimore is really big and varied, but I never felt like we ever really fit in there," says McFadden. "When we got to New York, we felt a lot more at home and got a much better reception. In New York, there're more people, there're more opportunities, there're more venues. You can play a few nights a week and still never run out of places to play."

Having already established themselves in their adopted hometown and having won a legion of new friends and fans on the road, Animal Years plan to continue doing what they do best: making music and touching people.

"We're planning on hitting the road super-hard," McFadden affirms. "We're definitely willing to put in the work, and make it happen by any means necessary. That's the only way you can do it these days. There are so many other people who are working as hard as you are, so you just have to work twice as hard."

Supermonkey Recording Company & Opus One Presents Byzantine with Special Guests Stone Wicked Souls and Wretched Hive

Supermonkey Recording Company & Opus One Presents Byzantine with Special Guests Stone Wicked Souls

Supermonkey Recording Company & Opus One Presents Byzantine with Special Guests Stone Wicked Souls

(Early Show) David Ramirez: Bootleg Tour (Live Album Recording) with Special Guest Matt Wright

We’re Not Going Anywhere: At a historical moment of immense political, social, and ecological uncertainty, those four simple words comprise both a promise and a protest, a comforting reassurance of inclusion as well as a hearty cry of defiance. It’s a statement that offers no small sense of hope, in that sense matching the music contained on the album.

On these vividly imagined and passionately performed songs David Ramirez takes in the world from his unique perspective: “Being half white and half Mexican has made this current political climate especially interesting. So many cultures in this country are being viewed as un-American and it breaks my heart. My family have raised children here, created successful businesses here, and are proud to be a part of this country. Most of what I've seen as of late is misplaced fear. I wanted to write about that fear and how, instead of benefiting us, it sends us spiraling out control.”

The album that bears that title marks a departure for Ramirez, who builds on the rootsy sound of his early albums to create something new, something bold, something anchored in the here and now. Scouting out unexplored music territory, these songs bounce around energetically, toying with new ideas and experimenting with new sounds, as barbed-wire guitars and retro-futuristic synths grind against his anguished vocals and evocative lyrics.

“We flipped script a little bit and went in with a pretty specific vision: lots of keyboards and some out-of-the-box guitar sounds. I took a lot of notes from the indie bands I’ve been listening to and from the bands I loved growing up in the ‘80s, like the Cars and Journey. Let’s just live in this spacy world for a while and see what comes out of it.”

What came out of it isn’t just Ramirez’s most adventurous album to date, but a record that captures the mood of the country in its music as well as in its lyrics. While he does tackle some new subjects, Ramirez grounds these songs in his own perspective, which means every song remains both human and humane, outraged and generous. There are some break-up songs on here, sober and self-castigating: first single “Watching from a Distance” thrums with iridescent synths and a tight backbeat that sounds like lines on the highway measuring the widening rift between lovers. “People Call Who They Wanna Talk To” is Ramirez at his catchiest, marrying a playful earworm hook to a somber realization about romantic irreconcilability: “Don’t blame it on the distance, don’t blame it on the booze… people call who they wanna talk to.” A simple line, but completely devastating.

“This is the first album I’ve had properly produced,” says Ramirez, who either produced or co-produced all of his previous efforts. For We’re Not Going Anywhere, he hired Sam Kassirer, who has helmed albums by Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Bhi Bhiman, and many other artists. “I needed to evolve and change things up a bit, which is why I chose Sam. He pushed me in a way I hadn’t been pushed before.” Kassirer challenged Ramirez to simultaneously simplify and complicate his songwriting, to find new ways to tell his stories. “He said, I want you to try to tell a story but use fewer words and more space. In other words, let’s not make a singer-songwriter record. Let’s make a band record. Once he said that, my mind just opened up in a way it never had before. It was fun to just be more straightforward lyrically. It left a lot of space for the music.”

In January 2017 Ramirez and his band decamped to the Great North Sound Society, an eighteenth-century farmhouse in rural Maine that serves as Kassirer’s studio. Especially in the winter, when the trees are bare and snow blankets the ground, the setting proved inspiring. “It’s very secluded, which was part of the appeal. We were able to get out of our touring headspace and stay completely involved with the record and what we were doing.” That allowed the band to concentrate on the music, to pursue ideas without distractions and misgivings, but it also removed them from the world during a momentous event.

We’re Not Going Anywhere turns that distance into a big-picture perspective— engaged and informed, compassionately political but not necessarily partisan. “We’d take breaks during the day and watch the news and see all the rallies and marches and the disruption and the out-of-control feeling that was everywhere then—and, frankly, still is now. We were looking around and no one was around us. The closest house was a mile away, so it was just us. We were grateful just to retreat from that social tornado for a while and create something that we hoped would be very beautiful.”

Looming over every song is the ghost of Ramirez’s great-grandmother, who inspired “Eliza Jane,” a deeply poignant and personal tune near the album’s conclusion. In gracefully plainspoken lyrics, Ramirez describes how she and her brothers left Oklahoma during the Great Depression, heading northwest to Oregon, where she played piano in a country band. “My mom was telling me this story and the song was writing itself. I wish I had known her, because I’m curious what drove her. I know what drives a lot of my musician friends, but I really want to ask a family member: Why did you do this? Was it just for fun? Was it a passion so deep-rooted that you couldn’t not do it?”

While he may describe the creative process as fun, Ramirez obviously has inherited a deep-rooted passion—one that will continue to drive him well into the future. “I’m not going to be so afraid to take risks in the future, like I have been in the past. I’ve been so stressed and concerned with every detail, but I learned to let that go. Let’s just have fun. Let’s get weird. I’ve never felt that way about my work. I still respect my older stuff, but I just didn’t want to be afraid anymore. That’s what I learned on this one.”

We’re Not Going Anywhere: At a historical moment of immense political, social, and ecological uncertainty, those four simple words comprise both a promise and a protest, a comforting reassurance of inclusion as well as a hearty cry of defiance. It’s a statement that offers no small sense of hope, in that sense matching the music contained on the album.

On these vividly imagined and passionately performed songs David Ramirez takes in the world from his unique perspective: “Being half white and half Mexican has made this current political climate especially interesting. So many cultures in this country are being viewed as un-American and it breaks my heart. My family have raised children here, created successful businesses here, and are proud to be a part of this country. Most of what I've seen as of late is misplaced fear. I wanted to write about that fear and how, instead of benefiting us, it sends us spiraling out control.”

The album that bears that title marks a departure for Ramirez, who builds on the rootsy sound of his early albums to create something new, something bold, something anchored in the here and now. Scouting out unexplored music territory, these songs bounce around energetically, toying with new ideas and experimenting with new sounds, as barbed-wire guitars and retro-futuristic synths grind against his anguished vocals and evocative lyrics.

“We flipped script a little bit and went in with a pretty specific vision: lots of keyboards and some out-of-the-box guitar sounds. I took a lot of notes from the indie bands I’ve been listening to and from the bands I loved growing up in the ‘80s, like the Cars and Journey. Let’s just live in this spacy world for a while and see what comes out of it.”

What came out of it isn’t just Ramirez’s most adventurous album to date, but a record that captures the mood of the country in its music as well as in its lyrics. While he does tackle some new subjects, Ramirez grounds these songs in his own perspective, which means every song remains both human and humane, outraged and generous. There are some break-up songs on here, sober and self-castigating: first single “Watching from a Distance” thrums with iridescent synths and a tight backbeat that sounds like lines on the highway measuring the widening rift between lovers. “People Call Who They Wanna Talk To” is Ramirez at his catchiest, marrying a playful earworm hook to a somber realization about romantic irreconcilability: “Don’t blame it on the distance, don’t blame it on the booze… people call who they wanna talk to.” A simple line, but completely devastating.

“This is the first album I’ve had properly produced,” says Ramirez, who either produced or co-produced all of his previous efforts. For We’re Not Going Anywhere, he hired Sam Kassirer, who has helmed albums by Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Bhi Bhiman, and many other artists. “I needed to evolve and change things up a bit, which is why I chose Sam. He pushed me in a way I hadn’t been pushed before.” Kassirer challenged Ramirez to simultaneously simplify and complicate his songwriting, to find new ways to tell his stories. “He said, I want you to try to tell a story but use fewer words and more space. In other words, let’s not make a singer-songwriter record. Let’s make a band record. Once he said that, my mind just opened up in a way it never had before. It was fun to just be more straightforward lyrically. It left a lot of space for the music.”

In January 2017 Ramirez and his band decamped to the Great North Sound Society, an eighteenth-century farmhouse in rural Maine that serves as Kassirer’s studio. Especially in the winter, when the trees are bare and snow blankets the ground, the setting proved inspiring. “It’s very secluded, which was part of the appeal. We were able to get out of our touring headspace and stay completely involved with the record and what we were doing.” That allowed the band to concentrate on the music, to pursue ideas without distractions and misgivings, but it also removed them from the world during a momentous event.

We’re Not Going Anywhere turns that distance into a big-picture perspective— engaged and informed, compassionately political but not necessarily partisan. “We’d take breaks during the day and watch the news and see all the rallies and marches and the disruption and the out-of-control feeling that was everywhere then—and, frankly, still is now. We were looking around and no one was around us. The closest house was a mile away, so it was just us. We were grateful just to retreat from that social tornado for a while and create something that we hoped would be very beautiful.”

Looming over every song is the ghost of Ramirez’s great-grandmother, who inspired “Eliza Jane,” a deeply poignant and personal tune near the album’s conclusion. In gracefully plainspoken lyrics, Ramirez describes how she and her brothers left Oklahoma during the Great Depression, heading northwest to Oregon, where she played piano in a country band. “My mom was telling me this story and the song was writing itself. I wish I had known her, because I’m curious what drove her. I know what drives a lot of my musician friends, but I really want to ask a family member: Why did you do this? Was it just for fun? Was it a passion so deep-rooted that you couldn’t not do it?”

While he may describe the creative process as fun, Ramirez obviously has inherited a deep-rooted passion—one that will continue to drive him well into the future. “I’m not going to be so afraid to take risks in the future, like I have been in the past. I’ve been so stressed and concerned with every detail, but I learned to let that go. Let’s just have fun. Let’s get weird. I’ve never felt that way about my work. I still respect my older stuff, but I just didn’t want to be afraid anymore. That’s what I learned on this one.”

Suzanne Santo of HONEYHONEY

Caught halfway between the dark swoon of pop-noir, the raw rasp of soul music, and the honest punch of Americana, Suzanne Santo's Ruby Red tells the story of a singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist who, more than 10 years into an acclaimed career, is turning a new corner.

Produced by multi-platinum Grammy nominee Butch Walker (whose Los Angeles recording studio gives the album its name), Ruby Red marks Santo's first release as a solo artist. For the past decade, she's spent most of her time fronting the Americana duo HONEYHONEY, whittling her banjo, violin, and vocal chops into sharp shape along the way. Here, she takes a break from that longtime gig to explore something different, creating a moody, sexually-charged album filled with organic instruments, distorted fiddle, Walker's powerful electric guitar, and Santo's most stunning vocal performances to date.

"I think I started writing songs for this record long before I realized that I was writing songs for this record,” said Santo. “I’ve identified with a collaboration for so long that the thought of taking a leap into the depths of my own music and having no idea what that would look like, definitely came as a shock. I was getting lazy and not finishing the tasks at hand like I really wanted, deep down, to be able to do. Writing this record was bewitching in a way.”

Before they collaborated on Ruby Red, Santo made multiple appearances on Butch Walker's eighth album, Stay Gold. She joined him on the road, too, singing harmonies and playing violin, guitar, and banjo during a nationwide tour in 2016. During breaks in her touring schedule, she began diving into a different type of songwriting, looking to diverse albums by Erykah Badu, David Bowie, Townes Van Zandt, and the Alabama Shakes for inspiration. For years, she'd always been somebody else's bandmate. This was a time to explore her own identity. To write her own music. To ignore genres and defy expectations. To determine what, exactly, she wanted to say. . .and find out the best way to deliver it.

“Once Butch acquiesced to producing the record, I had an ‘oh shit!’ moment where I realized that I needed to really show up,” continued Santo. “I had to have songs that were finished, let alone good enough. I couldn’t stop and I wrote all day every day to finish the songs I’d started years ago as well as the few that presented themselves in the 4th quarter. I took long walks in my neighborhood and listened to demos on my cell phone and worked out lyrics. I would also wake up in the middle of the night with new ideas and would get up and write them down or record them. It felt like the songs were seeping through the cracks of my mind and out of my mouth, without much of my consent. I think art is a channel, connected to something much greater than we are and I feel honored when it picks me from time to time.

Ruby Red is an album about love, life, and lust in the modern world. Moody and melody-driven, its 11 songs range from "Handshake" — the record's epic opening track, equal parts Southern-gothic anthem and slow-burning soul ballad — to the driving "Ghost in my Bed," which pairs an explosive chorus with layers of mandolin, fiddle, and piano. Meanwhile, tracks like "Better Than That" focus on little more than Santo's voice: an electrifying, elastic instrument that's capable of both vulnerability and ferocity.

Santo and Walker recorded Ruby Red quickly, pulling long hours in Walker's bright, sunlit studio in Southern California. The instrumental tracks were captured live, with help from guests like pedal steel player Dr. Stephen Patt — Santo's primary care physician, as well as a former member of the Edgar Winter Group — and drummer Mark Stepro. Santo kept the guest list small, though, splitting the bulk of the instrumental duties with Walker.

"It was incredible to work with Butch. He facilitates a great time and an artistic environment that orbits solely around what’s best for the song, which is so rare in a business full of egos. Butch and this environment liberated and enabled me to work in a way that I never knew I was capable of."

Although Ruby Red marks the start of something new, it doesn't signify the end of Santo's long run with HONEYHONEY. Santo will join bandmate Ben Jaffe in the television series The Guest Book, whose episodes feature the two musicians in acting and musical roles. The show premieres on TBS during the latter half of 2017, adding another bullet point to the acting career Santo launched years before HONEYHONEY's formation.

Santo's story is still unfolding. This is the newest chapter, bringing with it a track list that doubles down on the songwriter's strengths and stretches her limits. There will be more chapters to explore. More colorful stories to tell. But for now, Suzanne Santo's future is looking Ruby Red.

"This record is so fucking sexy, I can't deal,” said Walker. “Proud to have been in the room when these songs were going down. Put it on and turn out the lights."

Caught halfway between the dark swoon of pop-noir, the raw rasp of soul music, and the honest punch of Americana, Suzanne Santo's Ruby Red tells the story of a singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist who, more than 10 years into an acclaimed career, is turning a new corner.

Produced by multi-platinum Grammy nominee Butch Walker (whose Los Angeles recording studio gives the album its name), Ruby Red marks Santo's first release as a solo artist. For the past decade, she's spent most of her time fronting the Americana duo HONEYHONEY, whittling her banjo, violin, and vocal chops into sharp shape along the way. Here, she takes a break from that longtime gig to explore something different, creating a moody, sexually-charged album filled with organic instruments, distorted fiddle, Walker's powerful electric guitar, and Santo's most stunning vocal performances to date.

"I think I started writing songs for this record long before I realized that I was writing songs for this record,” said Santo. “I’ve identified with a collaboration for so long that the thought of taking a leap into the depths of my own music and having no idea what that would look like, definitely came as a shock. I was getting lazy and not finishing the tasks at hand like I really wanted, deep down, to be able to do. Writing this record was bewitching in a way.”

Before they collaborated on Ruby Red, Santo made multiple appearances on Butch Walker's eighth album, Stay Gold. She joined him on the road, too, singing harmonies and playing violin, guitar, and banjo during a nationwide tour in 2016. During breaks in her touring schedule, she began diving into a different type of songwriting, looking to diverse albums by Erykah Badu, David Bowie, Townes Van Zandt, and the Alabama Shakes for inspiration. For years, she'd always been somebody else's bandmate. This was a time to explore her own identity. To write her own music. To ignore genres and defy expectations. To determine what, exactly, she wanted to say. . .and find out the best way to deliver it.

“Once Butch acquiesced to producing the record, I had an ‘oh shit!’ moment where I realized that I needed to really show up,” continued Santo. “I had to have songs that were finished, let alone good enough. I couldn’t stop and I wrote all day every day to finish the songs I’d started years ago as well as the few that presented themselves in the 4th quarter. I took long walks in my neighborhood and listened to demos on my cell phone and worked out lyrics. I would also wake up in the middle of the night with new ideas and would get up and write them down or record them. It felt like the songs were seeping through the cracks of my mind and out of my mouth, without much of my consent. I think art is a channel, connected to something much greater than we are and I feel honored when it picks me from time to time.

Ruby Red is an album about love, life, and lust in the modern world. Moody and melody-driven, its 11 songs range from "Handshake" — the record's epic opening track, equal parts Southern-gothic anthem and slow-burning soul ballad — to the driving "Ghost in my Bed," which pairs an explosive chorus with layers of mandolin, fiddle, and piano. Meanwhile, tracks like "Better Than That" focus on little more than Santo's voice: an electrifying, elastic instrument that's capable of both vulnerability and ferocity.

Santo and Walker recorded Ruby Red quickly, pulling long hours in Walker's bright, sunlit studio in Southern California. The instrumental tracks were captured live, with help from guests like pedal steel player Dr. Stephen Patt — Santo's primary care physician, as well as a former member of the Edgar Winter Group — and drummer Mark Stepro. Santo kept the guest list small, though, splitting the bulk of the instrumental duties with Walker.

"It was incredible to work with Butch. He facilitates a great time and an artistic environment that orbits solely around what’s best for the song, which is so rare in a business full of egos. Butch and this environment liberated and enabled me to work in a way that I never knew I was capable of."

Although Ruby Red marks the start of something new, it doesn't signify the end of Santo's long run with HONEYHONEY. Santo will join bandmate Ben Jaffe in the television series The Guest Book, whose episodes feature the two musicians in acting and musical roles. The show premieres on TBS during the latter half of 2017, adding another bullet point to the acting career Santo launched years before HONEYHONEY's formation.

Santo's story is still unfolding. This is the newest chapter, bringing with it a track list that doubles down on the songwriter's strengths and stretches her limits. There will be more chapters to explore. More colorful stories to tell. But for now, Suzanne Santo's future is looking Ruby Red.

"This record is so fucking sexy, I can't deal,” said Walker. “Proud to have been in the room when these songs were going down. Put it on and turn out the lights."

The Posies with Special Guest The Me Toos

It's officially been 30 years since Jon Auer & Ken Stringfellow, high school mates from Bellingham WA, USA,recorded and released "Failure", a home recorded, self-released cassette that had the improbable fate of landing the band two commercial radio hits and a record deal w the David Geffen Company, where they became labelmates of Sonic Youth, Nirvana & Teenage Fanclub. Now with a legacy of eight critically lauded albums (their latest, "Solid States" was released in 2016), a loyal population of fans around the globe, and a body of work with such classic alternative/indie anthems as "Dream All Day", "Solar Sister", "Coming Right Along" and many more, the band is still active and looking forward to its fourth decade in music. The band's '90s catalogue is set to be re-released in 2018 by Omnivore Records, and there are plans to start working on a new album soon after. The band has survived thedeaths of two longtime members in the last 3 years: bassist Joe Skyward and drummer Darius Minwalla; despite that, they managed to stage a brilliant comeback in 2016 with drummer Frankie Siragusa and do several sold out toursdoing pop up shows -- self-produced concerts in improvised venues and unlikely spaces; indie rock raves, if you will. For their 30th Anniversary, Omnivore Records will re-release the band's crucial 1990s catalog -- "Dear 23", "Frosting on the Beater", and "Amazing Disgrace", as double CDs replete with an astounding number of previously unreleased bonus cuts, and also as double 45 RPM high fidelity LPs. The band is currently running a Pledge Music campaign(https://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/the-posies) for pre-ordering the three albums. Radiohead mentioned to Ken one night out in the pub (in Hollywood, tho) that "Frosting on the Beater" was the most played album in the van during the band's first American tour; Snow Patrol's Gary Lightbody & Beach Slang's James Alex, two name but two, have each put that album in their personal top ten. "Frosting" encapsulates all the elements that make the band timeless --the two-voices-as-one interplay of Auer and Stringfellow; thoughtful and literate lyrics; broiling guitars married to shimmering melodies. If the band was out of step with its more brutal Seattle compatriots 25 years ago, it has served them well -- the times, at last, have caught up to their vision. To take this celebration around the globe, the Posies, who have had a few lineup changes over the years (alwaysbased around the founding duo of Auer & Stringfellow) will be on tour as the 1992-1994 lineup that made "Frosting on the Beater" -- Jon & Ken will be complemented by drummer Mike Musburger and bassist Dave Fox. It's been almost a quarter century since this quartet has been on the road, and recent warm up shows have been as explosive as those played by the twentysomethings of yore. Catch the band on tour this spring in North America, and this fall in Europe -- their time is now, again.

It's officially been 30 years since Jon Auer & Ken Stringfellow, high school mates from Bellingham WA, USA,recorded and released "Failure", a home recorded, self-released cassette that had the improbable fate of landing the band two commercial radio hits and a record deal w the David Geffen Company, where they became labelmates of Sonic Youth, Nirvana & Teenage Fanclub. Now with a legacy of eight critically lauded albums (their latest, "Solid States" was released in 2016), a loyal population of fans around the globe, and a body of work with such classic alternative/indie anthems as "Dream All Day", "Solar Sister", "Coming Right Along" and many more, the band is still active and looking forward to its fourth decade in music. The band's '90s catalogue is set to be re-released in 2018 by Omnivore Records, and there are plans to start working on a new album soon after. The band has survived thedeaths of two longtime members in the last 3 years: bassist Joe Skyward and drummer Darius Minwalla; despite that, they managed to stage a brilliant comeback in 2016 with drummer Frankie Siragusa and do several sold out toursdoing pop up shows -- self-produced concerts in improvised venues and unlikely spaces; indie rock raves, if you will. For their 30th Anniversary, Omnivore Records will re-release the band's crucial 1990s catalog -- "Dear 23", "Frosting on the Beater", and "Amazing Disgrace", as double CDs replete with an astounding number of previously unreleased bonus cuts, and also as double 45 RPM high fidelity LPs. The band is currently running a Pledge Music campaign(https://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/the-posies) for pre-ordering the three albums. Radiohead mentioned to Ken one night out in the pub (in Hollywood, tho) that "Frosting on the Beater" was the most played album in the van during the band's first American tour; Snow Patrol's Gary Lightbody & Beach Slang's James Alex, two name but two, have each put that album in their personal top ten. "Frosting" encapsulates all the elements that make the band timeless --the two-voices-as-one interplay of Auer and Stringfellow; thoughtful and literate lyrics; broiling guitars married to shimmering melodies. If the band was out of step with its more brutal Seattle compatriots 25 years ago, it has served them well -- the times, at last, have caught up to their vision. To take this celebration around the globe, the Posies, who have had a few lineup changes over the years (alwaysbased around the founding duo of Auer & Stringfellow) will be on tour as the 1992-1994 lineup that made "Frosting on the Beater" -- Jon & Ken will be complemented by drummer Mike Musburger and bassist Dave Fox. It's been almost a quarter century since this quartet has been on the road, and recent warm up shows have been as explosive as those played by the twentysomethings of yore. Catch the band on tour this spring in North America, and this fall in Europe -- their time is now, again.

The Iguanas

What if Americana actually encompassed ALL of North America? You'd have the Franco Acadian inflections of Canada, as best exemplified by the accordion, blues and jazz, the only truly indigenous music the US has ever produced, and the lilting grace and fiery passion of the music of Mexico. You'd also have New Orleans' premiere distillers of this continental musical melange, The Iguanas, and their new album Juarez.

Taking their cues from all of the above influences and then some, Juarez, the band's first studio album since 2012’s Sin to Sin, redefines the notion of Americana, crossing cultures, styles, eras...and even languages. It's as if Rue Bourbon, Muscle Shoals and Plaza México were all within earshot of each other and The Iguanas were the musical conduit between them. Based out of New Orleans for the past couple of decades save for a short, Katrina imposed exile in Austin the members of the Iguanas have (collectively or individually) played or recorded with everyone from Charlie Rich, Alex Chilton, and Willie DeVille to Emmylou Harris, Allen Toussaint, and Pretty Lights.

Their two decade ride has taken them all over the map musically and geographically, yet the inescapable patina of their hometown infuses every note they play. Through eight studio albums, countless tours and Jazz Fest appearances, and a flood that did its best to take their adopted city with it, it's a testament to the band's endurance that the same four guys that started playing in the early 1990s are still together. Joe Cabral is philosophical about the band's persistence in the face of challenges that would have felled indeed have felled lesser bands. "First of all, this is all we know how to do; we're musicians. But more than that," he continues, "we respect the power of the band as an entity, and each individual in the band steps up to play his part. When it's good, that's really what it's all about."

Rod Hodges agrees. "I don't want to get all heady and mystical about this, but it's not really an outward reward we're looking for. We all enjoy playing music, we all get along, and finding a group of people who can say that after all this time is a rare thing."

What if Americana actually encompassed ALL of North America? You'd have the Franco Acadian inflections of Canada, as best exemplified by the accordion, blues and jazz, the only truly indigenous music the US has ever produced, and the lilting grace and fiery passion of the music of Mexico. You'd also have New Orleans' premiere distillers of this continental musical melange, The Iguanas, and their new album Juarez.

Taking their cues from all of the above influences and then some, Juarez, the band's first studio album since 2012’s Sin to Sin, redefines the notion of Americana, crossing cultures, styles, eras...and even languages. It's as if Rue Bourbon, Muscle Shoals and Plaza México were all within earshot of each other and The Iguanas were the musical conduit between them. Based out of New Orleans for the past couple of decades save for a short, Katrina imposed exile in Austin the members of the Iguanas have (collectively or individually) played or recorded with everyone from Charlie Rich, Alex Chilton, and Willie DeVille to Emmylou Harris, Allen Toussaint, and Pretty Lights.

Their two decade ride has taken them all over the map musically and geographically, yet the inescapable patina of their hometown infuses every note they play. Through eight studio albums, countless tours and Jazz Fest appearances, and a flood that did its best to take their adopted city with it, it's a testament to the band's endurance that the same four guys that started playing in the early 1990s are still together. Joe Cabral is philosophical about the band's persistence in the face of challenges that would have felled indeed have felled lesser bands. "First of all, this is all we know how to do; we're musicians. But more than that," he continues, "we respect the power of the band as an entity, and each individual in the band steps up to play his part. When it's good, that's really what it's all about."

Rod Hodges agrees. "I don't want to get all heady and mystical about this, but it's not really an outward reward we're looking for. We all enjoy playing music, we all get along, and finding a group of people who can say that after all this time is a rare thing."

Motherfolk with Special Guests Caleb Kopta and Jesse Denaro

In a contemporary independent music scene inundated with up and coming bands, it takes a unique outfit to break through that noise. A truly exceptional group must exhibit authenticity, raw talent, and electrifying chemistry. This, of course, means there are very few of them. Motherfolk, formed in 2013, is certainly one of those most unique and dynamic acts.

Motherfolk began as a collaborative effort between Nathan Dickerson and Bobby Paver, two college friends with a penchant for writing songs with one another. In the first year of the project, the two songwriters made frequent trips to Nashville to record their first endeavor. In 2014, their eponymous debut album showcased the duo’s musical prowess through a genre-bending collection of elegantly crafted songs.

Since then, Joel Call, Ethan Wescott, Karlie Dickerson, and Clayton Allender have joined Motherfolk’s ranks, and the band has made a name for themselves touring all across the nation. The outfit’s high-energy live performances have won over audiences from coast to coast, and their infectious musical persona has become one of the most exciting rising success stories in the indie scene.

In 2016, Motherfolk released their highly anticipated sophomore effort, Fold. Clocking in with eleven compelling tracks, the album further defines the band as an act that effortlessly melds a slew of influences together to manifest their sound into a splendidly cohesive, original pursuit. From surreal, introspective jaunts to foot-stomping, anthemic rock and roll, Fold stood as tall as one of the most exciting records of 2016 and 2017.
“Motherfolk finds its way through a blend of genres by holding tight to their raw talents.” – Billboard

"[M]emorable, hauntingly gorgeous…the band has never been stronger." - Ghettoblaster

Building on the strength of their radio, press, and touring campaign in 2017, Motherfolk will continue to play dates around the US before hitting the studio to work on what’s to come in 2018!

In a contemporary independent music scene inundated with up and coming bands, it takes a unique outfit to break through that noise. A truly exceptional group must exhibit authenticity, raw talent, and electrifying chemistry. This, of course, means there are very few of them. Motherfolk, formed in 2013, is certainly one of those most unique and dynamic acts.

Motherfolk began as a collaborative effort between Nathan Dickerson and Bobby Paver, two college friends with a penchant for writing songs with one another. In the first year of the project, the two songwriters made frequent trips to Nashville to record their first endeavor. In 2014, their eponymous debut album showcased the duo’s musical prowess through a genre-bending collection of elegantly crafted songs.

Since then, Joel Call, Ethan Wescott, Karlie Dickerson, and Clayton Allender have joined Motherfolk’s ranks, and the band has made a name for themselves touring all across the nation. The outfit’s high-energy live performances have won over audiences from coast to coast, and their infectious musical persona has become one of the most exciting rising success stories in the indie scene.

In 2016, Motherfolk released their highly anticipated sophomore effort, Fold. Clocking in with eleven compelling tracks, the album further defines the band as an act that effortlessly melds a slew of influences together to manifest their sound into a splendidly cohesive, original pursuit. From surreal, introspective jaunts to foot-stomping, anthemic rock and roll, Fold stood as tall as one of the most exciting records of 2016 and 2017.
“Motherfolk finds its way through a blend of genres by holding tight to their raw talents.” – Billboard

"[M]emorable, hauntingly gorgeous…the band has never been stronger." - Ghettoblaster

Building on the strength of their radio, press, and touring campaign in 2017, Motherfolk will continue to play dates around the US before hitting the studio to work on what’s to come in 2018!

SOLD OUT - Dave Alvin & Jimmie Dale Gilmore (Backed by The Guilty Ones) with Special Guest Dead Rock West

On Stage Together!

Roots music legends, Dave Alvin and Jimmie Dale Gilmore, have been friends for 30 years, but only recently realized they had never played music with each other before. So in 2017, Grammy winner Alvin and Grammy nominee Gilmore, decided to hit the highway to swap songs, tell stories, and share their life experiences.

Though Texas born Gilmore was twice named Country Artist of the Year by Rolling Stone, and California native Alvin first came to fame in the hard rocking rhythm and blues band The Blasters, they discovered that their musical roots in old blues and folk music are exactly the same. In these spontaneous shows, audiences enjoyed classic original compositions from the two, and also songs from a wide spectrum of songwriters and styles - from Merle Haggard to Sam Cooke to the Young Bloods.

Mutually energized and inspired by these performances, Dave and Jimmie agreed to hit the road again in 2018…this time with a full band and some new stories to share.

On Stage Together!

Roots music legends, Dave Alvin and Jimmie Dale Gilmore, have been friends for 30 years, but only recently realized they had never played music with each other before. So in 2017, Grammy winner Alvin and Grammy nominee Gilmore, decided to hit the highway to swap songs, tell stories, and share their life experiences.

Though Texas born Gilmore was twice named Country Artist of the Year by Rolling Stone, and California native Alvin first came to fame in the hard rocking rhythm and blues band The Blasters, they discovered that their musical roots in old blues and folk music are exactly the same. In these spontaneous shows, audiences enjoyed classic original compositions from the two, and also songs from a wide spectrum of songwriters and styles - from Merle Haggard to Sam Cooke to the Young Bloods.

Mutually energized and inspired by these performances, Dave and Jimmie agreed to hit the road again in 2018…this time with a full band and some new stories to share.

Tracyanne & Danny (Tracyanne Campbell from Camera Obscura and Danny Coughlan from Crybaby) with Special Guest Lomelda

Tracyanne & Danny is a new collaborative project between singer-songwriters Tracyanne Campbell (Camera Obscura) and Danny Coughlan (Crybaby).

Tracyanne hails from Glasgow, Scotland. London-born Danny is based in Bristol, England.

Their paths first crossed in 2013 when introduced by mutual music industry pals. Tracyanne dug Danny’s Crybaby album (released on Helium Records) and invited him to open some Camera Obscura shows in the UK.

Mutual artistic respect led to the swapping of song ideas, but tentative plans to work together were set aside while Camera Obscura wrote, recorded, released, and promoted their fifth album Desire Lines.

Following the death of Camera Obscura’s Carey Lander, all band activity stopped. Time passed.

Tracyanne and Danny revisited the idea of collaborating.

A pool of songs were honed and crafted. On the suggestion of their manager (and Teenage Fanclub drummer) Francis Macdonald, they recorded at Clashnarrow, a studio in Helmsdale in the highlands of Scotland owned by the esteemed Edwyn Collins.

Sessions took place throughout 2016 and 2017. Edwyn co-produced along with engineer and multi-instrumentalist Sean Read (Dexys).

They had the use of Edwyn’s vintage gear (including the guitar pedal which features on his global hit “A Girl Like You”) as they invoked a range of shared influences: The Roches, Dion, Lou Reed, The Flamingos, Serge Gainsbourg, Santo & Johnny, and The Style Council.

Edywn pops up with a guest vocal on first single “Alabama,” an intentionally “joyous” tribute to Tracyanne’s late friend and band mate Carey Lander.

Tracyanne & Danny is not a diverting curio or a wee stop on the road to someplace else. It is a shared artistic aesthetic, forged over time. They have figured out how to fit round each other and work together, creating a rewarding musical synergy. There will be more songs.

Meanwhile, they are looking forward to releasing and promoting the first fruits of their labors with live shows throughout UK, Europe, North America, and beyond.

Tracyanne & Danny is a new collaborative project between singer-songwriters Tracyanne Campbell (Camera Obscura) and Danny Coughlan (Crybaby).

Tracyanne hails from Glasgow, Scotland. London-born Danny is based in Bristol, England.

Their paths first crossed in 2013 when introduced by mutual music industry pals. Tracyanne dug Danny’s Crybaby album (released on Helium Records) and invited him to open some Camera Obscura shows in the UK.

Mutual artistic respect led to the swapping of song ideas, but tentative plans to work together were set aside while Camera Obscura wrote, recorded, released, and promoted their fifth album Desire Lines.

Following the death of Camera Obscura’s Carey Lander, all band activity stopped. Time passed.

Tracyanne and Danny revisited the idea of collaborating.

A pool of songs were honed and crafted. On the suggestion of their manager (and Teenage Fanclub drummer) Francis Macdonald, they recorded at Clashnarrow, a studio in Helmsdale in the highlands of Scotland owned by the esteemed Edwyn Collins.

Sessions took place throughout 2016 and 2017. Edwyn co-produced along with engineer and multi-instrumentalist Sean Read (Dexys).

They had the use of Edwyn’s vintage gear (including the guitar pedal which features on his global hit “A Girl Like You”) as they invoked a range of shared influences: The Roches, Dion, Lou Reed, The Flamingos, Serge Gainsbourg, Santo & Johnny, and The Style Council.

Edywn pops up with a guest vocal on first single “Alabama,” an intentionally “joyous” tribute to Tracyanne’s late friend and band mate Carey Lander.

Tracyanne & Danny is not a diverting curio or a wee stop on the road to someplace else. It is a shared artistic aesthetic, forged over time. They have figured out how to fit round each other and work together, creating a rewarding musical synergy. There will be more songs.

Meanwhile, they are looking forward to releasing and promoting the first fruits of their labors with live shows throughout UK, Europe, North America, and beyond.

Davina & The Vagabonds

DAVINA SOWERS AND THE VAGABONDS have created a stir on the national music scene with their high-energy live shows, level A musicianship, sharp-dressed professionalism, and Sowers’ commanding stage presence. With influences ranging from Fats Domino and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band to Aretha Franklin and Tom Waits, the band is converting audiences one show at a time, from Vancouver to Miami and across Europe. In 2011 Davina released her first full length, all original album Black Cloud . It was named one of the 10 best releases of the year by the Minneapolis Star & Tribune and awarded 4 ½ stars from Downbeat Magazine. Their next release in 2014, Sunshine, hit number 13 in the Billboard Blues Chart and led them to landing a performance on the hit BBC2 show, Later with Jools Holland.

DATV’s shows are filled with New Orleans charm, Memphis soul swagger, dark theatrical moments that evoke Kurt Weill, and tender gospel passages. Davina’s voice and stage presence defy category in a different way. Davina has been compared to Etta James, Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Billie Holiday and Betty Boop, but comparisons don’t suffice: Sowers is a true original.

Bringing you 100 years of American music and Davina’s originals, which lend themselves to the American Songbook, the band brings edgy nostalgia to older generations and fresh new music to younger ears. This rollicking quintet is held together by Sowers’ keyboard playing, with acoustic bass, drums, and a spicy trumpet and trombone horn section. The group’s focused, clean sound and emphasis on acoustic instruments is novel to both blues and jazz worlds, and sets the show closer to New Orleans than to Chicago. This has set the Vagabonds apart at festivals in Thunder Bay, Ontario; Sighisoara, Romania; Sierre, Switzerland; Kemi, Finland; the 2012 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, and 2013 Monterey Jazz Festival ( in 2014 was asked back to play their main stage in 2014, Vache de Blues in France, and North Sea Jazz Festival. Catch this one-of-a-kind live show while they are in town!

DAVINA SOWERS AND THE VAGABONDS have created a stir on the national music scene with their high-energy live shows, level A musicianship, sharp-dressed professionalism, and Sowers’ commanding stage presence. With influences ranging from Fats Domino and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band to Aretha Franklin and Tom Waits, the band is converting audiences one show at a time, from Vancouver to Miami and across Europe. In 2011 Davina released her first full length, all original album Black Cloud . It was named one of the 10 best releases of the year by the Minneapolis Star & Tribune and awarded 4 ½ stars from Downbeat Magazine. Their next release in 2014, Sunshine, hit number 13 in the Billboard Blues Chart and led them to landing a performance on the hit BBC2 show, Later with Jools Holland.

DATV’s shows are filled with New Orleans charm, Memphis soul swagger, dark theatrical moments that evoke Kurt Weill, and tender gospel passages. Davina’s voice and stage presence defy category in a different way. Davina has been compared to Etta James, Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Billie Holiday and Betty Boop, but comparisons don’t suffice: Sowers is a true original.

Bringing you 100 years of American music and Davina’s originals, which lend themselves to the American Songbook, the band brings edgy nostalgia to older generations and fresh new music to younger ears. This rollicking quintet is held together by Sowers’ keyboard playing, with acoustic bass, drums, and a spicy trumpet and trombone horn section. The group’s focused, clean sound and emphasis on acoustic instruments is novel to both blues and jazz worlds, and sets the show closer to New Orleans than to Chicago. This has set the Vagabonds apart at festivals in Thunder Bay, Ontario; Sighisoara, Romania; Sierre, Switzerland; Kemi, Finland; the 2012 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, and 2013 Monterey Jazz Festival ( in 2014 was asked back to play their main stage in 2014, Vache de Blues in France, and North Sea Jazz Festival. Catch this one-of-a-kind live show while they are in town!

Kuinka

Described by NPR Music as joyous folk pop, Kuinka "laces modern folk and Americana with an electronic jolt, waltzing along the grooved edges of dream-pop, synth-pop, and Brooklyn’s mid-aughts guitar-rock revival" (Vanyaland). Their genre-defying music features several different lead singers, four-part harmony, and eclectic instrumentation including cello, banjo, synthesizers, ukulele and electronic percussion. For all of their sonic experimentation, the Seattle quartet's songs and live shows are linked by an infectious energy that remains present in everything they do. Their new EP Stay Up Late is available now on Spotify, iTunes, and at www.kuinkatheband.com.

"Kuinka crafts songs that are engaging and original with a proper amount of established canon and innovation. Stories are laced through the lyrics, there are celebrations as well as lamentations—there is synth and cello! It is such a wonderful thing to hear a sound you've adored for so long ameliorated like this, with nothing missing, only new possibilities added to the mix." -Paste Music & Daytrotter

"Seraphic vocals bookended by ukulele, cello, and heavy percussion will leave you feeling giddy and glad to be alive." -The Stranger

Described by NPR Music as joyous folk pop, Kuinka "laces modern folk and Americana with an electronic jolt, waltzing along the grooved edges of dream-pop, synth-pop, and Brooklyn’s mid-aughts guitar-rock revival" (Vanyaland). Their genre-defying music features several different lead singers, four-part harmony, and eclectic instrumentation including cello, banjo, synthesizers, ukulele and electronic percussion. For all of their sonic experimentation, the Seattle quartet's songs and live shows are linked by an infectious energy that remains present in everything they do. Their new EP Stay Up Late is available now on Spotify, iTunes, and at www.kuinkatheband.com.

"Kuinka crafts songs that are engaging and original with a proper amount of established canon and innovation. Stories are laced through the lyrics, there are celebrations as well as lamentations—there is synth and cello! It is such a wonderful thing to hear a sound you've adored for so long ameliorated like this, with nothing missing, only new possibilities added to the mix." -Paste Music & Daytrotter

"Seraphic vocals bookended by ukulele, cello, and heavy percussion will leave you feeling giddy and glad to be alive." -The Stranger

(Late Show) The Rainbow Ends (CD Release Show) with Voodoo Circuit and B.B. Guns. Hosted by Alonna Breisch.

The Rainbow Ends is an instrumental Guitar Trio Based out of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Rainbow Ends is an instrumental Guitar Trio Based out of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(Early Show) Nick Barilla / Marie Miller

Nick Barilla
While social media numbers and blue verification check marks might define success for some; the pursuit of happiness and inspiring other’s to do what they love describe Nick Barilla’s blueprint for success in a constantly changing music industry. Since turning his passion for music into a career in 2016, his soulful-pop sounds and honest lyric writing have been positively influencing audiences all over the country. He has shared the stage with a list of artists that include: Aaron Carter, Howie Day, American Idol winners Kris Allen and Lee Dewyze, as well as Elliot Yamin, Kina Grannis and more! In addition, his original music has received commercial song placement on AT&T Sports Network in consecutive years for the Pittsburgh Pirates; as well as other radio stations and media outlets both locally and nationally. Never straying from his humble beginnings, his relatable stories and soulful sounds have continued to inspire people from all walks of life no matter what stage he is performing on!

Nick Barilla
While social media numbers and blue verification check marks might define success for some; the pursuit of happiness and inspiring other’s to do what they love describe Nick Barilla’s blueprint for success in a constantly changing music industry. Since turning his passion for music into a career in 2016, his soulful-pop sounds and honest lyric writing have been positively influencing audiences all over the country. He has shared the stage with a list of artists that include: Aaron Carter, Howie Day, American Idol winners Kris Allen and Lee Dewyze, as well as Elliot Yamin, Kina Grannis and more! In addition, his original music has received commercial song placement on AT&T Sports Network in consecutive years for the Pittsburgh Pirates; as well as other radio stations and media outlets both locally and nationally. Never straying from his humble beginnings, his relatable stories and soulful sounds have continued to inspire people from all walks of life no matter what stage he is performing on!

(Late Show) Antz Marching - A Tribute to Dave Matthews

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Serving as veterans of the local Pittsburgh music scene, Antz Marching provide Dave Matthews fans a live experience, channeling the music, energy, passion and artistry of the original band.
Additionally, Antz Marching includes an acoustic duo set mirroring the intimate and enchanting ambience of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds. The acoustic set of Antz Marching features Matthew’s unconventional chord changes and inspiring lyrics performed by guitarist/singer Vee Sharma, and violinist Heather Pinson interprets the fast and furious musicianship of Tim Reynolds. The duet is a must see event, and welcomes all to “celebrate we will.”

Celebrate we will.....” Antz Marching was formed when a gathering of like-minded musicians came together with the hopes of recreating the essence of a Dave Matthews Band live performance. Antz Marching is comprised of 6 members, each of which has been involved in the professional musical scene for the majority of their career. Serving as veterans of the local Pittsburgh music scene, Antz Marching provide Dave Matthews fans a live experience, channeling the music, energy, passion and artistry of the original band.
Additionally, Antz Marching includes an acoustic duo set mirroring the intimate and enchanting ambience of Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds. The acoustic set of Antz Marching features Matthew’s unconventional chord changes and inspiring lyrics performed by guitarist/singer Vee Sharma, and violinist Heather Pinson interprets the fast and furious musicianship of Tim Reynolds. The duet is a must see event, and welcomes all to “celebrate we will.”

Dan Baird & Homemade Sin

Dan Baird is a singer-songwriter, musician and producer best known as the lead singer and rhythm guitarist from the chart-topping 80’s rock band The Georgia Satellites. Baird formed The Georgia Satellites in 1980 and the group ultimately released the self-titled debut Georgia Satellites on Elektra. Their most successful release; the album featured the track "Keep Your Hands to Yourself” which reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and went into heavy rotation on MTV.

Baird left the band in 1990 to pursue a solo career and released his first solo album, Love Songs for the Hearing Impaired, in October 1992. "I Love You Period”, a single from the album, charted and peaked at #26 on the Billboard Hot 100. A follow up single "The One I Am" charted and peaked at #13 on Billboard's "Album Rock Tracks” chart.

In 2005, Baird began touring and recording with his band, Homemade Sin which today features two ex-members of The Georgia Satellites, Baird and drummer Mauro Magellan, along with bassist Micke Nilsson and guitarist Warner E. Hodges (of Jason & the Scorchers).

Known for their blazing high-energy live shows, Homemade Sin performs a mixture of Baird's solo material in addition to the hits and fan favorites from his years with the Georgia Satellites. The band has built a solid name and touring history across the UK and Europe.

Dan Baird is a singer-songwriter, musician and producer best known as the lead singer and rhythm guitarist from the chart-topping 80’s rock band The Georgia Satellites. Baird formed The Georgia Satellites in 1980 and the group ultimately released the self-titled debut Georgia Satellites on Elektra. Their most successful release; the album featured the track "Keep Your Hands to Yourself” which reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and went into heavy rotation on MTV.

Baird left the band in 1990 to pursue a solo career and released his first solo album, Love Songs for the Hearing Impaired, in October 1992. "I Love You Period”, a single from the album, charted and peaked at #26 on the Billboard Hot 100. A follow up single "The One I Am" charted and peaked at #13 on Billboard's "Album Rock Tracks” chart.

In 2005, Baird began touring and recording with his band, Homemade Sin which today features two ex-members of The Georgia Satellites, Baird and drummer Mauro Magellan, along with bassist Micke Nilsson and guitarist Warner E. Hodges (of Jason & the Scorchers).

Known for their blazing high-energy live shows, Homemade Sin performs a mixture of Baird's solo material in addition to the hits and fan favorites from his years with the Georgia Satellites. The band has built a solid name and touring history across the UK and Europe.

The Felice Brothers with Special Guest Twain - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

The Felice Brothers' new album Life in the Dark, due June 24 on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band's latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers' 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once "timeless, yet tossed-off," they've released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band's DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

"The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap," James Felice says, laughing. "It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music."

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

"We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources," singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. "We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes."

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener "Aerosol Ball" - "They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there's a connection there," he says - while James Felice says listening to Neil Young's Tonight's the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

"If you listen to that record, it's fucking crazy," he says. "We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this."

He's referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on "Aerosol Ball," mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on "Triumph '73" and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of "Plunder," full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare's "Double, double toil and trouble" incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice's songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. "It's just what was going on when I was writing the songs," Ian Felice says. "It's a pretty politically charged climate right now." To say the least.

The singer's characters on "Aerosol Ball" exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while "Jack at the Asylum" catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on "Plunder." He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. "The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time," Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: "Triumph '73" follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad "Diamond Bell" tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. "It's part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits," Ian Felice says. "I think it's one of the most straight-ahead narratives I've written."

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly - "I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?'" he says - and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

"There wasn't too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music," James Felice says. "We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it."

The resulting album is more than just classic American music - it's a parable for modern America.

The Felice Brothers' new album Life in the Dark, due June 24 on Yep Roc, is classic American music. At once plainspoken and deeply literate, the band's latest features nine new songs that capture the hopes and fears, the yearning and resignation, of a rootless, restless nation at a time of change.

Life in the Dark also coincides with The Felice Brothers' 10th anniversary as a band. Hailed by the AV Club for a sound at once "timeless, yet tossed-off," they've released plenty of music over the past decade, often on their own without a record label, but the new album is the fullest realization yet of the band's DIY tendencies. Self-produced by the musicians and engineered by James Felice (who also contributed accordion, keyboards and vocals), the Felice Brothers made Life in the Dark themselves in a garage on a farm in upstate New York, observed only by audience of poultry.

"The recording is definitely rough around the edges and cheap," James Felice says, laughing. "It was liberating and really cool to do. It allowed us to untether ourselves from anything and just make music."

Because of makeshift studio set-up, the music they made was necessarily stripped down, emphasizing acoustic instruments and spacious arrangements on songs that showcase the sound of a band playing together live, with echoes in the music of Woody Guthrie, Townes Van Zandt, John Prine and rural blues.

"We tried to make it as simple and folk-based as possible, because we were working with limited resources," singer and guitarist Ian Felice says. "We wanted to take all the frills out and make it just meat and potatoes."

Still, there are hints of seasoning: among the folk and blues touchstones, the band took a certain inspiration from Neil Young and the Meat Puppets, too. Ian Felice says he was trying to channel the spirit of Meat Puppets II on opener "Aerosol Ball" - "They played kind of weird, freaky folk music, so there's a connection there," he says - while James Felice says listening to Neil Young's Tonight's the Night was like getting permission to make Life in the Dark.

"If you listen to that record, it's fucking crazy," he says. "We listened to that to know that what we were doing was legal and had precedent. If Neil Young could make a record that sounds like that, we can make a record that sounds like this."

He's referring to the wild, whirling accordion and big, loose rhythm on "Aerosol Ball," mournful glimmers of electric guitar and fiddle on "Triumph '73" and the ramshackle, blues-rock feel of "Plunder," full of grainy lead guitars, blasts of organ and a shout-along chorus inspired by the rhythm of Shakespeare's "Double, double toil and trouble" incantation in Macbeth. Though The Felice Brothers often share songwriting duties, the band gravitated toward Ian Felice's songs for Life in the Dark.

Along with Shakespeare and the Meat Puppets, Ian Felice absorbed the essence of writers from Anne Sexton to Anne Frank, Raymond Carver to Dr. Seuss, on tunes with clear, if unintentional, political undertones. "It's just what was going on when I was writing the songs," Ian Felice says. "It's a pretty politically charged climate right now." To say the least.

The singer's characters on "Aerosol Ball" exist in a dystopian culture bought, and ruled, by corporations; while "Jack at the Asylum" catalogs cultural ills including climate change, economic inequality and the numbing aspects of televised warfare, themes that recur again on "Plunder." He wrote the title track after re-reading The Diary of a Young Girl, the journal that Frank kept while in hiding from the Nazis during World War II. "The idea of living in a dark attic unable to fully grasp what is going on in your life and feeling powerless to change it seemed like a relevant metaphor for me at the time," Ian Felice says.

Elsewhere, he offers his own interpretation of classic American archetypes: "Triumph '73" follows a young man on the cusp of adulthood desperate to ride his motorcycle away from the life changes overtaking him, while the ballad "Diamond Bell" tells the story of a folk heroine gunslinger in the vein of Pretty Boy Floyd or Jesse James, and the hapless, lovestruck kid she ensnares. "It's part-love song, part-adventure story, part-tragedy, told in the Mexican folk tradition of singing about bandits," Ian Felice says. "I think it's one of the most straight-ahead narratives I've written."

The band, spent about a month recording Life in the Dark in the late winter of 2015. James Felice learned engineering on the fly - "I literally had a book, like, ‘Where do you put the mic? How do you mic the kick drum?'" he says - and the band managed to nail most of the tunes within a few takes.

"There wasn't too much agonizing, just the joy of playing music," James Felice says. "We had an audience of chickens, and an audience of each other, and we were just really enjoying making it."

The resulting album is more than just classic American music - it's a parable for modern America.

Anthony Picone with Tim Vitullo and RC Allison

Anthony grew up and played music in the suburbs of New York City. He began playing the guitar at the age of 11 and started performing in bars and nightclubs by the age of 18. He shortly began playing in some of the most popular venues in New York City such as CBGB's, The Bitter End, Kenny's Castaway,Cafe Wah, Contenental and many more. For 8 years he played in one of the biggest bands in New Jersey, The Benjamins. In 2007 The Benjamins released an indie album with national distribution on Koch Music and have appeared on National TV and radio. They opened up for such acts as Cheap Trick, The Goo Goo Dolls,Third Eye Blind and more.



In 2011, he decided to quit his band and move from Hoboken NJ to Key West Florida to embark on a solo career as a musician and songwriter. The laid back lifestyle, sunshine and diverse music scene has had a huge influence on his writing. His music which is a fusion of Rock, Americana, Folk and Pop is often referred to as "Keys Rock"



In addition to engineering and producing, Anthony performs all of the vocals and most of the instruments on his recordings. Shortly after the release of his debut solo album "The Highest I've Ever Been" he was booked as an opening act for legendary rock bands such as Kansas, 38 Special and Blue Oyster Cult. Anthony continues to tour to support his music throughout the country.



Filmmaking has always been Anthony's second passion. In 2010 he wrote and directed a feature film "Long Road Home" and has since directed an independent television pilot and several music videos. He is currently writing several screen plays, television shows and documentaries



You can hear Anthony's music in regular rotation on some of the biggest FM radio stations in South Florida including Sun 103.1 FM, The Wail 99.5 FM and Pirate Radio 101.7 as well as WRSU Rutgers Radio NJ 88.7 FM

Anthony grew up and played music in the suburbs of New York City. He began playing the guitar at the age of 11 and started performing in bars and nightclubs by the age of 18. He shortly began playing in some of the most popular venues in New York City such as CBGB's, The Bitter End, Kenny's Castaway,Cafe Wah, Contenental and many more. For 8 years he played in one of the biggest bands in New Jersey, The Benjamins. In 2007 The Benjamins released an indie album with national distribution on Koch Music and have appeared on National TV and radio. They opened up for such acts as Cheap Trick, The Goo Goo Dolls,Third Eye Blind and more.



In 2011, he decided to quit his band and move from Hoboken NJ to Key West Florida to embark on a solo career as a musician and songwriter. The laid back lifestyle, sunshine and diverse music scene has had a huge influence on his writing. His music which is a fusion of Rock, Americana, Folk and Pop is often referred to as "Keys Rock"



In addition to engineering and producing, Anthony performs all of the vocals and most of the instruments on his recordings. Shortly after the release of his debut solo album "The Highest I've Ever Been" he was booked as an opening act for legendary rock bands such as Kansas, 38 Special and Blue Oyster Cult. Anthony continues to tour to support his music throughout the country.



Filmmaking has always been Anthony's second passion. In 2010 he wrote and directed a feature film "Long Road Home" and has since directed an independent television pilot and several music videos. He is currently writing several screen plays, television shows and documentaries



You can hear Anthony's music in regular rotation on some of the biggest FM radio stations in South Florida including Sun 103.1 FM, The Wail 99.5 FM and Pirate Radio 101.7 as well as WRSU Rutgers Radio NJ 88.7 FM

Banditos

Originally from Birmingham, AL, Banditos is a group – more like a gang, actually – of six 20 somethings, nowadays operating out of Nashville, close to, and simultaneously very far away from, the gleaming towers and industry hustle of Lower Broad and Music Row.

With the rugged power of a flashy Super Chief locomotive, the Banditos’s self-titled debut album bodaciously appropriates elements of ’60s blues-fused acid rock, ZZ Top’s jangly boogie, garage punk scuzz a la Burger Records, the Drive-By Truckers’ yawp, the populist choogle of CCR, Slim Harpo’s hip shake baby groove, gut bucket Fat Possum hill country mojo and the Georgia Motherf**king Satellites. From backwoods bluegrass, to slinky nods to Muscle Shoals soul and unexpected bits of doo-wop sweetness, the Banditos recall many, but sound like no one but themselves.

The members of the band first met playing in various punk and rock ‘n’ roll projects around Birmingham at D.I.Y., all-ages venues. In 2010, singer/guitarist Corey Parsons and singer/banjo player Stephen Pierce began busking around town, and were soon asked to perform at their favorite local bar. Without a full band they invited friends Randy Wade (drums), Jeffrey Salter (guitar), and Mary Beth Richardson (vocals) to join them.

Salter and Wade studied together at music school learning classical/jazz techniques, while Richardson’s background was mostly singing in church choirs. After some apprehension from Richardson about taking the stage with an unrehearsed band, a last-minute trip to New Orleans with the group (which resulted in a stolen hotel Bible inscribed with the band’s lyrics) seemed to cure a case of the cold feet. The ensuing performance was raw and electric, and an ecstatic crowd response further cemented the members’ convictions to become a full band. The addition of bassist Danny Vines made the group complete.

The members soon moved into a house together in Birmingham and after repeated tours through Nashville decided to move the band there instead, where the music scene was bigger and more diverse. The sextet has since developed their unique and airtight sound, culminated through several years of enduring friendships and a roaddog touring schedule that has, at their count, numbered over 700 shows in the last three years.

Their selt-titled debut full-length album is layered with as much grime as it is with pinpoint songwriting and feverish technical savvy. Each song wafts new dynamics into a streamlined stylistic roots, punk and rock ‘n’ roll jet stream, the variations heard evidently through the vocal baton passing and wrenching harmonies of Parsons, Richardson, and Pierce. Each vocalist, as with each performer in the band, is given the spotlight during the course of the album’s 12 songs. And at its core, Banditos is a unified coalescence of six bright beams of light, a spiritual collaboration between friends with a singular musical vision.

Originally from Birmingham, AL, Banditos is a group – more like a gang, actually – of six 20 somethings, nowadays operating out of Nashville, close to, and simultaneously very far away from, the gleaming towers and industry hustle of Lower Broad and Music Row.

With the rugged power of a flashy Super Chief locomotive, the Banditos’s self-titled debut album bodaciously appropriates elements of ’60s blues-fused acid rock, ZZ Top’s jangly boogie, garage punk scuzz a la Burger Records, the Drive-By Truckers’ yawp, the populist choogle of CCR, Slim Harpo’s hip shake baby groove, gut bucket Fat Possum hill country mojo and the Georgia Motherf**king Satellites. From backwoods bluegrass, to slinky nods to Muscle Shoals soul and unexpected bits of doo-wop sweetness, the Banditos recall many, but sound like no one but themselves.

The members of the band first met playing in various punk and rock ‘n’ roll projects around Birmingham at D.I.Y., all-ages venues. In 2010, singer/guitarist Corey Parsons and singer/banjo player Stephen Pierce began busking around town, and were soon asked to perform at their favorite local bar. Without a full band they invited friends Randy Wade (drums), Jeffrey Salter (guitar), and Mary Beth Richardson (vocals) to join them.

Salter and Wade studied together at music school learning classical/jazz techniques, while Richardson’s background was mostly singing in church choirs. After some apprehension from Richardson about taking the stage with an unrehearsed band, a last-minute trip to New Orleans with the group (which resulted in a stolen hotel Bible inscribed with the band’s lyrics) seemed to cure a case of the cold feet. The ensuing performance was raw and electric, and an ecstatic crowd response further cemented the members’ convictions to become a full band. The addition of bassist Danny Vines made the group complete.

The members soon moved into a house together in Birmingham and after repeated tours through Nashville decided to move the band there instead, where the music scene was bigger and more diverse. The sextet has since developed their unique and airtight sound, culminated through several years of enduring friendships and a roaddog touring schedule that has, at their count, numbered over 700 shows in the last three years.

Their selt-titled debut full-length album is layered with as much grime as it is with pinpoint songwriting and feverish technical savvy. Each song wafts new dynamics into a streamlined stylistic roots, punk and rock ‘n’ roll jet stream, the variations heard evidently through the vocal baton passing and wrenching harmonies of Parsons, Richardson, and Pierce. Each vocalist, as with each performer in the band, is given the spotlight during the course of the album’s 12 songs. And at its core, Banditos is a unified coalescence of six bright beams of light, a spiritual collaboration between friends with a singular musical vision.

Reverend Raven & the Chain Smokin Altar Boys Featuring Westside Andy on Harmonica

Bringing crowds to their feet at the hardest to please and sophisticated night clubs in the Midwest, Reverend Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys play traditional blues, straight up with a big dose of passion. With smoking grooves, served up with hot harmonica and smooth stinging guitar they play original songs peppered with nods to Slim Harpo, Little Walter, Jimmy Rogers, Billy Boy Arnold, Junior Wells and the three Kings.

Born and raised on south side of Chicago, the Reverend has been playing the blues since 1971 when he first saw Freddy King play at the Kinetic Theatre in Chicago. After 16 year hitch in the Navy, Chief Raven moved to Milwaukee where he began a long friendship and collaboration with Madison Slim, long time harmonica player for Jimmy Rogers.

Since 1990 he has opened for B.B King, Gatemouth Brown, Pinetop Perkins, Koko Taylor Band, Junior Wells, Billy Branch, Magic Slim, Elvin Bishop, Sugar Blue, Lonnie Brooks, William Clarke, Lefty Dizz, Rod Piazza, Fabulous Thunderbirds, Duke Robillard, Jeff Healy, Trampled Underfoot, Mike Zito, Nick Moss, Tommy Castro and numerous others at festivals and at Buddy Guy’s Legends where he has been on rotation as a headliner for 16 years.

Westside Andy is one of the premier harp players to come out of Wisconsin along with Jim Liban, Steve Cohen, Madison Slim, Matthew Skoller and Cadillac Pete Rahn. A long time member of Paul Black's Flip Kings and his own band, The Westside Andy/Mel Ford Band, he's played just about everywhere and with anyone of note in the blues world. He's been with Reverend Raven since leaving his band in 2015.

More modern facts include that Hohner, Inc. lists him as an endorser alongside Rod Piazza, Toots Thielemans, & Corky Siegel, among many other great players.

Andy has shared the stage with James Cotton, Luther Allison, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Charlie Musselwhite, Doobie Brothers, Richie Havens, Muddy Waters, Gary Primich, Jimmy Johnson, Tab Benoit, Hubert Sumlin.

"Andy Linderman is one of my very favorite harp players. His tone and phrasing are tops in my book."
Gary Primich, premier harp player

“Best in the Midwest”
Johnny Rawls

“You guys are the real deal”
Tad Robinson

“They are very, very good. That’s why I keep having them back at my club”
Buddy Guy

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS
Wisconsin Music Industry (WAMI) award for best blues band in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2015. People’s Choice Award in 2006, 2008, 2010.
Voted the Best Blues Band In Milwaukee by The Shepherd Express Reader’s Poll in 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.
2011 Blues Blast Music Award Nominee for Best Blues Band” and “Best Song”
2015 Blues Blast Music Award Award for Best Live CD
2015 Independent Blues Scene Award for Best Live CD
Band features Hohner harmonica endorsee Westside Andy Linderman on harmonica

Bringing crowds to their feet at the hardest to please and sophisticated night clubs in the Midwest, Reverend Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys play traditional blues, straight up with a big dose of passion. With smoking grooves, served up with hot harmonica and smooth stinging guitar they play original songs peppered with nods to Slim Harpo, Little Walter, Jimmy Rogers, Billy Boy Arnold, Junior Wells and the three Kings.

Born and raised on south side of Chicago, the Reverend has been playing the blues since 1971 when he first saw Freddy King play at the Kinetic Theatre in Chicago. After 16 year hitch in the Navy, Chief Raven moved to Milwaukee where he began a long friendship and collaboration with Madison Slim, long time harmonica player for Jimmy Rogers.

Since 1990 he has opened for B.B King, Gatemouth Brown, Pinetop Perkins, Koko Taylor Band, Junior Wells, Billy Branch, Magic Slim, Elvin Bishop, Sugar Blue, Lonnie Brooks, William Clarke, Lefty Dizz, Rod Piazza, Fabulous Thunderbirds, Duke Robillard, Jeff Healy, Trampled Underfoot, Mike Zito, Nick Moss, Tommy Castro and numerous others at festivals and at Buddy Guy’s Legends where he has been on rotation as a headliner for 16 years.

Westside Andy is one of the premier harp players to come out of Wisconsin along with Jim Liban, Steve Cohen, Madison Slim, Matthew Skoller and Cadillac Pete Rahn. A long time member of Paul Black's Flip Kings and his own band, The Westside Andy/Mel Ford Band, he's played just about everywhere and with anyone of note in the blues world. He's been with Reverend Raven since leaving his band in 2015.

More modern facts include that Hohner, Inc. lists him as an endorser alongside Rod Piazza, Toots Thielemans, & Corky Siegel, among many other great players.

Andy has shared the stage with James Cotton, Luther Allison, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Charlie Musselwhite, Doobie Brothers, Richie Havens, Muddy Waters, Gary Primich, Jimmy Johnson, Tab Benoit, Hubert Sumlin.

"Andy Linderman is one of my very favorite harp players. His tone and phrasing are tops in my book."
Gary Primich, premier harp player

“Best in the Midwest”
Johnny Rawls

“You guys are the real deal”
Tad Robinson

“They are very, very good. That’s why I keep having them back at my club”
Buddy Guy

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS
Wisconsin Music Industry (WAMI) award for best blues band in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2015. People’s Choice Award in 2006, 2008, 2010.
Voted the Best Blues Band In Milwaukee by The Shepherd Express Reader’s Poll in 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.
2011 Blues Blast Music Award Nominee for Best Blues Band” and “Best Song”
2015 Blues Blast Music Award Award for Best Live CD
2015 Independent Blues Scene Award for Best Live CD
Band features Hohner harmonica endorsee Westside Andy Linderman on harmonica

(Early Show) Eilen Jewell - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

Eilen Jewell laughs when told her label’s president called her a musicologist. But she confirms she and her husband and bandmate, Jason Beek, have a passion for studying American music.

“We really love to uncover the past. It’s almost like digging for buried treasure,” she says. “For me, that’s where music is at. I like all kinds of music as long as there’s the word early in front of it.”

For her new album, Down Hearted Blues, releasing Sept. 22, 2017, on Signature Sounds, they unearthed 12 vintage gems written or made famous by an array of artists both renowned and obscure, from Willie Dixon and Memphis Minnie to Charles Sheffield and Betty James. Then, like expert stonecutters, they chiseled them into exciting new shapes and forms, honoring history while breathing new life into each discovery.

Eilen Jewell laughs when told her label’s president called her a musicologist. But she confirms she and her husband and bandmate, Jason Beek, have a passion for studying American music.

“We really love to uncover the past. It’s almost like digging for buried treasure,” she says. “For me, that’s where music is at. I like all kinds of music as long as there’s the word early in front of it.”

For her new album, Down Hearted Blues, releasing Sept. 22, 2017, on Signature Sounds, they unearthed 12 vintage gems written or made famous by an array of artists both renowned and obscure, from Willie Dixon and Memphis Minnie to Charles Sheffield and Betty James. Then, like expert stonecutters, they chiseled them into exciting new shapes and forms, honoring history while breathing new life into each discovery.

(Late Show) Turnpike Gardens

Combining equal parts tight, high-energy musicianship and dynamic songwriting, Turnpike Gardens is an up-and-coming rock band from Pittsburgh, PA. The band draws its influences from rock acts of late 60s and early 70s as well as early 90s alternative rock.

Turnpike Gardens consists of three high school friends, bassist Nick Funyak, guitarist Evan Mulgrave and drummer James Conley, a trio with more than a decade of shared musical history, and features vocalist Heather Polvinale, whose brash, powerful voice carries shades of Grace Slick and Fiona Apple.

In their short history, Turnpike Gardens has already created a reputation for packing local venues such as The Smiling Moose, Mr.Smalls, Club Cafe while delivering dynamic, energetic performances. The band has played a number of shows with touring acts and local mainstays such as The Semi-Supervillains and There You Are. Their debut, self-titled LP has received a warm reception from numerous online radio stations, and local radio appearances include regular turns on 105.9 the X and a live session in the WDVE Coffeehouse with Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show.

The band is currently writing and recording its follow-up LP to 2015's self-titled release and continues to play live sets in support of the first album.

Combining equal parts tight, high-energy musicianship and dynamic songwriting, Turnpike Gardens is an up-and-coming rock band from Pittsburgh, PA. The band draws its influences from rock acts of late 60s and early 70s as well as early 90s alternative rock.

Turnpike Gardens consists of three high school friends, bassist Nick Funyak, guitarist Evan Mulgrave and drummer James Conley, a trio with more than a decade of shared musical history, and features vocalist Heather Polvinale, whose brash, powerful voice carries shades of Grace Slick and Fiona Apple.

In their short history, Turnpike Gardens has already created a reputation for packing local venues such as The Smiling Moose, Mr.Smalls, Club Cafe while delivering dynamic, energetic performances. The band has played a number of shows with touring acts and local mainstays such as The Semi-Supervillains and There You Are. Their debut, self-titled LP has received a warm reception from numerous online radio stations, and local radio appearances include regular turns on 105.9 the X and a live session in the WDVE Coffeehouse with Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show.

The band is currently writing and recording its follow-up LP to 2015's self-titled release and continues to play live sets in support of the first album.

An Evening With Slaid Cleaves

Now twenty-five years into his storied career, Cleaves' songwriting has never been more potent than on his new album Ghost on the Car Radio, out June 23.

The characters in Slaid Cleaves' songs live in unglamorous reality. They work dead-end jobs, they run out of money, they grow old, they hold on to each other (or not), and they die. With an eye for the beauty in everyday life, he tells their stories, bringing a bit of empathy to their uncaring world.

On "Take Home Pay," co-written with longtime friend Rod Picott, Cleaves sings from the perspective of an aging manual laborer, fighting looming regret and sadness with stubborn resiliency (and opioid use).

"On my way down to the pawn shop
A couple hundred is all I need
If I have to, I’ll hit the blood bank
I’m bone dry but I can always bleed

I got some Oxy to keep me moving
It slowly takes some things away
The only thing I was scared of losing
She packed up and left today"
-"TAKE HOME PAY"

"As befits the times we live in, there's a heavy dose of disappointment and disillusion here," he says. But somehow, through the worst of it, optimism remains, as if to say, "Yeah, things are pretty bad out there. But there's still some good stuff if you know where to look."

One place his characters find solace is with each other. Traditional love songs are not often found on a Slaid Cleaves record. Here he approaches the subject less as a romantic gesture, and more as a world-weary appreciation of the one who's seen you through thick and thin, as in the song "So Good to Me."

"Times were tough but we were tougher
Slings and arrows we did suffer
Scars, we’ve got a few, but who has not

Words of love and words of anger
Times of peace and times of danger
Never take for granted what we've got"
- "SO GOOD TO ME"

Described as "terse, clear and heartfelt" (NPR Fresh Air), his songs speak to timeless truths. "I'm not an innovator. I'm more of a keeper of the flame," he says.

"Songs are so accessible. You don't need an education to fully appreciate them, you don't need a lot of leisure time to spend on them, you don't need to learn the language of song. We seem to be born with it," Cleaves explains. "With no preparation at all, they can bring you to tears in a matter of seconds. I remember being three or four and getting a lump in my throat when I heard Hank Williams sing."

Now in his fifties, Cleaves admits that it's sometimes hard to stay inspired. "I do become jaded," he says. "I wonder that, at this point in my career, I've had no real national success. No impact on the culture, as my heroes had. The music that I love just doesn't seem relevant to mainstream culture. But then, I have no interest in what mainstream culture offers either."

"But those feelings are always quickly overcome by gratitude," he explains. "I'm making a living as a musician, and making a meaningful connection with people - what could be better than that?"

Ghost on the Car Radio is Cleaves' first release since 2013's Still Fighting the War, which was praised as "one of the year's best albums" by American Songwriter and "carefully crafted...songs about the struggles of the heart in hard times" by the Wall Street Journal. The New York Daily News called his music "a treasure hidden in plain sight," while the Austin Chronicle declared, "there are few contemporaries that compare. He's become a master craftsman on the order of Guy Clark and John Prine."

Cleaves will hit the road this summer and fall in support of the album. For updated tour dates, visit slaidcleaves.com/tour

Now twenty-five years into his storied career, Cleaves' songwriting has never been more potent than on his new album Ghost on the Car Radio, out June 23.

The characters in Slaid Cleaves' songs live in unglamorous reality. They work dead-end jobs, they run out of money, they grow old, they hold on to each other (or not), and they die. With an eye for the beauty in everyday life, he tells their stories, bringing a bit of empathy to their uncaring world.

On "Take Home Pay," co-written with longtime friend Rod Picott, Cleaves sings from the perspective of an aging manual laborer, fighting looming regret and sadness with stubborn resiliency (and opioid use).

"On my way down to the pawn shop
A couple hundred is all I need
If I have to, I’ll hit the blood bank
I’m bone dry but I can always bleed

I got some Oxy to keep me moving
It slowly takes some things away
The only thing I was scared of losing
She packed up and left today"
-"TAKE HOME PAY"

"As befits the times we live in, there's a heavy dose of disappointment and disillusion here," he says. But somehow, through the worst of it, optimism remains, as if to say, "Yeah, things are pretty bad out there. But there's still some good stuff if you know where to look."

One place his characters find solace is with each other. Traditional love songs are not often found on a Slaid Cleaves record. Here he approaches the subject less as a romantic gesture, and more as a world-weary appreciation of the one who's seen you through thick and thin, as in the song "So Good to Me."

"Times were tough but we were tougher
Slings and arrows we did suffer
Scars, we’ve got a few, but who has not

Words of love and words of anger
Times of peace and times of danger
Never take for granted what we've got"
- "SO GOOD TO ME"

Described as "terse, clear and heartfelt" (NPR Fresh Air), his songs speak to timeless truths. "I'm not an innovator. I'm more of a keeper of the flame," he says.

"Songs are so accessible. You don't need an education to fully appreciate them, you don't need a lot of leisure time to spend on them, you don't need to learn the language of song. We seem to be born with it," Cleaves explains. "With no preparation at all, they can bring you to tears in a matter of seconds. I remember being three or four and getting a lump in my throat when I heard Hank Williams sing."

Now in his fifties, Cleaves admits that it's sometimes hard to stay inspired. "I do become jaded," he says. "I wonder that, at this point in my career, I've had no real national success. No impact on the culture, as my heroes had. The music that I love just doesn't seem relevant to mainstream culture. But then, I have no interest in what mainstream culture offers either."

"But those feelings are always quickly overcome by gratitude," he explains. "I'm making a living as a musician, and making a meaningful connection with people - what could be better than that?"

Ghost on the Car Radio is Cleaves' first release since 2013's Still Fighting the War, which was praised as "one of the year's best albums" by American Songwriter and "carefully crafted...songs about the struggles of the heart in hard times" by the Wall Street Journal. The New York Daily News called his music "a treasure hidden in plain sight," while the Austin Chronicle declared, "there are few contemporaries that compare. He's become a master craftsman on the order of Guy Clark and John Prine."

Cleaves will hit the road this summer and fall in support of the album. For updated tour dates, visit slaidcleaves.com/tour

JD Wilkes with The Legendary Shack Shakers Unplugged with Special Guest Pine Hill Haints

The Legendary Shack Shakers’ hell-for-leather roadshow has earned quite a name for itself with its unique brand of Southern Gothic that is all-at-once irreverent, revisionist, dangerous, and fun. Led by their charismatic, rail-thin frontman and blues-harpist JD Wilkes, the Shack Shakers are a four-man wrecking crew from the South whose explosive interpretations of the blues, punk, rock and country have made fans, critics and legions of potential converts into true believers.

After taking more than a year off to work on other projects (including JD Wilkes's book "Barn Dances & Jamborees Across Kentucky"), the band is re-mobilizing in the fall of 2014 much to the excitement of many a Shack Shaker fanatic. Despite the group’s time off, their reputation for intensity has stuck with them. On stage, JD has been compared to the likes of Iggy Pop, David Byrne, and Jerry Lee Lewis. The Nashville Scene named Wilkes “the best frontman in Nashville” in 2002, while former Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra has called JD “the last great Rock and Roll frontman.” Having joined the band in early 2012, garage blues guitar player Rod Hamdallah--who also lends his prowess to Wilkes's side project ‘JD Wilkes and the Dirt Daubers'--is back in the Shack Shakers’ lineup. The rhythm section is rounded out with Brett Whitacre on drums and Mark Robertson thumping out the upright bass.

Although not legendary upon being named, the band has grown into its reputation the last several years due to their heavy tour schedule, six critically acclaimed studio albums, and songs that have been featured on television shows such as HBO’s True Blood. Past tour mates and fans include Reverend Horton Heat, Rancid, The Black Keys, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, and Hank Williams III. Robert Plant is also a noted Legendary Shack Shakers fan, and picked the band to open for him on his 2005 tour of Europe. Plant named the band's third album Believe as one of his favorite records of 2005. The list of esteemed admirers goes on to include horror novelist Stephen King, who listed “CB Song” as among his iPod’s Top Five in a 2008 Entertainment Weekly article. Such a wealth of devoted fans over the years has only added to the mystique that the Legendary Shack Shakers possess, carrying them down the road toward new creative pursuits and barn-shaking tunes.

The Legendary Shack Shakers’ hell-for-leather roadshow has earned quite a name for itself with its unique brand of Southern Gothic that is all-at-once irreverent, revisionist, dangerous, and fun. Led by their charismatic, rail-thin frontman and blues-harpist JD Wilkes, the Shack Shakers are a four-man wrecking crew from the South whose explosive interpretations of the blues, punk, rock and country have made fans, critics and legions of potential converts into true believers.

After taking more than a year off to work on other projects (including JD Wilkes's book "Barn Dances & Jamborees Across Kentucky"), the band is re-mobilizing in the fall of 2014 much to the excitement of many a Shack Shaker fanatic. Despite the group’s time off, their reputation for intensity has stuck with them. On stage, JD has been compared to the likes of Iggy Pop, David Byrne, and Jerry Lee Lewis. The Nashville Scene named Wilkes “the best frontman in Nashville” in 2002, while former Dead Kennedys frontman Jello Biafra has called JD “the last great Rock and Roll frontman.” Having joined the band in early 2012, garage blues guitar player Rod Hamdallah--who also lends his prowess to Wilkes's side project ‘JD Wilkes and the Dirt Daubers'--is back in the Shack Shakers’ lineup. The rhythm section is rounded out with Brett Whitacre on drums and Mark Robertson thumping out the upright bass.

Although not legendary upon being named, the band has grown into its reputation the last several years due to their heavy tour schedule, six critically acclaimed studio albums, and songs that have been featured on television shows such as HBO’s True Blood. Past tour mates and fans include Reverend Horton Heat, Rancid, The Black Keys, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, and Hank Williams III. Robert Plant is also a noted Legendary Shack Shakers fan, and picked the band to open for him on his 2005 tour of Europe. Plant named the band's third album Believe as one of his favorite records of 2005. The list of esteemed admirers goes on to include horror novelist Stephen King, who listed “CB Song” as among his iPod’s Top Five in a 2008 Entertainment Weekly article. Such a wealth of devoted fans over the years has only added to the mystique that the Legendary Shack Shakers possess, carrying them down the road toward new creative pursuits and barn-shaking tunes.

Jim Avett with Special Guest Dan Zlotnick Presented by Opus One & PromoWest North Shore

Jim Avett of Concord, North Carolina, is the son of a Methodist minister and a classical pianist who grew up in a home full of love and music, a home where he learned the importance of hard work and honest living. He and his wife instilled these same values in their children, tempered with a lot of fun, and of course, music. Jim’s guitar was an ever present instrument, and there was always singing.

As much as he enjoyed writing and performing music, Jim put his family first and spent 35 years running his welding company, building bridges along much of the east coast in order to provide for them. After retiring from welding, he returned to music and recorded Jim Avett and Family, a collection of gospel music, with his children, Bonnie, Scott and Seth in 2008. Soon after, in 2010, he released Tribes, a collection of original tunes ranging from soulful love ballads like the title track to the more lighthearted, "Fight with a Bottle of Booze". In Second Chance, Jim’s latest offering, the influences of classic country and early rock and roll are apparent. Once again, he draws on life experiences to write songs about love ("Pictures in the Attic"), boyhood memories, ("Willard"), and loss ("Holy Ground").

You can find Jim performing in listening rooms and at festivals from the Southeast to New England. His shows are a combination of beloved country tunes, his original ballads, and the stories he tells to introduce them. Once comes away from a Jim Avett performance with the feeling that this is an honest man sharing his life and his love of music. It’s like spending the evening on the front porch singing and talking with a good friend.

Jim Avett of Concord, North Carolina, is the son of a Methodist minister and a classical pianist who grew up in a home full of love and music, a home where he learned the importance of hard work and honest living. He and his wife instilled these same values in their children, tempered with a lot of fun, and of course, music. Jim’s guitar was an ever present instrument, and there was always singing.

As much as he enjoyed writing and performing music, Jim put his family first and spent 35 years running his welding company, building bridges along much of the east coast in order to provide for them. After retiring from welding, he returned to music and recorded Jim Avett and Family, a collection of gospel music, with his children, Bonnie, Scott and Seth in 2008. Soon after, in 2010, he released Tribes, a collection of original tunes ranging from soulful love ballads like the title track to the more lighthearted, "Fight with a Bottle of Booze". In Second Chance, Jim’s latest offering, the influences of classic country and early rock and roll are apparent. Once again, he draws on life experiences to write songs about love ("Pictures in the Attic"), boyhood memories, ("Willard"), and loss ("Holy Ground").

You can find Jim performing in listening rooms and at festivals from the Southeast to New England. His shows are a combination of beloved country tunes, his original ballads, and the stories he tells to introduce them. Once comes away from a Jim Avett performance with the feeling that this is an honest man sharing his life and his love of music. It’s like spending the evening on the front porch singing and talking with a good friend.

(Early Show) The Suitcase Junket

From the salvaged sounds of American juke joints, back porches, honky tonks and rock clubs, The Suitcase Junket conjures an entirely new sound in this essential rock collection, Pile Driver. The Suitcase Junket is Matt Lorenz: artist, tinkerer, swamp yankee, one man band. His is the road worn voice rising over the grind of a tube amped dumpster guitar, with wild double pitches of throat singing. From The Suitcase Junket's penchant for thrift and ingenuity comes this full length album his debut at Signature Sounds of original rock anthems, mountain ballads, blues manifestos and dance hall festivity, played on instruments built of broken bottles, twisted forks, dried bones, gas cans, shoes, saw blades, a toy keyboard, and an overhead compartment’s worth of luggage.

From the salvaged sounds of American juke joints, back porches, honky tonks and rock clubs, The Suitcase Junket conjures an entirely new sound in this essential rock collection, Pile Driver. The Suitcase Junket is Matt Lorenz: artist, tinkerer, swamp yankee, one man band. His is the road worn voice rising over the grind of a tube amped dumpster guitar, with wild double pitches of throat singing. From The Suitcase Junket's penchant for thrift and ingenuity comes this full length album his debut at Signature Sounds of original rock anthems, mountain ballads, blues manifestos and dance hall festivity, played on instruments built of broken bottles, twisted forks, dried bones, gas cans, shoes, saw blades, a toy keyboard, and an overhead compartment’s worth of luggage.

Nicole Atkins with Special Guest Ruby Boots - Presented by Opus One & 91.3 WYEP

To borrow a phrase from heaven’s new poet laureate, Leonard Cohen, Nicole Atkins was “born with the gift of a golden voice.” But somewhere along the way she misplaced it. Goodnight Rhonda Lee is the story of Nicole finding her voice, and how, in doing so, she went a little crazy.

Great Art is born of struggle and Nicole was struggling. The problem was that she felt nothing. Her fans responded to her performances with the same fervor they always had, but Nicole felt nothing. Her new husband loved her and doted on her, but she felt nothing. She traced it back to her drinking and decided to try to learn to live without booze. But that first day of sobriety brought with it an unexpected additional test — Nicole’s dad was diagnosed with lung cancer. This Jersey girl, whose big voice was tethered to a big heart, and whose reaction to the mundane setbacks of everyday life had always been equally overblown, suddenly faced a real problem. “It toughened me up,” she says.

And the songs started to come. Little bursts of therapeutic creativity. Thorny feelings transubstantiated into melodies. Beginning with “Listen Up,” a wake-up call to a lucky girl who hadn’t realized how lucky she’d been, Nicole started to find her redemption in these songs. They rang true in a way no songs ever had before. They came from a deep, vulnerable place. If Nicole had been living an unexamined life, she wasn’t anymore.

She needed her newfound toughness though, as in the midst of all this turmoil, she prepared to move from her native Asbury Park to Nashville. Having spent more than a decade as the de facto queen of Asbury, Nicole was finally leaving the warm, but often stifling confines of her hometown. During one of her final nights before the exodus, a song came to her in a dream. “I Love Living Here Even When I Don’t” summed up the complicated feelings she experienced as she said goodbye to the only real home she’d ever known.

In Nashville, Nicole’s once hectic life was very different. Left home alone as her tour manager husband plied his trade out on the road, Nicole found herself writing songs that examined “feelings of separation and being scared of new surroundings.” In particular, the songs “Sleepwalking” and “Darkness Falls” echo like ghosts through an empty house.

Unsurprisingly, her sobriety faltered. She drifted in and out of it. Nicole knew the wagon was good for her, but she had a hard time staying focused on what was good for her. As it went on however, the clarity of those sober days started to shine through. And she was able to string them together in longer stretches. For the first time, she was able to offer a shoulder for others to lean on, rather than always being the one in need of a shoulder. It helped that she had to be strong for herself in order to be strong for her dad. Much of what she was feeling was painful, but it beat the hell out of feeling nothing.

She reconnected with her old friend Chris Isaak who encouraged her, in the midst of all the soul-searching and soul-baring, to write songs that emphasized the one trait that most sets her apart from the mere mortals of the industry, telling her, “Atkins, you have a very special thing in your voice that a lot of people can’t or don’t do. You need to stop shying away from that thing and let people hear it.” To that end, the two of them collaborated on Goodnight Rhonda Lee‘s standout track, the instant classic, “A Little Crazy.”

Great Art is a journey — and Nicole Atkins traveled quite a distance to bring us Goodnight Rhonda Lee. As Nicole explains it, “This record came to me at a time of deep transition. Some days were good, some not so good. What I did gain, though, from starting to make some changes and going inward, and putting it out on the table, was a joy in what I do again. Joy in the process and a newfound confidence that I don’t think I’ve ever had until now. The album title, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, also came from those feelings. Rhonda Lee was kind of my alias for bad behavior, and it was time to put that persona to bed.“

The direction in which these songs were headed was obvious. Nicole’s voice had always recalled a classic vinyl collection. She is the heir to the legacy of “Roy Orbison, Lee Hazelwood, Sinatra, Aretha, Carole King, Candi Staton.” She is untethered to decade or movement or the whim of the hipster elite.

In order to capture the timelessness she sought, Nicole enlisted a modern day Wrecking Crew: Niles City Sound in Fort Worth, TX, who had just risen to national acclaim as Leon Bridges‘ secret weapon. “We spoke the same language. We wanted to make something classic, something that had an atmosphere and a mood of romance and triumph and strength and soul.” The album was recorded in five days, live to tape. The album that Nicole and the boys came up with in those five days, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, is nothing less than Great Art and a quantum leap forward for Nicole Atkins who, no matter how much she grows up, will always be a little crazy.

To borrow a phrase from heaven’s new poet laureate, Leonard Cohen, Nicole Atkins was “born with the gift of a golden voice.” But somewhere along the way she misplaced it. Goodnight Rhonda Lee is the story of Nicole finding her voice, and how, in doing so, she went a little crazy.

Great Art is born of struggle and Nicole was struggling. The problem was that she felt nothing. Her fans responded to her performances with the same fervor they always had, but Nicole felt nothing. Her new husband loved her and doted on her, but she felt nothing. She traced it back to her drinking and decided to try to learn to live without booze. But that first day of sobriety brought with it an unexpected additional test — Nicole’s dad was diagnosed with lung cancer. This Jersey girl, whose big voice was tethered to a big heart, and whose reaction to the mundane setbacks of everyday life had always been equally overblown, suddenly faced a real problem. “It toughened me up,” she says.

And the songs started to come. Little bursts of therapeutic creativity. Thorny feelings transubstantiated into melodies. Beginning with “Listen Up,” a wake-up call to a lucky girl who hadn’t realized how lucky she’d been, Nicole started to find her redemption in these songs. They rang true in a way no songs ever had before. They came from a deep, vulnerable place. If Nicole had been living an unexamined life, she wasn’t anymore.

She needed her newfound toughness though, as in the midst of all this turmoil, she prepared to move from her native Asbury Park to Nashville. Having spent more than a decade as the de facto queen of Asbury, Nicole was finally leaving the warm, but often stifling confines of her hometown. During one of her final nights before the exodus, a song came to her in a dream. “I Love Living Here Even When I Don’t” summed up the complicated feelings she experienced as she said goodbye to the only real home she’d ever known.

In Nashville, Nicole’s once hectic life was very different. Left home alone as her tour manager husband plied his trade out on the road, Nicole found herself writing songs that examined “feelings of separation and being scared of new surroundings.” In particular, the songs “Sleepwalking” and “Darkness Falls” echo like ghosts through an empty house.

Unsurprisingly, her sobriety faltered. She drifted in and out of it. Nicole knew the wagon was good for her, but she had a hard time staying focused on what was good for her. As it went on however, the clarity of those sober days started to shine through. And she was able to string them together in longer stretches. For the first time, she was able to offer a shoulder for others to lean on, rather than always being the one in need of a shoulder. It helped that she had to be strong for herself in order to be strong for her dad. Much of what she was feeling was painful, but it beat the hell out of feeling nothing.

She reconnected with her old friend Chris Isaak who encouraged her, in the midst of all the soul-searching and soul-baring, to write songs that emphasized the one trait that most sets her apart from the mere mortals of the industry, telling her, “Atkins, you have a very special thing in your voice that a lot of people can’t or don’t do. You need to stop shying away from that thing and let people hear it.” To that end, the two of them collaborated on Goodnight Rhonda Lee‘s standout track, the instant classic, “A Little Crazy.”

Great Art is a journey — and Nicole Atkins traveled quite a distance to bring us Goodnight Rhonda Lee. As Nicole explains it, “This record came to me at a time of deep transition. Some days were good, some not so good. What I did gain, though, from starting to make some changes and going inward, and putting it out on the table, was a joy in what I do again. Joy in the process and a newfound confidence that I don’t think I’ve ever had until now. The album title, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, also came from those feelings. Rhonda Lee was kind of my alias for bad behavior, and it was time to put that persona to bed.“

The direction in which these songs were headed was obvious. Nicole’s voice had always recalled a classic vinyl collection. She is the heir to the legacy of “Roy Orbison, Lee Hazelwood, Sinatra, Aretha, Carole King, Candi Staton.” She is untethered to decade or movement or the whim of the hipster elite.

In order to capture the timelessness she sought, Nicole enlisted a modern day Wrecking Crew: Niles City Sound in Fort Worth, TX, who had just risen to national acclaim as Leon Bridges‘ secret weapon. “We spoke the same language. We wanted to make something classic, something that had an atmosphere and a mood of romance and triumph and strength and soul.” The album was recorded in five days, live to tape. The album that Nicole and the boys came up with in those five days, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, is nothing less than Great Art and a quantum leap forward for Nicole Atkins who, no matter how much she grows up, will always be a little crazy.

American Cancer Society Benefit with Ray Powers, Brian Genovesi, Fetish Noir, Paul McGinty, Megan Pennington, Carrie Collins

Join Club Cafe for a very special show benefitting the American Cancer Society with Ray Powers, Brian Genovesi, Fetish Noir, Paul McGinty, Megan Pennington, Carrie Collins

Join Club Cafe for a very special show benefitting the American Cancer Society with Ray Powers, Brian Genovesi, Fetish Noir, Paul McGinty, Megan Pennington, Carrie Collins

An Evening With Roomful of Blues

Even though Roomful of Blues’ lineup has changed over the years, the band has always been one of the tightest, most joyful blues ensembles in the world. Currently an eight-piece unit led by guitarist Chris Vachon, the band has never sounded fresher or stronger. In 2010, singer Phil Pemberton took over the vocal duties, bringing his sweet and soulful vocals and adding another bright new dimension to the jazzy, jump-blues musical roots. Their winning combination of jump, swing, blues, R&B and soul remains their calling card, as does their ability to fill the dance floor. Along with newer members, bassist John Turner, trumpeter Doug Woolverton, drummer Chris Rivelli, and keyboardist Rusty Scott, and longtime members baritone and tenor saxophonist Mark Earley, tenor and alto saxophonist Rich Lataille , Roomful keeps on rockin’ in 2015.

Roomful of Blues, according to DownBeat magazine, “are in a class by themselves.” With their masterful combination of jumping, horn-heavy, hard-edged blues and R&B, it’s no wonder why the great Count Basie called them “the hottest blues band I’ve ever heard.” Since 1967, the group’s deeply rooted blend of swing, rock ‘n’ roll, jump, blues and soul has earned it five Grammy Award nominations and a slew of other accolades, including seven Blues Music Awards.

With a non-stop performance schedule for over 45 years, Roomful of Blues has earned critical, popular and radio success and a legion of fans around the globe. including the prestigious DownBeat International Critics Poll for “Best Blues Band”.

Even though Roomful of Blues’ lineup has changed over the years, the band has always been one of the tightest, most joyful blues ensembles in the world. Currently an eight-piece unit led by guitarist Chris Vachon, the band has never sounded fresher or stronger. In 2010, singer Phil Pemberton took over the vocal duties, bringing his sweet and soulful vocals and adding another bright new dimension to the jazzy, jump-blues musical roots. Their winning combination of jump, swing, blues, R&B and soul remains their calling card, as does their ability to fill the dance floor. Along with newer members, bassist John Turner, trumpeter Doug Woolverton, drummer Chris Rivelli, and keyboardist Rusty Scott, and longtime members baritone and tenor saxophonist Mark Earley, tenor and alto saxophonist Rich Lataille , Roomful keeps on rockin’ in 2015.

Roomful of Blues, according to DownBeat magazine, “are in a class by themselves.” With their masterful combination of jumping, horn-heavy, hard-edged blues and R&B, it’s no wonder why the great Count Basie called them “the hottest blues band I’ve ever heard.” Since 1967, the group’s deeply rooted blend of swing, rock ‘n’ roll, jump, blues and soul has earned it five Grammy Award nominations and a slew of other accolades, including seven Blues Music Awards.

With a non-stop performance schedule for over 45 years, Roomful of Blues has earned critical, popular and radio success and a legion of fans around the globe. including the prestigious DownBeat International Critics Poll for “Best Blues Band”.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club with Special Guest The Armadillos

Seminal Gothic-Americana ensemble, Slim Cessna's Auto Club will be re-releasing their fourth album Cipher on June 2. This 2017 re-issue will be a double vinyl LP in a gatefold sleeve and marks the first release of the album on the Auto Club's label, SCACUNINCORPORATED. The band will be playing select MidWest dates this Summer.

Wallace Stenger may have captured the spirit of the west in his 1971 novel Angle of Repose. Jim Thompson surely exposed the lurid underbelly of the Western experience. Cormac McCarthy definitely evoked the conflicted, tortured spirit of small town life on the frontier. William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor informed all of them with a humor and soulfulness. It is that literary tradition that imbues the harrowing and celebratory sound and riveting stories of
Slim Cessna's Auto Club. Throughout its long and illustrious history, it is largely in that realm of
art that the Auto Club reveled and garnered a loyal cult following well beyond the boundaries of
The Queen City of the Plains.

Originally released in 2008, Cipher is the most cohesive SCAC album but also the most mysterious. Cipher is a deliberate puzzle loaded with coded language. The idea that braces are used to straighten crooked humanity provides a structure, but this code rewards effort to unpack the many messages it contains; many more relevant now than ever. Compared to its predecessors, this set of songs sounds more hopeful and expansive, a quality that was always there but this time out the brighter sides of the songwriting were emphasized.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club was originally formed in 1992 in Denver, Colorado by its namesake after he parted ways with The Denver Gentlemen, that grand progenitor of the peculiar strain of Gothic Americana unique to the Mile High City that also featured Jeffrey-Paul and David Eugene Edwards who’d go on to form 16 Horsepower, the latter then founding Wovenhand.

Slim’s longest running collaborators in the Auto Club have been Munly Munly and Lord Dwight Pentacost who’ve contributed both material and affected the ensemble’s stylistic vision. More recently there’ve been greater creative contributions from longtime collaborator Rebecca Vera, drummer Andrew Warner and the inclusion of upright bass player Ian O'Dougherty.

Late last year, the band released a new album after a five-year hiatus The Commandments According to SCAC. The album encompassed both the heady darkness and celebratory intensity with which the group made its name. That charmingly dusky and spare sound breathed with a new color and delicacy of feeling that perhaps sat in the background in times past.

When you get to see the Auto Club live, you'll see an already mighty band reinvigorated by a new spirit of exitement as well as by the fire that has long burned in its collective belly.

Seminal Gothic-Americana ensemble, Slim Cessna's Auto Club will be re-releasing their fourth album Cipher on June 2. This 2017 re-issue will be a double vinyl LP in a gatefold sleeve and marks the first release of the album on the Auto Club's label, SCACUNINCORPORATED. The band will be playing select MidWest dates this Summer.

Wallace Stenger may have captured the spirit of the west in his 1971 novel Angle of Repose. Jim Thompson surely exposed the lurid underbelly of the Western experience. Cormac McCarthy definitely evoked the conflicted, tortured spirit of small town life on the frontier. William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor informed all of them with a humor and soulfulness. It is that literary tradition that imbues the harrowing and celebratory sound and riveting stories of
Slim Cessna's Auto Club. Throughout its long and illustrious history, it is largely in that realm of
art that the Auto Club reveled and garnered a loyal cult following well beyond the boundaries of
The Queen City of the Plains.

Originally released in 2008, Cipher is the most cohesive SCAC album but also the most mysterious. Cipher is a deliberate puzzle loaded with coded language. The idea that braces are used to straighten crooked humanity provides a structure, but this code rewards effort to unpack the many messages it contains; many more relevant now than ever. Compared to its predecessors, this set of songs sounds more hopeful and expansive, a quality that was always there but this time out the brighter sides of the songwriting were emphasized.

Slim Cessna's Auto Club was originally formed in 1992 in Denver, Colorado by its namesake after he parted ways with The Denver Gentlemen, that grand progenitor of the peculiar strain of Gothic Americana unique to the Mile High City that also featured Jeffrey-Paul and David Eugene Edwards who’d go on to form 16 Horsepower, the latter then founding Wovenhand.

Slim’s longest running collaborators in the Auto Club have been Munly Munly and Lord Dwight Pentacost who’ve contributed both material and affected the ensemble’s stylistic vision. More recently there’ve been greater creative contributions from longtime collaborator Rebecca Vera, drummer Andrew Warner and the inclusion of upright bass player Ian O'Dougherty.

Late last year, the band released a new album after a five-year hiatus The Commandments According to SCAC. The album encompassed both the heady darkness and celebratory intensity with which the group made its name. That charmingly dusky and spare sound breathed with a new color and delicacy of feeling that perhaps sat in the background in times past.

When you get to see the Auto Club live, you'll see an already mighty band reinvigorated by a new spirit of exitement as well as by the fire that has long burned in its collective belly.

(Early Show) Steve Forbert

"Compromised" is Steve Forbert's newest and from the comparative essay of the disc’s title song,(complete with catchy chorus and signature harmonica solo), to the exasperated advice for "everyman" on the album closer, “Whatever, Man,” Steve Forbert leaves no stone unturned in his exploration of life, love, turmoil and survival.

After years with local bands, Steve Forbert left his hometown of Meridian, Mississippi in his early 20s and headed for the Big Apple in search of recording deals and larger audiences. He started out playing for change at Grand Central Station and hitting every open mic night he could before eventually moving into the club scene at infamous spots like New York City’s CBGB’s. At a time when rootsy rock was fading in favor of punk edged bands such as the Ramones, Talking Heads, and Blondie, Forbert’s folk pop “Romeo’s Tune” hit #11 on the charts and brought him into the international spotlight. Critics and the public embraced his melodic and lyrical styles, a more traditional sound among the post disco punk and rock of the late ’70s and early ’80s. Always following his own instincts, Forbert says, “I’ve never been interested in changing what I do to fit popular style and needs.”

And that’s the motto he has lived by since the release of his debut album, Alive on Arrival, in 1978. Rolling Stone contributing editor David Wild recently wrote that “now or then, you would have been hard pressed to find a debut effort that was simultaneously as fresh and accomplished as Alive on Arrival. It was like a great novel by a young author who somehow managed to split the difference between Mark Twain and J. D. Salinger.”

"Compromised" is Steve Forbert's newest and from the comparative essay of the disc’s title song,(complete with catchy chorus and signature harmonica solo), to the exasperated advice for "everyman" on the album closer, “Whatever, Man,” Steve Forbert leaves no stone unturned in his exploration of life, love, turmoil and survival.

After years with local bands, Steve Forbert left his hometown of Meridian, Mississippi in his early 20s and headed for the Big Apple in search of recording deals and larger audiences. He started out playing for change at Grand Central Station and hitting every open mic night he could before eventually moving into the club scene at infamous spots like New York City’s CBGB’s. At a time when rootsy rock was fading in favor of punk edged bands such as the Ramones, Talking Heads, and Blondie, Forbert’s folk pop “Romeo’s Tune” hit #11 on the charts and brought him into the international spotlight. Critics and the public embraced his melodic and lyrical styles, a more traditional sound among the post disco punk and rock of the late ’70s and early ’80s. Always following his own instincts, Forbert says, “I’ve never been interested in changing what I do to fit popular style and needs.”

And that’s the motto he has lived by since the release of his debut album, Alive on Arrival, in 1978. Rolling Stone contributing editor David Wild recently wrote that “now or then, you would have been hard pressed to find a debut effort that was simultaneously as fresh and accomplished as Alive on Arrival. It was like a great novel by a young author who somehow managed to split the difference between Mark Twain and J. D. Salinger.”

The Coronas - North American Tour

With five critically-acclaimed albums to their credit and almost a decade spent touring all over the world, The Coronas have earned their place as one of Ireland’s best loved and hardest working bands. The Coronas’ fifth and latest album, TRUST THE WIRE, debuted at #1 on the Irish music chart in its first week of release in the summer of 2017, becoming the band’s first album to reach the top spot. The Coronas--Danny O’Reilly (vocals, guitar), Graham Knox(bass), Conor Egan (drums) and Dave McPhillips (guitar)—previously released four studio albums: HEROES OR GHOSTS (2007), TONY WAS AN EX-CON (2009), CLOSER TO YOU (2011) and THE LONG WAY (2014), the first three via the independent Irish label 3ú Records and the fourth one on Island Records. Returning to the independent route, they released TRUST THE WIRE on their own label imprint, So Far So Good Records.The band, who met while in school and largely grew up together, began their career playing student clubs around Ireland, which they quickly outgrew. Most recently, they sold out Dublin’s Royal Hospital Kilmainham--capacity 15,000--where they played to their largest headline audience. This year they will headline Ireland’s largest indoor concert venue in addition to playing an array of Irish summer festivals, after which they will return to North America. Following two successful recent tours, this time they’ll play larger venues and several high-profile festivals including Chicago’s Lollapalooza.

With five critically-acclaimed albums to their credit and almost a decade spent touring all over the world, The Coronas have earned their place as one of Ireland’s best loved and hardest working bands. The Coronas’ fifth and latest album, TRUST THE WIRE, debuted at #1 on the Irish music chart in its first week of release in the summer of 2017, becoming the band’s first album to reach the top spot. The Coronas--Danny O’Reilly (vocals, guitar), Graham Knox(bass), Conor Egan (drums) and Dave McPhillips (guitar)—previously released four studio albums: HEROES OR GHOSTS (2007), TONY WAS AN EX-CON (2009), CLOSER TO YOU (2011) and THE LONG WAY (2014), the first three via the independent Irish label 3ú Records and the fourth one on Island Records. Returning to the independent route, they released TRUST THE WIRE on their own label imprint, So Far So Good Records.The band, who met while in school and largely grew up together, began their career playing student clubs around Ireland, which they quickly outgrew. Most recently, they sold out Dublin’s Royal Hospital Kilmainham--capacity 15,000--where they played to their largest headline audience. This year they will headline Ireland’s largest indoor concert venue in addition to playing an array of Irish summer festivals, after which they will return to North America. Following two successful recent tours, this time they’ll play larger venues and several high-profile festivals including Chicago’s Lollapalooza.

(Rescheduled from March 5) Aubrey Logan

Rescheduled from March 5

Aubrey Logan is known throughout the world as the Queen of Sass. She has performed on several national television shows including a stint on American Idol, an appearance on The Goldbergs, Jools Holland and with Pharrell Williams at the Grammy Awards. A recent guest on the Jimmy Kimmel Show, she's spent the last two years touring around the world with Postmodern Jukebox, where she's featured nightly in front of thousands of fans, have performed in over 150 shows from The Greek Theatre to Radio City Music Hall and has made appearances in over 30 European cities from London to Moscow. To top it all off, she's just completed taping a PBS special with Postmodern Jukebox.

Rescheduled from March 5

Aubrey Logan is known throughout the world as the Queen of Sass. She has performed on several national television shows including a stint on American Idol, an appearance on The Goldbergs, Jools Holland and with Pharrell Williams at the Grammy Awards. A recent guest on the Jimmy Kimmel Show, she's spent the last two years touring around the world with Postmodern Jukebox, where she's featured nightly in front of thousands of fans, have performed in over 150 shows from The Greek Theatre to Radio City Music Hall and has made appearances in over 30 European cities from London to Moscow. To top it all off, she's just completed taping a PBS special with Postmodern Jukebox.

@clubcafelive

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